Homemade Grout Cleaner

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, buy shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, store crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, buy shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, store crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, healing chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, buy shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, store crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, healing chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)
  • Attach a prize to each shamrock. (a coin, side effects a piece of candy, approved a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, buy shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, store crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, healing chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)
  • Attach a prize to each shamrock. (a coin, side effects a piece of candy, approved a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure.

Photo Source: Property of Flooring Liquidators

Grout can become dingy pretty fast. It is important to seal grout, find with a penetrating sealer, visit web to help keep bacteria and grime out of the pores. Sealing the grout also helps to make it waterproof. Grout sealer stops the water from seeping through the pores of the grout and underneath the tile. To keep tile and grout looking it’s best here are several homemade cleaners that are affordable and actually work.

For Basic Cleaning:

Combine equal parts table salt, store baking soda and white vinegar into a bowl. Mix to form a paste. Use a sponge to scrub the mixture into the grout. Let it sit for a couple of minutes, then wipe the grout clean with a damp rag.

Mold and Mildew:

For Colored Grout: Dampen a rag with white vinegar and scrub. Let sit for a few minutes. Wash grout with soapy water and rinse.

For Light Colored Grout: 1:1 ratio of bleach or use Hydrogen Peroxide. Spray the peroxide onto the grout. Let it sit for five minutes, then wipe the grout clean with a wet rag.

Hard Core Grout Cleaner for Floors and Bathrooms:

Combine 1/2 cup baking soda, 1/3 cup household ammonia, 1/4 cup white vinegar, and 7 cups warm water. Scrub grout with mixture using a toothbrush or grout brush.

If this does not work, use Ajax Oxygen Bleach Cleaner Heavy Duty Formula. (This is the magic ingredient in the Magic Eraser.) Sprinkle Ajax on the grout. Use water to work up a lather. Let sit for 30 minutes. Wipe up cleaner. Mop the floor to remove any leftover residue.

Recycled Trash Into Treasures

If you are still not sure what to gift this upcoming holiday season take a look at all the things you can make from recycling items you may already have at home.

CraftGossip.com and CraftBits.com is home to some really great quick last minutes gift giving ideas.

Plastic Bottle Fairy Houses
Cardboard Doll House
Foam Board Dollhouse
Fabric Dollhouse
Tube Bracelets
Pillowcase Tote Bag
Baby Sock Advent Calendar
Towel Kittens
Fabric Garland

Recycled Can Ornaments
Necktie Purse
Cardboard Coasters

22 Uses for CDs: CD Lamp
Paper Bag Art Journal
Placemat Scrapbook

Plastic bottle Wire
Magnet Bottlecaps
Vertical Hanging Herb Garden

Bowl Lampshades
Cardboard Butterfly Observatory

Family Togetherness: Sunday Family Counsel

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, viagra buy Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours or starchy potatoes or sweet potatoes. It is not uncommon to find recipes that mix part potato with squash or spinach. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. Everyone loves them. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, nurse for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 30-45 minutes) Lay the potatoes on a board or towel to cool slightly before peeling.

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

The dough should be gently handled similar to when making biscuits or pie crusts or even meatballs. Everything is folded in mixing until just blended. This is not a pasta or bread dough so avoid kneading the dough too much. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas. Click here for a step by step tutorial from making the dough to ro

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks, approved
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 30 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, viagra buy Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours or starchy potatoes or sweet potatoes. It is not uncommon to find recipes that mix part potato with squash or spinach. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. Everyone loves them. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, nurse for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 30-45 minutes) Lay the potatoes on a board or towel to cool slightly before peeling.

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

The dough should be gently handled similar to when making biscuits or pie crusts or even meatballs. Everything is folded in mixing until just blended. This is not a pasta or bread dough so avoid kneading the dough too much. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas. Click here for a step by step tutorial from making the dough to ro

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks, approved
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 30 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, prostate Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, viagra buy Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours or starchy potatoes or sweet potatoes. It is not uncommon to find recipes that mix part potato with squash or spinach. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. Everyone loves them. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, nurse for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 30-45 minutes) Lay the potatoes on a board or towel to cool slightly before peeling.

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

The dough should be gently handled similar to when making biscuits or pie crusts or even meatballs. Everything is folded in mixing until just blended. This is not a pasta or bread dough so avoid kneading the dough too much. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas. Click here for a step by step tutorial from making the dough to ro

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks, approved
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 30 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, prostate Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, viagra approved she has meet since we moved, drug are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, discount after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, viagra buy Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours or starchy potatoes or sweet potatoes. It is not uncommon to find recipes that mix part potato with squash or spinach. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. Everyone loves them. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, nurse for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 30-45 minutes) Lay the potatoes on a board or towel to cool slightly before peeling.

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

The dough should be gently handled similar to when making biscuits or pie crusts or even meatballs. Everything is folded in mixing until just blended. This is not a pasta or bread dough so avoid kneading the dough too much. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas. Click here for a step by step tutorial from making the dough to ro

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks, approved
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 30 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, prostate Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, viagra approved she has meet since we moved, drug are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, discount after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies

Photo: property of Lily Jane Stationery

With the start of school also means the addition of all the extra curricular activities. Household schedules can become pretty hectic. Sunday Family Counsel is a way to meet up with the rest of the family to plan the week and work out any conflicting schedules.  In our home we meet together on Sunday night to go over the calendar and finances. We plan the weekly menu inviting suggestions from the gang. We also discuss any needs and reasonable wants. We can plan time for completing both home and school projects, illness schedule outings and even chores.

Family Counsel encourages communication, illness teaches leadership, this time management and financial responsibility.  Create a suggestion box or a dedicated notepad to jot down notes and ideas throughout the week to be discussed. Be sure to come prepared with the necessary documents and calendars. Follow an itinerary to keep things moving and to insure you do not forget anything. Jazz up the meeting by serving dessert or offering a chance to win a door prize.

October Resolution: Face the Lion- Accomplish a Difficult Task

The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
Source: Better Homes and Gardens
4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
1 cup water
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp packed brown sugar
2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp peach preserves
1 tbsp horseradish mustard
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

Makes 4 servings.

The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
Source: Better Homes and Gardens
4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
1 cup water
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp packed brown sugar
2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp peach preserves
1 tbsp horseradish mustard
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

Makes 4 servings.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, seek sausage, approved fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh or Gala, more about cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
1 cup flour
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp baking powder
A pinch of salt
2 eggs
Milk 1 1/4 cup

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and a little milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter.

Heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 6 large pancakes

The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
Source: Better Homes and Gardens
4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
1 cup water
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp packed brown sugar
2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp peach preserves
1 tbsp horseradish mustard
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

Makes 4 servings.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, seek sausage, approved fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh or Gala, more about cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
1 cup flour
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp baking powder
A pinch of salt
2 eggs
Milk 1 1/4 cup

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and a little milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter.

Heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 6 large pancakes

Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, viagra 100mg

Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, what is ed “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.” The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

With the final exam approaching fast, nurse I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

–If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
–Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
–Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
–Learn that new hobby or trade.
–Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
–Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
Host a dinner party.
–Simplify your life and home.
–Reconnect severed ties with family.
–Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
–Break off unhealthy relationships.
–Go back to school.
–Stand up to a bully.
–Be positive.

October Website Review: On Being Frugal

http://www.joythebaker.com/blog/2009/11/vegan-pumpkin-walnut-bread/
As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
Visualize
prepare

As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
Visualize
prepare

http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

  • 2 c all purpose flour
  • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 c white sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
  • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 pinches of allspice
  • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
  • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 6 Tbs butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
Visualize
prepare

http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

  • 2 c all purpose flour
  • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 c white sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
  • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 pinches of allspice
  • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
  • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 6 Tbs butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, side effects sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
Visualize
prepare

http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

  • 2 c all purpose flour
  • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 c white sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
  • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 pinches of allspice
  • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
  • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 6 Tbs butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, side effects sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
Visualize
prepare

http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

  • 2 c all purpose flour
  • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 c white sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
  • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 pinches of allspice
  • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
  • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 6 Tbs butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, side effects sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 cup flour (optional)
1 medium onion, doctor sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge or
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
Visualize
prepare

http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

  • 2 c all purpose flour
  • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 c white sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
  • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 pinches of allspice
  • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
  • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 6 Tbs butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, side effects sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 cup flour (optional)
1 medium onion, doctor sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge or
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts, healing purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
Flour
1 medium onion, sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.

As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
Visualize
prepare

http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

  • 2 c all purpose flour
  • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 c white sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
  • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 pinches of allspice
  • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
  • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 6 Tbs butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, side effects sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 cup flour (optional)
1 medium onion, doctor sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge or
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts, healing purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
Flour
1 medium onion, sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.

Photo: Property of the CupcakeProject.com

When my oldest child was about to start kindergarten I had not begun to think about the yearly rites of passage. I was too consumed with the swirling emotions of sending my baby off to all day kindergarten. Stephen delightedly recalled memories of school clothes shopping and the first day of school photo. The mention of school shopping sent my mind back to the Saw Grass Mills Mall in South Florida. Who could ever forget retail bliss a mile long. As I reminisced a little while longer I remembered a few of the odious haunts of the 80’s I chose to leave buried in the past. The K-Swiss sneakers from 10th grade were not so embarrassing as the white Reebok high-tops I had to have in 9th grade and the orange neon pleather purse I just could not live without in 6th grade. Just Scary.

This year our daughter is about to embark on her first year in Kindergarten. In keeping with our newly found family traditions she got a new backpack, visit web a lunch box, viagra 40mg and a new coat in addition to several new outfits. When the big day arrives we will take the much anticipated “first day of school” snapshot. To let her know we are thinking of her she will find a special note attached to a yummy (but healthy) treat inside her lunch pail. That night the dinner menu is kids choice (within reason). It is always nice to have a relaxing comforting meal at the end of a high anxiety day.

The following is a list of fun ways to help motivate the kids in preparing them for back to school.

  1. Back to School Shopping: Make a special day of it. Take your daughter for a pedicure, buy take the boys to the movies.
  2. Back Packs and Lunch Boxes: We have a tradition once the kids start Kindergarten they get a new backpack and lunch box.
  3. Special Breakfast: Try to avoid sugary foods that tend to cause the kids to crash. Fill their bellies and minds with hearty oatmeal or protein boosting eggs and toast. Pair proteins like nuts, eggs or yogurt with sugary dishes like pancakes.
  4. Back to School Brunch: The day before the big day invite friends or keep it just family to a back to school brunch. This is a more appropriate time to serve favorites such as cinnamon rolls or doughnuts. Set up a table with packages of needed school supplies such as crayons, pencils, rulers, paper, ect. Help the kids put their supplies in their backpacks so they are all ready for school in the morning.
  5. Back to School Dinner: If breakfast is too rushed plan a  special dinner. The menu can be kids choice, a family favorite, or go out to eat.
  6. Ice cream sundaes: Treat the kids to an ice cream dessert. Invite friends over after school or serve as a dessert with dinner.
  7. 1st day of School Photo: The first day of school picture can be a fun group photo or a single snapshot of each child. Some families like to use the same backdrop year after year. Have the kids hold up the same number of fingers as the grade they are entering or create a banner with their name and grade to stand in front of.
  8. Decorations: Secretly hang up balloons and streamers the night before to surprise them in the morning. Make a banner with glitter and markers for the front door that includes the kids names and grade.
  9. Make Goals: At breakfast or the day before gather as a family to come up with individual and family goals. Review goals once a month. Discuss what is expected of them at home and at school. No TV until chores and homework are done. If the week is hectic maybe you plan to move chores to saturday. If someone has a hard time with math discuss ways to help them.
  10. After School Treat: Bake homemade cookies for when they get home. Nothing says love like fresh baked bread or cookies.
  11. The Back to School Fairy or Magic School Bus: Leave a backpack filled with snacks and school supplies by their pillow or by the front door.
  12. German Schultuete: This giant posterboard cone is filled with back-to-school goodies and supplies as a token of good luck. Similar to a Christmas stocking. Decorate with stickers and markers or use fancy paper. Fill the Schultuete with edible treats, fun bright supplies (markers, glue, pens, erasers, Post-it notes, magnet letters, ect), and small trinkets or toys.
  13. 12 Days Before School: Hang the kid’s backpacks on their door. Put something new in it each day to count down the days to school.
  14. Color of the Day: Choose a color the whole family will wear on the first day.
  15. Swim and BBQ party: Plan a swim party before school starts or a week or two after. Waiting a week allows the kids to invite a friend or two from school. Have games to play or another kind of fun activity.
  16. Letter to Child: The start of school is a major milestone. Take the time to write a heart felt letter pointing out how proud you are of your child. List several attributes you admire about them and why.
  17. Classic Tradition: Come up with a fun song to sing or a story to read during breakfast each year on the 1st day of school.
  18. Walk to school together: If possible park several block away and walk your child to school. The leisurely stroll will help release some of the tention.
  19. Special Touches: Send the kids to school with a special treat in their lunch bag- a love note, a sandwich cut into a fun shape using cookie cutters, or a favorite snack.

As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
Visualize
prepare

http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

  • 2 c all purpose flour
  • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 c white sugar
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
  • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 pinches of allspice
  • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
  • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 6 Tbs butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, side effects sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup flour
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts
1 cup flour (optional)
1 medium onion, doctor sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge or
Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts, healing purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
Flour
1 medium onion, sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.

Photo: Property of the CupcakeProject.com

When my oldest child was about to start kindergarten I had not begun to think about the yearly rites of passage. I was too consumed with the swirling emotions of sending my baby off to all day kindergarten. Stephen delightedly recalled memories of school clothes shopping and the first day of school photo. The mention of school shopping sent my mind back to the Saw Grass Mills Mall in South Florida. Who could ever forget retail bliss a mile long. As I reminisced a little while longer I remembered a few of the odious haunts of the 80’s I chose to leave buried in the past. The K-Swiss sneakers from 10th grade were not so embarrassing as the white Reebok high-tops I had to have in 9th grade and the orange neon pleather purse I just could not live without in 6th grade. Just Scary.

This year our daughter is about to embark on her first year in Kindergarten. In keeping with our newly found family traditions she got a new backpack, visit web a lunch box, viagra 40mg and a new coat in addition to several new outfits. When the big day arrives we will take the much anticipated “first day of school” snapshot. To let her know we are thinking of her she will find a special note attached to a yummy (but healthy) treat inside her lunch pail. That night the dinner menu is kids choice (within reason). It is always nice to have a relaxing comforting meal at the end of a high anxiety day.

The following is a list of fun ways to help motivate the kids in preparing them for back to school.

  1. Back to School Shopping: Make a special day of it. Take your daughter for a pedicure, buy take the boys to the movies.
  2. Back Packs and Lunch Boxes: We have a tradition once the kids start Kindergarten they get a new backpack and lunch box.
  3. Special Breakfast: Try to avoid sugary foods that tend to cause the kids to crash. Fill their bellies and minds with hearty oatmeal or protein boosting eggs and toast. Pair proteins like nuts, eggs or yogurt with sugary dishes like pancakes.
  4. Back to School Brunch: The day before the big day invite friends or keep it just family to a back to school brunch. This is a more appropriate time to serve favorites such as cinnamon rolls or doughnuts. Set up a table with packages of needed school supplies such as crayons, pencils, rulers, paper, ect. Help the kids put their supplies in their backpacks so they are all ready for school in the morning.
  5. Back to School Dinner: If breakfast is too rushed plan a  special dinner. The menu can be kids choice, a family favorite, or go out to eat.
  6. Ice cream sundaes: Treat the kids to an ice cream dessert. Invite friends over after school or serve as a dessert with dinner.
  7. 1st day of School Photo: The first day of school picture can be a fun group photo or a single snapshot of each child. Some families like to use the same backdrop year after year. Have the kids hold up the same number of fingers as the grade they are entering or create a banner with their name and grade to stand in front of.
  8. Decorations: Secretly hang up balloons and streamers the night before to surprise them in the morning. Make a banner with glitter and markers for the front door that includes the kids names and grade.
  9. Make Goals: At breakfast or the day before gather as a family to come up with individual and family goals. Review goals once a month. Discuss what is expected of them at home and at school. No TV until chores and homework are done. If the week is hectic maybe you plan to move chores to saturday. If someone has a hard time with math discuss ways to help them.
  10. After School Treat: Bake homemade cookies for when they get home. Nothing says love like fresh baked bread or cookies.
  11. The Back to School Fairy or Magic School Bus: Leave a backpack filled with snacks and school supplies by their pillow or by the front door.
  12. German Schultuete: This giant posterboard cone is filled with back-to-school goodies and supplies as a token of good luck. Similar to a Christmas stocking. Decorate with stickers and markers or use fancy paper. Fill the Schultuete with edible treats, fun bright supplies (markers, glue, pens, erasers, Post-it notes, magnet letters, ect), and small trinkets or toys.
  13. 12 Days Before School: Hang the kid’s backpacks on their door. Put something new in it each day to count down the days to school.
  14. Color of the Day: Choose a color the whole family will wear on the first day.
  15. Swim and BBQ party: Plan a swim party before school starts or a week or two after. Waiting a week allows the kids to invite a friend or two from school. Have games to play or another kind of fun activity.
  16. Letter to Child: The start of school is a major milestone. Take the time to write a heart felt letter pointing out how proud you are of your child. List several attributes you admire about them and why.
  17. Classic Tradition: Come up with a fun song to sing or a story to read during breakfast each year on the 1st day of school.
  18. Walk to school together: If possible park several block away and walk your child to school. The leisurely stroll will help release some of the tention.
  19. Special Touches: Send the kids to school with a special treat in their lunch bag- a love note, a sandwich cut into a fun shape using cookie cutters, or a favorite snack.

This month’s website review covers several websites. I am sure there are thousands of fabulous sites that offer the latest in coupons and deals. These are just a few of my favorites from this year. I use them all. It takes me about an hour to write up my weekly dinner menu and comb the coupon sites, hospital grocery store site and local advertisements for deals.

If you are new to clipping coupons, just curious or even a veteran this story “If I Didn’t See It With My Own Eyes” by Jaye Watson, will take you on a step by step journey on how to get the most for your buck.

The following websites offer coupons, giveaways as well as tips on the trade.

My Frugal Adventures

Becentsable

Money Saving Mom

Coupon Cooking

Hip 2 Save

Coupon Cravings

True Couponing

Raising A Leader

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

January 6th is known as the Christian feast or day of Epiphany. For many it is the day they celebrate Christmas, recipe the day the Magi or Three Wise Men arrived at the manger and presented gifts to the baby Jesus. The Magi leaves gifts on the Eve similar to Santa Clause on Christmas Eve. In Mexico, gifts such as candies are left in their shoes to symbolize the gifts given to Jesus. A feast is prepared and a special cake or Rosca is baked with a tiny doll, (representing the baby Jesus and the quest of the Wise Men to find him) the person who finds the doll in their piece of “Rosca” must throw a party on February 2, “Candelaria Day,” offering tamales and Atole (a hot sweet drink thickened with corn flour).

Día de la Candelaria (Day of the Candles or Candle Mass) represents a fusion of pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs. Celebrated on February 2nd, Candelaria Day marks the mid-way point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The end of the Christmas festivities, when Jesus was presented to the church. Images of baby Jesus are dressed with special clothes and taken to mass. Some areas of Mexico hold a parade, bull fight and dancing.

Here in the states, we celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog day, the day we anxiously await the appearance of a ground hog to tell us if winter is moving on. So, we decided to combine the two and serve tamales and Atole for dinner. After tasting the Atole, the kids decided hot chocolate would be better.

Atole:
1/3 cup masa harina blended with 1/4 cup warm water in blender until smooth
3 cups water or milk
5 tablespoons brown sugar or piloncillo
1 pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons vanilla or one one vanilla bean
1 to 2 tablets Mexican Chocolate
1/2 cup pureed fruit (optional)

Heat all ingredients (except for any toppings you may be using) in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat while stirring. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir frequently for 20-25 minutes until thickened. If used, remove the cinnamon stick and/or vanilla bean. Pour into mugs or thick glasses. Warm fruit puree in a small saucepan and drizzle on top of Atole. Serves 2-3

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

January 6th is known as the Christian feast or day of Epiphany. For many it is the day they celebrate Christmas, recipe the day the Magi or Three Wise Men arrived at the manger and presented gifts to the baby Jesus. The Magi leaves gifts on the Eve similar to Santa Clause on Christmas Eve. In Mexico, gifts such as candies are left in their shoes to symbolize the gifts given to Jesus. A feast is prepared and a special cake or Rosca is baked with a tiny doll, (representing the baby Jesus and the quest of the Wise Men to find him) the person who finds the doll in their piece of “Rosca” must throw a party on February 2, “Candelaria Day,” offering tamales and Atole (a hot sweet drink thickened with corn flour).

Día de la Candelaria (Day of the Candles or Candle Mass) represents a fusion of pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs. Celebrated on February 2nd, Candelaria Day marks the mid-way point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The end of the Christmas festivities, when Jesus was presented to the church. Images of baby Jesus are dressed with special clothes and taken to mass. Some areas of Mexico hold a parade, bull fight and dancing.

Here in the states, we celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog day, the day we anxiously await the appearance of a ground hog to tell us if winter is moving on. So, we decided to combine the two and serve tamales and Atole for dinner. After tasting the Atole, the kids decided hot chocolate would be better.

Atole:
1/3 cup masa harina blended with 1/4 cup warm water in blender until smooth
3 cups water or milk
5 tablespoons brown sugar or piloncillo
1 pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons vanilla or one one vanilla bean
1 to 2 tablets Mexican Chocolate
1/2 cup pureed fruit (optional)

Heat all ingredients (except for any toppings you may be using) in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat while stirring. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir frequently for 20-25 minutes until thickened. If used, remove the cinnamon stick and/or vanilla bean. Pour into mugs or thick glasses. Warm fruit puree in a small saucepan and drizzle on top of Atole. Serves 2-3
When I was very little, ask our family would take a drive out west of town to pick the wild blueberries that grew along the fence by the highway. Once we got them home mom busied herself in the kitchen washing the berries and boiling the water to make jars of homemade jam. I have always envisioned a homestead with raised gardens, dotted with fruit trees of every kind. It was no surprise decades later the first thing I wanted to do when Stephen and I bought our first home was plant a garden in the back yard. I wanted to enjoy the satisfaction of growing my own fruits and vegetables.

We had little money as newlyweds just starting out and I savored the thought of having a healthy vegetable and herb garden. I worked for hours hoeing the hard dirt to make it soft enough to mix in the nutrients it lacked. Then finally, with great anticipation, I planted the seedlings. The hard work paid off in the weeks that followed. It was exhilarating to walk out back and pick herbs for our morning omelet. Or to fill my apron with the green beans, tomatoes, zucchini and summer squash. However I was unhappy with my meager supply. Grated the squash and especially the zucchini took off and grew to considerable size. Still the tomatoes green beans and herbs were lacking.

Growing vegetables is like baking bread, every gardener has their own opinion. Some say you can grow green beans next to corn while others insist it is impossible since corn needs nitrogen which in turn will harm the beans. Still in a book I read recently they say green beans need nitrogen too and the author suggested growing green beans next to corn. It is enough to give any novice like myself a headache. I just want to plant, water and wah-la, have great tasting and abundant fresh fruits and vegetables.

My dad grew up on a farm. But never did I think to ask him about the tricks of the trade. It was not until after I started my own family that I began to think about my childhood and the memories that I want to create with my children. So while visiting this summer I sat down with the master farmer to pick his brain and get all the insider tips.

My dad did not say much. Instead he gave me a brochure for an Aero-garden and told me to go experiment with the rest. My mom came in the room and reminded my dad of when he planted a hydroponics garden. Apparently all you do is dig a trench or use a vented planter. Fill the trench or planter with wood shavings or chips. Not bark. Next plant you plant in the wood chips. You can grow tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers to name a few. Finally give the plant a good drink with a mixture of liquid fertilizer and water. Sounded simple enough, yet I was still searching for the secrets behind a Martha Stewart worthy garden.

A few days later I went to visit my Great Aunt and my Grandmother, dad’s mom and aunt. They both grew up on a farm. Grandma Penny is the person who taught my dad. So it figured I would get some help there. They told me the same thing. You have to experiment. They added the most important key to gardening is adequate water and food. Then they suggested I visit the local feed store or garden center and ask someone there who knows the area and is knowledgeable about gardening. It was clear I was going to have to put in my own work and figure it all out by myself.

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

January 6th is known as the Christian feast or day of Epiphany. For many it is the day they celebrate Christmas, recipe the day the Magi or Three Wise Men arrived at the manger and presented gifts to the baby Jesus. The Magi leaves gifts on the Eve similar to Santa Clause on Christmas Eve. In Mexico, gifts such as candies are left in their shoes to symbolize the gifts given to Jesus. A feast is prepared and a special cake or Rosca is baked with a tiny doll, (representing the baby Jesus and the quest of the Wise Men to find him) the person who finds the doll in their piece of “Rosca” must throw a party on February 2, “Candelaria Day,” offering tamales and Atole (a hot sweet drink thickened with corn flour).

Día de la Candelaria (Day of the Candles or Candle Mass) represents a fusion of pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs. Celebrated on February 2nd, Candelaria Day marks the mid-way point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The end of the Christmas festivities, when Jesus was presented to the church. Images of baby Jesus are dressed with special clothes and taken to mass. Some areas of Mexico hold a parade, bull fight and dancing.

Here in the states, we celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog day, the day we anxiously await the appearance of a ground hog to tell us if winter is moving on. So, we decided to combine the two and serve tamales and Atole for dinner. After tasting the Atole, the kids decided hot chocolate would be better.

Atole:
1/3 cup masa harina blended with 1/4 cup warm water in blender until smooth
3 cups water or milk
5 tablespoons brown sugar or piloncillo
1 pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons vanilla or one one vanilla bean
1 to 2 tablets Mexican Chocolate
1/2 cup pureed fruit (optional)

Heat all ingredients (except for any toppings you may be using) in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat while stirring. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir frequently for 20-25 minutes until thickened. If used, remove the cinnamon stick and/or vanilla bean. Pour into mugs or thick glasses. Warm fruit puree in a small saucepan and drizzle on top of Atole. Serves 2-3
When I was very little, ask our family would take a drive out west of town to pick the wild blueberries that grew along the fence by the highway. Once we got them home mom busied herself in the kitchen washing the berries and boiling the water to make jars of homemade jam. I have always envisioned a homestead with raised gardens, dotted with fruit trees of every kind. It was no surprise decades later the first thing I wanted to do when Stephen and I bought our first home was plant a garden in the back yard. I wanted to enjoy the satisfaction of growing my own fruits and vegetables.

We had little money as newlyweds just starting out and I savored the thought of having a healthy vegetable and herb garden. I worked for hours hoeing the hard dirt to make it soft enough to mix in the nutrients it lacked. Then finally, with great anticipation, I planted the seedlings. The hard work paid off in the weeks that followed. It was exhilarating to walk out back and pick herbs for our morning omelet. Or to fill my apron with the green beans, tomatoes, zucchini and summer squash. However I was unhappy with my meager supply. Grated the squash and especially the zucchini took off and grew to considerable size. Still the tomatoes green beans and herbs were lacking.

Growing vegetables is like baking bread, every gardener has their own opinion. Some say you can grow green beans next to corn while others insist it is impossible since corn needs nitrogen which in turn will harm the beans. Still in a book I read recently they say green beans need nitrogen too and the author suggested growing green beans next to corn. It is enough to give any novice like myself a headache. I just want to plant, water and wah-la, have great tasting and abundant fresh fruits and vegetables.

My dad grew up on a farm. But never did I think to ask him about the tricks of the trade. It was not until after I started my own family that I began to think about my childhood and the memories that I want to create with my children. So while visiting this summer I sat down with the master farmer to pick his brain and get all the insider tips.

My dad did not say much. Instead he gave me a brochure for an Aero-garden and told me to go experiment with the rest. My mom came in the room and reminded my dad of when he planted a hydroponics garden. Apparently all you do is dig a trench or use a vented planter. Fill the trench or planter with wood shavings or chips. Not bark. Next plant you plant in the wood chips. You can grow tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers to name a few. Finally give the plant a good drink with a mixture of liquid fertilizer and water. Sounded simple enough, yet I was still searching for the secrets behind a Martha Stewart worthy garden.

A few days later I went to visit my Great Aunt and my Grandmother, dad’s mom and aunt. They both grew up on a farm. Grandma Penny is the person who taught my dad. So it figured I would get some help there. They told me the same thing. You have to experiment. They added the most important key to gardening is adequate water and food. Then they suggested I visit the local feed store or garden center and ask someone there who knows the area and is knowledgeable about gardening. It was clear I was going to have to put in my own work and figure it all out by myself.
We have lived in this house for three years now and still no garden. This year, page I am determined to take the time to start one. My friends and family, approved who are experts on the subject, have clammed up forcing me to do my own research. First things first…find a place. That was easy. The minute we saw the house, I claimed the north east side of the yard for my own. The area gets the most sun during the summer and seemed like the natural place to plant a garden.

Next, I have to figure out what goes where. I have made several sketches of the garden, however, every time I compare it with the actual space, I stand there dumbfounded. I know I want to plant a “companion” garden utilizing containers. The theory of companion vegetable gardens is allowing Mother Nature to do what she does best. Pairing vegetables that grow deep in the soil with those that require a shallow bed, blending in plants that ward off pesty insects with those that invite creatures that are beneficial to producing a successful garden. We have plenty of birds, but I have not seen frogs since the first year we moved in. But, if I need frogs, birds and snakes so be it. We will create a nice little village for them.

Working with the sun, I will need to plant from North to south ensuring that every plant gets it’s share of the sun. Starting along the back fence, I have raspberries and blackberries. Originally, I planned on raising blueberries, but they are not as resilient and tend to be a bit more finicky than their cousins. (A tip when planting blueberries: plant two or more different varieties.) I will use sunflowers to separate the two and garlic as a border. Sunflowers attract bees and garlic is supposed to fight of bugs.

They say tomatoes are best when planted with basil, basil being a natural ward against pests. I plan on growing my tomatoes in containers with basil and parsley nestled right in the pot. Moving forward along the fence line with rows running East to West, I have peas, pots of tomatoes and potatoes. The next section will have green beans along the fence, squash (summer and zucchini) and cans of mint (again, to ward off the bad bugs) all divided by marigolds and Nasturtiums.

Continuing on along the fence, I have cucumbers in pots with a trellis, onions, thyme and carrots. Then peppers, cabbage, dill, lettuce and celery. Finally my herb garden consisting of basil, oregano, parsley, Nasturtium, asparagus, cilantro and marigolds and chives around the base of fruit trees. Flowers, Nasturtium and Marigolds thickly dotting where they will fit and strawberry plants as ground cover out front along the entry. I think that about covers it.

The fun part is tilling the earth. I need about 12 inches depth. The ground is clay and will become a nice home for my seedlings once some nutrient rich soil is mixed in and the earthworms move in. I have a ton of work ahead of me. I know in the end it will all be worth it.

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

January 6th is known as the Christian feast or day of Epiphany. For many it is the day they celebrate Christmas, recipe the day the Magi or Three Wise Men arrived at the manger and presented gifts to the baby Jesus. The Magi leaves gifts on the Eve similar to Santa Clause on Christmas Eve. In Mexico, gifts such as candies are left in their shoes to symbolize the gifts given to Jesus. A feast is prepared and a special cake or Rosca is baked with a tiny doll, (representing the baby Jesus and the quest of the Wise Men to find him) the person who finds the doll in their piece of “Rosca” must throw a party on February 2, “Candelaria Day,” offering tamales and Atole (a hot sweet drink thickened with corn flour).

Día de la Candelaria (Day of the Candles or Candle Mass) represents a fusion of pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs. Celebrated on February 2nd, Candelaria Day marks the mid-way point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The end of the Christmas festivities, when Jesus was presented to the church. Images of baby Jesus are dressed with special clothes and taken to mass. Some areas of Mexico hold a parade, bull fight and dancing.

Here in the states, we celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog day, the day we anxiously await the appearance of a ground hog to tell us if winter is moving on. So, we decided to combine the two and serve tamales and Atole for dinner. After tasting the Atole, the kids decided hot chocolate would be better.

Atole:
1/3 cup masa harina blended with 1/4 cup warm water in blender until smooth
3 cups water or milk
5 tablespoons brown sugar or piloncillo
1 pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons vanilla or one one vanilla bean
1 to 2 tablets Mexican Chocolate
1/2 cup pureed fruit (optional)

Heat all ingredients (except for any toppings you may be using) in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat while stirring. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir frequently for 20-25 minutes until thickened. If used, remove the cinnamon stick and/or vanilla bean. Pour into mugs or thick glasses. Warm fruit puree in a small saucepan and drizzle on top of Atole. Serves 2-3
When I was very little, ask our family would take a drive out west of town to pick the wild blueberries that grew along the fence by the highway. Once we got them home mom busied herself in the kitchen washing the berries and boiling the water to make jars of homemade jam. I have always envisioned a homestead with raised gardens, dotted with fruit trees of every kind. It was no surprise decades later the first thing I wanted to do when Stephen and I bought our first home was plant a garden in the back yard. I wanted to enjoy the satisfaction of growing my own fruits and vegetables.

We had little money as newlyweds just starting out and I savored the thought of having a healthy vegetable and herb garden. I worked for hours hoeing the hard dirt to make it soft enough to mix in the nutrients it lacked. Then finally, with great anticipation, I planted the seedlings. The hard work paid off in the weeks that followed. It was exhilarating to walk out back and pick herbs for our morning omelet. Or to fill my apron with the green beans, tomatoes, zucchini and summer squash. However I was unhappy with my meager supply. Grated the squash and especially the zucchini took off and grew to considerable size. Still the tomatoes green beans and herbs were lacking.

Growing vegetables is like baking bread, every gardener has their own opinion. Some say you can grow green beans next to corn while others insist it is impossible since corn needs nitrogen which in turn will harm the beans. Still in a book I read recently they say green beans need nitrogen too and the author suggested growing green beans next to corn. It is enough to give any novice like myself a headache. I just want to plant, water and wah-la, have great tasting and abundant fresh fruits and vegetables.

My dad grew up on a farm. But never did I think to ask him about the tricks of the trade. It was not until after I started my own family that I began to think about my childhood and the memories that I want to create with my children. So while visiting this summer I sat down with the master farmer to pick his brain and get all the insider tips.

My dad did not say much. Instead he gave me a brochure for an Aero-garden and told me to go experiment with the rest. My mom came in the room and reminded my dad of when he planted a hydroponics garden. Apparently all you do is dig a trench or use a vented planter. Fill the trench or planter with wood shavings or chips. Not bark. Next plant you plant in the wood chips. You can grow tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers to name a few. Finally give the plant a good drink with a mixture of liquid fertilizer and water. Sounded simple enough, yet I was still searching for the secrets behind a Martha Stewart worthy garden.

A few days later I went to visit my Great Aunt and my Grandmother, dad’s mom and aunt. They both grew up on a farm. Grandma Penny is the person who taught my dad. So it figured I would get some help there. They told me the same thing. You have to experiment. They added the most important key to gardening is adequate water and food. Then they suggested I visit the local feed store or garden center and ask someone there who knows the area and is knowledgeable about gardening. It was clear I was going to have to put in my own work and figure it all out by myself.
We have lived in this house for three years now and still no garden. This year, page I am determined to take the time to start one. My friends and family, approved who are experts on the subject, have clammed up forcing me to do my own research. First things first…find a place. That was easy. The minute we saw the house, I claimed the north east side of the yard for my own. The area gets the most sun during the summer and seemed like the natural place to plant a garden.

Next, I have to figure out what goes where. I have made several sketches of the garden, however, every time I compare it with the actual space, I stand there dumbfounded. I know I want to plant a “companion” garden utilizing containers. The theory of companion vegetable gardens is allowing Mother Nature to do what she does best. Pairing vegetables that grow deep in the soil with those that require a shallow bed, blending in plants that ward off pesty insects with those that invite creatures that are beneficial to producing a successful garden. We have plenty of birds, but I have not seen frogs since the first year we moved in. But, if I need frogs, birds and snakes so be it. We will create a nice little village for them.

Working with the sun, I will need to plant from North to south ensuring that every plant gets it’s share of the sun. Starting along the back fence, I have raspberries and blackberries. Originally, I planned on raising blueberries, but they are not as resilient and tend to be a bit more finicky than their cousins. (A tip when planting blueberries: plant two or more different varieties.) I will use sunflowers to separate the two and garlic as a border. Sunflowers attract bees and garlic is supposed to fight of bugs.

They say tomatoes are best when planted with basil, basil being a natural ward against pests. I plan on growing my tomatoes in containers with basil and parsley nestled right in the pot. Moving forward along the fence line with rows running East to West, I have peas, pots of tomatoes and potatoes. The next section will have green beans along the fence, squash (summer and zucchini) and cans of mint (again, to ward off the bad bugs) all divided by marigolds and Nasturtiums.

Continuing on along the fence, I have cucumbers in pots with a trellis, onions, thyme and carrots. Then peppers, cabbage, dill, lettuce and celery. Finally my herb garden consisting of basil, oregano, parsley, Nasturtium, asparagus, cilantro and marigolds and chives around the base of fruit trees. Flowers, Nasturtium and Marigolds thickly dotting where they will fit and strawberry plants as ground cover out front along the entry. I think that about covers it.

The fun part is tilling the earth. I need about 12 inches depth. The ground is clay and will become a nice home for my seedlings once some nutrient rich soil is mixed in and the earthworms move in. I have a ton of work ahead of me. I know in the end it will all be worth it.
Not long ago, viagra 100mg I made an amazing discovery. As in J.M Barrie’s classic Peter Pan, I had grown up. I had forgotten how to play dolls and cars or come up with a silly song or bedtime story. It is so easy to become consumed with the day to day responsibilities of being a mom and wife that I sometimes forget to laugh. I realized I had better lighten up relax and have fun. These years I have with my little ones are so short.

Child development experts believe that humor is a learned trait. While children do come with their own personalities, we can set the tone for how they cope with life’s ups and downs. If you want your child to be able to roll with it, to embrace defeat and move on, then we as parents need to be able to laugh at the uh-oh’s. I had an interesting conversation with my mom while she was here for Christmas. She mentioned how her mom would never let them play with paints until the situation was perfect for fear of having to clean up a huge mess. I am guilty as charged.

After little Everett was born, I was extremely ill and sleep deprived. The last thing I wanted to do is clean up an extra mess. I realized my mistake when one afternoon I thought I would be a great mom and let my kids paint. Mason refused to paint because as he put it “painting is messy.” Oh what great influences we have on our children. Yikes! No use in crying over spilt milk right? I needed to change if I expected them to change. Instead of getting mad over an accident I taught them to just clean it up. That is not to say I am never exasperated in the face of another clean up. I am trying to be more aware of how I handle the situation. Adelin adopted “it’s ok, it is just an accident” as her favorite catch phrase. Now, I get a laugh when the kids pull out the art supplies or make a mess and I hear Stephen freak. He looks at me for support and I sheepishly have to say they are fine.

Studies have shown laughter improves mood, strengthens the immune system and lowers blood pressure. It can also take the stress out of being a parent. Comedy can conquer a tantrum 99.9 % of the time. The goal is to diffuse the tantrum. Talking and scolding only make it worse. I like to play “Where is it”. A game I adopted from a friend of mine. You say “Oh my, it is gone. Is it in your ear? Is it in your shirt?” The goal is to find his lost smile. Other times, I point to his shirt and say is that your sock? Kids get a real kick out of funky sounds and calling a body part or object by the wrong name. Another strategy I try to use is singing. It is hard to yell when you are singing. I usually will sing a song about what they are doing. Sometimes nothing works and it is best to leave them alone.

Don’t get me wrong, I am definitely not Mother of the Year. My friend and I sadly share our dirty secrets to each other about how many times that week we lost it. I think it helps us feel we are not alone and we are filled with the necessary encouragement to press forward.

Here are some ways we try to fit fun and laughter into our lives.
-Take time out to see a funny play or movie or go to a local comedy club
-Organize a game night with family or friends.
-Host a karaoke night or XBOX tournament. Our favorite is Rock Band
-Call an old friend
-Play Snake in the Cave
-Play Monster coming
-Play peek-a-boo.
-Play hide-n-seek.
-Say you are a cat but moo like a cow
-Sing using a goofy voice.
-Make up rhymes. The kids love stuff like faster, faster we need another master.
-Read stories using different voices. My daughter squeals when I read her Charlie and Lola using the voices from the TV show.
-Walk and dance using funny movements.
-Kids love the old slapstick humor of falling down. They love it a little too much.
-Play construction trucks to pick up a load of laundry and bulldoze them to the laundry room.
-Teach a baby doll a crazy dance. Another favorite.
-Place objects where they do not belong such as a shoe on your head and a hat on your foot.
-Point to a body part and say the wrong word.
-Celebrate traditional and made up holidays

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

January 6th is known as the Christian feast or day of Epiphany. For many it is the day they celebrate Christmas, recipe the day the Magi or Three Wise Men arrived at the manger and presented gifts to the baby Jesus. The Magi leaves gifts on the Eve similar to Santa Clause on Christmas Eve. In Mexico, gifts such as candies are left in their shoes to symbolize the gifts given to Jesus. A feast is prepared and a special cake or Rosca is baked with a tiny doll, (representing the baby Jesus and the quest of the Wise Men to find him) the person who finds the doll in their piece of “Rosca” must throw a party on February 2, “Candelaria Day,” offering tamales and Atole (a hot sweet drink thickened with corn flour).

Día de la Candelaria (Day of the Candles or Candle Mass) represents a fusion of pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs. Celebrated on February 2nd, Candelaria Day marks the mid-way point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The end of the Christmas festivities, when Jesus was presented to the church. Images of baby Jesus are dressed with special clothes and taken to mass. Some areas of Mexico hold a parade, bull fight and dancing.

Here in the states, we celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog day, the day we anxiously await the appearance of a ground hog to tell us if winter is moving on. So, we decided to combine the two and serve tamales and Atole for dinner. After tasting the Atole, the kids decided hot chocolate would be better.

Atole:
1/3 cup masa harina blended with 1/4 cup warm water in blender until smooth
3 cups water or milk
5 tablespoons brown sugar or piloncillo
1 pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons vanilla or one one vanilla bean
1 to 2 tablets Mexican Chocolate
1/2 cup pureed fruit (optional)

Heat all ingredients (except for any toppings you may be using) in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat while stirring. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir frequently for 20-25 minutes until thickened. If used, remove the cinnamon stick and/or vanilla bean. Pour into mugs or thick glasses. Warm fruit puree in a small saucepan and drizzle on top of Atole. Serves 2-3
When I was very little, ask our family would take a drive out west of town to pick the wild blueberries that grew along the fence by the highway. Once we got them home mom busied herself in the kitchen washing the berries and boiling the water to make jars of homemade jam. I have always envisioned a homestead with raised gardens, dotted with fruit trees of every kind. It was no surprise decades later the first thing I wanted to do when Stephen and I bought our first home was plant a garden in the back yard. I wanted to enjoy the satisfaction of growing my own fruits and vegetables.

We had little money as newlyweds just starting out and I savored the thought of having a healthy vegetable and herb garden. I worked for hours hoeing the hard dirt to make it soft enough to mix in the nutrients it lacked. Then finally, with great anticipation, I planted the seedlings. The hard work paid off in the weeks that followed. It was exhilarating to walk out back and pick herbs for our morning omelet. Or to fill my apron with the green beans, tomatoes, zucchini and summer squash. However I was unhappy with my meager supply. Grated the squash and especially the zucchini took off and grew to considerable size. Still the tomatoes green beans and herbs were lacking.

Growing vegetables is like baking bread, every gardener has their own opinion. Some say you can grow green beans next to corn while others insist it is impossible since corn needs nitrogen which in turn will harm the beans. Still in a book I read recently they say green beans need nitrogen too and the author suggested growing green beans next to corn. It is enough to give any novice like myself a headache. I just want to plant, water and wah-la, have great tasting and abundant fresh fruits and vegetables.

My dad grew up on a farm. But never did I think to ask him about the tricks of the trade. It was not until after I started my own family that I began to think about my childhood and the memories that I want to create with my children. So while visiting this summer I sat down with the master farmer to pick his brain and get all the insider tips.

My dad did not say much. Instead he gave me a brochure for an Aero-garden and told me to go experiment with the rest. My mom came in the room and reminded my dad of when he planted a hydroponics garden. Apparently all you do is dig a trench or use a vented planter. Fill the trench or planter with wood shavings or chips. Not bark. Next plant you plant in the wood chips. You can grow tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers to name a few. Finally give the plant a good drink with a mixture of liquid fertilizer and water. Sounded simple enough, yet I was still searching for the secrets behind a Martha Stewart worthy garden.

A few days later I went to visit my Great Aunt and my Grandmother, dad’s mom and aunt. They both grew up on a farm. Grandma Penny is the person who taught my dad. So it figured I would get some help there. They told me the same thing. You have to experiment. They added the most important key to gardening is adequate water and food. Then they suggested I visit the local feed store or garden center and ask someone there who knows the area and is knowledgeable about gardening. It was clear I was going to have to put in my own work and figure it all out by myself.
We have lived in this house for three years now and still no garden. This year, page I am determined to take the time to start one. My friends and family, approved who are experts on the subject, have clammed up forcing me to do my own research. First things first…find a place. That was easy. The minute we saw the house, I claimed the north east side of the yard for my own. The area gets the most sun during the summer and seemed like the natural place to plant a garden.

Next, I have to figure out what goes where. I have made several sketches of the garden, however, every time I compare it with the actual space, I stand there dumbfounded. I know I want to plant a “companion” garden utilizing containers. The theory of companion vegetable gardens is allowing Mother Nature to do what she does best. Pairing vegetables that grow deep in the soil with those that require a shallow bed, blending in plants that ward off pesty insects with those that invite creatures that are beneficial to producing a successful garden. We have plenty of birds, but I have not seen frogs since the first year we moved in. But, if I need frogs, birds and snakes so be it. We will create a nice little village for them.

Working with the sun, I will need to plant from North to south ensuring that every plant gets it’s share of the sun. Starting along the back fence, I have raspberries and blackberries. Originally, I planned on raising blueberries, but they are not as resilient and tend to be a bit more finicky than their cousins. (A tip when planting blueberries: plant two or more different varieties.) I will use sunflowers to separate the two and garlic as a border. Sunflowers attract bees and garlic is supposed to fight of bugs.

They say tomatoes are best when planted with basil, basil being a natural ward against pests. I plan on growing my tomatoes in containers with basil and parsley nestled right in the pot. Moving forward along the fence line with rows running East to West, I have peas, pots of tomatoes and potatoes. The next section will have green beans along the fence, squash (summer and zucchini) and cans of mint (again, to ward off the bad bugs) all divided by marigolds and Nasturtiums.

Continuing on along the fence, I have cucumbers in pots with a trellis, onions, thyme and carrots. Then peppers, cabbage, dill, lettuce and celery. Finally my herb garden consisting of basil, oregano, parsley, Nasturtium, asparagus, cilantro and marigolds and chives around the base of fruit trees. Flowers, Nasturtium and Marigolds thickly dotting where they will fit and strawberry plants as ground cover out front along the entry. I think that about covers it.

The fun part is tilling the earth. I need about 12 inches depth. The ground is clay and will become a nice home for my seedlings once some nutrient rich soil is mixed in and the earthworms move in. I have a ton of work ahead of me. I know in the end it will all be worth it.
Not long ago, viagra 100mg I made an amazing discovery. As in J.M Barrie’s classic Peter Pan, I had grown up. I had forgotten how to play dolls and cars or come up with a silly song or bedtime story. It is so easy to become consumed with the day to day responsibilities of being a mom and wife that I sometimes forget to laugh. I realized I had better lighten up relax and have fun. These years I have with my little ones are so short.

Child development experts believe that humor is a learned trait. While children do come with their own personalities, we can set the tone for how they cope with life’s ups and downs. If you want your child to be able to roll with it, to embrace defeat and move on, then we as parents need to be able to laugh at the uh-oh’s. I had an interesting conversation with my mom while she was here for Christmas. She mentioned how her mom would never let them play with paints until the situation was perfect for fear of having to clean up a huge mess. I am guilty as charged.

After little Everett was born, I was extremely ill and sleep deprived. The last thing I wanted to do is clean up an extra mess. I realized my mistake when one afternoon I thought I would be a great mom and let my kids paint. Mason refused to paint because as he put it “painting is messy.” Oh what great influences we have on our children. Yikes! No use in crying over spilt milk right? I needed to change if I expected them to change. Instead of getting mad over an accident I taught them to just clean it up. That is not to say I am never exasperated in the face of another clean up. I am trying to be more aware of how I handle the situation. Adelin adopted “it’s ok, it is just an accident” as her favorite catch phrase. Now, I get a laugh when the kids pull out the art supplies or make a mess and I hear Stephen freak. He looks at me for support and I sheepishly have to say they are fine.

Studies have shown laughter improves mood, strengthens the immune system and lowers blood pressure. It can also take the stress out of being a parent. Comedy can conquer a tantrum 99.9 % of the time. The goal is to diffuse the tantrum. Talking and scolding only make it worse. I like to play “Where is it”. A game I adopted from a friend of mine. You say “Oh my, it is gone. Is it in your ear? Is it in your shirt?” The goal is to find his lost smile. Other times, I point to his shirt and say is that your sock? Kids get a real kick out of funky sounds and calling a body part or object by the wrong name. Another strategy I try to use is singing. It is hard to yell when you are singing. I usually will sing a song about what they are doing. Sometimes nothing works and it is best to leave them alone.

Don’t get me wrong, I am definitely not Mother of the Year. My friend and I sadly share our dirty secrets to each other about how many times that week we lost it. I think it helps us feel we are not alone and we are filled with the necessary encouragement to press forward.

Here are some ways we try to fit fun and laughter into our lives.
-Take time out to see a funny play or movie or go to a local comedy club
-Organize a game night with family or friends.
-Host a karaoke night or XBOX tournament. Our favorite is Rock Band
-Call an old friend
-Play Snake in the Cave
-Play Monster coming
-Play peek-a-boo.
-Play hide-n-seek.
-Say you are a cat but moo like a cow
-Sing using a goofy voice.
-Make up rhymes. The kids love stuff like faster, faster we need another master.
-Read stories using different voices. My daughter squeals when I read her Charlie and Lola using the voices from the TV show.
-Walk and dance using funny movements.
-Kids love the old slapstick humor of falling down. They love it a little too much.
-Play construction trucks to pick up a load of laundry and bulldoze them to the laundry room.
-Teach a baby doll a crazy dance. Another favorite.
-Place objects where they do not belong such as a shoe on your head and a hat on your foot.
-Point to a body part and say the wrong word.
-Celebrate traditional and made up holidays

Love and Logic Parenting with Love and Logic

As I watch the three loverly’s grow I am posed with a conundrum. In one year, generic the average child learns to suck from the breast or a bottle, rx drink from a cup, sip from a straw. He also masters eating solids, rolling over, sitting up, crawling, walking and clapping. More over babies can understand directions, recognize faces, shapes, colors, numbers, letters and speak. Why can’t they behave when we want them to?

I want to enjoy being around my kids and I want others to enjoy being around them. We have tried to instill basic courtesies. They know please and thank you. Do not hit. Do not bit. Be gentle to the cat. Share your toys. Do not jump on the couch. Do they always stay within the bounds? No, of course not, they are kids. They like to test the waters and they like to do it when we least expect it. It is our job to constantly be one step ahead of them. So we arm ourselves with what we know and the lessons learned by others and hope for the best.

Granted I remember many times as a teenager I thought I knew what I was doing and luckily I had a mom to step in and redirect me. When I am dealing with my own little ones I cannot count how many times I have thought, “what in the world are you doing?” “You should know better!” There are plenty of adults I would ask the same questions. Being a mom is one of the most challenging jobs I have undertaken. With so many books on the subject you would think we moms and dads would have it all figured out. Problem is the majority of experts writing those books focus on the average child and do not take into account the differences of personality. After spending hundreds of dollars to help me figure out why my kid was slightly different from the other kids he played with and not getting anywhere I got the best advice you can get. It was free and from an experienced mom.

That was where I was three years ago. I felt like I was failing miserably. Nothing worked. I tried reading books. I tried watching the Nanny shows. I talked with friends. My son was getting angrier and acting out even more. I was running out of consequences. His toys were gone. There was nothing left in his room but a bed. Why the answer is never there before we reach the dead end eludes me. I was at a friend’s house pouring out my frustrations. She mentioned she had the same struggles with finding consequences and offered to let me borrow a book that helped her. I did not want to scoff in her face. I doubted another book written by another so called expert would be of any help. Politely, I accepted the book. That night I flipped through it. The following day I had finished reading the entire book. It was exactly what I was searching for. I admit I was completely overwhelmed at first. Yet, to my surprise there was a completely different kid living with us after a few days of implementing the strategies taught in the book.

After some observation I made an alarming discovery. My child was not only 100% all natural certified “boy”, but he is a sensitive and spirited child. The average child has an activity level of seven. One being the lowest, ten the highest. Spirited children have an activity level of 9. When I placed him in time out or yelled at him he got worse. Love and Logic helped me realize I was going about discipline the wrong way. We do not have to use a big voice or act authoritative in order to correct bad behavior. Rather allow the child to discover their mistakes and learn how to make right choices while in a loving environment. Instead of saying “that was naughty, you go to time out, now!” I can calmly put my hand on his should, sing “uh-uh, you chose to go to time out!” He is calmly and quietly moved to a time out spot, his bedroom or couch. When he is calm I go to him and give him a big hug and kiss, calmly ask him why he is there and tell him he may come out of time out. As Mason got older we started using delayed consequences. If he broke a rule and I was unable to come up with a consequence right away, the next time he wanted a treat, to play a game or watch TV we would tell him “that’s so sad. You did this.

Love and Logic is also all about making choices. Give the responsibility back to the child. Say things like “do you want to put your shirt on first our your pants?” When they ask for a treat before dinner ask “would you like to have it with your dinner or after?” If it is cold outside, rather than get in a fight over a coat say “it is cold outside, I am going to wear my coat so I do not get cold. Do you want to wear your coat or carry it?” But never give a choice that you cannot follow through on. Choices 99% of the time will defuse the situation. Both parties win.

Love and Logic has become the preferred method of parenting in foster homes and schools around the country. I can see why. The phylosopy is simple. Teach responsibilty and how to make wise choices in a loving, calm and safe environment. The Love and Logic website is a great tool to get up to speed as well as The Parents of Love and Logic group on Cafemom.

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

January 6th is known as the Christian feast or day of Epiphany. For many it is the day they celebrate Christmas, recipe the day the Magi or Three Wise Men arrived at the manger and presented gifts to the baby Jesus. The Magi leaves gifts on the Eve similar to Santa Clause on Christmas Eve. In Mexico, gifts such as candies are left in their shoes to symbolize the gifts given to Jesus. A feast is prepared and a special cake or Rosca is baked with a tiny doll, (representing the baby Jesus and the quest of the Wise Men to find him) the person who finds the doll in their piece of “Rosca” must throw a party on February 2, “Candelaria Day,” offering tamales and Atole (a hot sweet drink thickened with corn flour).

Día de la Candelaria (Day of the Candles or Candle Mass) represents a fusion of pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs. Celebrated on February 2nd, Candelaria Day marks the mid-way point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The end of the Christmas festivities, when Jesus was presented to the church. Images of baby Jesus are dressed with special clothes and taken to mass. Some areas of Mexico hold a parade, bull fight and dancing.

Here in the states, we celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog day, the day we anxiously await the appearance of a ground hog to tell us if winter is moving on. So, we decided to combine the two and serve tamales and Atole for dinner. After tasting the Atole, the kids decided hot chocolate would be better.

Atole:
1/3 cup masa harina blended with 1/4 cup warm water in blender until smooth
3 cups water or milk
5 tablespoons brown sugar or piloncillo
1 pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons vanilla or one one vanilla bean
1 to 2 tablets Mexican Chocolate
1/2 cup pureed fruit (optional)

Heat all ingredients (except for any toppings you may be using) in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat while stirring. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir frequently for 20-25 minutes until thickened. If used, remove the cinnamon stick and/or vanilla bean. Pour into mugs or thick glasses. Warm fruit puree in a small saucepan and drizzle on top of Atole. Serves 2-3
When I was very little, ask our family would take a drive out west of town to pick the wild blueberries that grew along the fence by the highway. Once we got them home mom busied herself in the kitchen washing the berries and boiling the water to make jars of homemade jam. I have always envisioned a homestead with raised gardens, dotted with fruit trees of every kind. It was no surprise decades later the first thing I wanted to do when Stephen and I bought our first home was plant a garden in the back yard. I wanted to enjoy the satisfaction of growing my own fruits and vegetables.

We had little money as newlyweds just starting out and I savored the thought of having a healthy vegetable and herb garden. I worked for hours hoeing the hard dirt to make it soft enough to mix in the nutrients it lacked. Then finally, with great anticipation, I planted the seedlings. The hard work paid off in the weeks that followed. It was exhilarating to walk out back and pick herbs for our morning omelet. Or to fill my apron with the green beans, tomatoes, zucchini and summer squash. However I was unhappy with my meager supply. Grated the squash and especially the zucchini took off and grew to considerable size. Still the tomatoes green beans and herbs were lacking.

Growing vegetables is like baking bread, every gardener has their own opinion. Some say you can grow green beans next to corn while others insist it is impossible since corn needs nitrogen which in turn will harm the beans. Still in a book I read recently they say green beans need nitrogen too and the author suggested growing green beans next to corn. It is enough to give any novice like myself a headache. I just want to plant, water and wah-la, have great tasting and abundant fresh fruits and vegetables.

My dad grew up on a farm. But never did I think to ask him about the tricks of the trade. It was not until after I started my own family that I began to think about my childhood and the memories that I want to create with my children. So while visiting this summer I sat down with the master farmer to pick his brain and get all the insider tips.

My dad did not say much. Instead he gave me a brochure for an Aero-garden and told me to go experiment with the rest. My mom came in the room and reminded my dad of when he planted a hydroponics garden. Apparently all you do is dig a trench or use a vented planter. Fill the trench or planter with wood shavings or chips. Not bark. Next plant you plant in the wood chips. You can grow tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers to name a few. Finally give the plant a good drink with a mixture of liquid fertilizer and water. Sounded simple enough, yet I was still searching for the secrets behind a Martha Stewart worthy garden.

A few days later I went to visit my Great Aunt and my Grandmother, dad’s mom and aunt. They both grew up on a farm. Grandma Penny is the person who taught my dad. So it figured I would get some help there. They told me the same thing. You have to experiment. They added the most important key to gardening is adequate water and food. Then they suggested I visit the local feed store or garden center and ask someone there who knows the area and is knowledgeable about gardening. It was clear I was going to have to put in my own work and figure it all out by myself.
We have lived in this house for three years now and still no garden. This year, page I am determined to take the time to start one. My friends and family, approved who are experts on the subject, have clammed up forcing me to do my own research. First things first…find a place. That was easy. The minute we saw the house, I claimed the north east side of the yard for my own. The area gets the most sun during the summer and seemed like the natural place to plant a garden.

Next, I have to figure out what goes where. I have made several sketches of the garden, however, every time I compare it with the actual space, I stand there dumbfounded. I know I want to plant a “companion” garden utilizing containers. The theory of companion vegetable gardens is allowing Mother Nature to do what she does best. Pairing vegetables that grow deep in the soil with those that require a shallow bed, blending in plants that ward off pesty insects with those that invite creatures that are beneficial to producing a successful garden. We have plenty of birds, but I have not seen frogs since the first year we moved in. But, if I need frogs, birds and snakes so be it. We will create a nice little village for them.

Working with the sun, I will need to plant from North to south ensuring that every plant gets it’s share of the sun. Starting along the back fence, I have raspberries and blackberries. Originally, I planned on raising blueberries, but they are not as resilient and tend to be a bit more finicky than their cousins. (A tip when planting blueberries: plant two or more different varieties.) I will use sunflowers to separate the two and garlic as a border. Sunflowers attract bees and garlic is supposed to fight of bugs.

They say tomatoes are best when planted with basil, basil being a natural ward against pests. I plan on growing my tomatoes in containers with basil and parsley nestled right in the pot. Moving forward along the fence line with rows running East to West, I have peas, pots of tomatoes and potatoes. The next section will have green beans along the fence, squash (summer and zucchini) and cans of mint (again, to ward off the bad bugs) all divided by marigolds and Nasturtiums.

Continuing on along the fence, I have cucumbers in pots with a trellis, onions, thyme and carrots. Then peppers, cabbage, dill, lettuce and celery. Finally my herb garden consisting of basil, oregano, parsley, Nasturtium, asparagus, cilantro and marigolds and chives around the base of fruit trees. Flowers, Nasturtium and Marigolds thickly dotting where they will fit and strawberry plants as ground cover out front along the entry. I think that about covers it.

The fun part is tilling the earth. I need about 12 inches depth. The ground is clay and will become a nice home for my seedlings once some nutrient rich soil is mixed in and the earthworms move in. I have a ton of work ahead of me. I know in the end it will all be worth it.
Not long ago, viagra 100mg I made an amazing discovery. As in J.M Barrie’s classic Peter Pan, I had grown up. I had forgotten how to play dolls and cars or come up with a silly song or bedtime story. It is so easy to become consumed with the day to day responsibilities of being a mom and wife that I sometimes forget to laugh. I realized I had better lighten up relax and have fun. These years I have with my little ones are so short.

Child development experts believe that humor is a learned trait. While children do come with their own personalities, we can set the tone for how they cope with life’s ups and downs. If you want your child to be able to roll with it, to embrace defeat and move on, then we as parents need to be able to laugh at the uh-oh’s. I had an interesting conversation with my mom while she was here for Christmas. She mentioned how her mom would never let them play with paints until the situation was perfect for fear of having to clean up a huge mess. I am guilty as charged.

After little Everett was born, I was extremely ill and sleep deprived. The last thing I wanted to do is clean up an extra mess. I realized my mistake when one afternoon I thought I would be a great mom and let my kids paint. Mason refused to paint because as he put it “painting is messy.” Oh what great influences we have on our children. Yikes! No use in crying over spilt milk right? I needed to change if I expected them to change. Instead of getting mad over an accident I taught them to just clean it up. That is not to say I am never exasperated in the face of another clean up. I am trying to be more aware of how I handle the situation. Adelin adopted “it’s ok, it is just an accident” as her favorite catch phrase. Now, I get a laugh when the kids pull out the art supplies or make a mess and I hear Stephen freak. He looks at me for support and I sheepishly have to say they are fine.

Studies have shown laughter improves mood, strengthens the immune system and lowers blood pressure. It can also take the stress out of being a parent. Comedy can conquer a tantrum 99.9 % of the time. The goal is to diffuse the tantrum. Talking and scolding only make it worse. I like to play “Where is it”. A game I adopted from a friend of mine. You say “Oh my, it is gone. Is it in your ear? Is it in your shirt?” The goal is to find his lost smile. Other times, I point to his shirt and say is that your sock? Kids get a real kick out of funky sounds and calling a body part or object by the wrong name. Another strategy I try to use is singing. It is hard to yell when you are singing. I usually will sing a song about what they are doing. Sometimes nothing works and it is best to leave them alone.

Don’t get me wrong, I am definitely not Mother of the Year. My friend and I sadly share our dirty secrets to each other about how many times that week we lost it. I think it helps us feel we are not alone and we are filled with the necessary encouragement to press forward.

Here are some ways we try to fit fun and laughter into our lives.
-Take time out to see a funny play or movie or go to a local comedy club
-Organize a game night with family or friends.
-Host a karaoke night or XBOX tournament. Our favorite is Rock Band
-Call an old friend
-Play Snake in the Cave
-Play Monster coming
-Play peek-a-boo.
-Play hide-n-seek.
-Say you are a cat but moo like a cow
-Sing using a goofy voice.
-Make up rhymes. The kids love stuff like faster, faster we need another master.
-Read stories using different voices. My daughter squeals when I read her Charlie and Lola using the voices from the TV show.
-Walk and dance using funny movements.
-Kids love the old slapstick humor of falling down. They love it a little too much.
-Play construction trucks to pick up a load of laundry and bulldoze them to the laundry room.
-Teach a baby doll a crazy dance. Another favorite.
-Place objects where they do not belong such as a shoe on your head and a hat on your foot.
-Point to a body part and say the wrong word.
-Celebrate traditional and made up holidays

Love and Logic Parenting with Love and Logic

As I watch the three loverly’s grow I am posed with a conundrum. In one year, generic the average child learns to suck from the breast or a bottle, rx drink from a cup, sip from a straw. He also masters eating solids, rolling over, sitting up, crawling, walking and clapping. More over babies can understand directions, recognize faces, shapes, colors, numbers, letters and speak. Why can’t they behave when we want them to?

I want to enjoy being around my kids and I want others to enjoy being around them. We have tried to instill basic courtesies. They know please and thank you. Do not hit. Do not bit. Be gentle to the cat. Share your toys. Do not jump on the couch. Do they always stay within the bounds? No, of course not, they are kids. They like to test the waters and they like to do it when we least expect it. It is our job to constantly be one step ahead of them. So we arm ourselves with what we know and the lessons learned by others and hope for the best.

Granted I remember many times as a teenager I thought I knew what I was doing and luckily I had a mom to step in and redirect me. When I am dealing with my own little ones I cannot count how many times I have thought, “what in the world are you doing?” “You should know better!” There are plenty of adults I would ask the same questions. Being a mom is one of the most challenging jobs I have undertaken. With so many books on the subject you would think we moms and dads would have it all figured out. Problem is the majority of experts writing those books focus on the average child and do not take into account the differences of personality. After spending hundreds of dollars to help me figure out why my kid was slightly different from the other kids he played with and not getting anywhere I got the best advice you can get. It was free and from an experienced mom.

That was where I was three years ago. I felt like I was failing miserably. Nothing worked. I tried reading books. I tried watching the Nanny shows. I talked with friends. My son was getting angrier and acting out even more. I was running out of consequences. His toys were gone. There was nothing left in his room but a bed. Why the answer is never there before we reach the dead end eludes me. I was at a friend’s house pouring out my frustrations. She mentioned she had the same struggles with finding consequences and offered to let me borrow a book that helped her. I did not want to scoff in her face. I doubted another book written by another so called expert would be of any help. Politely, I accepted the book. That night I flipped through it. The following day I had finished reading the entire book. It was exactly what I was searching for. I admit I was completely overwhelmed at first. Yet, to my surprise there was a completely different kid living with us after a few days of implementing the strategies taught in the book.

After some observation I made an alarming discovery. My child was not only 100% all natural certified “boy”, but he is a sensitive and spirited child. The average child has an activity level of seven. One being the lowest, ten the highest. Spirited children have an activity level of 9. When I placed him in time out or yelled at him he got worse. Love and Logic helped me realize I was going about discipline the wrong way. We do not have to use a big voice or act authoritative in order to correct bad behavior. Rather allow the child to discover their mistakes and learn how to make right choices while in a loving environment. Instead of saying “that was naughty, you go to time out, now!” I can calmly put my hand on his should, sing “uh-uh, you chose to go to time out!” He is calmly and quietly moved to a time out spot, his bedroom or couch. When he is calm I go to him and give him a big hug and kiss, calmly ask him why he is there and tell him he may come out of time out. As Mason got older we started using delayed consequences. If he broke a rule and I was unable to come up with a consequence right away, the next time he wanted a treat, to play a game or watch TV we would tell him “that’s so sad. You did this.

Love and Logic is also all about making choices. Give the responsibility back to the child. Say things like “do you want to put your shirt on first our your pants?” When they ask for a treat before dinner ask “would you like to have it with your dinner or after?” If it is cold outside, rather than get in a fight over a coat say “it is cold outside, I am going to wear my coat so I do not get cold. Do you want to wear your coat or carry it?” But never give a choice that you cannot follow through on. Choices 99% of the time will defuse the situation. Both parties win.

Love and Logic has become the preferred method of parenting in foster homes and schools around the country. I can see why. The phylosopy is simple. Teach responsibilty and how to make wise choices in a loving, calm and safe environment. The Love and Logic website is a great tool to get up to speed as well as The Parents of Love and Logic group on Cafemom.
I am faced with a heavy dilemma at present. The time to sign Mason up for Kindergarten is fast approaching and I am questioning is he really ready to go. He is doing exceedingly well academically. I fear however, link that with the the demise of nap time, in most schools playtime and play centers that Mason will meet Kindergarten with a negative attitude resulting in a dislike of school. Moreover my greatest fear is that he will be labeled a problem child for his displays of boyishness. He still has a hard time giving up his toys in exchange for other activities. He dislikes crafts and is not all that interested in participating in class. He can sign his name but prefers writing the letters very small, very large, in scary type or just takes his time because he would rather be doing something else. Mason is very much a boy, a very active boy, in all aspects of the word. All he wants to do is play.

So do I hold Mason back for one more year of Preschool or send him on to Kindergarten. I have pretty much raised our children in a loving and playful home. We are strict about sleep. Adamant about manners and being kind to others. We teach them to help clean up when they make a mess. We have somewhat of a schedule; mostly, we learn through play Montessori style. I am an advocate of letting kids be kids. However, the time has come for Mason to learn a little responsibility. Sort of a coming of age.

After careful consideration Stephen and I have come to the conclusion that if we hold Mason back he will ultimately graduate high school at age 19. A friend of mine who is a child psychologist was helpful in the matter. She cautioned me to think about later on when he gets into 5th and 6th grades and their minds become aware of the age difference. She has seen quite a few problems lately in regards to a child’s self esteem in this particular area. After determining his age difference I went back to Susan and discussed possible solutions to prepare him for the rigors of Kindergarten.

I explained the strategies I had in mind such as introducing a behavior chart. Something we tried before but he was not quite into. Susan gave me a great idea to take pictures of Mason doing each of the activities on the behavior chart such as brushing his teeth, setting the table, behaving at school, sharing his toys and so on. When he sees himself performing all these tasks he will be more likely to participate. Another suggestion Susan had was to play more games that require him to listen to what I am saying and copy what I am doing as in Simon Says and do as I am doing. Then try seeing who can sit still the longest. Rewards can be handed out if needed. My goal is to have them sit still for 30 minutes of reading time.

I found a great idea on a blog Kirk Family Adventures. I do not know how I stumbled upon the blog but I was glad I did. We adhere somewhat to the Love and Logic philosophy. A parenting technique centered around making choices. Needless to say I was right on board with the Kirk Family’s idea of allowing their son to choose if he wanted to do the chores or have mom. If he does them then he gets a bead and if she does them them there is no reward. (A great introducing to prepare him for his first official chore and allowance beginning next year.) She made a list divided by morning, evening, any time chores and enrichment. Her son earns privileges in exchange for beads.

Another option my brother introduced to me is Handipoints. Handipoints is a free behavioral/chore chart website. It keeps track of all the child’s responsibilities and the points earned for completing them. The child can create an Avatar cat complete with user name. The parent assigns how many points and Handiland bonus points are awarded for each completed task. The parent also has to grade the tasks. So if your child gets sneaky and says they did something they did not, when you grade their chart points are deducted. Points go toward rewards you both come up with and bonus points are exchanged for clothing for their cat and decor for their house. Handiland is where the cats can chat, trade clothes or furniture with other members, play games for more bonus points and shop.

The challenge is to remember to keep Mason to task. I hung his strand of beads up where he can always see them. Out of site out of mind, right? I am encouraged and excited to see him move on and conquer great things.

quinoa plant

Ancient in its origins, sick Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

Source: GoodCheapEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper and cook 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic, and sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Stir in quinoa, carrots, and 1 3/4 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes, or until quinoa is tender. Combine quinoa and carrots with black beans, 1 cup of cheese, and the onion mixture from the first step, . Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.
When my oldest does not like something he tells me “Mom, sildenafil we all have different tastes.” So true. I would not expect our little ones to bounce up and down excited over stuffed tomatoes. It took me awhile to be convinced. They are excited over the cute little tomato cup the tuna and beans are served in. It is all in the way you look at it. I have taken many an idea from Charlie on Charlie and Lola. Charlie is Lola’s big brother. He is constantly having to come up with imaginative ways to help his sister through every day problems.

Source: The Italian Dish
3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp minced flat leaf parsley
1 (12-ounce) can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by one inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.

A lot of people are confused about how to cook dried beans and are scared to try. It’s so easy. You just soak and simmer. Sometimes I just throw the beans in a pot and cover with cold water to soak before I go to bed. If I don’t do that, viagra I just go ahead and throw them in some water in the morning and let them soak all day. There is no exact science to it. After they soak you just need to give yourself a couple of hours to cook them, more about depending on what kind of bean you have and how long they have soaked. I just put mine on to simmer with some aromatics and start tasting them after an hour and keep tasting them until they are the texture I like. That’s it.

The rule of thumb in cooking beans is to not add salt until the last 15 or 20 minutes of cooking because it is believed that the salt makes them tougher. I always did this until earlier this year, when I read an article in Gourmet magazine’s April issue about cooking beans. They tested this myth and cooked several batches of beans. They found out that the beans which they salted before cooking ended up slightly more tender than those cooked with no salt, or had the salt added at the end of cooking. Also, the beans cooked slightly faster and the tasters felt the salted beans had more flavor. Myth buster! So now I’m putting the salt right in the pot to cook along with the beans.

Tomatoes Stuffed with Tuna and Cellini Beans
for a printer friendly recipe, click here

3/4 cup dried cellini, cannellini or white navy beans, soaked for several hours or overnight (or 1 can of beans, drained)
1 bay leaf
several peppercorns
1 clove garlic
4 large tomatoes
1/2 red onion, sliced as thin as you can
2 tablespoons minced flat leaf parsley
12 ounce can tuna, packed in water, drained
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
kosher salt and pepper

Drain the beans and place in a saucepan with 1 bay leave, several peppercorns, a clove of garlic and 1 tablespoon of salt. Add water to cover by a at least an inch and simmer over low heat, covered, until tender about 1-1/2 to 2 hours. Drain and remove bay leaf, garlic and peppercorns. Drizzle with 1/4 cup of the olive oil.

Slice tops off of the tomatoes and scoop out seeds and most of the flesh with a spoon. Lightly salt the inside of each tomato and place upside down on paper towels to drain for about 3o minutes.

In a bowl, stir together the beans, tuna fish, onion, parsley and the remainder of the olive oil. Generously season with salt to taste and add pepper to taste. Spoon the mixture into the tomatoes and serve.
http://theitaliandish.blogspot.com/2009/04/meatless-meals-tomatoes-stuffed-with.html

January 6th is known as the Christian feast or day of Epiphany. For many it is the day they celebrate Christmas, recipe the day the Magi or Three Wise Men arrived at the manger and presented gifts to the baby Jesus. The Magi leaves gifts on the Eve similar to Santa Clause on Christmas Eve. In Mexico, gifts such as candies are left in their shoes to symbolize the gifts given to Jesus. A feast is prepared and a special cake or Rosca is baked with a tiny doll, (representing the baby Jesus and the quest of the Wise Men to find him) the person who finds the doll in their piece of “Rosca” must throw a party on February 2, “Candelaria Day,” offering tamales and Atole (a hot sweet drink thickened with corn flour).

Día de la Candelaria (Day of the Candles or Candle Mass) represents a fusion of pre-Hispanic traditions and Catholic beliefs. Celebrated on February 2nd, Candelaria Day marks the mid-way point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The end of the Christmas festivities, when Jesus was presented to the church. Images of baby Jesus are dressed with special clothes and taken to mass. Some areas of Mexico hold a parade, bull fight and dancing.

Here in the states, we celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog day, the day we anxiously await the appearance of a ground hog to tell us if winter is moving on. So, we decided to combine the two and serve tamales and Atole for dinner. After tasting the Atole, the kids decided hot chocolate would be better.

Atole:
1/3 cup masa harina blended with 1/4 cup warm water in blender until smooth
3 cups water or milk
5 tablespoons brown sugar or piloncillo
1 pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon or 1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons vanilla or one one vanilla bean
1 to 2 tablets Mexican Chocolate
1/2 cup pureed fruit (optional)

Heat all ingredients (except for any toppings you may be using) in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat while stirring. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir frequently for 20-25 minutes until thickened. If used, remove the cinnamon stick and/or vanilla bean. Pour into mugs or thick glasses. Warm fruit puree in a small saucepan and drizzle on top of Atole. Serves 2-3
When I was very little, ask our family would take a drive out west of town to pick the wild blueberries that grew along the fence by the highway. Once we got them home mom busied herself in the kitchen washing the berries and boiling the water to make jars of homemade jam. I have always envisioned a homestead with raised gardens, dotted with fruit trees of every kind. It was no surprise decades later the first thing I wanted to do when Stephen and I bought our first home was plant a garden in the back yard. I wanted to enjoy the satisfaction of growing my own fruits and vegetables.

We had little money as newlyweds just starting out and I savored the thought of having a healthy vegetable and herb garden. I worked for hours hoeing the hard dirt to make it soft enough to mix in the nutrients it lacked. Then finally, with great anticipation, I planted the seedlings. The hard work paid off in the weeks that followed. It was exhilarating to walk out back and pick herbs for our morning omelet. Or to fill my apron with the green beans, tomatoes, zucchini and summer squash. However I was unhappy with my meager supply. Grated the squash and especially the zucchini took off and grew to considerable size. Still the tomatoes green beans and herbs were lacking.

Growing vegetables is like baking bread, every gardener has their own opinion. Some say you can grow green beans next to corn while others insist it is impossible since corn needs nitrogen which in turn will harm the beans. Still in a book I read recently they say green beans need nitrogen too and the author suggested growing green beans next to corn. It is enough to give any novice like myself a headache. I just want to plant, water and wah-la, have great tasting and abundant fresh fruits and vegetables.

My dad grew up on a farm. But never did I think to ask him about the tricks of the trade. It was not until after I started my own family that I began to think about my childhood and the memories that I want to create with my children. So while visiting this summer I sat down with the master farmer to pick his brain and get all the insider tips.

My dad did not say much. Instead he gave me a brochure for an Aero-garden and told me to go experiment with the rest. My mom came in the room and reminded my dad of when he planted a hydroponics garden. Apparently all you do is dig a trench or use a vented planter. Fill the trench or planter with wood shavings or chips. Not bark. Next plant you plant in the wood chips. You can grow tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers to name a few. Finally give the plant a good drink with a mixture of liquid fertilizer and water. Sounded simple enough, yet I was still searching for the secrets behind a Martha Stewart worthy garden.

A few days later I went to visit my Great Aunt and my Grandmother, dad’s mom and aunt. They both grew up on a farm. Grandma Penny is the person who taught my dad. So it figured I would get some help there. They told me the same thing. You have to experiment. They added the most important key to gardening is adequate water and food. Then they suggested I visit the local feed store or garden center and ask someone there who knows the area and is knowledgeable about gardening. It was clear I was going to have to put in my own work and figure it all out by myself.
We have lived in this house for three years now and still no garden. This year, page I am determined to take the time to start one. My friends and family, approved who are experts on the subject, have clammed up forcing me to do my own research. First things first…find a place. That was easy. The minute we saw the house, I claimed the north east side of the yard for my own. The area gets the most sun during the summer and seemed like the natural place to plant a garden.

Next, I have to figure out what goes where. I have made several sketches of the garden, however, every time I compare it with the actual space, I stand there dumbfounded. I know I want to plant a “companion” garden utilizing containers. The theory of companion vegetable gardens is allowing Mother Nature to do what she does best. Pairing vegetables that grow deep in the soil with those that require a shallow bed, blending in plants that ward off pesty insects with those that invite creatures that are beneficial to producing a successful garden. We have plenty of birds, but I have not seen frogs since the first year we moved in. But, if I need frogs, birds and snakes so be it. We will create a nice little village for them.

Working with the sun, I will need to plant from North to south ensuring that every plant gets it’s share of the sun. Starting along the back fence, I have raspberries and blackberries. Originally, I planned on raising blueberries, but they are not as resilient and tend to be a bit more finicky than their cousins. (A tip when planting blueberries: plant two or more different varieties.) I will use sunflowers to separate the two and garlic as a border. Sunflowers attract bees and garlic is supposed to fight of bugs.

They say tomatoes are best when planted with basil, basil being a natural ward against pests. I plan on growing my tomatoes in containers with basil and parsley nestled right in the pot. Moving forward along the fence line with rows running East to West, I have peas, pots of tomatoes and potatoes. The next section will have green beans along the fence, squash (summer and zucchini) and cans of mint (again, to ward off the bad bugs) all divided by marigolds and Nasturtiums.

Continuing on along the fence, I have cucumbers in pots with a trellis, onions, thyme and carrots. Then peppers, cabbage, dill, lettuce and celery. Finally my herb garden consisting of basil, oregano, parsley, Nasturtium, asparagus, cilantro and marigolds and chives around the base of fruit trees. Flowers, Nasturtium and Marigolds thickly dotting where they will fit and strawberry plants as ground cover out front along the entry. I think that about covers it.

The fun part is tilling the earth. I need about 12 inches depth. The ground is clay and will become a nice home for my seedlings once some nutrient rich soil is mixed in and the earthworms move in. I have a ton of work ahead of me. I know in the end it will all be worth it.
Not long ago, viagra 100mg I made an amazing discovery. As in J.M Barrie’s classic Peter Pan, I had grown up. I had forgotten how to play dolls and cars or come up with a silly song or bedtime story. It is so easy to become consumed with the day to day responsibilities of being a mom and wife that I sometimes forget to laugh. I realized I had better lighten up relax and have fun. These years I have with my little ones are so short.

Child development experts believe that humor is a learned trait. While children do come with their own personalities, we can set the tone for how they cope with life’s ups and downs. If you want your child to be able to roll with it, to embrace defeat and move on, then we as parents need to be able to laugh at the uh-oh’s. I had an interesting conversation with my mom while she was here for Christmas. She mentioned how her mom would never let them play with paints until the situation was perfect for fear of having to clean up a huge mess. I am guilty as charged.

After little Everett was born, I was extremely ill and sleep deprived. The last thing I wanted to do is clean up an extra mess. I realized my mistake when one afternoon I thought I would be a great mom and let my kids paint. Mason refused to paint because as he put it “painting is messy.” Oh what great influences we have on our children. Yikes! No use in crying over spilt milk right? I needed to change if I expected them to change. Instead of getting mad over an accident I taught them to just clean it up. That is not to say I am never exasperated in the face of another clean up. I am trying to be more aware of how I handle the situation. Adelin adopted “it’s ok, it is just an accident” as her favorite catch phrase. Now, I get a laugh when the kids pull out the art supplies or make a mess and I hear Stephen freak. He looks at me for support and I sheepishly have to say they are fine.

Studies have shown laughter improves mood, strengthens the immune system and lowers blood pressure. It can also take the stress out of being a parent. Comedy can conquer a tantrum 99.9 % of the time. The goal is to diffuse the tantrum. Talking and scolding only make it worse. I like to play “Where is it”. A game I adopted from a friend of mine. You say “Oh my, it is gone. Is it in your ear? Is it in your shirt?” The goal is to find his lost smile. Other times, I point to his shirt and say is that your sock? Kids get a real kick out of funky sounds and calling a body part or object by the wrong name. Another strategy I try to use is singing. It is hard to yell when you are singing. I usually will sing a song about what they are doing. Sometimes nothing works and it is best to leave them alone.

Don’t get me wrong, I am definitely not Mother of the Year. My friend and I sadly share our dirty secrets to each other about how many times that week we lost it. I think it helps us feel we are not alone and we are filled with the necessary encouragement to press forward.

Here are some ways we try to fit fun and laughter into our lives.
-Take time out to see a funny play or movie or go to a local comedy club
-Organize a game night with family or friends.
-Host a karaoke night or XBOX tournament. Our favorite is Rock Band
-Call an old friend
-Play Snake in the Cave
-Play Monster coming
-Play peek-a-boo.
-Play hide-n-seek.
-Say you are a cat but moo like a cow
-Sing using a goofy voice.
-Make up rhymes. The kids love stuff like faster, faster we need another master.
-Read stories using different voices. My daughter squeals when I read her Charlie and Lola using the voices from the TV show.
-Walk and dance using funny movements.
-Kids love the old slapstick humor of falling down. They love it a little too much.
-Play construction trucks to pick up a load of laundry and bulldoze them to the laundry room.
-Teach a baby doll a crazy dance. Another favorite.
-Place objects where they do not belong such as a shoe on your head and a hat on your foot.
-Point to a body part and say the wrong word.
-Celebrate traditional and made up holidays

Love and Logic Parenting with Love and Logic

As I watch the three loverly’s grow I am posed with a conundrum. In one year, generic the average child learns to suck from the breast or a bottle, rx drink from a cup, sip from a straw. He also masters eating solids, rolling over, sitting up, crawling, walking and clapping. More over babies can understand directions, recognize faces, shapes, colors, numbers, letters and speak. Why can’t they behave when we want them to?

I want to enjoy being around my kids and I want others to enjoy being around them. We have tried to instill basic courtesies. They know please and thank you. Do not hit. Do not bit. Be gentle to the cat. Share your toys. Do not jump on the couch. Do they always stay within the bounds? No, of course not, they are kids. They like to test the waters and they like to do it when we least expect it. It is our job to constantly be one step ahead of them. So we arm ourselves with what we know and the lessons learned by others and hope for the best.

Granted I remember many times as a teenager I thought I knew what I was doing and luckily I had a mom to step in and redirect me. When I am dealing with my own little ones I cannot count how many times I have thought, “what in the world are you doing?” “You should know better!” There are plenty of adults I would ask the same questions. Being a mom is one of the most challenging jobs I have undertaken. With so many books on the subject you would think we moms and dads would have it all figured out. Problem is the majority of experts writing those books focus on the average child and do not take into account the differences of personality. After spending hundreds of dollars to help me figure out why my kid was slightly different from the other kids he played with and not getting anywhere I got the best advice you can get. It was free and from an experienced mom.

That was where I was three years ago. I felt like I was failing miserably. Nothing worked. I tried reading books. I tried watching the Nanny shows. I talked with friends. My son was getting angrier and acting out even more. I was running out of consequences. His toys were gone. There was nothing left in his room but a bed. Why the answer is never there before we reach the dead end eludes me. I was at a friend’s house pouring out my frustrations. She mentioned she had the same struggles with finding consequences and offered to let me borrow a book that helped her. I did not want to scoff in her face. I doubted another book written by another so called expert would be of any help. Politely, I accepted the book. That night I flipped through it. The following day I had finished reading the entire book. It was exactly what I was searching for. I admit I was completely overwhelmed at first. Yet, to my surprise there was a completely different kid living with us after a few days of implementing the strategies taught in the book.

After some observation I made an alarming discovery. My child was not only 100% all natural certified “boy”, but he is a sensitive and spirited child. The average child has an activity level of seven. One being the lowest, ten the highest. Spirited children have an activity level of 9. When I placed him in time out or yelled at him he got worse. Love and Logic helped me realize I was going about discipline the wrong way. We do not have to use a big voice or act authoritative in order to correct bad behavior. Rather allow the child to discover their mistakes and learn how to make right choices while in a loving environment. Instead of saying “that was naughty, you go to time out, now!” I can calmly put my hand on his should, sing “uh-uh, you chose to go to time out!” He is calmly and quietly moved to a time out spot, his bedroom or couch. When he is calm I go to him and give him a big hug and kiss, calmly ask him why he is there and tell him he may come out of time out. As Mason got older we started using delayed consequences. If he broke a rule and I was unable to come up with a consequence right away, the next time he wanted a treat, to play a game or watch TV we would tell him “that’s so sad. You did this.

Love and Logic is also all about making choices. Give the responsibility back to the child. Say things like “do you want to put your shirt on first our your pants?” When they ask for a treat before dinner ask “would you like to have it with your dinner or after?” If it is cold outside, rather than get in a fight over a coat say “it is cold outside, I am going to wear my coat so I do not get cold. Do you want to wear your coat or carry it?” But never give a choice that you cannot follow through on. Choices 99% of the time will defuse the situation. Both parties win.

Love and Logic has become the preferred method of parenting in foster homes and schools around the country. I can see why. The phylosopy is simple. Teach responsibilty and how to make wise choices in a loving, calm and safe environment. The Love and Logic website is a great tool to get up to speed as well as The Parents of Love and Logic group on Cafemom.
I am faced with a heavy dilemma at present. The time to sign Mason up for Kindergarten is fast approaching and I am questioning is he really ready to go. He is doing exceedingly well academically. I fear however, link that with the the demise of nap time, in most schools playtime and play centers that Mason will meet Kindergarten with a negative attitude resulting in a dislike of school. Moreover my greatest fear is that he will be labeled a problem child for his displays of boyishness. He still has a hard time giving up his toys in exchange for other activities. He dislikes crafts and is not all that interested in participating in class. He can sign his name but prefers writing the letters very small, very large, in scary type or just takes his time because he would rather be doing something else. Mason is very much a boy, a very active boy, in all aspects of the word. All he wants to do is play.

So do I hold Mason back for one more year of Preschool or send him on to Kindergarten. I have pretty much raised our children in a loving and playful home. We are strict about sleep. Adamant about manners and being kind to others. We teach them to help clean up when they make a mess. We have somewhat of a schedule; mostly, we learn through play Montessori style. I am an advocate of letting kids be kids. However, the time has come for Mason to learn a little responsibility. Sort of a coming of age.

After careful consideration Stephen and I have come to the conclusion that if we hold Mason back he will ultimately graduate high school at age 19. A friend of mine who is a child psychologist was helpful in the matter. She cautioned me to think about later on when he gets into 5th and 6th grades and their minds become aware of the age difference. She has seen quite a few problems lately in regards to a child’s self esteem in this particular area. After determining his age difference I went back to Susan and discussed possible solutions to prepare him for the rigors of Kindergarten.

I explained the strategies I had in mind such as introducing a behavior chart. Something we tried before but he was not quite into. Susan gave me a great idea to take pictures of Mason doing each of the activities on the behavior chart such as brushing his teeth, setting the table, behaving at school, sharing his toys and so on. When he sees himself performing all these tasks he will be more likely to participate. Another suggestion Susan had was to play more games that require him to listen to what I am saying and copy what I am doing as in Simon Says and do as I am doing. Then try seeing who can sit still the longest. Rewards can be handed out if needed. My goal is to have them sit still for 30 minutes of reading time.

I found a great idea on a blog Kirk Family Adventures. I do not know how I stumbled upon the blog but I was glad I did. We adhere somewhat to the Love and Logic philosophy. A parenting technique centered around making choices. Needless to say I was right on board with the Kirk Family’s idea of allowing their son to choose if he wanted to do the chores or have mom. If he does them then he gets a bead and if she does them them there is no reward. (A great introducing to prepare him for his first official chore and allowance beginning next year.) She made a list divided by morning, evening, any time chores and enrichment. Her son earns privileges in exchange for beads.

Another option my brother introduced to me is Handipoints. Handipoints is a free behavioral/chore chart website. It keeps track of all the child’s responsibilities and the points earned for completing them. The child can create an Avatar cat complete with user name. The parent assigns how many points and Handiland bonus points are awarded for each completed task. The parent also has to grade the tasks. So if your child gets sneaky and says they did something they did not, when you grade their chart points are deducted. Points go toward rewards you both come up with and bonus points are exchanged for clothing for their cat and decor for their house. Handiland is where the cats can chat, trade clothes or furniture with other members, play games for more bonus points and shop.

The challenge is to remember to keep Mason to task. I hung his strand of beads up where he can always see them. Out of site out of mind, right? I am encouraged and excited to see him move on and conquer great things.

Washing dishes

To become a successful leader kids need to learn responsibility somewhere. That begins in the home when they are young by building their confidence through applauding small achievements. Some may have negative feelings toward chores because of the way they were brought up. I know I often felt like I was a slave rather than a kid but as I matured and gained insight I realized the responsibilities thrown at me as a kid has taught me how to be self-reliant as an adult.

Chores can be a positive and constructive way to build confidence and teach leadership through responsibility. Boys especially need chores. We are no longer a society that sends our boys out to work in the field all day. They relish the satisfaction of a job done well. Boys love to solve problems. They also need structure and to be held accountable. Give them a task and help them learn how to go about completing that task by giving them clear concise directions but with a little leeway for creativity and a consequence to hold them to it and they will radiate confidence.

Chores are also a way to teach our children how to one day care for their own homestead; moreover, this site chores teach them to respect property and accountability. Boys should learn to cook, decease clean, do dishes and mend clothing just like girls should know how to care for their car, take out the trash, repairs and mow the law.

Know What Is Expected- Be Consistent.

I think we can agree that chores are not on our kids list of top priorities. Whenever my mom would ask my brother to clean up his reply was always “I am eating.” Somehow he was absolved without any further discussion. My daughter though she is three takes after he Uncle Todd. When asked to clean up she will lie down and feign she is oh so tired.

If you implement a system you have to be ready and willing to be consistent because they will fight you on it. They will push the boundaries a little to see how tough you are. Lay out the rules so they know what is expected of them and hold them to it. We are a team and we work together to keep the home functioning.

– Use a chore chart to help them keep track of the chores they are responsible for. There are a myriad of charts out there. Behavioral charts use motivational cues such as rewards. Chore charts can be a spinning wheel to cards. Just search Chore Charts in Google Images to find something that fits your family.

Set a time frame. Something like all their chores must be done before school or by dinnertime. For younger children the consequence might be if you have to pick up their toys you get to keep them. The next day when they ask to play with them you calmly remind them why they are put away and that they may have them tomorrow or they must earn them back. For teens you might take away a privilege. They can’t go out with their friends, play video games or watch TV.

A timer works well to keep them on task. If they insist they are too tired or hungry to do their chore set the timer for 15 minutes. Once the timer goes off they must complete the chore or there are consequences.

Play to the age group.

Create the habit of cleaning up by introducing the concept of chores at an early age. Kids can learn at one year of age how to pick up their toys and throw away their diaper. The little ones love to imitate mom and dad hard at work. Let them contribute in their own way even though you will have to go back later to “fix” the job. Little ones can help vacuum, sweep, wash dishes and help make the bed. As they grow look for tasks they are good at and those that will help improve developmental milestones.

Since our kids are young their chores are pretty simple. I help the two year old clean the loft, the three year old has to keep the downstairs free of toys and clothing (since she is the one who usually puts them there) and the five year old chooses a task to complete each day. It could be emptying the laundry baskets or shredding papers. They are also responsible for cleaning their own room as well as helping set and clear the table. It was interesting to note one day when our five year old left something downstairs and the three year old got onto him about it. She was showing accountability for her area.

Make a list then have them choose the one they would like to be responsible for. I mentioned that the two younger children have specific household chore they are responsible for overseeing each day while the oldest may choose. When dealing out chores the first criteria to take into consideration should be age and the second the child. Our oldest is five and a highly creative kinetic learner. We know that he performs best when given the leeway to do it his way. Our daughter does not like change. She prefers to know what is expected of her in advance.

Make chores fun.

Play to a child is their job. Some days it is a struggle to get the kids to finish their chores. Other days they beg me to let them help me with mine.

– The kitchen floor becomes a skating rink. Wrap wet rags around their feet and let them skate to mop the floor.

– The sink becomes a car wash. Little ones love to play in the suds. They may start out playing with their cars and end up washing dishes, the chairs, the cabinets and even you.

– Play a game under the blanket to make the bed. The kids can pretend they are in a cave. Spread the bedding out over them smoothing the edges to make the bed. Reaching in from the bottom of the bed grab their feet and pull them toward you and off the end of the bed. Then attack them with tickles and kisses. move on to the next bed.

As a mom I understand the biggest hurtle is time. School and extra-curricular activities do not leave much time for quality family time or responsibilities at home. Your plan and how it is carried out depends on your family dynamics and the specific chores. After a six hour day at school the last thing I want to ask of my child when he gets home from school is to complete his chore, especially if he has homework and sports practice. We have tried early morning chores before school. Before bed time did not work either. We have small children who go to bed early to ensure they get the maximum sleep needed. In the mornings it is a race to get everyone dressed, fed and out the door. We have found right before dinner works best in our home, if weekdays are too hectic schedule chores on the weekends.

May Website Review: Inhabitots.com

The “Super Birthday” comes from a friend of mine, ask Shauna Taggart.

The Taggart family has a fun way to celebrate what Shauna calls “your super birthday.” When her children turn the age of the day they were born, they get a Super Birthday. Shauna says “you only have one Super Birthday, so why not make it special?”

I agree. So, what exactly does a super birthday entail?

The child having the super birthday gets to choose a big thing. For instance, one of her sons is turning 18 in a couple of months and wants to take a trip to Utah.

Sounds like Super Birthdays can get really expensive.

Super birthdays are usually more expensive, but since we only get one a lifetime, she is ok with fullfilling her kids’ dreams.

Within reason right?

Yes, for the most part, they get what they want. Shauna and Sean have to agree.

And what if you have a child who’s super birthday is not until they are, say 28?

Then the spouse has to grant the wish and we will pay to come along.

Sounds like so much fun. Thanks. I think I have some time to save. Everett was born on the 4th. I do not know many 4-year-olds with grandios ideas.
The “Super Birthday” comes from a friend of mine, ask Shauna Taggart.

The Taggart family has a fun way to celebrate what Shauna calls “your super birthday.” When her children turn the age of the day they were born, they get a Super Birthday. Shauna says “you only have one Super Birthday, so why not make it special?”

I agree. So, what exactly does a super birthday entail?

The child having the super birthday gets to choose a big thing. For instance, one of her sons is turning 18 in a couple of months and wants to take a trip to Utah.

Sounds like Super Birthdays can get really expensive.

Super birthdays are usually more expensive, but since we only get one a lifetime, she is ok with fullfilling her kids’ dreams.

Within reason right?

Yes, for the most part, they get what they want. Shauna and Sean have to agree.

And what if you have a child who’s super birthday is not until they are, say 28?

Then the spouse has to grant the wish and we will pay to come along.

Sounds like so much fun. Thanks. I think I have some time to save. Everett was born on the 4th. I do not know many 4-year-olds with grandios ideas.

I think Asian cuisine is by far my favorite type of food. It is simple and makes me feel good after I eat it. Tonight was a “all I want is mac and cheese” night. Luckily this dish is so easy and quick to prepare because the kids were crowed around me like vultures. For kids who were “not going to eat anything but macaroni and cheese” they gobbled down their dinner expressing rave reviews between bites. I think little Everett might have licked his plate clean. It was nice to see them so lively and happy after their little tummies were filled with a good meal. I think they felt it too.

2 tbsp soy sauce
4 cups beef broth
1 clove garlic, dosage chopped
Noodles
Cooked beef, mind cut into strips
Broccoli florets
Carrots, julienned

Bring stock, soy sauce and garlic to a boil over medium-high heat. Add noodles and meat. Simmer for a few minutes. Add the vegetables and simmer a few minutes more. Until the noodles are done but the vegetables firm, not mushy.

Variations:
Add torn cabbage or kale with the veggies or spinach before serving.
For the noodles use angel hair, Japanese soba, spaghetti or top ramen.
For the meat use cooked roast beef, pork, chicken, firm tofu or shrimp.
For a more adult version add a sprinkle of cilantro and a tbsp or more of chilli garlic sauce.
The “Super Birthday” comes from a friend of mine, ask Shauna Taggart.

The Taggart family has a fun way to celebrate what Shauna calls “your super birthday.” When her children turn the age of the day they were born, they get a Super Birthday. Shauna says “you only have one Super Birthday, so why not make it special?”

I agree. So, what exactly does a super birthday entail?

The child having the super birthday gets to choose a big thing. For instance, one of her sons is turning 18 in a couple of months and wants to take a trip to Utah.

Sounds like Super Birthdays can get really expensive.

Super birthdays are usually more expensive, but since we only get one a lifetime, she is ok with fullfilling her kids’ dreams.

Within reason right?

Yes, for the most part, they get what they want. Shauna and Sean have to agree.

And what if you have a child who’s super birthday is not until they are, say 28?

Then the spouse has to grant the wish and we will pay to come along.

Sounds like so much fun. Thanks. I think I have some time to save. Everett was born on the 4th. I do not know many 4-year-olds with grandios ideas.

I think Asian cuisine is by far my favorite type of food. It is simple and makes me feel good after I eat it. Tonight was a “all I want is mac and cheese” night. Luckily this dish is so easy and quick to prepare because the kids were crowed around me like vultures. For kids who were “not going to eat anything but macaroni and cheese” they gobbled down their dinner expressing rave reviews between bites. I think little Everett might have licked his plate clean. It was nice to see them so lively and happy after their little tummies were filled with a good meal. I think they felt it too.

2 tbsp soy sauce
4 cups beef broth
1 clove garlic, dosage chopped
Noodles
Cooked beef, mind cut into strips
Broccoli florets
Carrots, julienned

Bring stock, soy sauce and garlic to a boil over medium-high heat. Add noodles and meat. Simmer for a few minutes. Add the vegetables and simmer a few minutes more. Until the noodles are done but the vegetables firm, not mushy.

Variations:
Add torn cabbage or kale with the veggies or spinach before serving.
For the noodles use angel hair, Japanese soba, spaghetti or top ramen.
For the meat use cooked roast beef, pork, chicken, firm tofu or shrimp.
For a more adult version add a sprinkle of cilantro and a tbsp or more of chilli garlic sauce.

Several years ago I traveled to Twain Harte California to visit my friend Tami. Twain Harte is a small community located just minutes north of Sonora. While there Tami and I went out to lunch. At the recommendation of Tami, try I ordered the Pork Medallions with Carrot Puree. The dish was amazing. The pork was so tender. The carrots, information pills the perfect compliment to the pork. Famished and pregnant I ate every bite.

Watch the pork closely when cooking it in the skillet. You never want to over cook pork because like chicken breasts it turns dry. Dry meat is a waste of money because who wants to choke down their food? Cook until just barely done. That could be anywhere between 3-5 minutes. The meat will continue to cook as it rests.

Source: unknown
Four 1-inch think boneless pork loin chops
Salt and pepper
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, drugs coarsely chopped
1 cup apple juice
1/2 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup golden raisins
3 tbsp chopped fresh sage

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Season the pork chops with salt and pepper. In a large heavy skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium-high heat. Working in 2 batches, add the pork chops and 1 more tablespoon olive oil between batches. Cook until browned, about 5 minutes on each side. Transfer to an ovenproof dish and tent with foil; place in the oven.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the skillet over. Add the onion and cook for 2 minutes

Variations:
Replace the butternut squash with carrots or sweet potatoes.
The “Super Birthday” comes from a friend of mine, ask Shauna Taggart.

The Taggart family has a fun way to celebrate what Shauna calls “your super birthday.” When her children turn the age of the day they were born, they get a Super Birthday. Shauna says “you only have one Super Birthday, so why not make it special?”

I agree. So, what exactly does a super birthday entail?

The child having the super birthday gets to choose a big thing. For instance, one of her sons is turning 18 in a couple of months and wants to take a trip to Utah.

Sounds like Super Birthdays can get really expensive.

Super birthdays are usually more expensive, but since we only get one a lifetime, she is ok with fullfilling her kids’ dreams.

Within reason right?

Yes, for the most part, they get what they want. Shauna and Sean have to agree.

And what if you have a child who’s super birthday is not until they are, say 28?

Then the spouse has to grant the wish and we will pay to come along.

Sounds like so much fun. Thanks. I think I have some time to save. Everett was born on the 4th. I do not know many 4-year-olds with grandios ideas.

I think Asian cuisine is by far my favorite type of food. It is simple and makes me feel good after I eat it. Tonight was a “all I want is mac and cheese” night. Luckily this dish is so easy and quick to prepare because the kids were crowed around me like vultures. For kids who were “not going to eat anything but macaroni and cheese” they gobbled down their dinner expressing rave reviews between bites. I think little Everett might have licked his plate clean. It was nice to see them so lively and happy after their little tummies were filled with a good meal. I think they felt it too.

2 tbsp soy sauce
4 cups beef broth
1 clove garlic, dosage chopped
Noodles
Cooked beef, mind cut into strips
Broccoli florets
Carrots, julienned

Bring stock, soy sauce and garlic to a boil over medium-high heat. Add noodles and meat. Simmer for a few minutes. Add the vegetables and simmer a few minutes more. Until the noodles are done but the vegetables firm, not mushy.

Variations:
Add torn cabbage or kale with the veggies or spinach before serving.
For the noodles use angel hair, Japanese soba, spaghetti or top ramen.
For the meat use cooked roast beef, pork, chicken, firm tofu or shrimp.
For a more adult version add a sprinkle of cilantro and a tbsp or more of chilli garlic sauce.

Several years ago I traveled to Twain Harte California to visit my friend Tami. Twain Harte is a small community located just minutes north of Sonora. While there Tami and I went out to lunch. At the recommendation of Tami, try I ordered the Pork Medallions with Carrot Puree. The dish was amazing. The pork was so tender. The carrots, information pills the perfect compliment to the pork. Famished and pregnant I ate every bite.

Watch the pork closely when cooking it in the skillet. You never want to over cook pork because like chicken breasts it turns dry. Dry meat is a waste of money because who wants to choke down their food? Cook until just barely done. That could be anywhere between 3-5 minutes. The meat will continue to cook as it rests.

Source: unknown
Four 1-inch think boneless pork loin chops
Salt and pepper
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, drugs coarsely chopped
1 cup apple juice
1/2 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup golden raisins
3 tbsp chopped fresh sage

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Season the pork chops with salt and pepper. In a large heavy skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium-high heat. Working in 2 batches, add the pork chops and 1 more tablespoon olive oil between batches. Cook until browned, about 5 minutes on each side. Transfer to an ovenproof dish and tent with foil; place in the oven.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the skillet over. Add the onion and cook for 2 minutes

Variations:
Replace the butternut squash with carrots or sweet potatoes.

After the success of the blueberry pie Mason’s next request was an apple pie. I admire that he thinks so highly of my baking skills. It is a funny thing when he asks a question and in response to my “I do not know” he tells me “but you are a mom, cialis 40mg you know everything.” That my dear friends is better than winning an academy award. To buy a little time (I am gathering the courage to make another pie) I decided to make this golden statuesque lemon cake. The cake is quite spectacular. The glaze sparkles like snow covered mountains. I thought it a perfect choice to celebrate all the moms of the year.

I admit, sales with my recent passion for lemons I went a little crazy with the lemon zest and juice. I think the extra lemon was a fine addition. For the glaze I started to reach for the powdered sugar questioning if there was a typo. I went ahead and used granulated sugar and am so glad I did not foul it up with powdered sugar. Once cooled the glaze created a lemony crystal shell that is oh so delightful. I understand why white sugar was chosen over powered. This cake is the perfect conclusion to a dinner party or holiday meal. The lemon is refreshing. The cake light and comforting. Do be careful when inverting the cake onto the wire rack. When the cake is warm it is crumbly and could possibly tear away from the pan. I had minimal damage using a nonstick pan and olive oil spray. Make sure to spray the pan really well. One reviewer suggested using a baking dish and spreading the glaze on top rather than turning the cake out.

Source: Woman’s Day
2 1⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
1⁄2 cup yellow cornmeal
2 tsp baking powder
1⁄2 tsp each baking soda and salt
2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, prostate softened
1 3⁄4 cups sugar
1 Tbsp grated lemon zest
1⁄4 cup lemon juice
4 large eggs
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt, stirred to loosen

Sugar Glaze
1 cup sugar
1⁄3 cup lemon juice

Heat oven to 325°F. You’ll need a 10-cup decorative tube pan or a 12-cup Bundt pan coated with baking spray. In medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder and soda, and salt.

2. In a large bowl beat butter, sugar, lemon zest and juice with mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time until blended. With mixer on low, alternately beat in flour mixture and buttermilk until batter is smooth. Scrape into prepared pan; level top with spatula.

3. Bake 55 to 65 minutes until a wooden pick inserted in cake comes out clean. Cool cake in pan on wire rack 5 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, make the sugar glaze: Whisk glaze ingredients in a small bowl just until combined (sugar will not be totally dissolved). Invert cake from pan onto rack; place rack over a baking sheet. Brush glaze all over hot cake until absorbed (sugar crystals will be evident). Cool completely. Transfer cake to a serving plate and cover. Let cake rest several hours, or overnight, before serving. Store cake covered at room temperature up to 4 days. Cut into thin slices to serve.

Tip: Use lime zest and juice for a zesty alternative.
The “Super Birthday” comes from a friend of mine, ask Shauna Taggart.

The Taggart family has a fun way to celebrate what Shauna calls “your super birthday.” When her children turn the age of the day they were born, they get a Super Birthday. Shauna says “you only have one Super Birthday, so why not make it special?”

I agree. So, what exactly does a super birthday entail?

The child having the super birthday gets to choose a big thing. For instance, one of her sons is turning 18 in a couple of months and wants to take a trip to Utah.

Sounds like Super Birthdays can get really expensive.

Super birthdays are usually more expensive, but since we only get one a lifetime, she is ok with fullfilling her kids’ dreams.

Within reason right?

Yes, for the most part, they get what they want. Shauna and Sean have to agree.

And what if you have a child who’s super birthday is not until they are, say 28?

Then the spouse has to grant the wish and we will pay to come along.

Sounds like so much fun. Thanks. I think I have some time to save. Everett was born on the 4th. I do not know many 4-year-olds with grandios ideas.

I think Asian cuisine is by far my favorite type of food. It is simple and makes me feel good after I eat it. Tonight was a “all I want is mac and cheese” night. Luckily this dish is so easy and quick to prepare because the kids were crowed around me like vultures. For kids who were “not going to eat anything but macaroni and cheese” they gobbled down their dinner expressing rave reviews between bites. I think little Everett might have licked his plate clean. It was nice to see them so lively and happy after their little tummies were filled with a good meal. I think they felt it too.

2 tbsp soy sauce
4 cups beef broth
1 clove garlic, dosage chopped
Noodles
Cooked beef, mind cut into strips
Broccoli florets
Carrots, julienned

Bring stock, soy sauce and garlic to a boil over medium-high heat. Add noodles and meat. Simmer for a few minutes. Add the vegetables and simmer a few minutes more. Until the noodles are done but the vegetables firm, not mushy.

Variations:
Add torn cabbage or kale with the veggies or spinach before serving.
For the noodles use angel hair, Japanese soba, spaghetti or top ramen.
For the meat use cooked roast beef, pork, chicken, firm tofu or shrimp.
For a more adult version add a sprinkle of cilantro and a tbsp or more of chilli garlic sauce.

Several years ago I traveled to Twain Harte California to visit my friend Tami. Twain Harte is a small community located just minutes north of Sonora. While there Tami and I went out to lunch. At the recommendation of Tami, try I ordered the Pork Medallions with Carrot Puree. The dish was amazing. The pork was so tender. The carrots, information pills the perfect compliment to the pork. Famished and pregnant I ate every bite.

Watch the pork closely when cooking it in the skillet. You never want to over cook pork because like chicken breasts it turns dry. Dry meat is a waste of money because who wants to choke down their food? Cook until just barely done. That could be anywhere between 3-5 minutes. The meat will continue to cook as it rests.

Source: unknown
Four 1-inch think boneless pork loin chops
Salt and pepper
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, drugs coarsely chopped
1 cup apple juice
1/2 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup golden raisins
3 tbsp chopped fresh sage

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Season the pork chops with salt and pepper. In a large heavy skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium-high heat. Working in 2 batches, add the pork chops and 1 more tablespoon olive oil between batches. Cook until browned, about 5 minutes on each side. Transfer to an ovenproof dish and tent with foil; place in the oven.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the skillet over. Add the onion and cook for 2 minutes

Variations:
Replace the butternut squash with carrots or sweet potatoes.

After the success of the blueberry pie Mason’s next request was an apple pie. I admire that he thinks so highly of my baking skills. It is a funny thing when he asks a question and in response to my “I do not know” he tells me “but you are a mom, cialis 40mg you know everything.” That my dear friends is better than winning an academy award. To buy a little time (I am gathering the courage to make another pie) I decided to make this golden statuesque lemon cake. The cake is quite spectacular. The glaze sparkles like snow covered mountains. I thought it a perfect choice to celebrate all the moms of the year.

I admit, sales with my recent passion for lemons I went a little crazy with the lemon zest and juice. I think the extra lemon was a fine addition. For the glaze I started to reach for the powdered sugar questioning if there was a typo. I went ahead and used granulated sugar and am so glad I did not foul it up with powdered sugar. Once cooled the glaze created a lemony crystal shell that is oh so delightful. I understand why white sugar was chosen over powered. This cake is the perfect conclusion to a dinner party or holiday meal. The lemon is refreshing. The cake light and comforting. Do be careful when inverting the cake onto the wire rack. When the cake is warm it is crumbly and could possibly tear away from the pan. I had minimal damage using a nonstick pan and olive oil spray. Make sure to spray the pan really well. One reviewer suggested using a baking dish and spreading the glaze on top rather than turning the cake out.

Source: Woman’s Day
2 1⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
1⁄2 cup yellow cornmeal
2 tsp baking powder
1⁄2 tsp each baking soda and salt
2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, prostate softened
1 3⁄4 cups sugar
1 Tbsp grated lemon zest
1⁄4 cup lemon juice
4 large eggs
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt, stirred to loosen

Sugar Glaze
1 cup sugar
1⁄3 cup lemon juice

Heat oven to 325°F. You’ll need a 10-cup decorative tube pan or a 12-cup Bundt pan coated with baking spray. In medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder and soda, and salt.

2. In a large bowl beat butter, sugar, lemon zest and juice with mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time until blended. With mixer on low, alternately beat in flour mixture and buttermilk until batter is smooth. Scrape into prepared pan; level top with spatula.

3. Bake 55 to 65 minutes until a wooden pick inserted in cake comes out clean. Cool cake in pan on wire rack 5 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, make the sugar glaze: Whisk glaze ingredients in a small bowl just until combined (sugar will not be totally dissolved). Invert cake from pan onto rack; place rack over a baking sheet. Brush glaze all over hot cake until absorbed (sugar crystals will be evident). Cool completely. Transfer cake to a serving plate and cover. Let cake rest several hours, or overnight, before serving. Store cake covered at room temperature up to 4 days. Cut into thin slices to serve.

Tip: Use lime zest and juice for a zesty alternative.
There is a little hole-in-the-wall cafe in Modesto California call The Brighter Side. It is only open for lunch and usually crowed but so worth the wait. Once I manged to find the entrance I opted for a chef salad with, ampoule my favorite splurge, this blue cheese dressing (no dieting here). The salad consisted of a bed of lettuce, a few slices of beets, a sprinkle of garbanzo beans, a cucumber or two, shredded deli turkey slices, tomato wedges and cheese. There are days I crave this salad. I have tried to replicate it at home without success. It is just not the same. My mother-n-law always comments that when someone else makes a meal it tastes so much better. She has a point. I think of my dad and his feeble attempt to successfully recreate a subway sandwich. He would throw his hands up and exclaim how he bought all the same ingredients so why doesn’t his sandwich taste like Subway’s? I am going to side with Nadine and say it tastes better when someone else makes it. I will also inject something my niece Jennifer passed on from culinary school. Restaurants use lots of butter and sugar. Moreover I recently read an article that claimed there are healthier choices than chick peas and beets.

We do not have to worry about butter or the lack of fortified vitamins and minerals here. This salad is packed with a supersized amount of cancer fighting vitamins and it tastes like someone else made it. I made a few changes mostly because I knew the kids were not going to eat lettuce laden with balsamic vinaigrette without a fight. Instead I threw all the veggies in a bowl and served the cheese and dressing on the side. I also left the broccoli raw.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 large ripe tomato, cut into bite sized pieces
1 small red onion, thinly sliced
1 cup thinly sliced red bell pepper
1/3 cup balsamic vinaigrette
1 pkg (16 oz) cheese tortellini
4 cups broccoli florets
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
1 bag (5 oz) spring lettuce mixture
1 cup (4 oz) smoked or regular mozzarella, cut into small cubes

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Meanwhile combine tomato, onion, pepper and dressing in a large bowl. Leave at room temperature.

Add tortellini to boiling water, cook as package directs, adding broccoli to pot 5 minutes before tortellini is done. Drain, rinse under cold water. Add to tomato mixture; add basil and toss to mix.

Arrange 1 cup lettuce, top with tortellini mixture and mozzarella.

Balsamic Vinaigrette
Source: Emeril
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
2 tsp dark brown sugar, optional*
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3/4 cup olive oil

Beat the vinegar in a bowl with the optional sugar, garlic, salt and pepper until sugar and salt dissolves. Then beat in the oil by droplets, whisking constantly. (Or place all the ingredients in a screw-top jar and shake to combine.) Taste and adjust the seasonings. If not using dressing right away, cover and refrigerate, whisking or shaking again before use.

*If using a good quality balsamic vinegar you should not need the sugar, but if using a lesser quality you might want the sugar to round out the dressing.
The “Super Birthday” comes from a friend of mine, ask Shauna Taggart.

The Taggart family has a fun way to celebrate what Shauna calls “your super birthday.” When her children turn the age of the day they were born, they get a Super Birthday. Shauna says “you only have one Super Birthday, so why not make it special?”

I agree. So, what exactly does a super birthday entail?

The child having the super birthday gets to choose a big thing. For instance, one of her sons is turning 18 in a couple of months and wants to take a trip to Utah.

Sounds like Super Birthdays can get really expensive.

Super birthdays are usually more expensive, but since we only get one a lifetime, she is ok with fullfilling her kids’ dreams.

Within reason right?

Yes, for the most part, they get what they want. Shauna and Sean have to agree.

And what if you have a child who’s super birthday is not until they are, say 28?

Then the spouse has to grant the wish and we will pay to come along.

Sounds like so much fun. Thanks. I think I have some time to save. Everett was born on the 4th. I do not know many 4-year-olds with grandios ideas.

I think Asian cuisine is by far my favorite type of food. It is simple and makes me feel good after I eat it. Tonight was a “all I want is mac and cheese” night. Luckily this dish is so easy and quick to prepare because the kids were crowed around me like vultures. For kids who were “not going to eat anything but macaroni and cheese” they gobbled down their dinner expressing rave reviews between bites. I think little Everett might have licked his plate clean. It was nice to see them so lively and happy after their little tummies were filled with a good meal. I think they felt it too.

2 tbsp soy sauce
4 cups beef broth
1 clove garlic, dosage chopped
Noodles
Cooked beef, mind cut into strips
Broccoli florets
Carrots, julienned

Bring stock, soy sauce and garlic to a boil over medium-high heat. Add noodles and meat. Simmer for a few minutes. Add the vegetables and simmer a few minutes more. Until the noodles are done but the vegetables firm, not mushy.

Variations:
Add torn cabbage or kale with the veggies or spinach before serving.
For the noodles use angel hair, Japanese soba, spaghetti or top ramen.
For the meat use cooked roast beef, pork, chicken, firm tofu or shrimp.
For a more adult version add a sprinkle of cilantro and a tbsp or more of chilli garlic sauce.

Several years ago I traveled to Twain Harte California to visit my friend Tami. Twain Harte is a small community located just minutes north of Sonora. While there Tami and I went out to lunch. At the recommendation of Tami, try I ordered the Pork Medallions with Carrot Puree. The dish was amazing. The pork was so tender. The carrots, information pills the perfect compliment to the pork. Famished and pregnant I ate every bite.

Watch the pork closely when cooking it in the skillet. You never want to over cook pork because like chicken breasts it turns dry. Dry meat is a waste of money because who wants to choke down their food? Cook until just barely done. That could be anywhere between 3-5 minutes. The meat will continue to cook as it rests.

Source: unknown
Four 1-inch think boneless pork loin chops
Salt and pepper
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, drugs coarsely chopped
1 cup apple juice
1/2 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup golden raisins
3 tbsp chopped fresh sage

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Season the pork chops with salt and pepper. In a large heavy skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium-high heat. Working in 2 batches, add the pork chops and 1 more tablespoon olive oil between batches. Cook until browned, about 5 minutes on each side. Transfer to an ovenproof dish and tent with foil; place in the oven.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the skillet over. Add the onion and cook for 2 minutes

Variations:
Replace the butternut squash with carrots or sweet potatoes.

After the success of the blueberry pie Mason’s next request was an apple pie. I admire that he thinks so highly of my baking skills. It is a funny thing when he asks a question and in response to my “I do not know” he tells me “but you are a mom, cialis 40mg you know everything.” That my dear friends is better than winning an academy award. To buy a little time (I am gathering the courage to make another pie) I decided to make this golden statuesque lemon cake. The cake is quite spectacular. The glaze sparkles like snow covered mountains. I thought it a perfect choice to celebrate all the moms of the year.

I admit, sales with my recent passion for lemons I went a little crazy with the lemon zest and juice. I think the extra lemon was a fine addition. For the glaze I started to reach for the powdered sugar questioning if there was a typo. I went ahead and used granulated sugar and am so glad I did not foul it up with powdered sugar. Once cooled the glaze created a lemony crystal shell that is oh so delightful. I understand why white sugar was chosen over powered. This cake is the perfect conclusion to a dinner party or holiday meal. The lemon is refreshing. The cake light and comforting. Do be careful when inverting the cake onto the wire rack. When the cake is warm it is crumbly and could possibly tear away from the pan. I had minimal damage using a nonstick pan and olive oil spray. Make sure to spray the pan really well. One reviewer suggested using a baking dish and spreading the glaze on top rather than turning the cake out.

Source: Woman’s Day
2 1⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
1⁄2 cup yellow cornmeal
2 tsp baking powder
1⁄2 tsp each baking soda and salt
2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, prostate softened
1 3⁄4 cups sugar
1 Tbsp grated lemon zest
1⁄4 cup lemon juice
4 large eggs
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt, stirred to loosen

Sugar Glaze
1 cup sugar
1⁄3 cup lemon juice

Heat oven to 325°F. You’ll need a 10-cup decorative tube pan or a 12-cup Bundt pan coated with baking spray. In medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder and soda, and salt.

2. In a large bowl beat butter, sugar, lemon zest and juice with mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time until blended. With mixer on low, alternately beat in flour mixture and buttermilk until batter is smooth. Scrape into prepared pan; level top with spatula.

3. Bake 55 to 65 minutes until a wooden pick inserted in cake comes out clean. Cool cake in pan on wire rack 5 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, make the sugar glaze: Whisk glaze ingredients in a small bowl just until combined (sugar will not be totally dissolved). Invert cake from pan onto rack; place rack over a baking sheet. Brush glaze all over hot cake until absorbed (sugar crystals will be evident). Cool completely. Transfer cake to a serving plate and cover. Let cake rest several hours, or overnight, before serving. Store cake covered at room temperature up to 4 days. Cut into thin slices to serve.

Tip: Use lime zest and juice for a zesty alternative.
There is a little hole-in-the-wall cafe in Modesto California call The Brighter Side. It is only open for lunch and usually crowed but so worth the wait. Once I manged to find the entrance I opted for a chef salad with, ampoule my favorite splurge, this blue cheese dressing (no dieting here). The salad consisted of a bed of lettuce, a few slices of beets, a sprinkle of garbanzo beans, a cucumber or two, shredded deli turkey slices, tomato wedges and cheese. There are days I crave this salad. I have tried to replicate it at home without success. It is just not the same. My mother-n-law always comments that when someone else makes a meal it tastes so much better. She has a point. I think of my dad and his feeble attempt to successfully recreate a subway sandwich. He would throw his hands up and exclaim how he bought all the same ingredients so why doesn’t his sandwich taste like Subway’s? I am going to side with Nadine and say it tastes better when someone else makes it. I will also inject something my niece Jennifer passed on from culinary school. Restaurants use lots of butter and sugar. Moreover I recently read an article that claimed there are healthier choices than chick peas and beets.

We do not have to worry about butter or the lack of fortified vitamins and minerals here. This salad is packed with a supersized amount of cancer fighting vitamins and it tastes like someone else made it. I made a few changes mostly because I knew the kids were not going to eat lettuce laden with balsamic vinaigrette without a fight. Instead I threw all the veggies in a bowl and served the cheese and dressing on the side. I also left the broccoli raw.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 large ripe tomato, cut into bite sized pieces
1 small red onion, thinly sliced
1 cup thinly sliced red bell pepper
1/3 cup balsamic vinaigrette
1 pkg (16 oz) cheese tortellini
4 cups broccoli florets
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
1 bag (5 oz) spring lettuce mixture
1 cup (4 oz) smoked or regular mozzarella, cut into small cubes

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Meanwhile combine tomato, onion, pepper and dressing in a large bowl. Leave at room temperature.

Add tortellini to boiling water, cook as package directs, adding broccoli to pot 5 minutes before tortellini is done. Drain, rinse under cold water. Add to tomato mixture; add basil and toss to mix.

Arrange 1 cup lettuce, top with tortellini mixture and mozzarella.

Balsamic Vinaigrette
Source: Emeril
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
2 tsp dark brown sugar, optional*
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3/4 cup olive oil

Beat the vinegar in a bowl with the optional sugar, garlic, salt and pepper until sugar and salt dissolves. Then beat in the oil by droplets, whisking constantly. (Or place all the ingredients in a screw-top jar and shake to combine.) Taste and adjust the seasonings. If not using dressing right away, cover and refrigerate, whisking or shaking again before use.

*If using a good quality balsamic vinegar you should not need the sugar, but if using a lesser quality you might want the sugar to round out the dressing.

apple Pie

One day this past spring, this on the way back to the car after picking Mason up from school, information pills he stopped to admire a great redwood tree standing in a neighboring yard. “Hey, search that looks like the tree in the book my teacher read today!” I could tell Mason had a great day at school because he actually remembered what he learned. He continued to tell me about how trees, eggs and frogs grow.

When we got home Mason asked if I would bake him an apple pie. A couple of weeks prior he requested a blueberry pie inspired by Pig on Word World who loves to bake blueberry pie. Now here was another request but for an apple pie. I surprised myself by successfully baking the blueberry pie but pastries make me nervous so it took me quite a while to get up the nerve to try it again. I have gone through several failures to get to this recipe of apple pie.

I have come to understand when making crusts for delicate pastries such as pie crust the ingredients must be cold. When I made the blueberry pie I used frozen butter. By the time I was done cutting the butter into cubes it was the perfect temperature as if I just pulled it out of the refrigerator. However in subsequent baking attempts my pastry cutter broke. I have not replaced it for I find I enjoy working the butter in with my fingers. Consequently you will notice the recipe will direct you to use chilled butter (not frozen) and return the crust to the refrigerator until ready to use. The reasoning is the cold butter in the crust helps produce a flakier moist tastier crust. To cut in the butter use a food processor, pastry cutter or your fingers. Always cut butter into small cubes before adding butter to the flour mixture.

Let’s talk apples now. Granny Smith is the apple of choice. It keeps its shape and gives the apple pie that tart flavor. You can make the pie using just Granny Smith apples or a combination of Granny Smith and the following: Braeburn, Rome, Jonathan, Winesap, Empire, Fuji, Pink Lady and McIntosh. I like to use Ganny Smith and Braeburn. The Breaburn is sweet and is a nice compliment to the sour Granny Smith.
Apples used in apple pie may be chopped into 1/2 inch pieces or sliced thinly or thickly.

Apple Pie A-la Mode

Flaky Crust:
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup chilled shortening
1/4 cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
4-6 tbsp ice-cold water

Fill a small cup with ice cubes and water. Let sit.

Whisk flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter with a pastry blender or rub in with fingers, until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Do not mix too much; a few pieces of butter are ok. Sprinkle with ice water, a tablespoon at a time. Stir with a fork to moisten. Gather dough into a ball. Divide in half. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Filling:
4-5 medium-large baking apples
3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
3/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tbsp butter
Heavy Cream
Sugar

Peel and core the apples and cut into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Combine the sugar, flour, cinnamon and allspice; toss mixture with apples. Let sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile roll out bottom crust. Drape over a pie plate smoothing the bottom and sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Pour apples and juice into a strainer set over a sauce pan. Let drain for 15 minutes (should have at least 1/2 cup).

Add two tablespoons butter to the pot with the apple juice. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until liquid has reduced slightly and mixture is syrupy and lightly caramelized; about 3-5 minutes

Roll out top crust. Remove pie plate with bottom crust from refrigerator. Spoon apples into the crust lined pie plate. Pour syrup over apples.

Drape top crust over apples. Trim edges to 1-inch below rim of pie plate. Tuck the edges under and leave as is or flute using knuckles. Cut slits in the top to vent. Brush with heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover edges with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake 25-30 minutes until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly.

Variations:
Add 1/4 cup raisins to filling.
The “Super Birthday” comes from a friend of mine, ask Shauna Taggart.

The Taggart family has a fun way to celebrate what Shauna calls “your super birthday.” When her children turn the age of the day they were born, they get a Super Birthday. Shauna says “you only have one Super Birthday, so why not make it special?”

I agree. So, what exactly does a super birthday entail?

The child having the super birthday gets to choose a big thing. For instance, one of her sons is turning 18 in a couple of months and wants to take a trip to Utah.

Sounds like Super Birthdays can get really expensive.

Super birthdays are usually more expensive, but since we only get one a lifetime, she is ok with fullfilling her kids’ dreams.

Within reason right?

Yes, for the most part, they get what they want. Shauna and Sean have to agree.

And what if you have a child who’s super birthday is not until they are, say 28?

Then the spouse has to grant the wish and we will pay to come along.

Sounds like so much fun. Thanks. I think I have some time to save. Everett was born on the 4th. I do not know many 4-year-olds with grandios ideas.

I think Asian cuisine is by far my favorite type of food. It is simple and makes me feel good after I eat it. Tonight was a “all I want is mac and cheese” night. Luckily this dish is so easy and quick to prepare because the kids were crowed around me like vultures. For kids who were “not going to eat anything but macaroni and cheese” they gobbled down their dinner expressing rave reviews between bites. I think little Everett might have licked his plate clean. It was nice to see them so lively and happy after their little tummies were filled with a good meal. I think they felt it too.

2 tbsp soy sauce
4 cups beef broth
1 clove garlic, dosage chopped
Noodles
Cooked beef, mind cut into strips
Broccoli florets
Carrots, julienned

Bring stock, soy sauce and garlic to a boil over medium-high heat. Add noodles and meat. Simmer for a few minutes. Add the vegetables and simmer a few minutes more. Until the noodles are done but the vegetables firm, not mushy.

Variations:
Add torn cabbage or kale with the veggies or spinach before serving.
For the noodles use angel hair, Japanese soba, spaghetti or top ramen.
For the meat use cooked roast beef, pork, chicken, firm tofu or shrimp.
For a more adult version add a sprinkle of cilantro and a tbsp or more of chilli garlic sauce.

Several years ago I traveled to Twain Harte California to visit my friend Tami. Twain Harte is a small community located just minutes north of Sonora. While there Tami and I went out to lunch. At the recommendation of Tami, try I ordered the Pork Medallions with Carrot Puree. The dish was amazing. The pork was so tender. The carrots, information pills the perfect compliment to the pork. Famished and pregnant I ate every bite.

Watch the pork closely when cooking it in the skillet. You never want to over cook pork because like chicken breasts it turns dry. Dry meat is a waste of money because who wants to choke down their food? Cook until just barely done. That could be anywhere between 3-5 minutes. The meat will continue to cook as it rests.

Source: unknown
Four 1-inch think boneless pork loin chops
Salt and pepper
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, drugs coarsely chopped
1 cup apple juice
1/2 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup golden raisins
3 tbsp chopped fresh sage

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Season the pork chops with salt and pepper. In a large heavy skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium-high heat. Working in 2 batches, add the pork chops and 1 more tablespoon olive oil between batches. Cook until browned, about 5 minutes on each side. Transfer to an ovenproof dish and tent with foil; place in the oven.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the skillet over. Add the onion and cook for 2 minutes

Variations:
Replace the butternut squash with carrots or sweet potatoes.

After the success of the blueberry pie Mason’s next request was an apple pie. I admire that he thinks so highly of my baking skills. It is a funny thing when he asks a question and in response to my “I do not know” he tells me “but you are a mom, cialis 40mg you know everything.” That my dear friends is better than winning an academy award. To buy a little time (I am gathering the courage to make another pie) I decided to make this golden statuesque lemon cake. The cake is quite spectacular. The glaze sparkles like snow covered mountains. I thought it a perfect choice to celebrate all the moms of the year.

I admit, sales with my recent passion for lemons I went a little crazy with the lemon zest and juice. I think the extra lemon was a fine addition. For the glaze I started to reach for the powdered sugar questioning if there was a typo. I went ahead and used granulated sugar and am so glad I did not foul it up with powdered sugar. Once cooled the glaze created a lemony crystal shell that is oh so delightful. I understand why white sugar was chosen over powered. This cake is the perfect conclusion to a dinner party or holiday meal. The lemon is refreshing. The cake light and comforting. Do be careful when inverting the cake onto the wire rack. When the cake is warm it is crumbly and could possibly tear away from the pan. I had minimal damage using a nonstick pan and olive oil spray. Make sure to spray the pan really well. One reviewer suggested using a baking dish and spreading the glaze on top rather than turning the cake out.

Source: Woman’s Day
2 1⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
1⁄2 cup yellow cornmeal
2 tsp baking powder
1⁄2 tsp each baking soda and salt
2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, prostate softened
1 3⁄4 cups sugar
1 Tbsp grated lemon zest
1⁄4 cup lemon juice
4 large eggs
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt, stirred to loosen

Sugar Glaze
1 cup sugar
1⁄3 cup lemon juice

Heat oven to 325°F. You’ll need a 10-cup decorative tube pan or a 12-cup Bundt pan coated with baking spray. In medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder and soda, and salt.

2. In a large bowl beat butter, sugar, lemon zest and juice with mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time until blended. With mixer on low, alternately beat in flour mixture and buttermilk until batter is smooth. Scrape into prepared pan; level top with spatula.

3. Bake 55 to 65 minutes until a wooden pick inserted in cake comes out clean. Cool cake in pan on wire rack 5 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, make the sugar glaze: Whisk glaze ingredients in a small bowl just until combined (sugar will not be totally dissolved). Invert cake from pan onto rack; place rack over a baking sheet. Brush glaze all over hot cake until absorbed (sugar crystals will be evident). Cool completely. Transfer cake to a serving plate and cover. Let cake rest several hours, or overnight, before serving. Store cake covered at room temperature up to 4 days. Cut into thin slices to serve.

Tip: Use lime zest and juice for a zesty alternative.
There is a little hole-in-the-wall cafe in Modesto California call The Brighter Side. It is only open for lunch and usually crowed but so worth the wait. Once I manged to find the entrance I opted for a chef salad with, ampoule my favorite splurge, this blue cheese dressing (no dieting here). The salad consisted of a bed of lettuce, a few slices of beets, a sprinkle of garbanzo beans, a cucumber or two, shredded deli turkey slices, tomato wedges and cheese. There are days I crave this salad. I have tried to replicate it at home without success. It is just not the same. My mother-n-law always comments that when someone else makes a meal it tastes so much better. She has a point. I think of my dad and his feeble attempt to successfully recreate a subway sandwich. He would throw his hands up and exclaim how he bought all the same ingredients so why doesn’t his sandwich taste like Subway’s? I am going to side with Nadine and say it tastes better when someone else makes it. I will also inject something my niece Jennifer passed on from culinary school. Restaurants use lots of butter and sugar. Moreover I recently read an article that claimed there are healthier choices than chick peas and beets.

We do not have to worry about butter or the lack of fortified vitamins and minerals here. This salad is packed with a supersized amount of cancer fighting vitamins and it tastes like someone else made it. I made a few changes mostly because I knew the kids were not going to eat lettuce laden with balsamic vinaigrette without a fight. Instead I threw all the veggies in a bowl and served the cheese and dressing on the side. I also left the broccoli raw.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 large ripe tomato, cut into bite sized pieces
1 small red onion, thinly sliced
1 cup thinly sliced red bell pepper
1/3 cup balsamic vinaigrette
1 pkg (16 oz) cheese tortellini
4 cups broccoli florets
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
1 bag (5 oz) spring lettuce mixture
1 cup (4 oz) smoked or regular mozzarella, cut into small cubes

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Meanwhile combine tomato, onion, pepper and dressing in a large bowl. Leave at room temperature.

Add tortellini to boiling water, cook as package directs, adding broccoli to pot 5 minutes before tortellini is done. Drain, rinse under cold water. Add to tomato mixture; add basil and toss to mix.

Arrange 1 cup lettuce, top with tortellini mixture and mozzarella.

Balsamic Vinaigrette
Source: Emeril
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
2 tsp dark brown sugar, optional*
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3/4 cup olive oil

Beat the vinegar in a bowl with the optional sugar, garlic, salt and pepper until sugar and salt dissolves. Then beat in the oil by droplets, whisking constantly. (Or place all the ingredients in a screw-top jar and shake to combine.) Taste and adjust the seasonings. If not using dressing right away, cover and refrigerate, whisking or shaking again before use.

*If using a good quality balsamic vinegar you should not need the sugar, but if using a lesser quality you might want the sugar to round out the dressing.

apple Pie

One day this past spring, this on the way back to the car after picking Mason up from school, information pills he stopped to admire a great redwood tree standing in a neighboring yard. “Hey, search that looks like the tree in the book my teacher read today!” I could tell Mason had a great day at school because he actually remembered what he learned. He continued to tell me about how trees, eggs and frogs grow.

When we got home Mason asked if I would bake him an apple pie. A couple of weeks prior he requested a blueberry pie inspired by Pig on Word World who loves to bake blueberry pie. Now here was another request but for an apple pie. I surprised myself by successfully baking the blueberry pie but pastries make me nervous so it took me quite a while to get up the nerve to try it again. I have gone through several failures to get to this recipe of apple pie.

I have come to understand when making crusts for delicate pastries such as pie crust the ingredients must be cold. When I made the blueberry pie I used frozen butter. By the time I was done cutting the butter into cubes it was the perfect temperature as if I just pulled it out of the refrigerator. However in subsequent baking attempts my pastry cutter broke. I have not replaced it for I find I enjoy working the butter in with my fingers. Consequently you will notice the recipe will direct you to use chilled butter (not frozen) and return the crust to the refrigerator until ready to use. The reasoning is the cold butter in the crust helps produce a flakier moist tastier crust. To cut in the butter use a food processor, pastry cutter or your fingers. Always cut butter into small cubes before adding butter to the flour mixture.

Let’s talk apples now. Granny Smith is the apple of choice. It keeps its shape and gives the apple pie that tart flavor. You can make the pie using just Granny Smith apples or a combination of Granny Smith and the following: Braeburn, Rome, Jonathan, Winesap, Empire, Fuji, Pink Lady and McIntosh. I like to use Ganny Smith and Braeburn. The Breaburn is sweet and is a nice compliment to the sour Granny Smith.
Apples used in apple pie may be chopped into 1/2 inch pieces or sliced thinly or thickly.

Apple Pie A-la Mode

Flaky Crust:
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup chilled shortening
1/4 cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
4-6 tbsp ice-cold water

Fill a small cup with ice cubes and water. Let sit.

Whisk flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter with a pastry blender or rub in with fingers, until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Do not mix too much; a few pieces of butter are ok. Sprinkle with ice water, a tablespoon at a time. Stir with a fork to moisten. Gather dough into a ball. Divide in half. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Filling:
4-5 medium-large baking apples
3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
3/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tbsp butter
Heavy Cream
Sugar

Peel and core the apples and cut into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Combine the sugar, flour, cinnamon and allspice; toss mixture with apples. Let sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile roll out bottom crust. Drape over a pie plate smoothing the bottom and sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Pour apples and juice into a strainer set over a sauce pan. Let drain for 15 minutes (should have at least 1/2 cup).

Add two tablespoons butter to the pot with the apple juice. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until liquid has reduced slightly and mixture is syrupy and lightly caramelized; about 3-5 minutes

Roll out top crust. Remove pie plate with bottom crust from refrigerator. Spoon apples into the crust lined pie plate. Pour syrup over apples.

Drape top crust over apples. Trim edges to 1-inch below rim of pie plate. Tuck the edges under and leave as is or flute using knuckles. Cut slits in the top to vent. Brush with heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover edges with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake 25-30 minutes until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly.

Variations:
Add 1/4 cup raisins to filling.
Jill Fehrenbacher is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Inhabitat.com; a weblog devoted to tracking sustainable living trends in design innovation. Inhabitat.com’s philosophy considers not only design, store but also the materials used, practices, function and purpose. They are somewhat frustrated with the growing hype on “Green Design”. Simply stating “good design is not about color, style or trends – but instead about thoughtfully considering the user, the experience, the social context and the impact of an object on the surrounding environment.” “No design can be considered good design unless it at least attempts to address some of these concerns.”

In the summer of 2008 Inhabitots.com was born. Jill was pregnant anxiously awaiting the arrival of her first baby. For many, the birth of their first child marks a turning point and often times an urge to step back, slow down and most recently ‘go green’ by way of housing the use of organic products and food. Committed to the belief “that becoming a parent doesn’t have to mean sacrificing style or ideals”, Jill launched her campaign in “sustainable design for the next generation“. Inhabitots is a supplement website created for children and parents who are interested in sustainable modern design for kids.

The Traveling Snack Bag

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

Bacon Wrapped Chicken

Several years ago, approved a group of moms started a monthly Bunko night. There were 12 of us with alternates in case one of us could not make it. Each member had to play hostess to a game night. She would provide the house, the meal, dessert and the prizes. Every month, we contributed $5.00 to the next month’s hostess to cover the cost for prizes. Everyone walked away a winner. That might be the most wins with a $15.00 prize to a complimentary $6.00 prize. The food was great, but the company was the best part. Being all moms, it was nice to let loose once in a while.

One month, my friend Lindsey surprised us all with this simple, yet elegant dish served with Parmesan Garlic Asparagus and Boiled Red Potatoes. I tracked the recipe down only to discover it belonged to my friend Cathy’s grandmother. She is also the woman who gave us the caramel recipe and Easy Crock Pot Chicken. Bacon wrapped chicken quickly became a Valentine’s Day tradition in our home. The meal is finished off with a rich chocolaty dessert of Molten Lava Cakes and vanilla ice cream.

6 chicken breasts (you can use regular chicken breasts and fillet them and pound them flat or buy the thin cut chicken breast. I still had to pound the thin cutlets. You want to be able to roll them up nicely)
Butter, softened
1-2 containers of chive and onion cream cheese
Salt and Pepper
6 bacon strips
Toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350.

Dot or spread each thinned chicken breast with a pad of butter. (A pad of butter is like half a tablespoon). Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Spread 1-2 tbsp of Onion/Chives Cream Cheese. Roll up. Wrap with a slice of bacon. Pin with toothpick.

Bake 350 for 20-30 minutes, or until juice runs clear. Put under the broiler for 5 minutes to crisp the bacon.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

Bacon Wrapped Chicken

Several years ago, approved a group of moms started a monthly Bunko night. There were 12 of us with alternates in case one of us could not make it. Each member had to play hostess to a game night. She would provide the house, the meal, dessert and the prizes. Every month, we contributed $5.00 to the next month’s hostess to cover the cost for prizes. Everyone walked away a winner. That might be the most wins with a $15.00 prize to a complimentary $6.00 prize. The food was great, but the company was the best part. Being all moms, it was nice to let loose once in a while.

One month, my friend Lindsey surprised us all with this simple, yet elegant dish served with Parmesan Garlic Asparagus and Boiled Red Potatoes. I tracked the recipe down only to discover it belonged to my friend Cathy’s grandmother. She is also the woman who gave us the caramel recipe and Easy Crock Pot Chicken. Bacon wrapped chicken quickly became a Valentine’s Day tradition in our home. The meal is finished off with a rich chocolaty dessert of Molten Lava Cakes and vanilla ice cream.

6 chicken breasts (you can use regular chicken breasts and fillet them and pound them flat or buy the thin cut chicken breast. I still had to pound the thin cutlets. You want to be able to roll them up nicely)
Butter, softened
1-2 containers of chive and onion cream cheese
Salt and Pepper
6 bacon strips
Toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350.

Dot or spread each thinned chicken breast with a pad of butter. (A pad of butter is like half a tablespoon). Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Spread 1-2 tbsp of Onion/Chives Cream Cheese. Roll up. Wrap with a slice of bacon. Pin with toothpick.

Bake 350 for 20-30 minutes, or until juice runs clear. Put under the broiler for 5 minutes to crisp the bacon.
I did it. I covered my chair cushions with clear vinyl from the fabric store. I know for years it was a decor no-no. I thought so, malady until I saw a picture in “Traditional Home”. If Clinton and Stacy from “What not to Wear” were here, drug I know they would say, “Just because it is in a magazine, does not mean you should do it.”

My sister-n-law, Natalie, gave us her slightly used table and chairs, all from Ikea. What I love most about the chairs, are the seat cushions. The fabric is actually a cover. I did not know that until the first time I removed the cushions from the chair to measure for replacement material. I threw the covers in the wash instead of buying new ones. They have been spilled on, stained, and bleached until there is no hope left.

The chairs in the magazine looked fabulous. Originally, we looked at other styles of vinyl, but I was not satisfied with the selections available. I found some decent upholstery material on sale for a dollar and decided, if it is going to last, I would have to cover it with the clear vinyl. It is not like I went and covered my living room couches and chairs. Most important of all, they are kid proof. I giggle every time I swipe the rag across the chair seat. Cleaning is a cinch. No more scrubbing. No more bleaching.

Scout out fabric discount stores, yard sales and thrift stores for deals on fabric. Belive it or not, I used to find beautiful fabric at Walmart. When I decorated our first house, I found amazing deals at a $2.00 fabric store. Material that regularly costs between $15 – $20, was $1.00 – $10. Other tools may include a pair of scissors, a staple gun with staples and 1 1/2 inch foam. WikiHow has a step by step tutorial on how to reupholster a dining chair.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

Bacon Wrapped Chicken

Several years ago, approved a group of moms started a monthly Bunko night. There were 12 of us with alternates in case one of us could not make it. Each member had to play hostess to a game night. She would provide the house, the meal, dessert and the prizes. Every month, we contributed $5.00 to the next month’s hostess to cover the cost for prizes. Everyone walked away a winner. That might be the most wins with a $15.00 prize to a complimentary $6.00 prize. The food was great, but the company was the best part. Being all moms, it was nice to let loose once in a while.

One month, my friend Lindsey surprised us all with this simple, yet elegant dish served with Parmesan Garlic Asparagus and Boiled Red Potatoes. I tracked the recipe down only to discover it belonged to my friend Cathy’s grandmother. She is also the woman who gave us the caramel recipe and Easy Crock Pot Chicken. Bacon wrapped chicken quickly became a Valentine’s Day tradition in our home. The meal is finished off with a rich chocolaty dessert of Molten Lava Cakes and vanilla ice cream.

6 chicken breasts (you can use regular chicken breasts and fillet them and pound them flat or buy the thin cut chicken breast. I still had to pound the thin cutlets. You want to be able to roll them up nicely)
Butter, softened
1-2 containers of chive and onion cream cheese
Salt and Pepper
6 bacon strips
Toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350.

Dot or spread each thinned chicken breast with a pad of butter. (A pad of butter is like half a tablespoon). Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Spread 1-2 tbsp of Onion/Chives Cream Cheese. Roll up. Wrap with a slice of bacon. Pin with toothpick.

Bake 350 for 20-30 minutes, or until juice runs clear. Put under the broiler for 5 minutes to crisp the bacon.
I did it. I covered my chair cushions with clear vinyl from the fabric store. I know for years it was a decor no-no. I thought so, malady until I saw a picture in “Traditional Home”. If Clinton and Stacy from “What not to Wear” were here, drug I know they would say, “Just because it is in a magazine, does not mean you should do it.”

My sister-n-law, Natalie, gave us her slightly used table and chairs, all from Ikea. What I love most about the chairs, are the seat cushions. The fabric is actually a cover. I did not know that until the first time I removed the cushions from the chair to measure for replacement material. I threw the covers in the wash instead of buying new ones. They have been spilled on, stained, and bleached until there is no hope left.

The chairs in the magazine looked fabulous. Originally, we looked at other styles of vinyl, but I was not satisfied with the selections available. I found some decent upholstery material on sale for a dollar and decided, if it is going to last, I would have to cover it with the clear vinyl. It is not like I went and covered my living room couches and chairs. Most important of all, they are kid proof. I giggle every time I swipe the rag across the chair seat. Cleaning is a cinch. No more scrubbing. No more bleaching.

Scout out fabric discount stores, yard sales and thrift stores for deals on fabric. Belive it or not, I used to find beautiful fabric at Walmart. When I decorated our first house, I found amazing deals at a $2.00 fabric store. Material that regularly costs between $15 – $20, was $1.00 – $10. Other tools may include a pair of scissors, a staple gun with staples and 1 1/2 inch foam. WikiHow has a step by step tutorial on how to reupholster a dining chair.

Quesadillas or “Cheesers”, approved as Stephen’s family calls them, try are a regular staple at our house. They are quick and versatile. They can be made with just cheese or chicken and cheese, thumb tuna and cheese; you get the picture.

This is one of my favorite ways to spice up chicken quesadillas. I got the idea from a friend of mine, Sara Bascom. Her neighbor taught her how to make quesadillas using chicken and salsa. When I tried it at home, it was a failure. Sometimes, things just taste better when someone else makes them. I did a little tinkering and came up with this recipe for chicken quesadillas. Definitely play around with the ingredients to suit your own tastes.

Flour tortillas- two per quesadilla
Shredded cheese- such as cheddar or cheddar and Monterrey jack, 3-4 tbsp per quesadilla
1/2 salsa
2 cans chicken- you can also use cooked chicken breast, shredded. Gauge 3-4 servings per chicken breast
2 tbsp fresh cilantro
1 tsp lime juice
salt and pepper, to taste
1/4 tsp cumin

Mix the shredded chicken, salsa, cilantro, lime juice, salt and pepper and cumin. Lay one tortilla on the griddle. Spread some of the mixture on a tortilla. Sprinkle with cheese. Cover with another tortilla. Cook on both sides until crisp and browned. Cut into wedges and serve.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

Bacon Wrapped Chicken

Several years ago, approved a group of moms started a monthly Bunko night. There were 12 of us with alternates in case one of us could not make it. Each member had to play hostess to a game night. She would provide the house, the meal, dessert and the prizes. Every month, we contributed $5.00 to the next month’s hostess to cover the cost for prizes. Everyone walked away a winner. That might be the most wins with a $15.00 prize to a complimentary $6.00 prize. The food was great, but the company was the best part. Being all moms, it was nice to let loose once in a while.

One month, my friend Lindsey surprised us all with this simple, yet elegant dish served with Parmesan Garlic Asparagus and Boiled Red Potatoes. I tracked the recipe down only to discover it belonged to my friend Cathy’s grandmother. She is also the woman who gave us the caramel recipe and Easy Crock Pot Chicken. Bacon wrapped chicken quickly became a Valentine’s Day tradition in our home. The meal is finished off with a rich chocolaty dessert of Molten Lava Cakes and vanilla ice cream.

6 chicken breasts (you can use regular chicken breasts and fillet them and pound them flat or buy the thin cut chicken breast. I still had to pound the thin cutlets. You want to be able to roll them up nicely)
Butter, softened
1-2 containers of chive and onion cream cheese
Salt and Pepper
6 bacon strips
Toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350.

Dot or spread each thinned chicken breast with a pad of butter. (A pad of butter is like half a tablespoon). Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Spread 1-2 tbsp of Onion/Chives Cream Cheese. Roll up. Wrap with a slice of bacon. Pin with toothpick.

Bake 350 for 20-30 minutes, or until juice runs clear. Put under the broiler for 5 minutes to crisp the bacon.
I did it. I covered my chair cushions with clear vinyl from the fabric store. I know for years it was a decor no-no. I thought so, malady until I saw a picture in “Traditional Home”. If Clinton and Stacy from “What not to Wear” were here, drug I know they would say, “Just because it is in a magazine, does not mean you should do it.”

My sister-n-law, Natalie, gave us her slightly used table and chairs, all from Ikea. What I love most about the chairs, are the seat cushions. The fabric is actually a cover. I did not know that until the first time I removed the cushions from the chair to measure for replacement material. I threw the covers in the wash instead of buying new ones. They have been spilled on, stained, and bleached until there is no hope left.

The chairs in the magazine looked fabulous. Originally, we looked at other styles of vinyl, but I was not satisfied with the selections available. I found some decent upholstery material on sale for a dollar and decided, if it is going to last, I would have to cover it with the clear vinyl. It is not like I went and covered my living room couches and chairs. Most important of all, they are kid proof. I giggle every time I swipe the rag across the chair seat. Cleaning is a cinch. No more scrubbing. No more bleaching.

Scout out fabric discount stores, yard sales and thrift stores for deals on fabric. Belive it or not, I used to find beautiful fabric at Walmart. When I decorated our first house, I found amazing deals at a $2.00 fabric store. Material that regularly costs between $15 – $20, was $1.00 – $10. Other tools may include a pair of scissors, a staple gun with staples and 1 1/2 inch foam. WikiHow has a step by step tutorial on how to reupholster a dining chair.

Quesadillas or “Cheesers”, approved as Stephen’s family calls them, try are a regular staple at our house. They are quick and versatile. They can be made with just cheese or chicken and cheese, thumb tuna and cheese; you get the picture.

This is one of my favorite ways to spice up chicken quesadillas. I got the idea from a friend of mine, Sara Bascom. Her neighbor taught her how to make quesadillas using chicken and salsa. When I tried it at home, it was a failure. Sometimes, things just taste better when someone else makes them. I did a little tinkering and came up with this recipe for chicken quesadillas. Definitely play around with the ingredients to suit your own tastes.

Flour tortillas- two per quesadilla
Shredded cheese- such as cheddar or cheddar and Monterrey jack, 3-4 tbsp per quesadilla
1/2 salsa
2 cans chicken- you can also use cooked chicken breast, shredded. Gauge 3-4 servings per chicken breast
2 tbsp fresh cilantro
1 tsp lime juice
salt and pepper, to taste
1/4 tsp cumin

Mix the shredded chicken, salsa, cilantro, lime juice, salt and pepper and cumin. Lay one tortilla on the griddle. Spread some of the mixture on a tortilla. Sprinkle with cheese. Cover with another tortilla. Cook on both sides until crisp and browned. Cut into wedges and serve.

I enjoy making my own croutons, visit this site because they have more flavor than the store-bought kind. It is also another way of using up day-old bread or the crust cut off of the kids sandwiches. I changed the original recipe up a bit mostly because I tend not to buy specialty items unless I have too. Since it was just us I swapped the french bread with whole wheat, sale X-ed the tomatoes (we did not have any) and dressing, shop substituted feta for the blue cheese and used olive oil instead of the spray.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 (12-oz) Sirloin steak, 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick
1/2 (1 pound) loaf French bread, split
Garlic oil spray
Salt and pepper
2 cups wedge ripe tomatoes
2 bags (6 oz) baby spinach trio (spinach, arugula and carrots)
1/2 cup bottled olive oil and vinegar dressing
1/2 cup sliced onion
1/2 crumbled blue cheese

Heat outdoor grill or stovetop ridged grill pan. Coat steak and cut surfaces of bread with garlic spray; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill steak, turning once, 6 minutes, or until an instant-read thermometer inserted from side to middle registers 155°F. Remove to a cutting board, cover loosely with foil and let rest. (Temperature of steak will continue to rise to 160°F for medium doneness.)

Meanwhile, grill bread, cut sides down, 2 minutes, or until lightly toasted. Cut bread in chunks; thinly slice steak. Combine in a bowl with remaining ingredients; toss to mix.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

Bacon Wrapped Chicken

Several years ago, approved a group of moms started a monthly Bunko night. There were 12 of us with alternates in case one of us could not make it. Each member had to play hostess to a game night. She would provide the house, the meal, dessert and the prizes. Every month, we contributed $5.00 to the next month’s hostess to cover the cost for prizes. Everyone walked away a winner. That might be the most wins with a $15.00 prize to a complimentary $6.00 prize. The food was great, but the company was the best part. Being all moms, it was nice to let loose once in a while.

One month, my friend Lindsey surprised us all with this simple, yet elegant dish served with Parmesan Garlic Asparagus and Boiled Red Potatoes. I tracked the recipe down only to discover it belonged to my friend Cathy’s grandmother. She is also the woman who gave us the caramel recipe and Easy Crock Pot Chicken. Bacon wrapped chicken quickly became a Valentine’s Day tradition in our home. The meal is finished off with a rich chocolaty dessert of Molten Lava Cakes and vanilla ice cream.

6 chicken breasts (you can use regular chicken breasts and fillet them and pound them flat or buy the thin cut chicken breast. I still had to pound the thin cutlets. You want to be able to roll them up nicely)
Butter, softened
1-2 containers of chive and onion cream cheese
Salt and Pepper
6 bacon strips
Toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350.

Dot or spread each thinned chicken breast with a pad of butter. (A pad of butter is like half a tablespoon). Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Spread 1-2 tbsp of Onion/Chives Cream Cheese. Roll up. Wrap with a slice of bacon. Pin with toothpick.

Bake 350 for 20-30 minutes, or until juice runs clear. Put under the broiler for 5 minutes to crisp the bacon.
I did it. I covered my chair cushions with clear vinyl from the fabric store. I know for years it was a decor no-no. I thought so, malady until I saw a picture in “Traditional Home”. If Clinton and Stacy from “What not to Wear” were here, drug I know they would say, “Just because it is in a magazine, does not mean you should do it.”

My sister-n-law, Natalie, gave us her slightly used table and chairs, all from Ikea. What I love most about the chairs, are the seat cushions. The fabric is actually a cover. I did not know that until the first time I removed the cushions from the chair to measure for replacement material. I threw the covers in the wash instead of buying new ones. They have been spilled on, stained, and bleached until there is no hope left.

The chairs in the magazine looked fabulous. Originally, we looked at other styles of vinyl, but I was not satisfied with the selections available. I found some decent upholstery material on sale for a dollar and decided, if it is going to last, I would have to cover it with the clear vinyl. It is not like I went and covered my living room couches and chairs. Most important of all, they are kid proof. I giggle every time I swipe the rag across the chair seat. Cleaning is a cinch. No more scrubbing. No more bleaching.

Scout out fabric discount stores, yard sales and thrift stores for deals on fabric. Belive it or not, I used to find beautiful fabric at Walmart. When I decorated our first house, I found amazing deals at a $2.00 fabric store. Material that regularly costs between $15 – $20, was $1.00 – $10. Other tools may include a pair of scissors, a staple gun with staples and 1 1/2 inch foam. WikiHow has a step by step tutorial on how to reupholster a dining chair.

Quesadillas or “Cheesers”, approved as Stephen’s family calls them, try are a regular staple at our house. They are quick and versatile. They can be made with just cheese or chicken and cheese, thumb tuna and cheese; you get the picture.

This is one of my favorite ways to spice up chicken quesadillas. I got the idea from a friend of mine, Sara Bascom. Her neighbor taught her how to make quesadillas using chicken and salsa. When I tried it at home, it was a failure. Sometimes, things just taste better when someone else makes them. I did a little tinkering and came up with this recipe for chicken quesadillas. Definitely play around with the ingredients to suit your own tastes.

Flour tortillas- two per quesadilla
Shredded cheese- such as cheddar or cheddar and Monterrey jack, 3-4 tbsp per quesadilla
1/2 salsa
2 cans chicken- you can also use cooked chicken breast, shredded. Gauge 3-4 servings per chicken breast
2 tbsp fresh cilantro
1 tsp lime juice
salt and pepper, to taste
1/4 tsp cumin

Mix the shredded chicken, salsa, cilantro, lime juice, salt and pepper and cumin. Lay one tortilla on the griddle. Spread some of the mixture on a tortilla. Sprinkle with cheese. Cover with another tortilla. Cook on both sides until crisp and browned. Cut into wedges and serve.

I enjoy making my own croutons, visit this site because they have more flavor than the store-bought kind. It is also another way of using up day-old bread or the crust cut off of the kids sandwiches. I changed the original recipe up a bit mostly because I tend not to buy specialty items unless I have too. Since it was just us I swapped the french bread with whole wheat, sale X-ed the tomatoes (we did not have any) and dressing, shop substituted feta for the blue cheese and used olive oil instead of the spray.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 (12-oz) Sirloin steak, 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick
1/2 (1 pound) loaf French bread, split
Garlic oil spray
Salt and pepper
2 cups wedge ripe tomatoes
2 bags (6 oz) baby spinach trio (spinach, arugula and carrots)
1/2 cup bottled olive oil and vinegar dressing
1/2 cup sliced onion
1/2 crumbled blue cheese

Heat outdoor grill or stovetop ridged grill pan. Coat steak and cut surfaces of bread with garlic spray; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill steak, turning once, 6 minutes, or until an instant-read thermometer inserted from side to middle registers 155°F. Remove to a cutting board, cover loosely with foil and let rest. (Temperature of steak will continue to rise to 160°F for medium doneness.)

Meanwhile, grill bread, cut sides down, 2 minutes, or until lightly toasted. Cut bread in chunks; thinly slice steak. Combine in a bowl with remaining ingredients; toss to mix.
Old Man Winter has been reluctant to leave. The minute I think we are heading into mild weather, visit this site bitter cold and shrill winds rip through causing me to re-think packing up the winter clothing. Last year, more about Old Man Winter toyed with us clear into June. Anyone remember it snowing in Idaho in June? I am definitely not complaining. The 115 degree heat of the valley is nothing I look forward to. However, order I am anxious to get my garden planted.

Mason’s preschool class learned about gardening last week. It was part of the topic “growing”. All week, they witnessed caterpillars creating chrysalis. I am as excited as the kids to see the appearance of butterflies soon. The sandbox was turned into a garden. They planted marigolds, some herbs, tomatoes and pumpkin seeds. I signed up to bring tomato plants and marigolds. While at the nursery, I took the opportunity to purchase a few plants for myself.

I was in the process of building the raised beds when I realized the biggest enemy to my garden at present are the kids. Adelin loves flowers so much I had to stand guard over the fruit trees when they were in bloom. Last year, they dug up the potted orange tree I planted so they could use the dirt. I decided last minute to move the plants to the front yard incorporating the them into the landscape. I took three half barrels and planted tomatoes, cilantro, marigolds and green peppers then set them on the front porch. I lined the walkway with strawberry plants then dug a bed for future planting. The tree in the front yard was finally saved from the encroaching grass.

I am still working on setting the stage in the backyard. The kids finally managed to demolish the wooden boat sandbox. As I was taking it apart, I saw the makings of a trellis for the raspberries and the perfect box for the kids garden. We took the egg cartons I was saving to make flowers with and used them to plant vegetable seeds in. I have even seen the use of cotton balls and peat moss to start seeds. The leftover seeds belong to the kids to plant in their garden.

The next step is to figure out how to keep the bugs away from the growing strawberries, wait for the seedlings to grow and the larger plants to produce.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

Bacon Wrapped Chicken

Several years ago, approved a group of moms started a monthly Bunko night. There were 12 of us with alternates in case one of us could not make it. Each member had to play hostess to a game night. She would provide the house, the meal, dessert and the prizes. Every month, we contributed $5.00 to the next month’s hostess to cover the cost for prizes. Everyone walked away a winner. That might be the most wins with a $15.00 prize to a complimentary $6.00 prize. The food was great, but the company was the best part. Being all moms, it was nice to let loose once in a while.

One month, my friend Lindsey surprised us all with this simple, yet elegant dish served with Parmesan Garlic Asparagus and Boiled Red Potatoes. I tracked the recipe down only to discover it belonged to my friend Cathy’s grandmother. She is also the woman who gave us the caramel recipe and Easy Crock Pot Chicken. Bacon wrapped chicken quickly became a Valentine’s Day tradition in our home. The meal is finished off with a rich chocolaty dessert of Molten Lava Cakes and vanilla ice cream.

6 chicken breasts (you can use regular chicken breasts and fillet them and pound them flat or buy the thin cut chicken breast. I still had to pound the thin cutlets. You want to be able to roll them up nicely)
Butter, softened
1-2 containers of chive and onion cream cheese
Salt and Pepper
6 bacon strips
Toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350.

Dot or spread each thinned chicken breast with a pad of butter. (A pad of butter is like half a tablespoon). Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Spread 1-2 tbsp of Onion/Chives Cream Cheese. Roll up. Wrap with a slice of bacon. Pin with toothpick.

Bake 350 for 20-30 minutes, or until juice runs clear. Put under the broiler for 5 minutes to crisp the bacon.
I did it. I covered my chair cushions with clear vinyl from the fabric store. I know for years it was a decor no-no. I thought so, malady until I saw a picture in “Traditional Home”. If Clinton and Stacy from “What not to Wear” were here, drug I know they would say, “Just because it is in a magazine, does not mean you should do it.”

My sister-n-law, Natalie, gave us her slightly used table and chairs, all from Ikea. What I love most about the chairs, are the seat cushions. The fabric is actually a cover. I did not know that until the first time I removed the cushions from the chair to measure for replacement material. I threw the covers in the wash instead of buying new ones. They have been spilled on, stained, and bleached until there is no hope left.

The chairs in the magazine looked fabulous. Originally, we looked at other styles of vinyl, but I was not satisfied with the selections available. I found some decent upholstery material on sale for a dollar and decided, if it is going to last, I would have to cover it with the clear vinyl. It is not like I went and covered my living room couches and chairs. Most important of all, they are kid proof. I giggle every time I swipe the rag across the chair seat. Cleaning is a cinch. No more scrubbing. No more bleaching.

Scout out fabric discount stores, yard sales and thrift stores for deals on fabric. Belive it or not, I used to find beautiful fabric at Walmart. When I decorated our first house, I found amazing deals at a $2.00 fabric store. Material that regularly costs between $15 – $20, was $1.00 – $10. Other tools may include a pair of scissors, a staple gun with staples and 1 1/2 inch foam. WikiHow has a step by step tutorial on how to reupholster a dining chair.

Quesadillas or “Cheesers”, approved as Stephen’s family calls them, try are a regular staple at our house. They are quick and versatile. They can be made with just cheese or chicken and cheese, thumb tuna and cheese; you get the picture.

This is one of my favorite ways to spice up chicken quesadillas. I got the idea from a friend of mine, Sara Bascom. Her neighbor taught her how to make quesadillas using chicken and salsa. When I tried it at home, it was a failure. Sometimes, things just taste better when someone else makes them. I did a little tinkering and came up with this recipe for chicken quesadillas. Definitely play around with the ingredients to suit your own tastes.

Flour tortillas- two per quesadilla
Shredded cheese- such as cheddar or cheddar and Monterrey jack, 3-4 tbsp per quesadilla
1/2 salsa
2 cans chicken- you can also use cooked chicken breast, shredded. Gauge 3-4 servings per chicken breast
2 tbsp fresh cilantro
1 tsp lime juice
salt and pepper, to taste
1/4 tsp cumin

Mix the shredded chicken, salsa, cilantro, lime juice, salt and pepper and cumin. Lay one tortilla on the griddle. Spread some of the mixture on a tortilla. Sprinkle with cheese. Cover with another tortilla. Cook on both sides until crisp and browned. Cut into wedges and serve.

I enjoy making my own croutons, visit this site because they have more flavor than the store-bought kind. It is also another way of using up day-old bread or the crust cut off of the kids sandwiches. I changed the original recipe up a bit mostly because I tend not to buy specialty items unless I have too. Since it was just us I swapped the french bread with whole wheat, sale X-ed the tomatoes (we did not have any) and dressing, shop substituted feta for the blue cheese and used olive oil instead of the spray.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 (12-oz) Sirloin steak, 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick
1/2 (1 pound) loaf French bread, split
Garlic oil spray
Salt and pepper
2 cups wedge ripe tomatoes
2 bags (6 oz) baby spinach trio (spinach, arugula and carrots)
1/2 cup bottled olive oil and vinegar dressing
1/2 cup sliced onion
1/2 crumbled blue cheese

Heat outdoor grill or stovetop ridged grill pan. Coat steak and cut surfaces of bread with garlic spray; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill steak, turning once, 6 minutes, or until an instant-read thermometer inserted from side to middle registers 155°F. Remove to a cutting board, cover loosely with foil and let rest. (Temperature of steak will continue to rise to 160°F for medium doneness.)

Meanwhile, grill bread, cut sides down, 2 minutes, or until lightly toasted. Cut bread in chunks; thinly slice steak. Combine in a bowl with remaining ingredients; toss to mix.
Old Man Winter has been reluctant to leave. The minute I think we are heading into mild weather, visit this site bitter cold and shrill winds rip through causing me to re-think packing up the winter clothing. Last year, more about Old Man Winter toyed with us clear into June. Anyone remember it snowing in Idaho in June? I am definitely not complaining. The 115 degree heat of the valley is nothing I look forward to. However, order I am anxious to get my garden planted.

Mason’s preschool class learned about gardening last week. It was part of the topic “growing”. All week, they witnessed caterpillars creating chrysalis. I am as excited as the kids to see the appearance of butterflies soon. The sandbox was turned into a garden. They planted marigolds, some herbs, tomatoes and pumpkin seeds. I signed up to bring tomato plants and marigolds. While at the nursery, I took the opportunity to purchase a few plants for myself.

I was in the process of building the raised beds when I realized the biggest enemy to my garden at present are the kids. Adelin loves flowers so much I had to stand guard over the fruit trees when they were in bloom. Last year, they dug up the potted orange tree I planted so they could use the dirt. I decided last minute to move the plants to the front yard incorporating the them into the landscape. I took three half barrels and planted tomatoes, cilantro, marigolds and green peppers then set them on the front porch. I lined the walkway with strawberry plants then dug a bed for future planting. The tree in the front yard was finally saved from the encroaching grass.

I am still working on setting the stage in the backyard. The kids finally managed to demolish the wooden boat sandbox. As I was taking it apart, I saw the makings of a trellis for the raspberries and the perfect box for the kids garden. We took the egg cartons I was saving to make flowers with and used them to plant vegetable seeds in. I have even seen the use of cotton balls and peat moss to start seeds. The leftover seeds belong to the kids to plant in their garden.

The next step is to figure out how to keep the bugs away from the growing strawberries, wait for the seedlings to grow and the larger plants to produce.

While we teach the kids the importance of sharing, treatment sometimes it is better to choose your battles. So it is with the case of the one-eyed woolly monster. My friend relayed a story once about her husband and cereal. Growing up, buy information pills it was first come, seek first serve. If you lagged behind, there was a pretty good chance you would not eat or find disappointment that your favorite cereal was all gone. To compensate, the boys would overeat on their share of cereal.

Some days, my kids behave like they are going to starve to death fighting over who holds the snack bag; or how much the other can have. They act like a one-eyed woolly monster; a term I got from Caillou. His mom used a similar term to describe his moody and selfish behavior. To remedy the problem, I give them each their own snack bag. When we travel, it is the same. They each get to pack a lunch and snacks. They enjoy being in charge of their own bag. Many times, they surprise us and offer to share their snacks with a hungry brother or sister who has gulped theirs all up.

I Love Cleaning My Kitchen Table Chairs

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

Bacon Wrapped Chicken

Several years ago, approved a group of moms started a monthly Bunko night. There were 12 of us with alternates in case one of us could not make it. Each member had to play hostess to a game night. She would provide the house, the meal, dessert and the prizes. Every month, we contributed $5.00 to the next month’s hostess to cover the cost for prizes. Everyone walked away a winner. That might be the most wins with a $15.00 prize to a complimentary $6.00 prize. The food was great, but the company was the best part. Being all moms, it was nice to let loose once in a while.

One month, my friend Lindsey surprised us all with this simple, yet elegant dish served with Parmesan Garlic Asparagus and Boiled Red Potatoes. I tracked the recipe down only to discover it belonged to my friend Cathy’s grandmother. She is also the woman who gave us the caramel recipe and Easy Crock Pot Chicken. Bacon wrapped chicken quickly became a Valentine’s Day tradition in our home. The meal is finished off with a rich chocolaty dessert of Molten Lava Cakes and vanilla ice cream.

6 chicken breasts (you can use regular chicken breasts and fillet them and pound them flat or buy the thin cut chicken breast. I still had to pound the thin cutlets. You want to be able to roll them up nicely)
Butter, softened
1-2 containers of chive and onion cream cheese
Salt and Pepper
6 bacon strips
Toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350.

Dot or spread each thinned chicken breast with a pad of butter. (A pad of butter is like half a tablespoon). Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Spread 1-2 tbsp of Onion/Chives Cream Cheese. Roll up. Wrap with a slice of bacon. Pin with toothpick.

Bake 350 for 20-30 minutes, or until juice runs clear. Put under the broiler for 5 minutes to crisp the bacon.

The weather was absolutely gorgeous today, physician a perfect day for a picnic. We ran around the backyard with Police Officer Mason in hot pursuit. Mason is a no-nonsense cop. Forget the ticket for speeding, order we had to go straight to jail on the trampoline, where I jumped until I had to leave to start dinner. As I cooked, the kids took advantage of the warm weather spraying themselves with the water hose. I did not have the heart to make them come inside and so decided we would have a picnic. A perfect meal for a perfect day.

I know this salad may seem a little weird, but it tastes phenomenal. It is super quick, healthy and goes well with seasoned pork chops and roasted potatoes.

Source: Rachael Ray
1 red onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 cup red seedless grapes, halved
4 oz baby spinach
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Heat oil in a skillet, cook red onion over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Stir in the grapes and 1/4 cup water and remove from heat. Stir the spinach, almonds and balsamic vinegar into the onion mixture, season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
My mom used to make our Easter basket and Christmas stocking treats. I loved going to the candy shop with her to pick out the chocolate wafers, troche caramel and licorice ropes. We each took turns making our own confections to give to teachers and friends.

I love this recipe for bird’s nest, treatment because it is so cute and simple and the ingredients are available anywhere. Wrap them up in cellophane bags and tie with a colorful spring ribbon.

Source: Unknown
Makes 10 nests
1 cup chocolate chips
1 1/2 cups shredded wheat or chow mein noodles
Candy that resembles bird eggs (jelly beans, approved small speckled eggs, peanut M&M’s)

Line muffin pan or small bowls with aluminum foil. Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler. Do not overheat. Add the shredded wheat or noodles to the melted chocolate. Place a few spoonfuls of the mixture in each muffin cup or small bowl, and form little nests by making an indentation with the back of the spoon. Arrange candy in the nests. Chill about 5 minutes or until set.
With the birth of our first baby, hospital my mom flew out to help me get settled in as a new mother. One day for lunch, order she surprised me with a glass of blueberries drizzled with lemonade dressing. It was a special moment, drugs because her mom made fruit cups with lemonade dressing for her when she was a girl.

Source: Grandmother Lois Jepson
3 tbsp undiluted concentrate
3 tbsp oil
3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp celery or poppy seeds

Mix concentrate and honey with a whisk. Slowly drizzle in oil Mix well. Add seeds. Serve over fruit salads.
A couple weeks ago, more about I took Mason and Adelin to a kids workshop where they learned to make dirt referring to the dessert known as, ampoule Dirt. The kids helped measure the milk and stir the pudding. Each child was given a cup and bag with oreos (to go with the chocolate pudding) or vanilla sandwich cookies (to go with the vanilla pudding) to smash. Then, they mixed their cookies with the pudding in the cup, added a few worms and stuck them in the refrigerator to set.

I went to the store yesterday to pick up a few things one of the items being eggs. Guess what I found in the front seat of my car this morning? Since we were without eggs, I opted to make pudding for the kids’ afternoon snack. As I was stirring the cook and serve boxed pudding, I thought about the Dirt the kids made and how much fun they had putting it together. While the pudding cooled, I put a variety of ingredients on the table to give the kids the opportunity to make their own fanciful pudding concoctions.

We used sliced strawberries, a sliced banana, coconut, chocolate chips, graham crackers, walnuts and nutella. I think the best part was piling on the toppings.

Bacon Wrapped Chicken

Several years ago, approved a group of moms started a monthly Bunko night. There were 12 of us with alternates in case one of us could not make it. Each member had to play hostess to a game night. She would provide the house, the meal, dessert and the prizes. Every month, we contributed $5.00 to the next month’s hostess to cover the cost for prizes. Everyone walked away a winner. That might be the most wins with a $15.00 prize to a complimentary $6.00 prize. The food was great, but the company was the best part. Being all moms, it was nice to let loose once in a while.

One month, my friend Lindsey surprised us all with this simple, yet elegant dish served with Parmesan Garlic Asparagus and Boiled Red Potatoes. I tracked the recipe down only to discover it belonged to my friend Cathy’s grandmother. She is also the woman who gave us the caramel recipe and Easy Crock Pot Chicken. Bacon wrapped chicken quickly became a Valentine’s Day tradition in our home. The meal is finished off with a rich chocolaty dessert of Molten Lava Cakes and vanilla ice cream.

6 chicken breasts (you can use regular chicken breasts and fillet them and pound them flat or buy the thin cut chicken breast. I still had to pound the thin cutlets. You want to be able to roll them up nicely)
Butter, softened
1-2 containers of chive and onion cream cheese
Salt and Pepper
6 bacon strips
Toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350.

Dot or spread each thinned chicken breast with a pad of butter. (A pad of butter is like half a tablespoon). Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Spread 1-2 tbsp of Onion/Chives Cream Cheese. Roll up. Wrap with a slice of bacon. Pin with toothpick.

Bake 350 for 20-30 minutes, or until juice runs clear. Put under the broiler for 5 minutes to crisp the bacon.
I did it. I covered my chair cushions with clear vinyl from the fabric store. I know for years it was a decor no-no. I thought so, malady until I saw a picture in “Traditional Home”. If Clinton and Stacy from “What not to Wear” were here, drug I know they would say, “Just because it is in a magazine, does not mean you should do it.”

My sister-n-law, Natalie, gave us her slightly used table and chairs, all from Ikea. What I love most about the chairs, are the seat cushions. The fabric is actually a cover. I did not know that until the first time I removed the cushions from the chair to measure for replacement material. I threw the covers in the wash instead of buying new ones. They have been spilled on, stained, and bleached until there is no hope left.

The chairs in the magazine looked fabulous. Originally, we looked at other styles of vinyl, but I was not satisfied with the selections available. I found some decent upholstery material on sale for a dollar and decided, if it is going to last, I would have to cover it with the clear vinyl. It is not like I went and covered my living room couches and chairs. Most important of all, they are kid proof. I giggle every time I swipe the rag across the chair seat. Cleaning is a cinch. No more scrubbing. No more bleaching.

Scout out fabric discount stores, yard sales and thrift stores for deals on fabric. Belive it or not, I used to find beautiful fabric at Walmart. When I decorated our first house, I found amazing deals at a $2.00 fabric store. Material that regularly costs between $15 – $20, was $1.00 – $10. Other tools may include a pair of scissors, a staple gun with staples and 1 1/2 inch foam. WikiHow has a step by step tutorial on how to reupholster a dining chair.

Neighborhood Yard Sale

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion
2-lb. chicken fryer, cialis 40mg cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion
2-lb. chicken fryer, cialis 40mg cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.

I do not remember where I found this recipe. I thought it was in a book called Sugar-Free Toddlers by Susan Watson.  When I went looking for the recipe to verify, generic I could not find it in the book. These little pancake sandwiches have been a favorite snack since Mason was a toddler.

When my kids started solids, I took the homemade baby food route using So Easy Baby Food So Easy Baby by Joan Ahlers and Cheryl Tallman the creators of Fresh Baby. The book teaches how to puree and at what age to introduce each food. With weight issues and health problems at the forefront of today’s society, I was extremely cautious about what I gave Mason to eat. Mason ate the healthiest of the three. When he turned 1, he had no clue what cake was or what he was supposed to do with it. Instead of cheddar fish or cheerios, Mason munched on softened fruit and veggies or snacks made from the Sugar-free Toddler cookbook. That all changed after Adelin joined us. We still try to limit the sugar by making our own snacks, discussing healthy choices, and eating in moderation. We must be doing something right. Adelin calls Craisins candy and they still think my banana shakes are ice cream.

Source: unknown
Warm Pancakes
Pumpkin Butter
Cream Cheese

Spread some cream cheese on one pancake. Spread another pancake with a little pumpkin butter then sandwich together.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion
2-lb. chicken fryer, cialis 40mg cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute