Easy Crock Pot Chicken

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

This recipe was THE popular weekly dinner menu item with my circle of friends. No one knew exactly where it came from, viagra though. One person thought it was this person’s, discount and that person thought it was someone else, this and that person thought it was….. well you get the picture. I followed all the someone’s back to my friend Cathy Carter. She got the recipe from her Grandmother. Then one day when I was looking through a cookbook of crock pot recipes, low and behold there it was, but with a slight variation. Once you try it you’ll know why it is a favorite.

***Adapted August 5, 2012***
I have since adapted this recipe to eliminate the processed and canned ingredients. The original recipe called for canned condensed chicken soup and an Italian seasonings packet. Review the notes under variations for these substitutions. For variations to the homemade versions of Italian seasonings and condensed chicken follow the links provided.

Source: Cathy’s Grandmother
2 tablespoons Italian season mix (recipe below)
1 (8 oz) package cream cheese
6 chicken breasts
2 cups cream of chicken (based on recipe below)

Place all the ingredients in the crock pot. Cook on low for 4-6 hours. Serve over rice or noodles.

Italian Seasonings Mix:
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

In a small bowl, mix together the garlic salt, onion powder, sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

Cream of Chicken:
1 1/2 cups fresh chicken stock*
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon onion powder**
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder***
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt (or less; taste to test)
1/4 teaspoon parsley
dash of paprika
1 1/2 cups milk
3/4 cup flour

In medium-sized saucepan, boil chicken broth, 1/2 cup of the milk, and the seasonings for a minute or two (longer if using fresh onions or garlic).
In a bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup of milk and flour. Add to boiling mixture and continue whisking briskly until mixture boils and thickens. Remove from heat.

Variations:
– 1 can cream of chicken soup (cream of celery or mushroom can be substituted)
– In place of above seasoning use 1 packet Italian salad dressing powdered mix.
– Fat free version, in place of the cream cheese and cream of soup use a cup of water.
– Low fat version, omit the cream cheese.

6 Replies to “Easy Crock Pot Chicken”

  1. I made this recipe one day because I was looking to save some time and love coming home from work and having my dinner already done in the crockpot. This recipe was SOO yummy! I highly recommend this to any mom that wants a good home cooked meal with no muss or fuss. It was extremely easy to make!

  2. Has anyone ever tried this with Neufchatel cheese (lower fat) or fat free cream cheese and low-fat cream of chicken soup? Does it taste as good or does it alter the flavor?

  3. If you use a better brand of low fat or fat free cream cheese such as Philadelphia I would say you should not notice a difference. The cheaper brands or store brand have an off taste that I can notice. But I can never tell the difference when I use Philadelphia brand cream cheese. The only time I would be cautious about using fat free cream cheese is when baking. The fat free cream cheese does not set up as well so unless specified stick to the full fat version.
    Low fat cream of chicken soup is what I use and it is fine.

  4. we know this one as cream cheese chicken. my friend kelly came to visit when our daughter was born and cooked for me. she made this and many other similar type meals and froze them in storage bags with cooking instructions on the label. so as we needed we could pull a wonderful meal out of the freezer.

  5. Hi, do you need to brown the chicken breasts before putting them in the crock pot or just put them in raw? What are the stove top directions? Thanks!!

Comments are closed.