Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, diagnosis  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, viagra order blackberry jelly, more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, diagnosis  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, viagra order blackberry jelly, more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, remedy  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, for sale blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:













1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, diagnosis  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, viagra order blackberry jelly, more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, remedy  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, for sale blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:













1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, sale  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, pill blackberry jelly, approved blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Treats:










1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, diagnosis  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, viagra order blackberry jelly, more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, remedy  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, for sale blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:













1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, sale  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, pill blackberry jelly, approved blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Treats:










1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares
Fall finally arrived last weekend. Rainy and cold. It was heavenly. Thanks to Emily, dosage my brother’s wife, online the pantry is well stocked with canned pumpkin. Last year I was complaining about not being able to find canned pumpkin in the supermarket during the month of October. Emily made sure I had a few extra cans tucked away in the pantry to use this fall. This year we are hardly into october and I have used up two of those cans. The onset of rainy cold fall weather called for a batch of pumpkin muffins.

My favorite pumpkin recipe used to be Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I especially liked the ones from a grocery store in Utah. I searched recipe after recipe trying to find an exact match. Baked and baked, with unsuccessful results, until I found the closest contender on Joy the Baker. They were soft with a hint of spices just as I remembered. Pumpkin chocolate cookies are no longer my favorite. Although they still bring a smile to my lips as I remember wonderful dear friends I once shared them with.

Pumpkin Chip Muffins are similar to the cookie in taste. However, many people find the cake texture of the cookie to be annoying. If this is the case a chocolate chip pumpkin muffin might make more sense.

Source: Thorp House Inn of Fish Creek, WI
1-2/3 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal, optional
1 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1-1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
3/4 teaspoon ground mace
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
2 eggs
1 cup canned pumpkin (not pre-spiced)
1/2 cup butter, melted
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350°.

Spray a standard muffin pan with cooking spray or line with paper baking liners.  Set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine flour, sugar, salt, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, mace, nutmeg, and cloves.  Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and set aside.

In another medium bowl, combine the eggs, pumpkin, and melted butter.  Add the pumpkin mixture all at once to the flour mixture.  Stir until just moistened (batter may be a bit lumpy).  Fold in the chocolate chips.

Spoon batter into the 12 prepared muffin cups. Bake for about 20 minutes, or just until a wooden toothpick inserted into centers of the muffins comes out clean. Do not over bake. Let sit in the muffin pan to cool for 2 to 5 minutes. Remove from muffin cups.

Yield:  12 standard size muffins

Variations:
–This recipe calls for mace. Mace is the outer red webbing of a nutmeg seed. Add it if available. Otherwise omit it and add a hint more of nutmeg.

Apple Harvest Festival

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My kids love left over pasta, find enchiladas, what is ed pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My kids love left over pasta, find enchiladas, what is ed pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, erectile with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney

Southern Cottage Pie

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as Rock-It, doctor cheap just posted for the Fourth of July, healing teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, visit history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

If you are looking for a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.
Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as Rock-It, doctor cheap just posted for the Fourth of July, healing teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, visit history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

If you are looking for a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, page we just did for the Fourth of July, more about teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, viagra buy history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.
Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as Rock-It, doctor cheap just posted for the Fourth of July, healing teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, visit history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

If you are looking for a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, page we just did for the Fourth of July, more about teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, viagra buy history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, sickness we just did for the Fourth of July, teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.
Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as Rock-It, doctor cheap just posted for the Fourth of July, healing teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, visit history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

If you are looking for a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, page we just did for the Fourth of July, more about teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, viagra buy history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, sickness we just did for the Fourth of July, teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, pills we just did for the Fourth of July, stomach teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, page history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource as more and more studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.
Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as Rock-It, doctor cheap just posted for the Fourth of July, healing teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, visit history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

If you are looking for a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, page we just did for the Fourth of July, more about teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, viagra buy history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, sickness we just did for the Fourth of July, teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, pills we just did for the Fourth of July, stomach teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, page history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource as more and more studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

When our family decided to get away from processed foods one of my first hurdles of home baking was to make my mom’s cream puffs completely from scratch. Valentine’s day was on the horizon and I wanted to be able to make our traditional Valentine’s Day Cream Puffs. My favorite part of my mom’s cream puffs is the custard filling. I could just sit and eat a bowl of the stuff and forget the puffs altogether. The secret recipe calls for vanilla pudding mixed with whipped cream. The result is creamy decadence.

**Tips:
– If the ingredients get to warm the whipped cream will melt and become somewhat soupy.
– Chill the bowl and beaters beforehand.
– Use cool to cold ingredients.
– Watch the cream closely. Beating even 20 seconds too long will make the whipped cream curdle. Example, visit the photo above. I looked away for what seemed like a second and my whipped cream went from just about perfect to a little over done. But, cialis 40mg it still tasted scrumptious.

Source: Schaeffer Girl’s Grub
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1/3 cup powdered sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Whip whipping cream, try sugar, and vanilla on medium just until cream creates stiff peaks. Chill or use right away.

Store whipped cream in an air tight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

To
Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as Rock-It, doctor cheap just posted for the Fourth of July, healing teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, visit history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

If you are looking for a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, page we just did for the Fourth of July, more about teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, viagra buy history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, sickness we just did for the Fourth of July, teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource. Studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, pills we just did for the Fourth of July, stomach teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, page history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource as more and more studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

When our family decided to get away from processed foods one of my first hurdles of home baking was to make my mom’s cream puffs completely from scratch. Valentine’s day was on the horizon and I wanted to be able to make our traditional Valentine’s Day Cream Puffs. My favorite part of my mom’s cream puffs is the custard filling. I could just sit and eat a bowl of the stuff and forget the puffs altogether. The secret recipe calls for vanilla pudding mixed with whipped cream. The result is creamy decadence.

**Tips:
– If the ingredients get to warm the whipped cream will melt and become somewhat soupy.
– Chill the bowl and beaters beforehand.
– Use cool to cold ingredients.
– Watch the cream closely. Beating even 20 seconds too long will make the whipped cream curdle. Example, visit the photo above. I looked away for what seemed like a second and my whipped cream went from just about perfect to a little over done. But, cialis 40mg it still tasted scrumptious.

Source: Schaeffer Girl’s Grub
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1/3 cup powdered sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Whip whipping cream, try sugar, and vanilla on medium just until cream creates stiff peaks. Chill or use right away.

Store whipped cream in an air tight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

To

This version of Shepherds Pie, viagra approved as it is referred to in America, this site is reminiscent of an old time country diner in the South. The flavor is superb. The bacon pieces sprinkled on top adds a little extra pizazz.

A traditional Cottage Pie would include both meat and more vegetables similar to Ellie Krieger’s Cauliflower with Mashed Potatoes Shepherds Pie. However, if you are searching for more of a meat and potatoes manly style pie, a Southern Cottage Pie is sure to hit the spot.

Source: Christine Fernandez
2 pounds lean ground beef
1 cup mushrooms
1 medium onion chopped
5 slices of pre cooked bacon
3 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons of worcestershire sauce
4 tablespoons of flour
2 egg yolks
1/2 cup parmesan cheese
6 tablespoons of butter
1/2 cup of milk
Pinch of salt
Pinch of pepper
6 large potatoes

Place potatoes in a pot, cover with water and bring up to a boil. Season water with salt and boil potatoes until tender.

Heat a skillet over medium high heat. Add ground beef to the pan and caramelize the meat. Add in the mushrooms and onions and cook until tender,then season with salt and pepper.

While meat cooks heat a small sauce pot over medium heat and melt butter, whisk the flour into butter, cook 2 minutes then whisk beef stock into flour, add Worcestershire and season sauce with salt and pepper, to taste. Thicken.

Pour gravy over meat and turn on broiler.

Place drained potatoes back into the pot you cooked them in to dry them out a little. Mash potatoes with egg yolk, Parmesan cheese, milk and 2 tablespoons of butter. Season the potatoes with salt and pepper and spread across the top of the meat in an even layer. Garnish the potatoes with bacon and place under broiler to crisp and brown the potatoes, 2 to 3 minutes.

November Website Review: Toad Haven

This week’s post is a guest post by my niece Alexis Morris. Alexis made this lip smacking sandwich all by herself. We love to support the youngsters for their culinary ingenuity.

Sandwiches can be a healthy snack for starving after school bodies. Add some leafy lettuce for extra beneficial vitamins and minerals. Many children who refuse to eat a bowl of salad will tolerate a single leaf in a sandwich. Choose a darker leafier head such as red tip or romaine. The wholesome fiber found in whole grain breads minus all the artificial fillers fills the kids bellies and the zero or low sugar does not leave them craving more sugar.


The Alexis Delux:
Two slices whole wheat bread
Mayo
1 slice provolone cheese
2 slices black forrest ham

Spread slices of bread with a thin mayo. Layer one slice of bread with cheese, medical approved this ham, and then lettuce.
Serve with a side of pringles chips and a glass of orange juice.
This week’s post is a guest post by my niece Alexis Morris. Alexis made this lip smacking sandwich all by herself. We love to support the youngsters for their culinary ingenuity.

Sandwiches can be a healthy snack for starving after school bodies. Add some leafy lettuce for extra beneficial vitamins and minerals. Many children who refuse to eat a bowl of salad will tolerate a single leaf in a sandwich. Choose a darker leafier head such as red tip or romaine. The wholesome fiber found in whole grain breads minus all the artificial fillers fills the kids bellies and the zero or low sugar does not leave them craving more sugar.


The Alexis Delux:
Two slices whole wheat bread
Mayo
1 slice provolone cheese
2 slices black forrest ham

Spread slices of bread with a thin mayo. Layer one slice of bread with cheese, purchase information pills ham, and then lettuce.
Serve with a side of pringles chips and a glass of orange juice.

Toad Haven is more than just an educational family blog. It is a wonderland of ideas to keep kids entertained on a rainy day, malady nurse to help kids learn a hard to understand concept, approved or for exploring the world around us. Think school projects. I have not seen many science fair projects about baking salmon in the dishwasher?

Toad Haven offers links to online educational games and fun activities for home, unhealthy school, or church settings. Most of the ideas can be adapted for preschool to high school learners; utilizing many common items found around the house. The site is sorted by areas of study for ease in finding help in a particular course of study. Toad Haven is an educational resource for both home and community schoolers alike.

Fall Afternoon Snacks

Muffin Tin- http://michellesjournalcorner.blogspot.com/2009/09/muffin-tin-monday_14.html

Apple Smile-http://workmanfamily.typepad.com/our_life/2010/10/quick-halloween-treats.html

People-http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/activities/outdoor/apple-picking/?page=7

Crunchy Apple Sandwhich-http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/2535
Muffin Tin- http://michellesjournalcorner.blogspot.com/2009/09/muffin-tin-monday_14.html

Apple Smile-http://workmanfamily.typepad.com/our_life/2010/10/quick-halloween-treats.html

People-http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/activities/outdoor/apple-picking/?page=7

Crunchy Apple Sandwhich-http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/2535
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, viagra maybe a very close runner up to Spring, but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax. The recipe calls for a boxed brownie mix. You can make your own cookies from a brownie recipe. I have not figure it out just yet. So we use a chocolate brownie cookie recipe instead.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.

Vanilla Nectarine Jam

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Old Fashioned Homestead Cornbread

School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
D