Mom’s Coconut Cake

Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
My kids love it when I put out the muffin pan filled with fun snacks. They think we are having a party.

Set out a large bowl of popcorn. Fill smaller bowls, cheapest muffin pans or mini loaf pans with various snacks such as the ones listed.

Nuts and seeds
Crackers
Cereal
Pretzel
Dried fruit
cheese
Chocolate chips
Spices: Cinnamon, and brown sugar, viagra nutmeg, Cajun seasoning, garlic,

Give the kids bowls, bags or ice cream cones to fill with their favorite snacks.

Popping popcorn on the stove top: pour about three tablespoons of vegetable oil (don’t use butter, it will burn) in a large pot. heat the oil over medium heat. To test if the oil is hot enough drop a single kernel in the pot and cover allowing steam to escape. If it sizzles and pops right away it is ready. Pour 1/2 cup (enough to cover the bottom of the pot, a single layer). Cover and shake to evenly spread the oil. When the popping begins to slow to a few seconds apart, remove the pan from the stove. Season to taste.

Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
My kids love it when I put out the muffin pan filled with fun snacks. They think we are having a party.

Set out a large bowl of popcorn. Fill smaller bowls, cheapest muffin pans or mini loaf pans with various snacks such as the ones listed.

Nuts and seeds
Crackers
Cereal
Pretzel
Dried fruit
cheese
Chocolate chips
Spices: Cinnamon, and brown sugar, viagra nutmeg, Cajun seasoning, garlic,

Give the kids bowls, bags or ice cream cones to fill with their favorite snacks.

Popping popcorn on the stove top: pour about three tablespoons of vegetable oil (don’t use butter, it will burn) in a large pot. heat the oil over medium heat. To test if the oil is hot enough drop a single kernel in the pot and cover allowing steam to escape. If it sizzles and pops right away it is ready. Pour 1/2 cup (enough to cover the bottom of the pot, a single layer). Cover and shake to evenly spread the oil. When the popping begins to slow to a few seconds apart, remove the pan from the stove. Season to taste.

One of our Christmas traditions has been to rush out a batch of sugar cookies for Santa and a basket of nibbles for the reindeer all last minute. Then we rush the kids up stairs and wait for a scream of delight when they spy a wrapped present on their bed. Faster than you can say eggnog the boxes are ripped open to reveal the first gift of Christmas- Pajamas.

I thought of my sister-n-law who continued a family tradition of serving scrumptious cinnamon rolls and hot chocolate every Christmas Eve. Ever since I saw the doughnut pan in the Pottery Barn holiday catalog last year I have been dreaming of doughnuts and hot chocolate on Christmas Eve. And if we once again forget to make Santa’s cookies until last minute, cheapest I am sure he would not mind a oh so yummy chocolate glazed doughnut with sprinkles.

Makes 1 dozen doughnuts
1 (1/4-oz) package active dry yeast (2 1/2 teaspoons)
2 tablespoons warm water (105–115°F)
3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour plus additional for sprinkling and rolling out dough
1 cup whole milk at room temperature
1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, discount softened
3 large egg yolks
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
About 10 cups vegetable oil for deep frying

Stir together yeast and warm water in a small bowl until yeast is dissolved. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. (If yeast doesn’t foam, discard and start over with new yeast.)

Mix together flour, milk, butter, yolks, sugar, salt, cinnamon, and yeast mixture in mixer at low speed until a soft dough forms. Increase speed to medium-high and beat 3 minutes more. Scrape dough down side of bowl (all around) into center, then sprinkle lightly with flour (to keep a crust from forming). Cover bowl with a clean kitchen towel (not terry cloth) and let dough rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until doubled in bulk, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. (Alternatively, let dough rise in bowl in refrigerator 8 to 12 hours.)

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and roll out with a lightly floured rolling pin into a 12-inch round (1/2 inch thick). Cut out as many rounds as possible with 3-inch cutter, then cut a hole in center of each round with 1-inch cutter and transfer doughnuts to a lightly floured large baking sheet. Cover doughnuts with a clean kitchen towel and let rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until slightly puffed, about 30 minutes (45 minutes if dough was cold when cutting out doughnuts). Do not re-roll scraps.

Heat 2 1/2 inches oil in a deep 4-quart heavy pot until it registers 350°F on thermometer. Fry doughnuts, 2 at a time, turning occasionally with a wire or mesh skimmer or a slotted spoon, until puffed and golden brown, about 2 minutes per batch. Transfer to paper towels to drain. (Return oil to 350°F between batches.) I also fried the doughnut holes for about 1 minute and them tossed them in powdered sugar and cinnamon sugar straight out of the hot grease.

Source: Gourmet, December 2006

Chocolate Glaze: This is enough glaze for a double batch of doughnuts!
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/4 cup whole milk, warmed
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped
2 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted

Combine butter, milk, corn syrup, and vanilla in medium saucepan and heat over medium heat until butter is melted. Decrease the heat to low, add the chocolate, and whisk until melted. Turn off heat, add the powdered sugar, and whisk until smooth. Place the mixture over a bowl of warm water and dip the doughnuts immediately. Allow glaze to set for 30 minutes before serving. Recipe from Alton Brown.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

This recipe comes from a woman I met in Baybrook Texas. I wish I could remember her name because she really deserves the recognition. She is one of those die hard Christmas bakers but her goodies are the ones you look forward to all year. I have tried other versions of the pumpkin roll but Stephen and I agree we like taste and texture of this version best. So, more about the pumpkin roll has become a regular at our Thanksgiving table.

Many of my friends comment on how intimidated they are of making a rolled cake. It looks pretty daunting but is actually as simple as cutting and frosting a layer cake. I felt the same way before I made my first one. May I side with GI-Joe when I say knowing is half the battle. There is not that much batter, which has made a few people nervous. The cake is supposed to be thin so that it can be rolled up. There are two ways to roll the cake. I was taught to roll the cake with the short side facing me rolling short side toward the other shorts side. Last year I made a different recipe with a friend and she rolled it with the longest side towards her rolling longest side to long side. The only difference I could tell is the way my friend does it produces a much longer roll which means more to go around but they pieces are thinner and smaller. I prefer the denser version of rolling it into a shorter loaf.

Cake:
1 cup sugar
2/3 cups pumpkin
3 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 cups flour
1 tsp cinnamon

Filling:
1 (8 oz) pkg cream cheese
2 tbsp butter, softened
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 375. Spray a jelly roll pan with cooking spray or lightly spritz with water. This is to hold the waxed paper in place. Then line the pan with waxed or parchment paper. Spray the paper with cooking spray.
Combine the sugar, pumpkin and eggs; mix well. Add the soda, salt, flour and cinnamon; mix well.

Spread the batter in pan evenly. Bake 14-18 minutes. (Do Not Over Bake). Cover the pan with a clean dry dish towel then top with a wire cooling rack. Immediately invert pan onto hand/dish towel.

Peel off paper. With the long side in front of you, roll the cake up in the towel. Let cool rolled up.

Combine filling ingredients, mixing well. Unroll the cake, remove the towel, spread filling evenly. Roll cake back up (without the towel), wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

This recipe comes from a woman I met in Baybrook Texas. I wish I could remember her name because she really deserves the recognition. She is one of those die hard Christmas bakers but her goodies are the ones you look forward to all year. I have tried other versions of the pumpkin roll but Stephen and I agree we like taste and texture of this version best. So, more about the pumpkin roll has become a regular at our Thanksgiving table.

Many of my friends comment on how intimidated they are of making a rolled cake. It looks pretty daunting but is actually as simple as cutting and frosting a layer cake. I felt the same way before I made my first one. May I side with GI-Joe when I say knowing is half the battle. There is not that much batter, which has made a few people nervous. The cake is supposed to be thin so that it can be rolled up. There are two ways to roll the cake. I was taught to roll the cake with the short side facing me rolling short side toward the other shorts side. Last year I made a different recipe with a friend and she rolled it with the longest side towards her rolling longest side to long side. The only difference I could tell is the way my friend does it produces a much longer roll which means more to go around but they pieces are thinner and smaller. I prefer the denser version of rolling it into a shorter loaf.

Cake:
1 cup sugar
2/3 cups pumpkin
3 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 cups flour
1 tsp cinnamon

Filling:
1 (8 oz) pkg cream cheese
2 tbsp butter, softened
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 375. Spray a jelly roll pan with cooking spray or lightly spritz with water. This is to hold the waxed paper in place. Then line the pan with waxed or parchment paper. Spray the paper with cooking spray.
Combine the sugar, pumpkin and eggs; mix well. Add the soda, salt, flour and cinnamon; mix well.

Spread the batter in pan evenly. Bake 14-18 minutes. (Do Not Over Bake). Cover the pan with a clean dry dish towel then top with a wire cooling rack. Immediately invert pan onto hand/dish towel.

Peel off paper. With the long side in front of you, roll the cake up in the towel. Let cool rolled up.

Combine filling ingredients, mixing well. Unroll the cake, remove the towel, spread filling evenly. Roll cake back up (without the towel), wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

I think I found this recipe in an Everyday Food issue. My first thought was “balsalmic vinegar and maple syrup? What an interesting combination.” It turned out to be amazing. Well maybe not amazing but pretty darn good. I use 2-4 cutlets and reduce the time.

I love the show Hells Kitchen. My friends look at me like I am crazy but they like “Dancing With the Stars”. I have picked up many helpful cooking tips from watching Hells Kitchen. The most important being, viagra meat continues to cook as it rests. To avoid dry pork chops I watch them closely cooking them until they are just done. I take them out and cover them with tin foil for about 5 minutes.

1/4 c Balsalmic Vinegar
1 tbsp maple syrup

2 pork tenderloins (12 oz each)
2-3 apples, ed cut into wedges
1 large red onion, cut into wedges
1 tbsp olive oil
salt/pepper

Preheat oven to 450.
Glaze: In a sauce pan bring vinegar and syrup to a boil over high heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce is reduced to 1/4 cup. Remove from heat. Reserve 1 tbsp.

Place apples and onions on a baking sheet. Drizzle with oil, and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Arrange in a single layer. Roast about 15 minutes, until golden. Remove from oven and toss.
Meanwhile, place pork chops in a baking dish lined with foil. Season with salt and pepper. Brush with glaze from sauce pan.

Return apples/onions to the oven on a rack in the bottom 1/3 of the oven. Place pork on a rack in the top 1/3 of oven. Roast 10 minutes. Remove pork and brush with remaining glaze. Roast until cooked through and apples are tender, about 10 minutes more. Serve with apples and onions.
One December several years ago I was making pancakes for the family and realized I did not have any syrup. The spices remind me of Christmas time.

2 small pears, pharmacy capsule peeled, more about cored and sliced
1 small apple, erectile peeled, cored and sliced
Dash Nutmeg
1 / 8 tsp Cinnamon
1/3 cup raisins
Dash ground cloves
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 / 2 cup water
1 tbsp butter

In a sauce pan add all ingredients let come to a boil then simmer until pears and apples are soft. Mash up some of the pears and apples slightly to blend.  If syrup is to runny, in a small bowl mix juice from pan and a little flour until smooth. Add to syrup.  Serve with pancakes, waffles or French toast.
Note: use older pears and apples that are on the mushy side.
One December several years ago I was making pancakes for the family and realized I did not have any syrup. The spices remind me of Christmas time.

2 small pears, pharmacy capsule peeled, more about cored and sliced
1 small apple, erectile peeled, cored and sliced
Dash Nutmeg
1 / 8 tsp Cinnamon
1/3 cup raisins
Dash ground cloves
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 / 2 cup water
1 tbsp butter

In a sauce pan add all ingredients let come to a boil then simmer until pears and apples are soft. Mash up some of the pears and apples slightly to blend.  If syrup is to runny, in a small bowl mix juice from pan and a little flour until smooth. Add to syrup.  Serve with pancakes, waffles or French toast.
Note: use older pears and apples that are on the mushy side.

This Thanksgiving we started a Advent Gratitude Turkey. Every night after dinner we each take a paper feather and draw or write something we are grateful for. The kids enjoy looking at the pictures and talking about what they mean.

I heard someone say once that we need to fill our homes with happy and uplifting memories. So when the time comes that they are faced with a difficult choice they will think of home and the love that is felt there. I think the first place to start is gratitude. Learning to appreciate life’s gifts, seek big and small is a crucial lesson I strive to teach my children on a daily basis.

Be an example: Children learn by watching our actions. When we say please and thank you or are affectionate and loving in our words and actions we are teaching our children to become sensitive to the feelings of others and develop empathy. Showing disregard towards others and rules, complaining and negativity teaches our children life is unpleasant.

Set Limits: When Mason was a toddler we got into a horrible habit of buying him something every time we went to the store. After the birth of our second child I realized what a disservice Stephen, I and the relatives were being by allowing him to have so many toys. Far too often the toys our kids scream over end up abandoned or broken. Ultimately children develop a sense of entitlement that can lead to a lifetime of disappointment. Many touching life experiences are a result of a lesson learned in “less is more”.

Express Gratitude: I always try to express my gratitude to my children if they help me with a chore, when they treat each other nicely, or give me a hug. When Stephen goes to work I thank him and tell him know how proud I am that he works so hard for us. At the end of the day we gather as a family and share what we are most grateful for.

Say Thank You: Writing thank-you notes is a habit that never goes out of style but is slowly becoming a lost art. After a birthday or holiday I try to make myself stop, sit down with my children and teach them the art of expressing gratitude. I usually give them stamps and let them stamp away. Sometimes they will draw a picture or our four year old will dictate while I write.

Service: When we are serving others we tend to forget our own troubles and often feel more gratitude for what we have.

When I think of gratitude naturally Thanksgiving traditions come to mind. Every Thanksgiving I am reminded of two outstanding individuals, Ingrid and Dave Frey. When I was living in Texas far from family they welcomed me into their home for Thanksgiving dinner. Before we filled our plates, we passed a bowl filled with candy corn around the table. I am not a candy corn fan but I took a couple to be polite. Once everyone had their candy Ingrid asked us to count how many pieces of candy corn we had and name that many things we are thankful for.
One December several years ago I was making pancakes for the family and realized I did not have any syrup. The spices remind me of Christmas time.

2 small pears, pharmacy capsule peeled, more about cored and sliced
1 small apple, erectile peeled, cored and sliced
Dash Nutmeg
1 / 8 tsp Cinnamon
1/3 cup raisins
Dash ground cloves
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 / 2 cup water
1 tbsp butter

In a sauce pan add all ingredients let come to a boil then simmer until pears and apples are soft. Mash up some of the pears and apples slightly to blend.  If syrup is to runny, in a small bowl mix juice from pan and a little flour until smooth. Add to syrup.  Serve with pancakes, waffles or French toast.
Note: use older pears and apples that are on the mushy side.

This Thanksgiving we started a Advent Gratitude Turkey. Every night after dinner we each take a paper feather and draw or write something we are grateful for. The kids enjoy looking at the pictures and talking about what they mean.

I heard someone say once that we need to fill our homes with happy and uplifting memories. So when the time comes that they are faced with a difficult choice they will think of home and the love that is felt there. I think the first place to start is gratitude. Learning to appreciate life’s gifts, seek big and small is a crucial lesson I strive to teach my children on a daily basis.

Be an example: Children learn by watching our actions. When we say please and thank you or are affectionate and loving in our words and actions we are teaching our children to become sensitive to the feelings of others and develop empathy. Showing disregard towards others and rules, complaining and negativity teaches our children life is unpleasant.

Set Limits: When Mason was a toddler we got into a horrible habit of buying him something every time we went to the store. After the birth of our second child I realized what a disservice Stephen, I and the relatives were being by allowing him to have so many toys. Far too often the toys our kids scream over end up abandoned or broken. Ultimately children develop a sense of entitlement that can lead to a lifetime of disappointment. Many touching life experiences are a result of a lesson learned in “less is more”.

Express Gratitude: I always try to express my gratitude to my children if they help me with a chore, when they treat each other nicely, or give me a hug. When Stephen goes to work I thank him and tell him know how proud I am that he works so hard for us. At the end of the day we gather as a family and share what we are most grateful for.

Say Thank You: Writing thank-you notes is a habit that never goes out of style but is slowly becoming a lost art. After a birthday or holiday I try to make myself stop, sit down with my children and teach them the art of expressing gratitude. I usually give them stamps and let them stamp away. Sometimes they will draw a picture or our four year old will dictate while I write.

Service: When we are serving others we tend to forget our own troubles and often feel more gratitude for what we have.

When I think of gratitude naturally Thanksgiving traditions come to mind. Every Thanksgiving I am reminded of two outstanding individuals, Ingrid and Dave Frey. When I was living in Texas far from family they welcomed me into their home for Thanksgiving dinner. Before we filled our plates, we passed a bowl filled with candy corn around the table. I am not a candy corn fan but I took a couple to be polite. Once everyone had their candy Ingrid asked us to count how many pieces of candy corn we had and name that many things we are thankful for.
My mom’s coconut cake was probably my favorite part of Thanksgiving. My dad’s birthday is November 24th. It became a tradition to celebrate his birthday on Thanksgiving Day with a coconut cake.

1 white cake mix
1 1/4 cups light Karo syrup
2 egg whites
1 tsp vanilla
1 box cook/serve vanilla pudding
1 pkg Coconut

Bake cake in two round cake pans according to box directions. Cool.

Cook pudding according to box directions. Cover with plastic wrap, hospital making sure to gently press wrap flat against pudding. Chill 3-4 hours. Mix a couple cups of coconut into cooled pudding.

Cut cake rounds in half lengthwise to make 4 cake rounds. Place one round on a plate. Spread coconut pudding over layer. Top with next cake round and pudding, price repeat with third round. Top with 4th cake round. Place cake in the fridge.

Heat syrup on medium heat until a film begins to form (should have small steam bubbles). Beat egg whites one at a time on high speed until fluffy and stiff. (should not move when bowl is turned upside down). Pour syrup into the egg whites a little at a time, beating until thick. Add vanilla.

Frost cake with meringue mixture. Sprinkle with coconut. Keep refrigerated.

Dot with Maraschino cherries for added color.