The Scoop on Icy Treats

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

The dog days of Summer are fast approaching. In many parts of our beautiful country sweltering temperatures can bring on the craving for a cool refreshing treat. A simple icy fruit cocktail such as a citrus spiked Granita can instantly placate a parched tongue. Ever wonder what exactly is a granita or how sorbet differs from ice cream? Keep reading for the 101 on these sweet frozen treats and more.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, website cream, sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Constant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Spumoni – resembles Neapolitan ice cream. It consists of three layers of different flavored ice cream: Chocolate, pistachio and cherry or raspberry. Unlike the ice cream version of Neapolitan spumoni has actual bits of fruit and nuts.

Gelato – begins with a base of sugar, milk, very little cream, and sometimes eggs. The Italian gelato differs from ice cream in three ways. First, it uses a lower proportion of cream. The reduced butterfat does not coat the tongue as ice cream tends to do producing a more intense flavor. Second, the gelato mixture is churned at a slower rate. Less churning equals less air and a more dense gelato. Thirdly, gelato is frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The higher freezing temperature results in a silkier and softer texture.

Sherbet– is often confused with sorbet. Sherbet differs from sorbet in that sherbet contains milk and sorbet is made with fruit.

Sorbet – is a frozen fruit puree made from fruit juice or frozen fruit, and simple syrup. A classic sorbet has alcohol in it and it may be used to cleanse the palate before the main course. To make sorbet all the ingredients are blended together in a blender or food processor; then poured into an ice cream maker. The churning process helps to create a very smooth fine texture. It is possible to make sorbet without an ice cream maker using a container and mixing periodically by hand.

Granita – is made with pureed fruit, a simple syrup, and a squeeze of lime or lemon juice to balance the flavors. The result is a refreshing ice. Unlike sorbet the liquid is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the mixture is scraped with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. Because the granita is not churned it is coarser than the sorbet in texture.

Snow Cones – (shaved ice) are coarse grainy cups of shaved ice flavored with sugary syrups. The Hawaiian shaved ice has a ball of ice cream in the center similar to a cream pop.

Italian Ice – is the American invention of the Italian Grattacheca. Grattacheca is similar to shaved ice except that the flavors are added before freezing. Italian Ice is sweetened with real fruit juices and bits of fruit. The ice is coarser than a sorbet and finer than a granita.

Water Ice – is also an American concoction often referred to as “Italian Ice”. Water ice is as smooth as a slushy yet firmer and is eaten with a spoon rather than sipped through a straw.

Slushy – (called slurpee/ICEE) is a frozen drink flavored with sugary syrup. The constant churning motion keeps the slushy smooth. You can make a slushy at home by putting a plastic bottle of soda in the freezer. Rotate the bottle every half hour to distribute the ice crystals evenly until chilled but not frozen.

Smoothie – is a fruit flavored drink. Fresh fruit is blended together with flavored water or fruit juice or milk.

Mochi – is a confectionary treat from Japan. Little ice cream balls are wrapped in soft fluffy dough called mochi, pounded rice cakes, and dusted with rice flour. They come in a variety of flavors but chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mango and green tea are the most commercial.

Spritzer – is a drink made with alcohol and carbonated water. Spritzers can also be made non-alcoholic by replacing the alcohol with fruit juice. Sub flavored syrup for the juice and you have an “Italian Soda” that is not so Italian but rather another American invention. Add a scoop to either one for a refreshing frozen treat similar to the “ice cream float”.