Saint Nicholas Day Stocking Tradition

Photo: Klompen – A Family of Wooden Shoes

property of be_khe’s – Flickr.com

Today commemorates the death of St. Nicholas of Myra. St. Nicholas was born into a wealthy family from the small village of Patara, story view about it located on the southern coast of modern day Turkey. Though Patara was under Greek rule at the time, health St. Nicholas’ parents raised him to be a devout Christian.

Nicholas grew to develop a generous love for mankind. He lived his life ministering to the less fortunate and children. His reputation for secret gift giving is reflected in a Dutch tradition on the eve of December 5th. That night before bed children line up their clogs out on the porch or in the entryway in hopes that St. Nicholas will stop by to leave a treat. On the morning of December 6th children wake to find candy, coins and/or a small present in their clogs.

Here in the Western world we have a similar tradition. Stockings are hung the night of Christmas Eve to collect little treats from Santa Clause. Some families choose to reserve the stocking tradition as part of the St. Nicholas day celebration rather than on Christmas. We do both.

December is a wonderful time to create this amazing magical world filled with surprise and wonderment. Recognizing traditions from other countries or faiths can add to the Christmas season building roots of tradition that remain with our children forever. Adopting the St. Nicholas feast day into our winter wonderland traditions is something our children look forward to all year.

On the eve of St. Nicholas day we unpack the stockings to hang up. You could also use shoes instead of stockings. The next morning the kids might discover an orange or a small bag with hot chocolate mix to have with breakfast. There could be a treasure map to have a scavenger hunt or a special stationary set to write letters to Santa with. This year there will be tickets to a local Nutcracker ballet show.

St. Nicholas stockings, or clogs, could also serve as a fun daily advent calendar. Use pencils, a small piece of candy or puzzle pieces to put together on Christmas Eve.

Swedish Meatballs

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, buy information pills tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, buy information pills tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

One of the biggest celebrations in Sweden around Christmas time is St. Lucia Day on December 13th. The day was named after a young woman who was martyred for her faith in a Christian religion. The story tells of a young woman who helped to nurture the needy hiding in the catacombs in Rome by bringing them food despite the growing sentiment against those who believed in a Christian God.

In Sweden on St. Lucia Day girls and boys dress in white. One older girl is chosen to bear the candle wreath upon her head and leads the company of children in a parade. The St. Lucia tradition has grown in popularity throughout the world.

Each family chooses to celebrate this day in a different way. In my sister-n-law’s, remedy Natalie, home the oldest girl dresses in white, dones a wreath, and serves everyone baked goods in their beds. We like to choose a service project to help someone in need. We also make sweet rolls for breakfast and Swedish meatballs with mashed potatoes for dinner.

Source: Simple Recipes
Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.

Fall Spice Banana Nut Chocolate Chip Cookies

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, patient early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, abortion cobblers, viagra 60mg Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, patient early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, abortion cobblers, viagra 60mg Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, medications early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, buy information pills cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, patient early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, abortion cobblers, viagra 60mg Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, medications early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, buy information pills cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
This spice rub is my go to taco seasoning recipe. Look for herbs and spices at ethnic food stores and warehouses. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Mix all the spices together in a small jar or container with lid.

— Use the full recipe amount as a rub to season a 2-3 pound roast for Mexican shredded beef.

— Use one to two tablespoons per pound ground beef, prostate ground turkey, or chicken for tacos and fajitas.

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, patient early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, abortion cobblers, viagra 60mg Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, medications early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, buy information pills cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
This spice rub is my go to taco seasoning recipe. Look for herbs and spices at ethnic food stores and warehouses. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Mix all the spices together in a small jar or container with lid.

— Use the full recipe amount as a rub to season a 2-3 pound roast for Mexican shredded beef.

— Use one to two tablespoons per pound ground beef, prostate ground turkey, or chicken for tacos and fajitas.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, shop pizzas are fun to make, approved which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, sales which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
2 1/4 teaspoon Active Dry Yeast
Pinch of Sugar
1 1/4 cups lukewarm water (110-115 degrees), divided
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup olive oil, plus more

If using Active Dry yeast sprinkle the yeast and sugar into 1/4 cup warm (105-110 degree) water. Stir until completely dissolved. Set in warm, draft free place for 3-5 minutes or until yeast bubbles and doubles in volume. (If mixture does not bubble up after five minutes, throw out and start over) If using instant yeast, mix the yeast with the flour and salt in step two.

In a mixer bowl with the hook attachment, add flour and salt. Make a well, add yeast mixture, 1 cup of warm water and 1/4 cup olive oil. Mix at medium speed until almost combined. Knead on high speed for 6-8 minutes in the mixer or knead by hand on a floured surface for 10 minutes. Dust with flour, put in a clean dry bowl. Cover and let rise until doubled.

Preheat oven to 500. Place rack on lowest shelf of oven. Punch dough. Break dough into fourths to make four small to medium sized pizzas. Brush pizza stone or baking sheet with a little olive oil. Form the pizza dough by laying the dough on the pizza stone, then pat and pull the dough until it is the size you want. *Rolling the dough forces the air bubbles out which produces and thinner flat crust. For a thick crust make a little rim. Poke the center of the pizza with your fingers to make small indentations. Once the toppings are on and the pizza is ready to be baked, place pizza on the bottom rack. Bake 10-15 minutes until crust is browned.

Variations:
Use tortillas in the place of pizza dough. Place a tortilla on foil or a baking sheet. Brush with oil. Top with desired toppings. Bake 350 for 6-10 minutes. The cheese should be slightly browned and the tortilla a golden brown. So fast and easy they would make a great lunch.

PIZZA SAUCE:
Pick your sauce base- (about 3-4 cups or 4 pounds) fresh (peeled and seeded) or canned diced tomatoes or tomato sauce plus 1 can puree or tomato paste.
1 cup onion, chopped
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Oregano 1-2 teaspoons, dried
Rosemary 1/2 teaspoon, dried
Thyme 1/2 teaspoon, dried

Saute onions and garlic in a little olive oil, until onions begin to be transparent. Season with herbs and pepper. Add tomato base and sprinkle with salt. Bring everything to a boil, then let simmer for about 20 minutes.

Variations:
Replace the oregano, thyme and rosemary with 1 tbsp Italian seasoning.
Puree veggies such as zucchini, cauliflower or a carrot to add to the sauce.
If using diced tomatoes, process in a food processor until desired consistency.

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, patient early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, abortion cobblers, viagra 60mg Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, medications early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, buy information pills cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
This spice rub is my go to taco seasoning recipe. Look for herbs and spices at ethnic food stores and warehouses. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Mix all the spices together in a small jar or container with lid.

— Use the full recipe amount as a rub to season a 2-3 pound roast for Mexican shredded beef.

— Use one to two tablespoons per pound ground beef, prostate ground turkey, or chicken for tacos and fajitas.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, shop pizzas are fun to make, approved which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, sales which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
2 1/4 teaspoon Active Dry Yeast
Pinch of Sugar
1 1/4 cups lukewarm water (110-115 degrees), divided
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup olive oil, plus more

If using Active Dry yeast sprinkle the yeast and sugar into 1/4 cup warm (105-110 degree) water. Stir until completely dissolved. Set in warm, draft free place for 3-5 minutes or until yeast bubbles and doubles in volume. (If mixture does not bubble up after five minutes, throw out and start over) If using instant yeast, mix the yeast with the flour and salt in step two.

In a mixer bowl with the hook attachment, add flour and salt. Make a well, add yeast mixture, 1 cup of warm water and 1/4 cup olive oil. Mix at medium speed until almost combined. Knead on high speed for 6-8 minutes in the mixer or knead by hand on a floured surface for 10 minutes. Dust with flour, put in a clean dry bowl. Cover and let rise until doubled.

Preheat oven to 500. Place rack on lowest shelf of oven. Punch dough. Break dough into fourths to make four small to medium sized pizzas. Brush pizza stone or baking sheet with a little olive oil. Form the pizza dough by laying the dough on the pizza stone, then pat and pull the dough until it is the size you want. *Rolling the dough forces the air bubbles out which produces and thinner flat crust. For a thick crust make a little rim. Poke the center of the pizza with your fingers to make small indentations. Once the toppings are on and the pizza is ready to be baked, place pizza on the bottom rack. Bake 10-15 minutes until crust is browned.

Variations:
Use tortillas in the place of pizza dough. Place a tortilla on foil or a baking sheet. Brush with oil. Top with desired toppings. Bake 350 for 6-10 minutes. The cheese should be slightly browned and the tortilla a golden brown. So fast and easy they would make a great lunch.

PIZZA SAUCE:
Pick your sauce base- (about 3-4 cups or 4 pounds) fresh (peeled and seeded) or canned diced tomatoes or tomato sauce plus 1 can puree or tomato paste.
1 cup onion, chopped
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Oregano 1-2 teaspoons, dried
Rosemary 1/2 teaspoon, dried
Thyme 1/2 teaspoon, dried

Saute onions and garlic in a little olive oil, until onions begin to be transparent. Season with herbs and pepper. Add tomato base and sprinkle with salt. Bring everything to a boil, then let simmer for about 20 minutes.

Variations:
Replace the oregano, thyme and rosemary with 1 tbsp Italian seasoning.
Puree veggies such as zucchini, cauliflower or a carrot to add to the sauce.
If using diced tomatoes, process in a food processor until desired consistency.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, page pizzas are fun to make, clinic which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, patient early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, abortion cobblers, viagra 60mg Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, medications early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, buy information pills cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
This spice rub is my go to taco seasoning recipe. Look for herbs and spices at ethnic food stores and warehouses. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Mix all the spices together in a small jar or container with lid.

— Use the full recipe amount as a rub to season a 2-3 pound roast for Mexican shredded beef.

— Use one to two tablespoons per pound ground beef, prostate ground turkey, or chicken for tacos and fajitas.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, shop pizzas are fun to make, approved which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, sales which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
2 1/4 teaspoon Active Dry Yeast
Pinch of Sugar
1 1/4 cups lukewarm water (110-115 degrees), divided
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup olive oil, plus more

If using Active Dry yeast sprinkle the yeast and sugar into 1/4 cup warm (105-110 degree) water. Stir until completely dissolved. Set in warm, draft free place for 3-5 minutes or until yeast bubbles and doubles in volume. (If mixture does not bubble up after five minutes, throw out and start over) If using instant yeast, mix the yeast with the flour and salt in step two.

In a mixer bowl with the hook attachment, add flour and salt. Make a well, add yeast mixture, 1 cup of warm water and 1/4 cup olive oil. Mix at medium speed until almost combined. Knead on high speed for 6-8 minutes in the mixer or knead by hand on a floured surface for 10 minutes. Dust with flour, put in a clean dry bowl. Cover and let rise until doubled.

Preheat oven to 500. Place rack on lowest shelf of oven. Punch dough. Break dough into fourths to make four small to medium sized pizzas. Brush pizza stone or baking sheet with a little olive oil. Form the pizza dough by laying the dough on the pizza stone, then pat and pull the dough until it is the size you want. *Rolling the dough forces the air bubbles out which produces and thinner flat crust. For a thick crust make a little rim. Poke the center of the pizza with your fingers to make small indentations. Once the toppings are on and the pizza is ready to be baked, place pizza on the bottom rack. Bake 10-15 minutes until crust is browned.

Variations:
Use tortillas in the place of pizza dough. Place a tortilla on foil or a baking sheet. Brush with oil. Top with desired toppings. Bake 350 for 6-10 minutes. The cheese should be slightly browned and the tortilla a golden brown. So fast and easy they would make a great lunch.

PIZZA SAUCE:
Pick your sauce base- (about 3-4 cups or 4 pounds) fresh (peeled and seeded) or canned diced tomatoes or tomato sauce plus 1 can puree or tomato paste.
1 cup onion, chopped
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Oregano 1-2 teaspoons, dried
Rosemary 1/2 teaspoon, dried
Thyme 1/2 teaspoon, dried

Saute onions and garlic in a little olive oil, until onions begin to be transparent. Season with herbs and pepper. Add tomato base and sprinkle with salt. Bring everything to a boil, then let simmer for about 20 minutes.

Variations:
Replace the oregano, thyme and rosemary with 1 tbsp Italian seasoning.
Puree veggies such as zucchini, cauliflower or a carrot to add to the sauce.
If using diced tomatoes, process in a food processor until desired consistency.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, page pizzas are fun to make, clinic which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

One of the biggest celebrations in Sweden around Christmas time is St. Lucia Day on December 13th. The day was named after a young woman who was martyred for her faith in a Christian religion. The story tells of a young woman who helped to nurture the needy hiding in the catacombs in Rome by bringing them food despite the growing sentiment against those who believed in a Christian God.

In Sweden on St. Lucia Day girls and boys dress in white. One older girl is chosen to bear the candle wreath upon her head and leads the company of children in a parade. The St. Lucia tradition has grown in popularity throughout the world.

Each family chooses to celebrate this day in a different way. In my sister-n-law’s, diagnosis Natalie, story home the oldest girl dresses in white, pills dones a wreath, and serves everyone baked goods in their beds. We like to choose a service project to help someone in need. We also make sweet rolls for breakfast and Swedish meatballs with mashed potatoes for dinner.

Source: Simple Recipes
Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, patient early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, abortion cobblers, viagra 60mg Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, medications early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, buy information pills cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
This spice rub is my go to taco seasoning recipe. Look for herbs and spices at ethnic food stores and warehouses. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Mix all the spices together in a small jar or container with lid.

— Use the full recipe amount as a rub to season a 2-3 pound roast for Mexican shredded beef.

— Use one to two tablespoons per pound ground beef, prostate ground turkey, or chicken for tacos and fajitas.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, shop pizzas are fun to make, approved which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, sales which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
2 1/4 teaspoon Active Dry Yeast
Pinch of Sugar
1 1/4 cups lukewarm water (110-115 degrees), divided
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup olive oil, plus more

If using Active Dry yeast sprinkle the yeast and sugar into 1/4 cup warm (105-110 degree) water. Stir until completely dissolved. Set in warm, draft free place for 3-5 minutes or until yeast bubbles and doubles in volume. (If mixture does not bubble up after five minutes, throw out and start over) If using instant yeast, mix the yeast with the flour and salt in step two.

In a mixer bowl with the hook attachment, add flour and salt. Make a well, add yeast mixture, 1 cup of warm water and 1/4 cup olive oil. Mix at medium speed until almost combined. Knead on high speed for 6-8 minutes in the mixer or knead by hand on a floured surface for 10 minutes. Dust with flour, put in a clean dry bowl. Cover and let rise until doubled.

Preheat oven to 500. Place rack on lowest shelf of oven. Punch dough. Break dough into fourths to make four small to medium sized pizzas. Brush pizza stone or baking sheet with a little olive oil. Form the pizza dough by laying the dough on the pizza stone, then pat and pull the dough until it is the size you want. *Rolling the dough forces the air bubbles out which produces and thinner flat crust. For a thick crust make a little rim. Poke the center of the pizza with your fingers to make small indentations. Once the toppings are on and the pizza is ready to be baked, place pizza on the bottom rack. Bake 10-15 minutes until crust is browned.

Variations:
Use tortillas in the place of pizza dough. Place a tortilla on foil or a baking sheet. Brush with oil. Top with desired toppings. Bake 350 for 6-10 minutes. The cheese should be slightly browned and the tortilla a golden brown. So fast and easy they would make a great lunch.

PIZZA SAUCE:
Pick your sauce base- (about 3-4 cups or 4 pounds) fresh (peeled and seeded) or canned diced tomatoes or tomato sauce plus 1 can puree or tomato paste.
1 cup onion, chopped
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Oregano 1-2 teaspoons, dried
Rosemary 1/2 teaspoon, dried
Thyme 1/2 teaspoon, dried

Saute onions and garlic in a little olive oil, until onions begin to be transparent. Season with herbs and pepper. Add tomato base and sprinkle with salt. Bring everything to a boil, then let simmer for about 20 minutes.

Variations:
Replace the oregano, thyme and rosemary with 1 tbsp Italian seasoning.
Puree veggies such as zucchini, cauliflower or a carrot to add to the sauce.
If using diced tomatoes, process in a food processor until desired consistency.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, page pizzas are fun to make, clinic which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

One of the biggest celebrations in Sweden around Christmas time is St. Lucia Day on December 13th. The day was named after a young woman who was martyred for her faith in a Christian religion. The story tells of a young woman who helped to nurture the needy hiding in the catacombs in Rome by bringing them food despite the growing sentiment against those who believed in a Christian God.

In Sweden on St. Lucia Day girls and boys dress in white. One older girl is chosen to bear the candle wreath upon her head and leads the company of children in a parade. The St. Lucia tradition has grown in popularity throughout the world.

Each family chooses to celebrate this day in a different way. In my sister-n-law’s, diagnosis Natalie, story home the oldest girl dresses in white, pills dones a wreath, and serves everyone baked goods in their beds. We like to choose a service project to help someone in need. We also make sweet rolls for breakfast and Swedish meatballs with mashed potatoes for dinner.

Source: Simple Recipes
Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or grean beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, approved diced
3 cloves garlic, more about minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.

Photo: by Bunny Cakes

Beverage:

Slug Butter beer

Black Quagmire Potion

Appetizer:

Freshly Picked Graveyard Morsels

Skinned Vampire Fingers

Zombie Brains

Crispy Fried Bat Wings

Main Course:

Roasted Heart of Troll

Ogre Eyeball Sub

Dessert:

Snickers Cheesecake

Fruity Ghosts and Pumpkins

Upon their arrival, thumb early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, website cobblers, shop Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, patient early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, abortion cobblers, viagra 60mg Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
Upon their arrival, medications early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, buy information pills cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.
This spice rub is my go to taco seasoning recipe. Look for herbs and spices at ethnic food stores and warehouses. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Mix all the spices together in a small jar or container with lid.

— Use the full recipe amount as a rub to season a 2-3 pound roast for Mexican shredded beef.

— Use one to two tablespoons per pound ground beef, prostate ground turkey, or chicken for tacos and fajitas.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, shop pizzas are fun to make, approved which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, sales which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
2 1/4 teaspoon Active Dry Yeast
Pinch of Sugar
1 1/4 cups lukewarm water (110-115 degrees), divided
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup olive oil, plus more

If using Active Dry yeast sprinkle the yeast and sugar into 1/4 cup warm (105-110 degree) water. Stir until completely dissolved. Set in warm, draft free place for 3-5 minutes or until yeast bubbles and doubles in volume. (If mixture does not bubble up after five minutes, throw out and start over) If using instant yeast, mix the yeast with the flour and salt in step two.

In a mixer bowl with the hook attachment, add flour and salt. Make a well, add yeast mixture, 1 cup of warm water and 1/4 cup olive oil. Mix at medium speed until almost combined. Knead on high speed for 6-8 minutes in the mixer or knead by hand on a floured surface for 10 minutes. Dust with flour, put in a clean dry bowl. Cover and let rise until doubled.

Preheat oven to 500. Place rack on lowest shelf of oven. Punch dough. Break dough into fourths to make four small to medium sized pizzas. Brush pizza stone or baking sheet with a little olive oil. Form the pizza dough by laying the dough on the pizza stone, then pat and pull the dough until it is the size you want. *Rolling the dough forces the air bubbles out which produces and thinner flat crust. For a thick crust make a little rim. Poke the center of the pizza with your fingers to make small indentations. Once the toppings are on and the pizza is ready to be baked, place pizza on the bottom rack. Bake 10-15 minutes until crust is browned.

Variations:
Use tortillas in the place of pizza dough. Place a tortilla on foil or a baking sheet. Brush with oil. Top with desired toppings. Bake 350 for 6-10 minutes. The cheese should be slightly browned and the tortilla a golden brown. So fast and easy they would make a great lunch.

PIZZA SAUCE:
Pick your sauce base- (about 3-4 cups or 4 pounds) fresh (peeled and seeded) or canned diced tomatoes or tomato sauce plus 1 can puree or tomato paste.
1 cup onion, chopped
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Oregano 1-2 teaspoons, dried
Rosemary 1/2 teaspoon, dried
Thyme 1/2 teaspoon, dried

Saute onions and garlic in a little olive oil, until onions begin to be transparent. Season with herbs and pepper. Add tomato base and sprinkle with salt. Bring everything to a boil, then let simmer for about 20 minutes.

Variations:
Replace the oregano, thyme and rosemary with 1 tbsp Italian seasoning.
Puree veggies such as zucchini, cauliflower or a carrot to add to the sauce.
If using diced tomatoes, process in a food processor until desired consistency.
Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, page pizzas are fun to make, clinic which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

One of the biggest celebrations in Sweden around Christmas time is St. Lucia Day on December 13th. The day was named after a young woman who was martyred for her faith in a Christian religion. The story tells of a young woman who helped to nurture the needy hiding in the catacombs in Rome by bringing them food despite the growing sentiment against those who believed in a Christian God.

In Sweden on St. Lucia Day girls and boys dress in white. One older girl is chosen to bear the candle wreath upon her head and leads the company of children in a parade. The St. Lucia tradition has grown in popularity throughout the world.

Each family chooses to celebrate this day in a different way. In my sister-n-law’s, diagnosis Natalie, story home the oldest girl dresses in white, pills dones a wreath, and serves everyone baked goods in their beds. We like to choose a service project to help someone in need. We also make sweet rolls for breakfast and Swedish meatballs with mashed potatoes for dinner.

Source: Simple Recipes
Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or grean beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, approved diced
3 cloves garlic, more about minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Last month I was trying to think of a kid friendly snack to make for our pumpkin decorating party. I also had an entire bunch of bananas sitting untouched in the fruit basket. Not a normal phenomenon in this house. Fortunately for me I was able to produce two loaves of banana nut bread and our favorite fall banana cookies. I love this recipe because it is packed with chocolate and nuts and just the perfect hint of fall spices.

Source: adapted from Martha Stewart Banana Cookie

1/2 cup of unsalted butter, illness softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 ripe bananas, what is ed mashed
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 cup pecans, chopped
1/2 cup chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Stir the baking soda into the mashed bananas and let sit for 2 minutes.

Combine the flour, salt, spices, pecans and chocolate chips.

Cream the butter and sugars (on medium speed) until pale and fluffy. Add the egg and continue to beat until well combined. Fold in the mashed banana banana in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture, ending with the flour, folding until just combined.

Drop by tablespoonfuls onto a baking sheet. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Cool on wire racks.

Creamy Au Gratin Potatoes

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, this fluffy, pill flaky, sale buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb
In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, this fluffy, pill flaky, sale buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, buy more about fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/wholewheathoneybread

Honey Whole Wheat Bread
makes two loaves
1 lb whole wheat flour
12 oz hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour
1 5 oz can evaporated milk (or milk, advice or more water or soy if you are vegan)
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast
an additional 1/2-1 cup flour, as necessary, to achieve the desired consistency

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

(My thought is that soaking the flour may help soften the bran and release some of the sugars in the wheat, though, truthfully, I don’t know for sure if it does).

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic (I put them in a plastic bag), and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/wholewheathoneybread

Honey Whole Wheat Bread
makes two loaves
1 lb whole wheat flour
12 oz hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour
1 5 oz can evaporated milk (or milk, advice or more water or soy if you are vegan)
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast
an additional 1/2-1 cup flour, as necessary, to achieve the desired consistency

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

(My thought is that soaking the flour may help soften the bran and release some of the sugars in the wheat, though, truthfully, I don’t know for sure if it does).

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic (I put them in a plastic bag), and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
With Summer heat fast approaching in many parts of our beautiful country comes the craving for cool refreshing treats.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, more about cream, look sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Consistant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Gelato – starts out with a similar ice cream custard base, but it’s churned slower and frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The slow churning incorporates less air, so the gelato is more dense. The higher freezing temperature means that the gelato stays silkier and softer. It’s also more likely for gelato to use a lower proportion of cream and eggs (or none at all) so that the main flavor ingredient shines through.
gelato is churned at a slower speed than ice cream, so it’s denser because not as much air is whipped into the mixture. less percent of butterfat than ice cream from whole milk and cream makes it creamier and the flavors more intense. less air equ

Sorbet – sorbet is very smooth and fine.
dairy-free and egg-free, sorbets are made from fruit juice or flavored water and simple syrup. They’re churned like ice cream to give them a soft and snowy texture. (Sherbet usually contains some amount of milk or cream in addition to the fruit juice.) were served as a pre-course to the main course iMost of the recipes I found contain some type of alcohol. Fruit juices can be substituted for a non-alcoholic dessert.

Granita – Granitas are exactly like sorbets except they’re made by hand. The liquid base is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the base is stirred or racked with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. The result is a frozen dessert with a coarse and flaky texture.

Italian Ice -Italian ice is more grainy and icy similar to shaved ice or snow conesItalian ice should always be smooth, and sweetening is usually sugar

Slushy Snow cones and shaved ice have syrupy flavors added over ice and are crunchy.

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/wholewheathoneybread

Honey Whole Wheat Bread
makes two loaves
1 lb whole wheat flour
12 oz hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour
1 5 oz can evaporated milk (or milk, advice or more water or soy if you are vegan)
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast
an additional 1/2-1 cup flour, as necessary, to achieve the desired consistency

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

(My thought is that soaking the flour may help soften the bran and release some of the sugars in the wheat, though, truthfully, I don’t know for sure if it does).

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic (I put them in a plastic bag), and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
With Summer heat fast approaching in many parts of our beautiful country comes the craving for cool refreshing treats.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, more about cream, look sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Consistant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Gelato – starts out with a similar ice cream custard base, but it’s churned slower and frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The slow churning incorporates less air, so the gelato is more dense. The higher freezing temperature means that the gelato stays silkier and softer. It’s also more likely for gelato to use a lower proportion of cream and eggs (or none at all) so that the main flavor ingredient shines through.
gelato is churned at a slower speed than ice cream, so it’s denser because not as much air is whipped into the mixture. less percent of butterfat than ice cream from whole milk and cream makes it creamier and the flavors more intense. less air equ

Sorbet – sorbet is very smooth and fine.
dairy-free and egg-free, sorbets are made from fruit juice or flavored water and simple syrup. They’re churned like ice cream to give them a soft and snowy texture. (Sherbet usually contains some amount of milk or cream in addition to the fruit juice.) were served as a pre-course to the main course iMost of the recipes I found contain some type of alcohol. Fruit juices can be substituted for a non-alcoholic dessert.

Granita – Granitas are exactly like sorbets except they’re made by hand. The liquid base is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the base is stirred or racked with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. The result is a frozen dessert with a coarse and flaky texture.

Italian Ice -Italian ice is more grainy and icy similar to shaved ice or snow conesItalian ice should always be smooth, and sweetening is usually sugar

Slushy Snow cones and shaved ice have syrupy flavors added over ice and are crunchy.

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, viagra order learning patterns, shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/wholewheathoneybread

Honey Whole Wheat Bread
makes two loaves
1 lb whole wheat flour
12 oz hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour
1 5 oz can evaporated milk (or milk, advice or more water or soy if you are vegan)
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast
an additional 1/2-1 cup flour, as necessary, to achieve the desired consistency

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

(My thought is that soaking the flour may help soften the bran and release some of the sugars in the wheat, though, truthfully, I don’t know for sure if it does).

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic (I put them in a plastic bag), and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
With Summer heat fast approaching in many parts of our beautiful country comes the craving for cool refreshing treats.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, more about cream, look sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Consistant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Gelato – starts out with a similar ice cream custard base, but it’s churned slower and frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The slow churning incorporates less air, so the gelato is more dense. The higher freezing temperature means that the gelato stays silkier and softer. It’s also more likely for gelato to use a lower proportion of cream and eggs (or none at all) so that the main flavor ingredient shines through.
gelato is churned at a slower speed than ice cream, so it’s denser because not as much air is whipped into the mixture. less percent of butterfat than ice cream from whole milk and cream makes it creamier and the flavors more intense. less air equ

Sorbet – sorbet is very smooth and fine.
dairy-free and egg-free, sorbets are made from fruit juice or flavored water and simple syrup. They’re churned like ice cream to give them a soft and snowy texture. (Sherbet usually contains some amount of milk or cream in addition to the fruit juice.) were served as a pre-course to the main course iMost of the recipes I found contain some type of alcohol. Fruit juices can be substituted for a non-alcoholic dessert.

Granita – Granitas are exactly like sorbets except they’re made by hand. The liquid base is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the base is stirred or racked with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. The result is a frozen dessert with a coarse and flaky texture.

Italian Ice -Italian ice is more grainy and icy similar to shaved ice or snow conesItalian ice should always be smooth, and sweetening is usually sugar

Slushy Snow cones and shaved ice have syrupy flavors added over ice and are crunchy.

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, viagra order learning patterns, shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide us with an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, buy information pills learning patterns, what is ed shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, view cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I was a member of a woman’s choral group. One evening we were over time. I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. But we would change the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunt

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, viagra approved visit web fluffy, information pills flaky, there buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, viagra approved visit web fluffy, information pills flaky, there buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


The dog days of Summer are fast approaching. In many parts of our beautiful country sweltering temperatures can bring on the craving for a cool refreshing treat. A simple icy fruit cocktail such as a citrus spiked Granita can instantly placate a parched tongue. Ever wonder what exactly is a granita or how sorbet differs from ice cream? Keep reading for the 101 on these sweet frozen treats and more.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, drugs cream, purchase sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Constant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Spumoni – resembles Neapolitan ice cream. It consists of three layers of different flavored ice cream: Chocolate, pistachio and cherry or raspberry. Unlike the ice cream version of Neapolitan spumoni has actual bits of fruit and nuts.

Gelato – begins with a base of sugar, milk, very little cream, and sometimes eggs. The Italian gelato differs from ice cream in two ways. First, it uses a lower proportion of cream. The reduced butterfat does not coat the tongue producing a more intense flavor. Second, the gelato mixture is churned slower and is frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The slow churning means less air, making the gelato more dense. The higher freezing temperature produces a silkier and softer texture.

Sherbet – is often confused with sorbet. Sherbet differs from sorbet in that sherbet contains milk and sorbet is made with fruit.

Sorbet – is a frozen fruit puree made from fruit juice or frozen fruit, and simple syrup. A classic sorbet has alcohol in it and it may be used to cleanse the palate before the main course. To make sorbet all the ingredients are blended together in a blender or food processor; then poured into an ice cream maker. The churning process helps to create a very smooth fine texture. It is possible to make sorbet without an ice cream maker using a container and mixing periodically by hand.

Granita – is made with pureed fruit, a simple syrup, and a squeeze of lime or lemon juice to balance the flavors. The result is a refreshing ice. Unlike sorbet the liquid is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the mixture is scraped with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. Because the granita is not churned it is coarser than the sorbet in texture.

Italian Ice – is the American invention of the Italian Grattacheca. Grattacheca is similar to shaved ice except that the flavors are added before freezing. Italian Ice is sweetened with real fruit juices and bits of fruit. The ice is coarser than a sorbet and finer than a granita.

Water Ice – is also an American concoction often called Italian Ice. Water ice is as smooth as a slushy yet firmer and is eaten with a spoon rather than sipped through a straw.

Snow Cones – (shaved ice) are coarse grainy cups of shaved ice flavored with sugary syrups. The Hawaiian shaved ice has a vanilla ice cream center similar to a cream pop.

Slushy – (called slurpee/ICEE) is a frozen drink flavored with sugary syrup. The constant churning motion keeps the slushy smooth. You can make a slushy at home by putting a plastic bottle of soda in the freezer. Rotate the bottle every half hour to distribute the ice crystals evenly until chilled but not frozen.

Smoothie – is a fruit flavored drink. Fresh fruit is blended together with flavored water or fruit juice or milk.

Mochi – is a confectionary treat from Japan. Little ice cream balls are wrapped in soft fluffy dough called mochi, pounded rice cakes, and dusted with rice flour. They come in a variety of flavors but chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mango and green tea are the most commercial.

Spritzer – is a drink made with fruit juice and carbonated water. Spritzers are mostly made with alcohol but they can be made non-alcoholic too. An ice cream spritzer combines

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, viagra approved visit web fluffy, information pills flaky, there buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


The dog days of Summer are fast approaching. In many parts of our beautiful country sweltering temperatures can bring on the craving for a cool refreshing treat. A simple icy fruit cocktail such as a citrus spiked Granita can instantly placate a parched tongue. Ever wonder what exactly is a granita or how sorbet differs from ice cream? Keep reading for the 101 on these sweet frozen treats and more.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, drugs cream, purchase sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Constant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Spumoni – resembles Neapolitan ice cream. It consists of three layers of different flavored ice cream: Chocolate, pistachio and cherry or raspberry. Unlike the ice cream version of Neapolitan spumoni has actual bits of fruit and nuts.

Gelato – begins with a base of sugar, milk, very little cream, and sometimes eggs. The Italian gelato differs from ice cream in two ways. First, it uses a lower proportion of cream. The reduced butterfat does not coat the tongue producing a more intense flavor. Second, the gelato mixture is churned slower and is frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The slow churning means less air, making the gelato more dense. The higher freezing temperature produces a silkier and softer texture.

Sherbet – is often confused with sorbet. Sherbet differs from sorbet in that sherbet contains milk and sorbet is made with fruit.

Sorbet – is a frozen fruit puree made from fruit juice or frozen fruit, and simple syrup. A classic sorbet has alcohol in it and it may be used to cleanse the palate before the main course. To make sorbet all the ingredients are blended together in a blender or food processor; then poured into an ice cream maker. The churning process helps to create a very smooth fine texture. It is possible to make sorbet without an ice cream maker using a container and mixing periodically by hand.

Granita – is made with pureed fruit, a simple syrup, and a squeeze of lime or lemon juice to balance the flavors. The result is a refreshing ice. Unlike sorbet the liquid is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the mixture is scraped with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. Because the granita is not churned it is coarser than the sorbet in texture.

Italian Ice – is the American invention of the Italian Grattacheca. Grattacheca is similar to shaved ice except that the flavors are added before freezing. Italian Ice is sweetened with real fruit juices and bits of fruit. The ice is coarser than a sorbet and finer than a granita.

Water Ice – is also an American concoction often called Italian Ice. Water ice is as smooth as a slushy yet firmer and is eaten with a spoon rather than sipped through a straw.

Snow Cones – (shaved ice) are coarse grainy cups of shaved ice flavored with sugary syrups. The Hawaiian shaved ice has a vanilla ice cream center similar to a cream pop.

Slushy – (called slurpee/ICEE) is a frozen drink flavored with sugary syrup. The constant churning motion keeps the slushy smooth. You can make a slushy at home by putting a plastic bottle of soda in the freezer. Rotate the bottle every half hour to distribute the ice crystals evenly until chilled but not frozen.

Smoothie – is a fruit flavored drink. Fresh fruit is blended together with flavored water or fruit juice or milk.

Mochi – is a confectionary treat from Japan. Little ice cream balls are wrapped in soft fluffy dough called mochi, pounded rice cakes, and dusted with rice flour. They come in a variety of flavors but chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mango and green tea are the most commercial.

Spritzer – is a drink made with fruit juice and carbonated water. Spritzers are mostly made with alcohol but they can be made non-alcoholic too. An ice cream spritzer combines

Au Gratin potatoes makes a lovely comforting side dish perfect for the holiday table. Slicing the potatoes and onions into thin ring is a lot of work compared to a boxed version, viagra 40mg but it is so worth it in the end.

A few things I have learned with each failure to make the perfect creamy, abortion flavorful and tender casserole are:

Covering the top with the foil is MUY importante! It does a number of things — it protects the top from the direct heat so it does not dry out. This system traps in the steam creating a moist environment, resulting in a creamy saucy dish. Use this technique when making macaroni and cheese and roasted homefries. You can uncover the potatoes for the last ten minutes to brown the top or keep them covered.

So many times I have made Au Gratin potatoes by pouring the milk over the potatoes and then topping the whole thing with cheese. The sauce was always runny and curdled. Mixing the cheese with the milk mixture solved the curdled cheese problem. To avoid lumps in your sauce, add the milk just a little at a time into the flour mixture. Keep whisking until the sauce is smooth.

I like to sprinkle a bit more cheese on top. Sometimes I use cheddar, other times I use a mixture of cheddar and monterey jack.

Source: Allrecipes
4 russet potatoes, sliced into 1/4 inch slices or thinner
1 onion, sliced into thin rings
Salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups milk
1 1/2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Butter a 2-quart casserole dish.

Layer 1/2 of the potatoes into bottom of the prepared casserole dish. Top with the onion slices, and add the remaining potatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

In a medium-size saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Mix in the flour and salt, and stir constantly with a whisk for one minute until smooth. Gradually stir in milk a little at a time, constantly mixing, until sauce is smooth. Cook until mixture has thickened slightly, about 3-5 minutes. Stir in cheese all at once. Remove pan from heat. Continue stirring until cheese is melted and sauce is smooth and creamy, about 30 to 60 seconds.

Pour cheese sauce over the potatoes, lifting the potatoes with a fork in certain spots to help the sauce reach the bottom. Top with a sprinkle of more cheese, about 1/2 cup. Cover the dish with aluminum foil.

Bake 1 1/2 hours in the preheated oven. Uncover the last 10 minutes for a brown crisp top.

Dressing up the Thanksgiving Table

Au Gratin potatoes makes a lovely comforting side dish perfect for the holiday table. Slicing the potatoes and onions into thin ring is a lot of work compared to a boxed version, this web but it is so worth it in the end.

A few things I have learned with each failure to make the perfect creamy, flavorful and tender casserole are:

Covering the top with the foil is MUY importante! It does a number of things — it protects the top from the direct heat so it does not dry out. This system traps in the steam creating a moist environment, resulting in a creamy saucy dish. Use this technique when making macaroni and cheese and roasted homefries. You can uncover the potatoes for the last ten minutes to brown the top or keep them covered.

So many times I have made Au Gratin potatoes by pouring the milk over the potatoes and then topping the whole thing with cheese. The sauce was always runny and curdled. Mixing the cheese with the milk mixture solved the curdled cheese problem. To avoid lumps in your sauce, add the milk just a little at a time into the flour mixture. Keep whisking until the sauce is smooth.

I like to sprinkle a bit more cheese on top. Sometimes I use cheddar, other times I use a mixture of cheddar and monterey jack.

Source: Allrecipes
4 russet potatoes, sliced into 1/4 inch slices or thinner
1 onion, sliced into thin rings
Salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups milk
1 1/2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Butter a 2-quart casserole dish.

Layer 1/2 of the potatoes into bottom of the prepared casserole dish. Top with the onion slices, and add the remaining potatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

In a medium-size saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Mix in the flour and salt, and stir constantly with a whisk for one minute until smooth. Gradually stir in milk a little at a time, constantly mixing, until sauce is smooth. Cook until mixture has thickened slightly, about 3-5 minutes. Stir in cheese all at once. Remove pan from heat. Continue stirring until cheese is melted and sauce is smooth and creamy, about 30 to 60 seconds.

Pour cheese sauce over the potatoes, lifting the potatoes with a fork in certain spots to help the sauce reach the bottom. Top with a sprinkle of more cheese, about 1/2 cup. Cover the dish with aluminum foil.

Bake 1 1/2 hours in the preheated oven. Uncover the last 10 minutes for a brown crisp top.
Au Gratin potatoes makes a lovely comforting side dish perfect for the holiday table. Slicing the potatoes and onions into thin ring is a lot of work compared to a boxed version, this web but it is so worth it in the end.

A few things I have learned with each failure to make the perfect creamy, flavorful and tender casserole are:

Covering the top with the foil is MUY importante! It does a number of things — it protects the top from the direct heat so it does not dry out. This system traps in the steam creating a moist environment, resulting in a creamy saucy dish. Use this technique when making macaroni and cheese and roasted homefries. You can uncover the potatoes for the last ten minutes to brown the top or keep them covered.

So many times I have made Au Gratin potatoes by pouring the milk over the potatoes and then topping the whole thing with cheese. The sauce was always runny and curdled. Mixing the cheese with the milk mixture solved the curdled cheese problem. To avoid lumps in your sauce, add the milk just a little at a time into the flour mixture. Keep whisking until the sauce is smooth.

I like to sprinkle a bit more cheese on top. Sometimes I use cheddar, other times I use a mixture of cheddar and monterey jack.

Source: Allrecipes
4 russet potatoes, sliced into 1/4 inch slices or thinner
1 onion, sliced into thin rings
Salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups milk
1 1/2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Butter a 2-quart casserole dish.

Layer 1/2 of the potatoes into bottom of the prepared casserole dish. Top with the onion slices, and add the remaining potatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

In a medium-size saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Mix in the flour and salt, and stir constantly with a whisk for one minute until smooth. Gradually stir in milk a little at a time, constantly mixing, until sauce is smooth. Cook until mixture has thickened slightly, about 3-5 minutes. Stir in cheese all at once. Remove pan from heat. Continue stirring until cheese is melted and sauce is smooth and creamy, about 30 to 60 seconds.

Pour cheese sauce over the potatoes, lifting the potatoes with a fork in certain spots to help the sauce reach the bottom. Top with a sprinkle of more cheese, about 1/2 cup. Cover the dish with aluminum foil.

Bake 1 1/2 hours in the preheated oven. Uncover the last 10 minutes for a brown crisp top.

When I saw this recipe for gluten-free breakfast cookies, visit I was excited because it only calls for one type of flour and the results were amazing. Switching to a gluten-free diet is very difficult, more about it is not just replacing a cup of wheat flour with coconut flour, there is an entire new baking formula to go by. Even then, the results can be less than satisfactory.  Those who suffer from celiacs disease and gluten sensitivity deserve to have that perfect crunch of bread or moist light muffin, it is one of those simple pleasures many of us take for granted.

With Celiacs disease, the gluten attacks the lining of the intestines; once gluten is removed from the diet, the symtoms of the disease go away. Gluten is found in wheat, rye, and barley (there is some debate as to oats being included in the mix). Those with a sensitivity to gluten may feel run down, bloated, and risk developing other types of autoimmune diseases. However, you need not have Crohns disease or Celiacs disease to experience a sensitivity to gluten.

Today, the gluten content in wheat is 90% more than 70,  or even 100, years ago. Many doctors are advising patients with unknown chronic illnesses to lay off the gluten until their system recovers. Some individuals discover that they feel healthier and have more energy once the gluten is removed from their diet. All in all, I would not rush out and start buying gluten-free products, as it seems to be the craze now-a-days. Moderation is the key in all things.

Often times gluten-free recipes can be somewhat overwhelming with all the unfamiliar products. With recipes like this one, we can easily incorporate more grains into our diet. And, your gluten-free friends will be so shocked. Just remember to use uncontaminated baking equipment.

Source: Comfy Belly
2 1/2 cups of almond meal or almond flour (any nut flour will work really)
1/4 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon of baking soda
8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted (or 1/2 cup of coconut oil or vegetable shortening, melted)
1/2 cup of honey (or other sweetener)
1 egg
1 tablespoon of vanilla
2 cups of nuts, dried fruit, seeds, chocolate (in any variation)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Whisk the flour, salt and baking soda in a bowl. Stir in the 2 cups of desired nuts and fruits.

Stir in the melted butter, honey, egg, vanilla. Blending well.

Drop by tablespoonfuls on greased cookie sheets. Space them about 1 inch apart.
Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until brown around the edges. Cool on a wire rack.

Makes 25. Store in a sealed container.

Variations:
– For a crunchier cookie, leave them in the oven at 200 degrees F for another 15 minutes or so, or in a dehydrator on a fairly low temperature for about 2 hours.
– Fall spice blend: 1 teaspoons ground cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg and ground cloves. Add with dry ingredients.

Au Gratin potatoes makes a lovely comforting side dish perfect for the holiday table. Slicing the potatoes and onions into thin ring is a lot of work compared to a boxed version, this web but it is so worth it in the end.

A few things I have learned with each failure to make the perfect creamy, flavorful and tender casserole are:

Covering the top with the foil is MUY importante! It does a number of things — it protects the top from the direct heat so it does not dry out. This system traps in the steam creating a moist environment, resulting in a creamy saucy dish. Use this technique when making macaroni and cheese and roasted homefries. You can uncover the potatoes for the last ten minutes to brown the top or keep them covered.

So many times I have made Au Gratin potatoes by pouring the milk over the potatoes and then topping the whole thing with cheese. The sauce was always runny and curdled. Mixing the cheese with the milk mixture solved the curdled cheese problem. To avoid lumps in your sauce, add the milk just a little at a time into the flour mixture. Keep whisking until the sauce is smooth.

I like to sprinkle a bit more cheese on top. Sometimes I use cheddar, other times I use a mixture of cheddar and monterey jack.

Source: Allrecipes
4 russet potatoes, sliced into 1/4 inch slices or thinner
1 onion, sliced into thin rings
Salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups milk
1 1/2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Butter a 2-quart casserole dish.

Layer 1/2 of the potatoes into bottom of the prepared casserole dish. Top with the onion slices, and add the remaining potatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

In a medium-size saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Mix in the flour and salt, and stir constantly with a whisk for one minute until smooth. Gradually stir in milk a little at a time, constantly mixing, until sauce is smooth. Cook until mixture has thickened slightly, about 3-5 minutes. Stir in cheese all at once. Remove pan from heat. Continue stirring until cheese is melted and sauce is smooth and creamy, about 30 to 60 seconds.

Pour cheese sauce over the potatoes, lifting the potatoes with a fork in certain spots to help the sauce reach the bottom. Top with a sprinkle of more cheese, about 1/2 cup. Cover the dish with aluminum foil.

Bake 1 1/2 hours in the preheated oven. Uncover the last 10 minutes for a brown crisp top.

When I saw this recipe for gluten-free breakfast cookies, visit I was excited because it only calls for one type of flour and the results were amazing. Switching to a gluten-free diet is very difficult, more about it is not just replacing a cup of wheat flour with coconut flour, there is an entire new baking formula to go by. Even then, the results can be less than satisfactory.  Those who suffer from celiacs disease and gluten sensitivity deserve to have that perfect crunch of bread or moist light muffin, it is one of those simple pleasures many of us take for granted.

With Celiacs disease, the gluten attacks the lining of the intestines; once gluten is removed from the diet, the symtoms of the disease go away. Gluten is found in wheat, rye, and barley (there is some debate as to oats being included in the mix). Those with a sensitivity to gluten may feel run down, bloated, and risk developing other types of autoimmune diseases. However, you need not have Crohns disease or Celiacs disease to experience a sensitivity to gluten.

Today, the gluten content in wheat is 90% more than 70,  or even 100, years ago. Many doctors are advising patients with unknown chronic illnesses to lay off the gluten until their system recovers. Some individuals discover that they feel healthier and have more energy once the gluten is removed from their diet. All in all, I would not rush out and start buying gluten-free products, as it seems to be the craze now-a-days. Moderation is the key in all things.

Often times gluten-free recipes can be somewhat overwhelming with all the unfamiliar products. With recipes like this one, we can easily incorporate more grains into our diet. And, your gluten-free friends will be so shocked. Just remember to use uncontaminated baking equipment.

Source: Comfy Belly
2 1/2 cups of almond meal or almond flour (any nut flour will work really)
1/4 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon of baking soda
8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted (or 1/2 cup of coconut oil or vegetable shortening, melted)
1/2 cup of honey (or other sweetener)
1 egg
1 tablespoon of vanilla
2 cups of nuts, dried fruit, seeds, chocolate (in any variation)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Whisk the flour, salt and baking soda in a bowl. Stir in the 2 cups of desired nuts and fruits.

Stir in the melted butter, honey, egg, vanilla. Blending well.

Drop by tablespoonfuls on greased cookie sheets. Space them about 1 inch apart.
Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until brown around the edges. Cool on a wire rack.

Makes 25. Store in a sealed container.

Variations:
– For a crunchier cookie, leave them in the oven at 200 degrees F for another 15 minutes or so, or in a dehydrator on a fairly low temperature for about 2 hours.
– Fall spice blend: 1 teaspoons ground cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg and ground cloves. Add with dry ingredients.

Last month I was trying to come up with a treat to make for our pumpkin decorating party. I also had an entire bunch of bananas sitting untouched in the fruit basket. Not a normal phenomenon in this house. Fortunately for me I was able to produce two loaves of banana nut bread and our favorite fall banana cookies. I love this recipe because it is packed with chocolate and nuts and just the perfect hint of fall spices.

Source: adapted from Martha Stewart Banana Cookie

1/2 cup of unsalted butter, more about softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 ripe bananas, dosage mashed
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 cup pecans, seek chopped
1/2 cup chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Stir the baking soda into the mashed bananas and let sit for 2 minutes.

Combine the flour, salt, spices, pecans and chocolate chips.

Cream the butter and sugars (on medium speed) until pale and fluffy. Add the egg and continue to beat until well combined. Fold in the mashed banana banana in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture, ending with the flour, folding until just combined.

Drop by tablespoonfuls onto a baking sheet. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Cool on wire racks.
Au Gratin potatoes makes a lovely comforting side dish perfect for the holiday table. Slicing the potatoes and onions into thin ring is a lot of work compared to a boxed version, this web but it is so worth it in the end.

A few things I have learned with each failure to make the perfect creamy, flavorful and tender casserole are:

Covering the top with the foil is MUY importante! It does a number of things — it protects the top from the direct heat so it does not dry out. This system traps in the steam creating a moist environment, resulting in a creamy saucy dish. Use this technique when making macaroni and cheese and roasted homefries. You can uncover the potatoes for the last ten minutes to brown the top or keep them covered.

So many times I have made Au Gratin potatoes by pouring the milk over the potatoes and then topping the whole thing with cheese. The sauce was always runny and curdled. Mixing the cheese with the milk mixture solved the curdled cheese problem. To avoid lumps in your sauce, add the milk just a little at a time into the flour mixture. Keep whisking until the sauce is smooth.

I like to sprinkle a bit more cheese on top. Sometimes I use cheddar, other times I use a mixture of cheddar and monterey jack.

Source: Allrecipes
4 russet potatoes, sliced into 1/4 inch slices or thinner
1 onion, sliced into thin rings
Salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups milk
1 1/2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Butter a 2-quart casserole dish.

Layer 1/2 of the potatoes into bottom of the prepared casserole dish. Top with the onion slices, and add the remaining potatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

In a medium-size saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Mix in the flour and salt, and stir constantly with a whisk for one minute until smooth. Gradually stir in milk a little at a time, constantly mixing, until sauce is smooth. Cook until mixture has thickened slightly, about 3-5 minutes. Stir in cheese all at once. Remove pan from heat. Continue stirring until cheese is melted and sauce is smooth and creamy, about 30 to 60 seconds.

Pour cheese sauce over the potatoes, lifting the potatoes with a fork in certain spots to help the sauce reach the bottom. Top with a sprinkle of more cheese, about 1/2 cup. Cover the dish with aluminum foil.

Bake 1 1/2 hours in the preheated oven. Uncover the last 10 minutes for a brown crisp top.

When I saw this recipe for gluten-free breakfast cookies, visit I was excited because it only calls for one type of flour and the results were amazing. Switching to a gluten-free diet is very difficult, more about it is not just replacing a cup of wheat flour with coconut flour, there is an entire new baking formula to go by. Even then, the results can be less than satisfactory.  Those who suffer from celiacs disease and gluten sensitivity deserve to have that perfect crunch of bread or moist light muffin, it is one of those simple pleasures many of us take for granted.

With Celiacs disease, the gluten attacks the lining of the intestines; once gluten is removed from the diet, the symtoms of the disease go away. Gluten is found in wheat, rye, and barley (there is some debate as to oats being included in the mix). Those with a sensitivity to gluten may feel run down, bloated, and risk developing other types of autoimmune diseases. However, you need not have Crohns disease or Celiacs disease to experience a sensitivity to gluten.

Today, the gluten content in wheat is 90% more than 70,  or even 100, years ago. Many doctors are advising patients with unknown chronic illnesses to lay off the gluten until their system recovers. Some individuals discover that they feel healthier and have more energy once the gluten is removed from their diet. All in all, I would not rush out and start buying gluten-free products, as it seems to be the craze now-a-days. Moderation is the key in all things.

Often times gluten-free recipes can be somewhat overwhelming with all the unfamiliar products. With recipes like this one, we can easily incorporate more grains into our diet. And, your gluten-free friends will be so shocked. Just remember to use uncontaminated baking equipment.

Source: Comfy Belly
2 1/2 cups of almond meal or almond flour (any nut flour will work really)
1/4 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon of baking soda
8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted (or 1/2 cup of coconut oil or vegetable shortening, melted)
1/2 cup of honey (or other sweetener)
1 egg
1 tablespoon of vanilla
2 cups of nuts, dried fruit, seeds, chocolate (in any variation)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Whisk the flour, salt and baking soda in a bowl. Stir in the 2 cups of desired nuts and fruits.

Stir in the melted butter, honey, egg, vanilla. Blending well.

Drop by tablespoonfuls on greased cookie sheets. Space them about 1 inch apart.
Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until brown around the edges. Cool on a wire rack.

Makes 25. Store in a sealed container.

Variations:
– For a crunchier cookie, leave them in the oven at 200 degrees F for another 15 minutes or so, or in a dehydrator on a fairly low temperature for about 2 hours.
– Fall spice blend: 1 teaspoons ground cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg and ground cloves. Add with dry ingredients.

Last month I was trying to come up with a treat to make for our pumpkin decorating party. I also had an entire bunch of bananas sitting untouched in the fruit basket. Not a normal phenomenon in this house. Fortunately for me I was able to produce two loaves of banana nut bread and our favorite fall banana cookies. I love this recipe because it is packed with chocolate and nuts and just the perfect hint of fall spices.

Source: adapted from Martha Stewart Banana Cookie

1/2 cup of unsalted butter, more about softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 ripe bananas, dosage mashed
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 cup pecans, seek chopped
1/2 cup chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Stir the baking soda into the mashed bananas and let sit for 2 minutes.

Combine the flour, salt, spices, pecans and chocolate chips.

Cream the butter and sugars (on medium speed) until pale and fluffy. Add the egg and continue to beat until well combined. Fold in the mashed banana banana in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture, ending with the flour, folding until just combined.

Drop by tablespoonfuls onto a baking sheet. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Cool on wire racks.
Last month I was trying to come up with a treat to make for our pumpkin decorating party. I also had an entire bunch of bananas sitting untouched in the fruit basket. Not a normal phenomenon in this house. Fortunately for me I was able to produce two loaves of banana nut bread and our favorite fall banana cookies. I love this recipe because it is packed with chocolate and nuts and just the perfect hint of fall spices.

Source: adapted from Martha Stewart Banana Cookie

1/2 cup of unsalted butter, story softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 ripe bananas, thumb mashed
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 cup pecans, chopped
1/2 cup chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Stir the baking soda into the mashed bananas and let sit for 2 minutes.

Combine the flour, salt, spices, pecans and chocolate chips.

Cream the butter and sugars (on medium speed) until pale and fluffy. Add the egg and continue to beat until well combined. Fold in the mashed banana banana in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture, ending with the flour, folding until just combined.

Drop by tablespoonfuls onto a baking sheet. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Cool on wire racks.

In our home pancakes are more than just a breakfast food drenched in syrup. They are a quick snack with cream cheese or peanut butter. Or a sweet dessert with chocolate or butter and cinnamon sugar. And, pills clinic they had better hold up under the sharp scrutiny of the little guy, pills our carbohydrate connoisseur. So you can imagine my delight when the switch from wheat to gluten-free pancakes went unnoticed.

These gluten-free pancakes are light and fluffy just like a buttermilk pancake should be. I love them best with sauteed sliced banana in real maple syrup. They also taste scrumptious with a smear of butter and a drizzle of honey.

Source: Artisanal Gluten Free Cooking by Kelly Bronski and Peter Bronski
1 cup Artisan GF Flour Mix (see recipe below)
1 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons GF baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon GF vanilla extract
2 tablespoons salted butter, melted

Mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a bowl.

Add the egg, milk, and vanilla and mix. Add the melted butter and mix just until the ingredients are combined.

Heat a griddle or skillet to medium-high heat. Grease with butter. Pour batter into rounds on the hot griddle using a two-ounce ladle. Cook until bubbles have formed on the surface of the pancake. Flip and cook other side until golden brown. Serve with real maple syrup, honey, peanut butter, or berries.

Makes 12 pancakes

Artisan Gluten-free Flour Mix: Makes 3 cups
1 1/4 cups brown rice flour
3/4 cup sorghum flour
2/3 cup cornstarch
1/4 cup potato starch
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon potato flour
1 teaspoon xanthan gum

Combine all the ingredients and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
To use: stir flour then pour into measure cups using a spoon. Level off with a knife. Do not densely pack the measuring cup.

In our home pancakes are more than just a breakfast food drenched in syrup. They are a quick snack with cream cheese or peanut butter. Or a sweet dessert with chocolate or butter and cinnamon sugar. And, pills clinic they had better hold up under the sharp scrutiny of the little guy, pills our carbohydrate connoisseur. So you can imagine my delight when the switch from wheat to gluten-free pancakes went unnoticed.

These gluten-free pancakes are light and fluffy just like a buttermilk pancake should be. I love them best with sauteed sliced banana in real maple syrup. They also taste scrumptious with a smear of butter and a drizzle of honey.

Source: Artisanal Gluten Free Cooking by Kelly Bronski and Peter Bronski
1 cup Artisan GF Flour Mix (see recipe below)
1 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons GF baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon GF vanilla extract
2 tablespoons salted butter, melted

Mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a bowl.

Add the egg, milk, and vanilla and mix. Add the melted butter and mix just until the ingredients are combined.

Heat a griddle or skillet to medium-high heat. Grease with butter. Pour batter into rounds on the hot griddle using a two-ounce ladle. Cook until bubbles have formed on the surface of the pancake. Flip and cook other side until golden brown. Serve with real maple syrup, honey, peanut butter, or berries.

Makes 12 pancakes

Artisan Gluten-free Flour Mix: Makes 3 cups
1 1/4 cups brown rice flour
3/4 cup sorghum flour
2/3 cup cornstarch
1/4 cup potato starch
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon potato flour
1 teaspoon xanthan gum

Combine all the ingredients and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
To use: stir flour then pour into measure cups using a spoon. Level off with a knife. Do not densely pack the measuring cup.


Thanksgiving was not complete without a delicious pumpkin roll for dessert and scrumptious pumpkin pancakes for breakfast. Top with a dollop of whipped cream and some chopped pecans. Tastes just like pumpkin pie. We enjoyed them so much that we saved the left over pumpkin to make them again this week on Pancake Wednesday.

Source: High Heels and Grills
3 cups flour
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ginger
3 tablespoon brown sugar
1 (15 oz) can pure pumpkin or 1 1/2 cups.
3 cups buttermilk
3 eggs

In a large bowl, approved mix together flour, no rx salt, hospital baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and brown sugar, combining well.

Add pumpkin, buttermilk, and eggs to dry ingredients and mix gently. {If batter seems stiff, add water until it can be easily spooned onto a griddle.}

Heat griddle to medium heat and grease lightly.
Scoop about 1/3 cup of batter onto griddle and let cook until lightly browned, about 3 minutes.
Let other side cook again until lightly browned.
Repeat these steps until all the batter is gone.

Serve with whipped cream, mini chocolate chips, and hot maple syrup.

Variations:
– 1 1/2 cups fresh pumpkin puree: use a cheese cloth to help get some of the liquid out.
– Can use coconut milk or rice milk instead of buttermilk. Also water is fine but the end result is not as rich.
– Sub spices for 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice.
– If you find that the pancakes are not setting up properly (still mushy inside) add a bit more flour. Turn down the heat and cook at a lower temperature for a longer period of time.

In our home pancakes are more than just a breakfast food drenched in syrup. They are a quick snack with cream cheese or peanut butter. Or a sweet dessert with chocolate or butter and cinnamon sugar. And, pills clinic they had better hold up under the sharp scrutiny of the little guy, pills our carbohydrate connoisseur. So you can imagine my delight when the switch from wheat to gluten-free pancakes went unnoticed.

These gluten-free pancakes are light and fluffy just like a buttermilk pancake should be. I love them best with sauteed sliced banana in real maple syrup. They also taste scrumptious with a smear of butter and a drizzle of honey.

Source: Artisanal Gluten Free Cooking by Kelly Bronski and Peter Bronski
1 cup Artisan GF Flour Mix (see recipe below)
1 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons GF baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon GF vanilla extract
2 tablespoons salted butter, melted

Mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a bowl.

Add the egg, milk, and vanilla and mix. Add the melted butter and mix just until the ingredients are combined.

Heat a griddle or skillet to medium-high heat. Grease with butter. Pour batter into rounds on the hot griddle using a two-ounce ladle. Cook until bubbles have formed on the surface of the pancake. Flip and cook other side until golden brown. Serve with real maple syrup, honey, peanut butter, or berries.

Makes 12 pancakes

Artisan Gluten-free Flour Mix: Makes 3 cups
1 1/4 cups brown rice flour
3/4 cup sorghum flour
2/3 cup cornstarch
1/4 cup potato starch
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon potato flour
1 teaspoon xanthan gum

Combine all the ingredients and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
To use: stir flour then pour into measure cups using a spoon. Level off with a knife. Do not densely pack the measuring cup.


Thanksgiving was not complete without a delicious pumpkin roll for dessert and scrumptious pumpkin pancakes for breakfast. Top with a dollop of whipped cream and some chopped pecans. Tastes just like pumpkin pie. We enjoyed them so much that we saved the left over pumpkin to make them again this week on Pancake Wednesday.

Source: High Heels and Grills
3 cups flour
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ginger
3 tablespoon brown sugar
1 (15 oz) can pure pumpkin or 1 1/2 cups.
3 cups buttermilk
3 eggs

In a large bowl, approved mix together flour, no rx salt, hospital baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and brown sugar, combining well.

Add pumpkin, buttermilk, and eggs to dry ingredients and mix gently. {If batter seems stiff, add water until it can be easily spooned onto a griddle.}

Heat griddle to medium heat and grease lightly.
Scoop about 1/3 cup of batter onto griddle and let cook until lightly browned, about 3 minutes.
Let other side cook again until lightly browned.
Repeat these steps until all the batter is gone.

Serve with whipped cream, mini chocolate chips, and hot maple syrup.

Variations:
– 1 1/2 cups fresh pumpkin puree: use a cheese cloth to help get some of the liquid out.
– Can use coconut milk or rice milk instead of buttermilk. Also water is fine but the end result is not as rich.
– Sub spices for 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice.
– If you find that the pancakes are not setting up properly (still mushy inside) add a bit more flour. Turn down the heat and cook at a lower temperature for a longer period of time.
When planning a holiday meal, link setting the stage is just as important as the meal itself. From elegant china to simple paper plates, order table decor is the backdrop that sets a special dinner apart from the everyday. A festive table and decore need not be fussy or expensive. A simple scattering of leaves and votives can add just the right touch of flare to a harvest Thanksgiving table.

Incorporating decorations should not feel like an added stress. There is enough stress just worrying about the food and guests. Below are some fun ideas for table decore from the simple and inexpensive to formal and more time consuming. Feel free to illicit help from children and/or relatives.

Kids/Family Style Table:
I love the idea of using little boats for place cards and vintage maps as placemats or a table covering. Children can design their own turkey placemat using feathers or construction paper. Have them write what they are most thankful for on each turkey feather (if using paper). A boat can be made using paper, felt, paper mache, or a toy. Fill with nuts, dried fruit, toys, or a small game.


Place Settings:
A paper placemat or a ribbon around a napkin is a gorgeous way to add flare to a table. Use fabric squares as napkins or placemats. A burlap placemat pared with a rust colored suede ribbon would look picture perfect. Maybe add a row of votives down the center of the table, instant pizzaz. Fruit, pinecones, grains, a few leaves are inexpensive but can transform a table like magic. Cans make greats vases. And you will have plenty of them if you are making pumpkin pie. Leave the wrapper on or peel it off and wrap with paper or a ribbon.































Color Themes:
When deciding how and what to place on the table, begin with the color scheme. For a more modern eclectic style, fabric, patterns, and dishware do not have to match so long as the colors are in harmony with each other. For a fun fall table bring the outside, indoors. Stick with fall wood tones of whites and browns, incorporating natural elements such as rocks, leaves, branches, moss, vegetables and fruits.







Southern Green Beans with Bacon and Brown Sugar

Green beans are a true staple of the Americas. They may be eaten raw, page steamed, viagra 100mg blanched, page baked, or sautéed. The peak season for growing green beans is in the Spring and Fall, but they do well most of the year, depending on the area.

There are a variety of terms used for green beans but technically they are all the same.
– Pole beans require a support structure. The early Americans utilized the corn stalk by planting green beans along rows of corn. Allowing the bean vine to climb the stalk.
– Bush beans are identical to pole beans except that they grow on a bush.
– The snap bean refers to the snapping sound the beans make when broken.
– Earlier varieties of beans had a rough string of fiber along the side that had to be removed during preparation for cooking. Thus the name string bean.

Green beans grow in a variety of colors including yellow, purple and green. Combine the three for a beautiful presentation. Serve with baked pork chops or grilled salmon .

Source: Adapted from a recipe by Heather Murphy
1 1/2 pounds fresh green beans, washed and trimmed
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoon brown sugar
4 slices bacon, cut into ½ in pieces
1/4 of a large red onion, thinly sliced

Blanch the green beans, by placing them in salted boiling water for about 3 minutes. They should remain crisp but not tough. Remove the beans from the water. Immediately set them in a bowl of ice water to cool. Drain and set aside.

Cook bacon in a large saute pan on medium heat until done. Drain grease. Add onion and sauté until tender. Add the butter and sugar. Melt the butter. Saute the butter and brown sugar until it begins to thicken slightly. Add the green beans tossing to coat, warm through. Salt to taste.

Variations:
– use maple syrup instead of the brown sugar.
– 1 (16 ounce) bag of frozen green beans
– Add 1/4 cup broken walnut pieces. Saute with onions.

How To Quick Soak Beans

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and source of this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, medical use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, hospital naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and source of this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, medical use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, hospital naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, visit use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, cheapest naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, capsule plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and source of this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, medical use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, hospital naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, visit use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, cheapest naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, capsule plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
Green beans are a true staple of the Americas. They may be eaten raw, see steamed, thumb blanched, thumb baked, or sautéed. The peak season for growing green beans is in the Spring and Fall, but they do well most of the year, depending on the area.

There are a variety of terms used for green beans but technically they are all the same.
– Pole beans require a support structure. The early Americans utilized the corn stalk by planting green beans along rows of corn. Allowing the bean vine to climb the stalk.
– Bush beans are identical to pole beans except that they grow on a bush.
– The snap bean refers to the snapping sound the beans make when broken.
– Earlier varieties of beans had a rough string of fiber along the side that had to be removed during preparation for cooking. Thus the name string bean.

Green beans grow in a variety of colors including yellow, purple and green. Combine the three for a beautiful presentation. Serve with baked pork chops or grilled salmon .

Source: Adapted from a recipe by Heather Murphy
1 1/2 pounds fresh green beans, washed and trimmed
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoon brown sugar
4 slices bacon, cut into ½ in pieces
1/4 of a large red onion, thinly sliced

Blanch the green beans, by placing them in salted boiling water for about 3 minutes. They should remain crisp but not tough. Remove the beans from the water. Immediately set them in a bowl of ice water to cool. Drain and set aside.

Cook bacon in a large saute pan on medium heat until done. Add onion and sauté until tender. Add the butter and sugar. Melt the butter. Saute the butter and brown sugar until it begins to thicken slightly. Add the green beans tossing to coat, warm through. Salt to taste.

Variations:
– use maple syrup instead of the brown sugar.
– 1 (16 ounce) bag of frozen green beans
– Add 1/4 cup broken walnut pieces. Saute with onions.

Photo: Property of “Not Without Salt

Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, prescription pharmacy but the masses demand chili. My children tend to shy away from soups with excessive amounts of broth. They would much prefer a heartier stew or chili.

As with most chili recipes this one also has some kick to it. It is just perfect for my milder taste buds. However, approved if you think it is not hot enough increase the red pepper flakes to 1/2 – 1 teaspoons.

Source: Not Without Salt
2 large yellow onions, medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– Replace the black beans with white beans and kidney beans.
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped.
– This recipe works great with leftover turkey from the holiday.
– For a vegetarian version omit the chicken and add 1/2 cup lentils.

Photo: Property of “Not Without Salt

Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, prescription pharmacy but the masses demand chili. My children tend to shy away from soups with excessive amounts of broth. They would much prefer a heartier stew or chili.

As with most chili recipes this one also has some kick to it. It is just perfect for my milder taste buds. However, approved if you think it is not hot enough increase the red pepper flakes to 1/2 – 1 teaspoons.

Source: Not Without Salt
2 large yellow onions, medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– Replace the black beans with white beans and kidney beans.
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped.
– This recipe works great with leftover turkey from the holiday.
– For a vegetarian version omit the chicken and add 1/2 cup lentils.
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, help but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, buy medium dice

2 Tbl butter

3 cloves garlic, link finely minced

2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes

2 15 oz cans black beans

1/4 cup minced cilantro stems

3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Variations:

Omit bell peppers, cilantro, black beans

Add 2 diced celery sticks

White beans and kidney

Photo: Property of “Not Without Salt

Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, prescription pharmacy but the masses demand chili. My children tend to shy away from soups with excessive amounts of broth. They would much prefer a heartier stew or chili.

As with most chili recipes this one also has some kick to it. It is just perfect for my milder taste buds. However, approved if you think it is not hot enough increase the red pepper flakes to 1/2 – 1 teaspoons.

Source: Not Without Salt
2 large yellow onions, medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– Replace the black beans with white beans and kidney beans.
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped.
– This recipe works great with leftover turkey from the holiday.
– For a vegetarian version omit the chicken and add 1/2 cup lentils.
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, help but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, buy medium dice

2 Tbl butter

3 cloves garlic, link finely minced

2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes

2 15 oz cans black beans

1/4 cup minced cilantro stems

3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Variations:

Omit bell peppers, cilantro, black beans

Add 2 diced celery sticks

White beans and kidney
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, information pills but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, thumb medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– White beans and kidney
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped

Photo: Property of “Not Without Salt

Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, prescription pharmacy but the masses demand chili. My children tend to shy away from soups with excessive amounts of broth. They would much prefer a heartier stew or chili.

As with most chili recipes this one also has some kick to it. It is just perfect for my milder taste buds. However, approved if you think it is not hot enough increase the red pepper flakes to 1/2 – 1 teaspoons.

Source: Not Without Salt
2 large yellow onions, medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– Replace the black beans with white beans and kidney beans.
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped.
– This recipe works great with leftover turkey from the holiday.
– For a vegetarian version omit the chicken and add 1/2 cup lentils.
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, help but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, buy medium dice

2 Tbl butter

3 cloves garlic, link finely minced

2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes

2 15 oz cans black beans

1/4 cup minced cilantro stems

3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Variations:

Omit bell peppers, cilantro, black beans

Add 2 diced celery sticks

White beans and kidney
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, information pills but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, thumb medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– White beans and kidney
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped

Photo: Source Unavailable

There are two ways to buy beans; in the can or dried. The can is great because first of all the natural chemical in the bean’s coating, treatment that is known to give us gas, unhealthy is lessened during processing. Secondly, canned is a straight shot into the pot or salad.

The benefit of using dried beans is you control what goes into them. The downside to cooking with dried beans is the need to soak them. Soaking rehydrates the bean. Hydration is necessary to cut down on cooking time while preserving all the rich nutrients. Otherwise the beans will cook unevenly, the skins will slip off and you will have a giant soupy, mushy mess on your hands. Soaking is also used to clean the beans of pesticides, bug larva, and any other contaminates attached to the beans.

Soaking Overnight: (the best way to soak beans)
1. Clean the beans under cool tap water, removing damaged beans, debris and rocks.
2. Place beans in a non-reactive bowl, preferably glass.
3. Cover beans with three times the amount of water. (About 3-4 inches above layer of beans)
4. Cover and let sit for at least 4 hours or overnight. In warm weather refrigerate beans to prevent sprouting.
5. Drain the water. Rinse well.
6. Cover with water by 2 inches. Cook 30 minutes to 1 hour, until tender.
7. Proceed with recipe. Drain.

Quick Soak:
1. Clean the beans under cool tap water, removing damaged beans, debris and rocks.
2. Place beans in a stock pot.
3. Fill with three times water, about 3-4 inches above the layer of beans. (about 5 cups water per 1 cup beans.)
4. Bring to a boil. Boil beans in water for 3 minutes.
5. Remove from heat. Cover and set aside for 2 to 4 hours.
6. Drain water. Rinse beans and pot well.
7. Add fresh water. Cook until tender 30 minutes to 1 hour. Drain.
8. Proceed with recipe.

Pressure Soak: (for more easily digestible beans)
1. Clean the beans under cool tap water, removing damaged beans, debris and rocks.
2. Place beans in a pressure cooker.
4. Cover beans by 3 inches of water. Bring to pressure. Process 5 minutes.
5. Remove from heat; let pressure drop naturally.
6. Drain water. Rinse well.
7. Cover with water by 2 inches. Cook 30 minutes to 1 hour, until tender.
8. Proceed with recipe.

Favorite beans recipes:
White Bean Soup
Black Bean Soup
Black Bean Chicken Salad with Cilantro Vinaigrette

Naan- Indian Flat Bread

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

November Website Review: I Am An Organizing Junkie

Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, what is ed maybe a very close runner up to Spring, try but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, find announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, what is ed maybe a very close runner up to Spring, try but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, find announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, information pills maybe a very close runner up to Spring, but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax. The recipe calls for a boxed brownie mix. You can make your own cookies from a brownie recipe. I have not figure it out just yet. So we use a chocolate brownie cookie recipe instead.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, what is ed maybe a very close runner up to Spring, try but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, find announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, information pills maybe a very close runner up to Spring, but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax. The recipe calls for a boxed brownie mix. You can make your own cookies from a brownie recipe. I have not figure it out just yet. So we use a chocolate brownie cookie recipe instead.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, order maybe a very close runner up to Spring, search but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, sildenafil announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax. The recipe calls for a boxed brownie mix. You can make your own cookies from a brownie recipe. I have not figure it out just yet. So we use a chocolate brownie cookie recipe instead.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, what is ed maybe a very close runner up to Spring, try but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, find announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, information pills maybe a very close runner up to Spring, but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax. The recipe calls for a boxed brownie mix. You can make your own cookies from a brownie recipe. I have not figure it out just yet. So we use a chocolate brownie cookie recipe instead.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, order maybe a very close runner up to Spring, search but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, sildenafil announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax. The recipe calls for a boxed brownie mix. You can make your own cookies from a brownie recipe. I have not figure it out just yet. So we use a chocolate brownie cookie recipe instead.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.

Comic: Maxine, find by J Wagner

About every several months I get the itch to overhaul the house. I go through every nitch and cranny organizing and purging clutter. With the onset of fall I like to get things in order before the holiday chaos begins. I have not been happy with my system of organization upstairs, drugs or should I say the lack thereof. The kids space has been a free for all since we moved in last year. I have a few regular sites I peruse when I need an extra boost to keep me organized. But this time I had to go in search of something fresh.

Laura is my kind of gal. We share a crazy innate addiction to organization. Laura is passionate about what she does and it shows. Her site is filled with helpful information for clutter rehab, storage solutions, time management, and there is even a 52 week challenge, a step by step guide to a more productive life. Everything you need to know about the basics of organization is there. From menu plans to what type of products to buy. There are also free lists and templates available to print.

When life at home is flowing smoothly we have less stress and more time to enjoy our family. Finding routines and systems that compliment this goal takes planning and above all a commitment. Laura’s Household Mission Statement for the importance of home organization lists the rewards we can obtain if we stick to the plan. The Mission Statement says, “…to provide an inviting and peaceful household environment, for my family and all that enter, that is conducive to living simply, loving deeply and laughing abundantly.”

Peach Crisp

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My kids love left over pasta, find enchiladas, what is ed pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My kids love left over pasta, find enchiladas, what is ed pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, erectile with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, healing  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, side effects blackberry jelly, shop pies, tarts, and juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter and the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill is ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, healing  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, side effects blackberry jelly, shop pies, tarts, and juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter and the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill is ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, view blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples during the fall apple harvest. I am reminded of Mouse with his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies to share.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, healing  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, side effects blackberry jelly, shop pies, tarts, and juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter and the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill is ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, view blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples during the fall apple harvest. I am reminded of Mouse with his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies to share.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, approved  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, buy information pills blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. [We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.] Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter to the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods, Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family to take part in throughout the apple harvest season. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill are ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, healing  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, side effects blackberry jelly, shop pies, tarts, and juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter and the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill is ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, view blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples during the fall apple harvest. I am reminded of Mouse with his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies to share.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, approved  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, buy information pills blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. [We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.] Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter to the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods, Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family to take part in throughout the apple harvest season. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill are ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples

Upon their arrival, medical early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.