Dia De La Candelaria Day: A Mexican Celebration

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

January 6th is known as the Christian feast or day of Epiphany. For many it is the day they celebrate Christmas, recipe the day the Magi or Three Wise Men arrived at the manger and presented gifts to the baby Jesus. The Magi leaves gifts on the Eve similar to Santa Clause on Christmas Eve. In Mexico, gifts such as candies are left in their shoes to symbolize the gifts given to Jesus. A feast is prepared and a special cake or Rosca is baked with a tiny doll, (representing the baby Jesus and the quest of the Wise Men to find him) the person who finds the doll in their piece of “Rosca” must throw a party on February 2, “Candelaria Day,” offering tamales and Atole (a hot sweet drink thickened with corn flour).

Día de la Candelaria (Day of the Candles or Candle Mass) represents a fusion of pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs. Celebrated on February 2nd, Candelaria Day marks the mid-way point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The end of the Christmas festivities, when Jesus was presented to the church. Images of baby Jesus are dressed with special clothes and taken to mass. Some areas of Mexico hold a parade, bull fight and dancing.

Here in the states, we celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog day, the day we anxiously await the appearance of a ground hog to tell us if winter is moving on. So, we decided to combine the two and serve tamales and Atole for dinner. After tasting the Atole, the kids decided hot chocolate would be better.

Atole:
1/3 cup masa harina blended with 1/4 cup warm water in blender until smooth
3 cups water or milk
5 tablespoons brown sugar or piloncillo
1 pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons vanilla or one one vanilla bean
1 to 2 tablets Mexican Chocolate
1/2 cup pureed fruit (optional)

Heat all ingredients (except for any toppings you may be using) in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat while stirring. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir frequently for 20-25 minutes until thickened. If used, remove the cinnamon stick and/or vanilla bean. Pour into mugs or thick glasses. Warm fruit puree in a small saucepan and drizzle on top of Atole. Serves 2-3

4 Replies to “Dia De La Candelaria Day: A Mexican Celebration”

  1. I was looking this up today because it is 3-Kings-Day and my mother used to celebrate it with the “rosca” when we were kids, but I couldn’t remember what the significance of finding the baby Jesus was. I just wanted to comment that the atole recipe is missing “chocolate abuelita” a type of Mexican hot chocolate that is sold in round bars of chocolate that you can incorporate to the simmer stage and stir until it melts… this gives it a rich chocolate taste that the kids were missing. Try it this way and you will see the difference. I live in New Orleans now and don’t find it in too often here at the grocery stores, but the “Mexican Food Isle” at Wal-Mart usually has it. There are other varieties that can be used Colombian Chocolate Corona, or less known Mexican Chocolate Don Gustavo, that will give the atole an authentic taste.

    http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&source=hp&q=Chocolate%20Abuelita&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wf

  2. Sandra, thanks for that clarification. From what I just read Atole is a corn mesa base. There are varying types of Atole. Champurrado being one of them. A Champurrado is an Atole with chocolate. Is this correct?

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