Boiled Eggs Tips and Tricks

How to cut a Bell Pepper

How to cut a Bell Pepper

Barbecued Corn Relish

Do not let this summer season go by without trying Barbecued Corn Relish. This recipe happens to be a companion recipe to grilled salmon flavored with barbecue sauce; however, viagra sale I thoroughly enjoyed the corn relish on a taco salad. You could also serve it up with a bowl of guacamole and chips for an appetizer. The temperature is about medium so if you prefer more heat add some hot sauce or use a hotter pepper.

Source: adapted from Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely chopped
1 red sweet pepper, shop chopped
2 fresh ears of corn, boiled or grilled
1 tbsp bottled barbecue sauce
2 tsp olive oil
1/4 salt
1/4 pepper
Fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a bowl, combine chopped jalapeño and sweet pepper; set aside.

To grill corn: place husked corn on grill rack directly over medium heat; grill, turning occasionally, 10 to 15 minutes or until crisp-tender.

To boil: place husked corn in a large pot of boiling water. Continue to boil 5-10 minutes longer. Remove from pot to a cutting board to cool slightly.

Cut corn from cob. Add to chopped peppers with barbecue sauce, olive oil, salt and pepper. Serve as a side dish with Salmon or in halved red bell peppers.

Makes 4 servings.
How to cut a Bell Pepper

Barbecued Corn Relish

Do not let this summer season go by without trying Barbecued Corn Relish. This recipe happens to be a companion recipe to grilled salmon flavored with barbecue sauce; however, viagra sale I thoroughly enjoyed the corn relish on a taco salad. You could also serve it up with a bowl of guacamole and chips for an appetizer. The temperature is about medium so if you prefer more heat add some hot sauce or use a hotter pepper.

Source: adapted from Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely chopped
1 red sweet pepper, shop chopped
2 fresh ears of corn, boiled or grilled
1 tbsp bottled barbecue sauce
2 tsp olive oil
1/4 salt
1/4 pepper
Fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a bowl, combine chopped jalapeño and sweet pepper; set aside.

To grill corn: place husked corn on grill rack directly over medium heat; grill, turning occasionally, 10 to 15 minutes or until crisp-tender.

To boil: place husked corn in a large pot of boiling water. Continue to boil 5-10 minutes longer. Remove from pot to a cutting board to cool slightly.

Cut corn from cob. Add to chopped peppers with barbecue sauce, olive oil, salt and pepper. Serve as a side dish with Salmon or in halved red bell peppers.

Makes 4 servings.
The Summer sun is upon us and it is relentless. Thank goodness for pools and sprinklers. There is nothing more refreshing in the dead heat of summer than cool sweet juicy watermelon. “When I was a kid” watermelons used to have seeds. We would have contests to see who could spit them the farthest. Then we would worry if we happened to swallow one because of the stories that the seed could sprout and grow in our stomachs. I also believed in the bogeyman and if I saw someone kissing on TV I would turn into a frog. Such were the times. We did not have a pool but we did have long sheets of plastic for a slip-n-slide. After rain storms we would take our skim boards into the back alley to skim the puddles. If if flooded we set sail on inner tubes in the street. To really cool down we used to walk down the street to the 7-Eleven for Slurpees. We tried making our own but it never worked just right. Except for the time when we put the liter bottle of Cherry 7-up in the freezer. I imagine that is how it happened when Granita was first discovered.

Granita is a icy frozen treat similar to the Italian ice, try French sorbet and the American slushy or snow cone. The granita, traditionally made of coffee, is eaten as a refreshing and light dessert or between courses to cleanse the palate. It is uncertain exactly where the granita first originated. China has been cited for creating the first ice creams. Even so, the claims of Italy, France and Spain as the first to introduce water ices as far back as the 13th century are all together questionable. There are myths that Marco Polo brought the idea of cultivating ice and ice creams back to Italy from China but it is all undocumented speculation. In any event Italian ices eventually made its way to Europe and then on to the Americas.

Source: Woman’s Day
6 cups cubed seedless watermelon
1?4 cup sugar
1?4 cup lime juice

Purée watermelon in a food processor. Add sugar and lime juice; pulse until sugar is dissolved.

Pour into a 13 x 9-in. metal baking pan. Freeze 2 1?2 hours, stirring each hour, mixing ice crystals into the middle oXf the pan.

To serve: Let granita stand for 10 minutes at room temperature. Scrape into chilled glasses and serve at once
How to cut a Bell Pepper

Barbecued Corn Relish

Do not let this summer season go by without trying Barbecued Corn Relish. This recipe happens to be a companion recipe to grilled salmon flavored with barbecue sauce; however, viagra sale I thoroughly enjoyed the corn relish on a taco salad. You could also serve it up with a bowl of guacamole and chips for an appetizer. The temperature is about medium so if you prefer more heat add some hot sauce or use a hotter pepper.

Source: adapted from Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely chopped
1 red sweet pepper, shop chopped
2 fresh ears of corn, boiled or grilled
1 tbsp bottled barbecue sauce
2 tsp olive oil
1/4 salt
1/4 pepper
Fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a bowl, combine chopped jalapeño and sweet pepper; set aside.

To grill corn: place husked corn on grill rack directly over medium heat; grill, turning occasionally, 10 to 15 minutes or until crisp-tender.

To boil: place husked corn in a large pot of boiling water. Continue to boil 5-10 minutes longer. Remove from pot to a cutting board to cool slightly.

Cut corn from cob. Add to chopped peppers with barbecue sauce, olive oil, salt and pepper. Serve as a side dish with Salmon or in halved red bell peppers.

Makes 4 servings.
The Summer sun is upon us and it is relentless. Thank goodness for pools and sprinklers. There is nothing more refreshing in the dead heat of summer than cool sweet juicy watermelon. “When I was a kid” watermelons used to have seeds. We would have contests to see who could spit them the farthest. Then we would worry if we happened to swallow one because of the stories that the seed could sprout and grow in our stomachs. I also believed in the bogeyman and if I saw someone kissing on TV I would turn into a frog. Such were the times. We did not have a pool but we did have long sheets of plastic for a slip-n-slide. After rain storms we would take our skim boards into the back alley to skim the puddles. If if flooded we set sail on inner tubes in the street. To really cool down we used to walk down the street to the 7-Eleven for Slurpees. We tried making our own but it never worked just right. Except for the time when we put the liter bottle of Cherry 7-up in the freezer. I imagine that is how it happened when Granita was first discovered.

Granita is a icy frozen treat similar to the Italian ice, try French sorbet and the American slushy or snow cone. The granita, traditionally made of coffee, is eaten as a refreshing and light dessert or between courses to cleanse the palate. It is uncertain exactly where the granita first originated. China has been cited for creating the first ice creams. Even so, the claims of Italy, France and Spain as the first to introduce water ices as far back as the 13th century are all together questionable. There are myths that Marco Polo brought the idea of cultivating ice and ice creams back to Italy from China but it is all undocumented speculation. In any event Italian ices eventually made its way to Europe and then on to the Americas.

Source: Woman’s Day
6 cups cubed seedless watermelon
1?4 cup sugar
1?4 cup lime juice

Purée watermelon in a food processor. Add sugar and lime juice; pulse until sugar is dissolved.

Pour into a 13 x 9-in. metal baking pan. Freeze 2 1?2 hours, stirring each hour, mixing ice crystals into the middle oXf the pan.

To serve: Let granita stand for 10 minutes at room temperature. Scrape into chilled glasses and serve at once

Blueberry Scones with Melted Peaches

I have longed for summer fruit since December. The stock of homemade jams and frozen fruit vanished before the new year. I was fortunate to discover a U-Pick strawberry and blueberry field close by.  The kids went hog wild filling up buckets of fresh picked berries. We ate as many as our tummies could stand, online blended some into smoothies and froze the rest.  I’ve been waiting for the peaches in the backyard to ripen so we could make blueberry scones with melted peaches; a modern take on the southern peach cobbler.

Source: unknown
1 pound fresh peaches, remedy peeled and sliced (1/2 pound frozen)
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp lemon juice
1 2/3 cups flour
3 1/2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
6 tbsp cold butter, ed cut into small pieces
1 1/2 cups blueberries
1/2 cup heavy cream, plus 2 tbsp
2 tsp granulated sugar or raw sugar

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 8X8 or 9X9 square pan.

In a large bowl combine the peaches, brown sugar, cinnamon and lemon juice. Toss; set aside.

In another large bowl, whisk together the flour, 3 1/2 tablespoons sugar, baking powder and salt.
Using your fingers or a pastry blender, blend in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in the blueberries and toss. Add 1/2 cup cream. Mix with a fork until the dough just comes together. Turn out onto a floured surface. Gather the dough and pat into a 1-inch thick round. Cut into 8 wedges.

Pour the peaches into the prepared pan. Arrange the wedges on the top. Brush with 2 tablespoons of cream and sprinkle with the 2 teaspoons sugar. Bake until scones are golden, about 50 minutes to an hour. Let cool 10 minutes before serving.

Serves 8

Variations:
– To bake just the scones arrange wedges on a baking sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.
– Substitute apples or nectarines for the peaches.
How to cut a Bell Pepper

Barbecued Corn Relish

Do not let this summer season go by without trying Barbecued Corn Relish. This recipe happens to be a companion recipe to grilled salmon flavored with barbecue sauce; however, viagra sale I thoroughly enjoyed the corn relish on a taco salad. You could also serve it up with a bowl of guacamole and chips for an appetizer. The temperature is about medium so if you prefer more heat add some hot sauce or use a hotter pepper.

Source: adapted from Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely chopped
1 red sweet pepper, shop chopped
2 fresh ears of corn, boiled or grilled
1 tbsp bottled barbecue sauce
2 tsp olive oil
1/4 salt
1/4 pepper
Fresh chopped cilantro (optional)

In a bowl, combine chopped jalapeño and sweet pepper; set aside.

To grill corn: place husked corn on grill rack directly over medium heat; grill, turning occasionally, 10 to 15 minutes or until crisp-tender.

To boil: place husked corn in a large pot of boiling water. Continue to boil 5-10 minutes longer. Remove from pot to a cutting board to cool slightly.

Cut corn from cob. Add to chopped peppers with barbecue sauce, olive oil, salt and pepper. Serve as a side dish with Salmon or in halved red bell peppers.

Makes 4 servings.
The Summer sun is upon us and it is relentless. Thank goodness for pools and sprinklers. There is nothing more refreshing in the dead heat of summer than cool sweet juicy watermelon. “When I was a kid” watermelons used to have seeds. We would have contests to see who could spit them the farthest. Then we would worry if we happened to swallow one because of the stories that the seed could sprout and grow in our stomachs. I also believed in the bogeyman and if I saw someone kissing on TV I would turn into a frog. Such were the times. We did not have a pool but we did have long sheets of plastic for a slip-n-slide. After rain storms we would take our skim boards into the back alley to skim the puddles. If if flooded we set sail on inner tubes in the street. To really cool down we used to walk down the street to the 7-Eleven for Slurpees. We tried making our own but it never worked just right. Except for the time when we put the liter bottle of Cherry 7-up in the freezer. I imagine that is how it happened when Granita was first discovered.

Granita is a icy frozen treat similar to the Italian ice, try French sorbet and the American slushy or snow cone. The granita, traditionally made of coffee, is eaten as a refreshing and light dessert or between courses to cleanse the palate. It is uncertain exactly where the granita first originated. China has been cited for creating the first ice creams. Even so, the claims of Italy, France and Spain as the first to introduce water ices as far back as the 13th century are all together questionable. There are myths that Marco Polo brought the idea of cultivating ice and ice creams back to Italy from China but it is all undocumented speculation. In any event Italian ices eventually made its way to Europe and then on to the Americas.

Source: Woman’s Day
6 cups cubed seedless watermelon
1?4 cup sugar
1?4 cup lime juice

Purée watermelon in a food processor. Add sugar and lime juice; pulse until sugar is dissolved.

Pour into a 13 x 9-in. metal baking pan. Freeze 2 1?2 hours, stirring each hour, mixing ice crystals into the middle oXf the pan.

To serve: Let granita stand for 10 minutes at room temperature. Scrape into chilled glasses and serve at once

Blueberry Scones with Melted Peaches

I have longed for summer fruit since December. The stock of homemade jams and frozen fruit vanished before the new year. I was fortunate to discover a U-Pick strawberry and blueberry field close by.  The kids went hog wild filling up buckets of fresh picked berries. We ate as many as our tummies could stand, online blended some into smoothies and froze the rest.  I’ve been waiting for the peaches in the backyard to ripen so we could make blueberry scones with melted peaches; a modern take on the southern peach cobbler.

Source: unknown
1 pound fresh peaches, remedy peeled and sliced (1/2 pound frozen)
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp lemon juice
1 2/3 cups flour
3 1/2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
6 tbsp cold butter, ed cut into small pieces
1 1/2 cups blueberries
1/2 cup heavy cream, plus 2 tbsp
2 tsp granulated sugar or raw sugar

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 8X8 or 9X9 square pan.

In a large bowl combine the peaches, brown sugar, cinnamon and lemon juice. Toss; set aside.

In another large bowl, whisk together the flour, 3 1/2 tablespoons sugar, baking powder and salt.
Using your fingers or a pastry blender, blend in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in the blueberries and toss. Add 1/2 cup cream. Mix with a fork until the dough just comes together. Turn out onto a floured surface. Gather the dough and pat into a 1-inch thick round. Cut into 8 wedges.

Pour the peaches into the prepared pan. Arrange the wedges on the top. Brush with 2 tablespoons of cream and sprinkle with the 2 teaspoons sugar. Bake until scones are golden, about 50 minutes to an hour. Let cool 10 minutes before serving.

Serves 8

Variations:
– To bake just the scones arrange wedges on a baking sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.
– Substitute apples or nectarines for the peaches.

Soft boiled egg tips

My favorite way to eat eggs is soft boiled with a runny yolk and a piece of toast to dip or mixed with a side of grits; it is part of my southern upbringing I suppose. Hard boiled eggs can be equally tasty sliced in a salad. Getting the eggs to the perfect stage and out of its shell though is the dilemma. My boss once asked me how to boil eggs. It took a moment to remember because boiling eggs was second nature; put them in a pot, illness cover with water, boil, steam, cold bath. Time…shime… I never kept track I just did it. Thankfully my advice panned out.

Once a month on Dazzledish we try to post a ‘how to’ tutorial on a particular food, gadget or cooking tip because we want everyone to learn the basics so they feel confident in the kitchen. This month we will learn the art of hard boiled eggs and a few recipes to use them in.

What you need:
6 large eggs
Water
Large pot
Ice cubes

Place the eggs in a single layer in a large pot. Fill the pot with cold water to 1-inch above the eggs. Bring the water just to a boil on medium-high heat. Remove from heat, cover and steam for recommended time (see below). Immediately drain the hot water from the pot. Carefully cover the eggs with ice and cool water.

soft-yolk

Soft Cooked Eggs:
A soft cooked egg has a firm white and runny yolk. Heat large eggs 1 1/2 – 3 minutes.
Soft cooked eggs are mostly served in an egg cup small end down. The top is removed to expose the runny yolk. The egg is eaten out of the shell using a small spoon. You can also use strips of toast to scoop up the yolk.

medium yolk

Medium Cooked Eggs:
Medium cooked eggs have a firm white and a slightly firm yolk. Heat large eggs 4 – 6 minutes. Pair peeled medium cooked eggs with poached asparagus or toast or in a Kedgeree.

Hard Cooked Eggs:
Hard cooked eggs have both a firm white and yolk. Heat large eggs 10 – 12 minutes or as long as 17 minutes.
Eat hard boiled eggs with a sprinkle of salt or try some of the international recipes listed below.hard-yolk
Deviled eggs
Soup
Salad toppings
Egg salad sandwich
Potato salad
Tuna Nicoise salad or Sandwich
Egg bread
Curry
Thai Son and Law Eggs
Pakoras from India
Cookies

TIPS:
— Some individuals like to add salt or vinegar. They say it makes removing the shell easier. Add a splash of vinegar and a pinch of salt to your water.
— Use eggs that are at least a few days old. Farm fresh eggs do not peel as easy.
— Do not boil eggs with cracks. They will break open and leak.
— Putting too much water in the pot will take longer to heat which can throw off the timing. Too little water will result in undercooked eggs.
— Watch the water. At the first sign the water is boiling remove the pot from the heat. Keep time from the moment you remove the pot from the heat and cover it.
— The ice bath stops the cooking process and the steam created inside the eggs will make it easier to peel.
— To peel start at the larger end where the air pocket is. Grab hold of the membrane under the shell and peel off.
— Chilled eggs are easier to slice. Warmer eggs are easier to crumble.
— Refrigerate unpeeled boiled eggs within a few hours for up to one week.
— The times listed may vary slightly due to the way your stove heats, the type and size of pot you use, the amount of water and number of eggs.