Chinese Eggrolls

It has never crossed my mind to make homemade eggrolls. I guess for me eggrolls are part of the experience of eating at a Chinese restaurant. When I saw this recipe just in time for Superbowl, order well it seemed like a good time for a little adventure.

Jaden from the Steamy Kitchen stresses only using frozen eggroll wrappers and NOT the kind in the produce section of the grocery store. Which is exactly the kind I picked up because I failed to read the recipe completely. They were still delicious. They were not a lighter crispy eggroll, web more like the bumpy doughy kind; but still delicious. I used half of the filling to make the eggrolls and the other half of the filling to make wontons for wonton soup. You can even use some of the unused wrappers to make fried cream cheese wontons.

Source: Steamy Kitchen

My Mother’s Famous Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe

50 Spring/Egg Roll Wrappers (about 2 packages), defrosted unopened at room temperature for 45 minutes or in the refrigerator overnight
1 tablespoon rice flour or cornstarch
¼ cup of cool water
Oil, for frying

Filling:
1 pound ground pork
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon rice flour or corn starch
freshly ground black pepper

2 to 3 cloves garlic, very finely minced
½ head of cabbage (about 11 ounces)
3 carrots, shredded
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
10 fresh shiitake mushrooms (or dried black mushrooms soaked overnight), stems discarded
1 tablespoon cooking oil
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sesame oil
Freshly ground black pepper

Filling: combine the ground pork, tablespoon soy sauce, teaspoon flour, and season with pepper. Marinate at least 10 minutes.

In the meantime, shred the cabbage and the carrots using your food processor or grater. Slice the mushrooms into very thin strips (or you could use your food processer and pulse a few times to get a fine dice.

Heat a wok or large saute pan over high heat. Add the cooking oil and swirl to coat. Add the pork and stir-fry until no longer pink, about 2-3 minutes. Turn heat to medium-low, push the meat to one side of the pan. Add the garlic, cabbage, carrots, ginger and the mushrooms and stir-fry for 1 minute, until the vegetables are softened. Add the rice wine, soy sauce, sesame oil and black pepper. Continue to stir-fry for another minute. Scoop out the filling to a baking sheet and spread out to cool. Prop up one end of the baking sheet so that it tilts and will allow all the liquid to drain to one end. Let cool for 15 minutes. Discard all of the accumulated juices. Use paper towels to blot the filling to rid of extra oil or juice.

IMPORTANT: Only use 1 heaping tablespoon of filling for each egg roll. These are slender egg rolls, the width of the egg roll should only be 1.25″ diameter.

Keep the rolled egg rolls in neat, single layer and covered with plastic wrap to prevent drying. If you want to stack the egg rolls, make sure you have layer of parchment paper in between the layers to prevent sticking. Keep wrappers also covered with plastic wrap to prevent drying. Refrigerate up to 4 hours until ready to fry or freeze.

To fry the egg rolls, fill a wok or pot with 2 inches of high-heat cooking oil. Heat the oil to 350°F (175°C) or until a cube of bread will fry to golden brown within 10 seconds. Gently slide in or lower the egg rolls, frying 4 to 6 at a time, turning occasionally until golden brown about 1½ minutes. Place on wire rack to drain and cool.

NOTE: To fry frozen egg rolls, do not defrost the egg rolls – just add them to the oil frozen, frying 4 to 6 at a time. Add an additional 1½ minutes to the frying time since they are frozen.

Korean Tuna Pancakes (Chamchijeon)

Photo: Property of Allrecipes

No Bake Cookies are a standard in practically every Grandmother’s recipe box. Rich chocolate mixed with gooey peanut butter and chewy oats.

Do not let the no bake part fool you into thinking this is a quick cookie to make. No bake means just that, rx no baking required. Consequently, buy the batter must be heated to a boil, approved then dropped by spoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool. It is best to wait until they have cooled a couple of hours before eating.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 pinch salt
3 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a saucepan over medium heat bring sugar, cocoa, butter, milk, and salt to a rapid rolling boil. Continue to boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Add oats, peanut butter, and vanilla; mix well.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool.

Helpful Tips:
— Under boiling the cookies they will not set properly.
— Over boiling produces dry crumbly cookies.

Variations:
— Extra-chocolaty Cookies: Top cookies with chocolate chips.
— Easter Nests: Spoon batter into greased muffin pan. Cool. Remove from pan. Fill with shredded coconut and jelly beans.

Photo: Property of Allrecipes

No Bake Cookies are a standard in practically every Grandmother’s recipe box. Rich chocolate mixed with gooey peanut butter and chewy oats.

Do not let the no bake part fool you into thinking this is a quick cookie to make. No bake means just that, rx no baking required. Consequently, buy the batter must be heated to a boil, approved then dropped by spoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool. It is best to wait until they have cooled a couple of hours before eating.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 pinch salt
3 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a saucepan over medium heat bring sugar, cocoa, butter, milk, and salt to a rapid rolling boil. Continue to boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Add oats, peanut butter, and vanilla; mix well.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool.

Helpful Tips:
— Under boiling the cookies they will not set properly.
— Over boiling produces dry crumbly cookies.

Variations:
— Extra-chocolaty Cookies: Top cookies with chocolate chips.
— Easter Nests: Spoon batter into greased muffin pan. Cool. Remove from pan. Fill with shredded coconut and jelly beans.

Photo: Property of Morgan Moore

Spring has finally arrived. I love being able to open the windows to air out the winter. Problem is we all have allergies making airing out the house impossible. On the days the pollen and mold count is too high to open the windows this home fragrance adds a pleasant clean aroma without the congestion.

Source: Morgan Moore

Fill a small stockpot about 2/3 full with water. Add 1 lemon, viagra sliced, dosage and a few sprigs of rosemary, and 1-2 teaspoons of vanilla. Simmer, adding water as needed.

Discard after second day.

Photo: Property of Allrecipes

No Bake Cookies are a standard in practically every Grandmother’s recipe box. Rich chocolate mixed with gooey peanut butter and chewy oats.

Do not let the no bake part fool you into thinking this is a quick cookie to make. No bake means just that, rx no baking required. Consequently, buy the batter must be heated to a boil, approved then dropped by spoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool. It is best to wait until they have cooled a couple of hours before eating.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 pinch salt
3 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a saucepan over medium heat bring sugar, cocoa, butter, milk, and salt to a rapid rolling boil. Continue to boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Add oats, peanut butter, and vanilla; mix well.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool.

Helpful Tips:
— Under boiling the cookies they will not set properly.
— Over boiling produces dry crumbly cookies.

Variations:
— Extra-chocolaty Cookies: Top cookies with chocolate chips.
— Easter Nests: Spoon batter into greased muffin pan. Cool. Remove from pan. Fill with shredded coconut and jelly beans.

Photo: Property of Morgan Moore

Spring has finally arrived. I love being able to open the windows to air out the winter. Problem is we all have allergies making airing out the house impossible. On the days the pollen and mold count is too high to open the windows this home fragrance adds a pleasant clean aroma without the congestion.

Source: Morgan Moore

Fill a small stockpot about 2/3 full with water. Add 1 lemon, viagra sliced, dosage and a few sprigs of rosemary, and 1-2 teaspoons of vanilla. Simmer, adding water as needed.

Discard after second day.

Photo: Property of Allrecipes

No Bake Cookies are a standard in practically every Grandmother’s recipe box. Rich chocolate mixed with gooey peanut butter and chewy oats.

Do not let the no bake part fool you into thinking this is a quick cookie to make. No bake means just that, abortion no baking required. Consequently, check the batter must be heated to a boil, buy information pills then dropped by spoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool. It is best to wait until they have cooled a couple of hours before eating.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 pinch salt
3 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a saucepan over medium heat bring sugar, cocoa, butter, milk, and salt to a rapid rolling boil. Continue to boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Add oats, peanut butter, and vanilla; mix well.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool.

Helpful Tips:
— Under boiling the cookies they will not set properly.
— Over boiling produces dry crumbly cookies.

Variations:
— Extra-chocolaty Cookies: Top cookies with chocolate chips.
— Easter Nests: Spoon batter into greased muffin pan. Cool. Remove from pan. Fill with shredded coconut and jelly beans.

Photo: Property of Allrecipes

No Bake Cookies are a standard in practically every Grandmother’s recipe box. Rich chocolate mixed with gooey peanut butter and chewy oats.

Do not let the no bake part fool you into thinking this is a quick cookie to make. No bake means just that, rx no baking required. Consequently, buy the batter must be heated to a boil, approved then dropped by spoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool. It is best to wait until they have cooled a couple of hours before eating.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 pinch salt
3 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a saucepan over medium heat bring sugar, cocoa, butter, milk, and salt to a rapid rolling boil. Continue to boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Add oats, peanut butter, and vanilla; mix well.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool.

Helpful Tips:
— Under boiling the cookies they will not set properly.
— Over boiling produces dry crumbly cookies.

Variations:
— Extra-chocolaty Cookies: Top cookies with chocolate chips.
— Easter Nests: Spoon batter into greased muffin pan. Cool. Remove from pan. Fill with shredded coconut and jelly beans.

Photo: Property of Morgan Moore

Spring has finally arrived. I love being able to open the windows to air out the winter. Problem is we all have allergies making airing out the house impossible. On the days the pollen and mold count is too high to open the windows this home fragrance adds a pleasant clean aroma without the congestion.

Source: Morgan Moore

Fill a small stockpot about 2/3 full with water. Add 1 lemon, viagra sliced, dosage and a few sprigs of rosemary, and 1-2 teaspoons of vanilla. Simmer, adding water as needed.

Discard after second day.

Photo: Property of Allrecipes

No Bake Cookies are a standard in practically every Grandmother’s recipe box. Rich chocolate mixed with gooey peanut butter and chewy oats.

Do not let the no bake part fool you into thinking this is a quick cookie to make. No bake means just that, abortion no baking required. Consequently, check the batter must be heated to a boil, buy information pills then dropped by spoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool. It is best to wait until they have cooled a couple of hours before eating.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 pinch salt
3 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a saucepan over medium heat bring sugar, cocoa, butter, milk, and salt to a rapid rolling boil. Continue to boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Add oats, peanut butter, and vanilla; mix well.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool.

Helpful Tips:
— Under boiling the cookies they will not set properly.
— Over boiling produces dry crumbly cookies.

Variations:
— Extra-chocolaty Cookies: Top cookies with chocolate chips.
— Easter Nests: Spoon batter into greased muffin pan. Cool. Remove from pan. Fill with shredded coconut and jelly beans.

Photo: Property of MarthaStewart.com

January and March were cold wet months here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, physician other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), and cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, website diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.

Photo: Property of Allrecipes

No Bake Cookies are a standard in practically every Grandmother’s recipe box. Rich chocolate mixed with gooey peanut butter and chewy oats.

Do not let the no bake part fool you into thinking this is a quick cookie to make. No bake means just that, rx no baking required. Consequently, buy the batter must be heated to a boil, approved then dropped by spoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool. It is best to wait until they have cooled a couple of hours before eating.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 pinch salt
3 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a saucepan over medium heat bring sugar, cocoa, butter, milk, and salt to a rapid rolling boil. Continue to boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Add oats, peanut butter, and vanilla; mix well.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool.

Helpful Tips:
— Under boiling the cookies they will not set properly.
— Over boiling produces dry crumbly cookies.

Variations:
— Extra-chocolaty Cookies: Top cookies with chocolate chips.
— Easter Nests: Spoon batter into greased muffin pan. Cool. Remove from pan. Fill with shredded coconut and jelly beans.

Photo: Property of Morgan Moore

Spring has finally arrived. I love being able to open the windows to air out the winter. Problem is we all have allergies making airing out the house impossible. On the days the pollen and mold count is too high to open the windows this home fragrance adds a pleasant clean aroma without the congestion.

Source: Morgan Moore

Fill a small stockpot about 2/3 full with water. Add 1 lemon, viagra sliced, dosage and a few sprigs of rosemary, and 1-2 teaspoons of vanilla. Simmer, adding water as needed.

Discard after second day.

Photo: Property of Allrecipes

No Bake Cookies are a standard in practically every Grandmother’s recipe box. Rich chocolate mixed with gooey peanut butter and chewy oats.

Do not let the no bake part fool you into thinking this is a quick cookie to make. No bake means just that, abortion no baking required. Consequently, check the batter must be heated to a boil, buy information pills then dropped by spoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool. It is best to wait until they have cooled a couple of hours before eating.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup milk
1 pinch salt
3 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a saucepan over medium heat bring sugar, cocoa, butter, milk, and salt to a rapid rolling boil. Continue to boil for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Add oats, peanut butter, and vanilla; mix well.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper to cool.

Helpful Tips:
— Under boiling the cookies they will not set properly.
— Over boiling produces dry crumbly cookies.

Variations:
— Extra-chocolaty Cookies: Top cookies with chocolate chips.
— Easter Nests: Spoon batter into greased muffin pan. Cool. Remove from pan. Fill with shredded coconut and jelly beans.

Photo: Property of MarthaStewart.com

January and March were cold wet months here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, physician other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), and cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, website diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.

Photo: From StillTasty.com website

Ever wonder if that package of ground beef is still good? How about the shelf life of oil and honey? Certainly if the product smells funny, sildenafil has mold or a funny texture toss it. For all other inquires check out StillTasty.com. It is the ultimate website devoted exclusively to the proper storage and shelf life of both store bought and homemade foods.

Lately I have been obsessing over South Korean cuisine. My interest began with the Korean series “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What captivated my interested the most was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The family members were picking up bits of food, no rx more about with their chopsticks, nurse stuff from various bowls in the center of the table, thumb and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical as they each loaded one another’s bowl with morsels they “just had to try”. There was so much excitement over the food with the belief that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. Moreover, it was the wisdom of the Grandmother who had insisted that the two feuding sides of the family join her for dinner once a week until they learned to tolerate one another. She counseled them saying, (English translation) “our friendships are built by this type of dinner.”

In that moment I was reminded that despite all the whining and frustration trying to make dinner and get everyone to the dinner table, there is a purpose. Thus, my interest was peaked to discover more about this far away place and the people who live there. I was curious what the dynamics of the family is like in South Korea.

The kids and I have enjoyed learning the language and the various customs of South Korean culture. They graciously accepted the Korean cuisine, thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, as long as they could use chop sticks.

I have not had fried tofu before; I mostly use tofu in soup. Yet, Korean tofu with spicy sauce is one of my favorite dishes by far. The sauce is very similar to a wasabi sauce in both flavor and heat. I reduce the red pepper to 1/2 teaspoon and it is still pretty spicy. For children you can eliminate the red pepper or greatly reduce the amount. I have even served the tofu with a small bowl of soy sauce for dipping.

Source: Maangchi
1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with a side of steamed rice.

Lately I have been obsessing over South Korean cuisine. My interest began with the Korean series “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What captivated my interested the most was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The family members were picking up bits of food, no rx more about with their chopsticks, nurse stuff from various bowls in the center of the table, thumb and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical as they each loaded one another’s bowl with morsels they “just had to try”. There was so much excitement over the food with the belief that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. Moreover, it was the wisdom of the Grandmother who had insisted that the two feuding sides of the family join her for dinner once a week until they learned to tolerate one another. She counseled them saying, (English translation) “our friendships are built by this type of dinner.”

In that moment I was reminded that despite all the whining and frustration trying to make dinner and get everyone to the dinner table, there is a purpose. Thus, my interest was peaked to discover more about this far away place and the people who live there. I was curious what the dynamics of the family is like in South Korea.

The kids and I have enjoyed learning the language and the various customs of South Korean culture. They graciously accepted the Korean cuisine, thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, as long as they could use chop sticks.

I have not had fried tofu before; I mostly use tofu in soup. Yet, Korean tofu with spicy sauce is one of my favorite dishes by far. The sauce is very similar to a wasabi sauce in both flavor and heat. I reduce the red pepper to 1/2 teaspoon and it is still pretty spicy. For children you can eliminate the red pepper or greatly reduce the amount. I have even served the tofu with a small bowl of soy sauce for dipping.

Source: Maangchi
1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with a side of steamed rice.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, ambulance I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is number one. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, advice senior, online president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be

In Korea, the surname (family name) is given first. First names are seldom used in addressing another because of the social hierarchy established by Confucianism. Addressing a person by title or position is most correct. These include ??? (sunsaengnim – teacher) or ?? (paksa – doctor). Individuals who have achieved this title are given high respect because highest respect is deserved for scholars in the Confucian tradition.

Lately I have been obsessing over South Korean cuisine. My interest began with the Korean series “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What captivated my interested the most was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The family members were picking up bits of food, no rx more about with their chopsticks, nurse stuff from various bowls in the center of the table, thumb and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical as they each loaded one another’s bowl with morsels they “just had to try”. There was so much excitement over the food with the belief that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. Moreover, it was the wisdom of the Grandmother who had insisted that the two feuding sides of the family join her for dinner once a week until they learned to tolerate one another. She counseled them saying, (English translation) “our friendships are built by this type of dinner.”

In that moment I was reminded that despite all the whining and frustration trying to make dinner and get everyone to the dinner table, there is a purpose. Thus, my interest was peaked to discover more about this far away place and the people who live there. I was curious what the dynamics of the family is like in South Korea.

The kids and I have enjoyed learning the language and the various customs of South Korean culture. They graciously accepted the Korean cuisine, thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, as long as they could use chop sticks.

I have not had fried tofu before; I mostly use tofu in soup. Yet, Korean tofu with spicy sauce is one of my favorite dishes by far. The sauce is very similar to a wasabi sauce in both flavor and heat. I reduce the red pepper to 1/2 teaspoon and it is still pretty spicy. For children you can eliminate the red pepper or greatly reduce the amount. I have even served the tofu with a small bowl of soy sauce for dipping.

Source: Maangchi
1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with a side of steamed rice.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, ambulance I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is number one. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, advice senior, online president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be

In Korea, the surname (family name) is given first. First names are seldom used in addressing another because of the social hierarchy established by Confucianism. Addressing a person by title or position is most correct. These include ??? (sunsaengnim – teacher) or ?? (paksa – doctor). Individuals who have achieved this title are given high respect because highest respect is deserved for scholars in the Confucian tradition.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, rx I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is most important. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, visit this site senior, sickness president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be considered informal and frowned upon. With permission you might use the term sister- Unni or brother- Oppa.

Lately I have been obsessing over South Korean cuisine. My interest began with the Korean series “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What captivated my interested the most was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The family members were picking up bits of food, no rx more about with their chopsticks, nurse stuff from various bowls in the center of the table, thumb and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical as they each loaded one another’s bowl with morsels they “just had to try”. There was so much excitement over the food with the belief that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. Moreover, it was the wisdom of the Grandmother who had insisted that the two feuding sides of the family join her for dinner once a week until they learned to tolerate one another. She counseled them saying, (English translation) “our friendships are built by this type of dinner.”

In that moment I was reminded that despite all the whining and frustration trying to make dinner and get everyone to the dinner table, there is a purpose. Thus, my interest was peaked to discover more about this far away place and the people who live there. I was curious what the dynamics of the family is like in South Korea.

The kids and I have enjoyed learning the language and the various customs of South Korean culture. They graciously accepted the Korean cuisine, thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, as long as they could use chop sticks.

I have not had fried tofu before; I mostly use tofu in soup. Yet, Korean tofu with spicy sauce is one of my favorite dishes by far. The sauce is very similar to a wasabi sauce in both flavor and heat. I reduce the red pepper to 1/2 teaspoon and it is still pretty spicy. For children you can eliminate the red pepper or greatly reduce the amount. I have even served the tofu with a small bowl of soy sauce for dipping.

Source: Maangchi
1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with a side of steamed rice.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, ambulance I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is number one. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, advice senior, online president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be

In Korea, the surname (family name) is given first. First names are seldom used in addressing another because of the social hierarchy established by Confucianism. Addressing a person by title or position is most correct. These include ??? (sunsaengnim – teacher) or ?? (paksa – doctor). Individuals who have achieved this title are given high respect because highest respect is deserved for scholars in the Confucian tradition.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, rx I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is most important. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, visit this site senior, sickness president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be considered informal and frowned upon. With permission you might use the term sister- Unni or brother- Oppa.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, order I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is most important. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, prescription senior, cheap president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be considered informal and frowned upon. With permission you might use the term uhn-nee to call an older friend who wants to be sisters. Or a female would call an older male with whom she is close to  Oppa.

Koreans shake hands and bow at the same time. The depth of the bow depends on the relative seniority of the two people.

Each person has his own bowl of rice, but helps himself to other foods directly from the serving dishes.

Lately I have been obsessing over South Korean cuisine. My interest began with the Korean series “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What captivated my interested the most was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The family members were picking up bits of food, no rx more about with their chopsticks, nurse stuff from various bowls in the center of the table, thumb and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical as they each loaded one another’s bowl with morsels they “just had to try”. There was so much excitement over the food with the belief that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. Moreover, it was the wisdom of the Grandmother who had insisted that the two feuding sides of the family join her for dinner once a week until they learned to tolerate one another. She counseled them saying, (English translation) “our friendships are built by this type of dinner.”

In that moment I was reminded that despite all the whining and frustration trying to make dinner and get everyone to the dinner table, there is a purpose. Thus, my interest was peaked to discover more about this far away place and the people who live there. I was curious what the dynamics of the family is like in South Korea.

The kids and I have enjoyed learning the language and the various customs of South Korean culture. They graciously accepted the Korean cuisine, thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, as long as they could use chop sticks.

I have not had fried tofu before; I mostly use tofu in soup. Yet, Korean tofu with spicy sauce is one of my favorite dishes by far. The sauce is very similar to a wasabi sauce in both flavor and heat. I reduce the red pepper to 1/2 teaspoon and it is still pretty spicy. For children you can eliminate the red pepper or greatly reduce the amount. I have even served the tofu with a small bowl of soy sauce for dipping.

Source: Maangchi
1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with a side of steamed rice.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, ambulance I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is number one. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, advice senior, online president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be

In Korea, the surname (family name) is given first. First names are seldom used in addressing another because of the social hierarchy established by Confucianism. Addressing a person by title or position is most correct. These include ??? (sunsaengnim – teacher) or ?? (paksa – doctor). Individuals who have achieved this title are given high respect because highest respect is deserved for scholars in the Confucian tradition.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, rx I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is most important. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, visit this site senior, sickness president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be considered informal and frowned upon. With permission you might use the term sister- Unni or brother- Oppa.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a Stay At Home Mom, order I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. Who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new foods from Korea. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything. During our meal I am able to share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as if you poor your own drink you will have bad luck. Take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is most important. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, prescription senior, cheap president or chairman. Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be considered informal and frowned upon. With permission you might use the term uhn-nee to call an older friend who wants to be sisters. Or a female would call an older male with whom she is close to  Oppa.

Koreans shake hands and bow at the same time. The depth of the bow depends on the relative seniority of the two people.

Each person has his own bowl of rice, but helps himself to other foods directly from the serving dishes.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a stay-at-home mom, abortion I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. Before Seoul I was researching Great Britain. So, drug who knows where I will end up next.

The kids have graciously accepted the new Korean cuisine. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything I have placed in front of them, so far. During our meal I share with them the language and many of the Korean customs. Such as it is bad luck to pour your own drink and always take your shoes off before entering ones home.

Respect is of utmost importance: Use their surname first. To call a person by their name would be considered informal and frowned upon. Always address a person by title or position including professor or doctor, senior (Sunbea), president or chairman. With permission a younger girl might use the term Uhn-nee (meaning older sister) to address a female a few years older than she. A young male could call a female he is comfortable with Noona (meaning sister). A female would call an older young male with whom she is close to Oppa or Sunbea (meaning senior).

During a meal each person has his own bowl of rice, but helps himself to other foods directly from the serving dishes.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. My interest in Korean culture all began with the Korean film “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What hooked me was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The characters were picking up bits of food, more about information pills with their chopsticks, ambulance from various bowls in the center of the table, this and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical. There was so much excitement over the flavor of the dishes. Most of all they believed that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. I was curious what

The kids have graciously accepted the Korean cuisine. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, so far.

1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with rice a side of steamed rice.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. My interest in Korean culture all began with the Korean film “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What hooked me was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The characters were picking up bits of food, more about information pills with their chopsticks, ambulance from various bowls in the center of the table, this and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical. There was so much excitement over the flavor of the dishes. Most of all they believed that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. I was curious what

The kids have graciously accepted the Korean cuisine. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, so far.

1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with rice a side of steamed rice.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a stay-at-home mom, search I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. My interest in Korean culture all began with the Korean film “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What hooked me was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The characters were picking up bits of food, advice with their chopsticks, site from various bowls lining the center of the table, and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical. There was so much excitement over the flavor of the dishes. Most of all they believed that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. This particular scene represented the concept of Dazzledish to perfection. A family gathered around a table, conversing, laughing and enjoying good food.

I wondered if this was commonplace in Korea. So thus my research be

The kids have graciously accepted the Korean cuisine. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, so far.

1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with rice a side of steamed rice.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. My interest in Korean culture all began with the Korean film “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What hooked me was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The characters were picking up bits of food, more about information pills with their chopsticks, ambulance from various bowls in the center of the table, this and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical. There was so much excitement over the flavor of the dishes. Most of all they believed that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. I was curious what

The kids have graciously accepted the Korean cuisine. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, so far.

1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with rice a side of steamed rice.
Lately I have been obsessing over Korean culture. As a stay-at-home mom, search I suppose it is my way of seeing the world. My interest in Korean culture all began with the Korean film “Protect the Boss” by Boseureul Jikyeora. It is a quirky film about girl who wants to achieve her dream job in a corporate office. Problem is she is lacking the secretarial skills and a degree from a prestigious college.

What hooked me was a dinner scene at the Chairman’s house. The characters were picking up bits of food, advice with their chopsticks, site from various bowls lining the center of the table, and placing it on each others plates. The conversation was somewhat comical. There was so much excitement over the flavor of the dishes. Most of all they believed that if they ate well they would have a happy healthy disposition. This particular scene represented the concept of Dazzledish to perfection. A family gathered around a table, conversing, laughing and enjoying good food.

I wondered if this was commonplace in Korea. So thus my research be

The kids have graciously accepted the Korean cuisine. As long as they can use chop sticks they are thrilled to try anything placed in front of them, so far.

1 half package Tofu (about 10 oz)
2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
1/4 to 1 teaspoon Hot Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon honey
1 Green Onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
Roasted Sesame Seeds (optional)

Slice the tofu into bite size pieces (¼ inch thick rectangles); about 10 pieces. Towel off each piece with a paper towel.

Heat a pan with 1 to 2 tbs of vegetable oil. Add the tofu and lower the heat. Cook over low heat about 5-7 minutes.

When the bottom of the tofu looks golden brown, turn it over and cook another 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked tofu to a serving plate.

Meanwhile make the sauce:
In a small bowl mix: minced garlic, green onion, hot pepper flakes, honey, soy sauce, and sesame oil.

To serve, spoon the sauce evenly over the tofu. Sprinkle with roasted sesame seeds just before serving. Serve with rice a side of steamed rice.

Lately we have been learning all we can about South Korean customs. Such as it is bad luck to pour your own drink and always take your shoes off before entering ones home. Respect is of utmost importance in South Korea. The formality of Confucianism dictates so. It is a belief in a code of honor that is viewed as old fashioned by newer generations.

Generally most Koreans are warm and giving. They live by the age old traditions that when an elder enters a room you stand up. On the bus you offer them your seat. If someone is in need you help them. When accepting a gift use both hands to take it. And always be sure to say, health  “gamsa hapnida.” (Thank you)

The relationship between people of seniority is just as important. In fact, physician when adults speak to one another they use a formal form of speech; unlike when talking to a child or how youth of the same age converse. When addressing a person they always use the surname first. To call an acquaintance by their name would be considered informal and is frowned upon. For example, the name Eun Sun (first name) Park (surname) would be spoken Park Eun Sun. When familiar or given permission you can drop the surname. Interestingly enough even a slight inflection in the pronunciation of a name (similar to a nickname) is seen as informal.

When addressing a person of status always use their title or position first: including president, director, professor, doctor, Sunbea (senior at school). With permission a younger girl might use the term ‘Uhn-nee’ (meaning older sister) to address a female a few years older than she. A young male could call a female he is comfortable with ‘Noona’ (meaning sister). A female would call an older young male with whom she is close to ‘Oppa’.

Now on to the food! Maangchi’s tuna pancakes are amazing. My kids gobbled them all up. Do not let the word pancake confuse you. Jeon means pancake in Korean but it is basically a tuna cake. Like a crab cake. The onion and sesame oil are what what gives these little cakes flavor. I do not recommend omitting these ingredients as it would drastically change the taste.

Source: Maangchi
(Makes 6 small pancakes)
1 (5 oz) can of tuna
1/4 cup onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 egg
1 tablespoon flour
2 tablespoons canola oil

Strain out the liquid from a can of tuna and place it in a bowl.

Add onion, garlic, salt, pepper, egg, sesame oil, and flour to the tuna and mix it well.

Heat oil in up a pan until hot.

Scoop a spoonful of the tuna mixture with a spoon and place it on the heated pan. Press slightly and round the edges with the spoon.

When the bottom is cooked golden brown, turn it over and cook until both sides of the pancakes are golden brown. About 3-5 minutes total.
Transfer the cooked pancakes to a serving plate and serve with rice.

Sauce: Mix the following ingredients
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 tablespoon vinegar
left over onions

** Store leftovers in the refrigerator for up to two days. Reheat in the microwave or panfry.

Variations:
– Egg allergies: Egg can be omitted. No substitute needed.
– Gluten free: replace flour with corn flour.

Barbecue Chicken Pizza

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.

Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, view tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, drugs mace, viagra order pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, find tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, more about mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, diagnosis skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, diagnosis skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, decease skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, information pills halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, diagnosis skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, decease skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, information pills halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.


When I was little I loved Pizza Hut pizza. The crust was so thick and crunchy on the outside and so soft

and warm on the inside. Each slice had the perfect ratio of sauce to cheese. Of course if it was not a special occasion we usually ate homemade or Little Caesars. I remember the first time I had Pizza Hut BBQ pizza was on a trip to Atlanta. The BBQ flavor was short lived. Besides I seemed to have been the only one who favored a non traditional slice of pie.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
For the crust:
2 tsp yeast
2 tsp sugar
1 1/2 cups warm water (105 to 110 degrees F)
1/2 cup olive oil
1 tsp salt
1 tsp Italian seasoning, what is ed optional
4 – 4 1/2 cups flour (can use 3 cups white flour and 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour)

Let yeast and sugar dissolve in warm water in a large mixing bowl for about 5 minutes. Add olive oil, doctor salt and optional Italian seasoning.

Slowly add the flour until completely combined and dough is no longer sticky. Knead for 5 minutes, place in a greased bowl, cover and let rise for 1 hour.

Depending on how thin you like your crust, this makes enough for 2 large pizzas plus 2 small pizzas. The extra dough can be frozen.

For the barbecue sauce:
1 1/2 cups ketchup
2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cups brown sugar
1/2 tsp each – allspice, crushed red pepper flakes, pepper, cumin, chili powder, garlic powder

Add everything to a small bowl and stir until combined. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes before using to allow the flavors to blend.

For the toppings:
1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cooked and sliced
1/2 pounds bacon, diced and crisped *optional
1 onion, thinly sliced and caramelized (cooked in 2 tsp bacon grease or butter.) *optional
1 cup frozen corn, thawed *optional
2 cup shredded pizza blend cheese

To assemble the pizzas:
Roll out dough into desired sizes on thickness. Place on a baking sheet or stone dusted with cornmeal.

Spread barbecue sauce on top of the crust, leaving about 1/2 inch crust all the way around.

Top with chicken, any other desired toppings and cheese. Bake at 500 degrees for 12-15 minutes, until crust is golden brown.

Variations:
— Sub flour tortillas or frozen or refrigerated pizza dough for the homemade version.

Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.

Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, view tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, drugs mace, viagra order pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, find tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, more about mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, diagnosis skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

Zucchini Patties

The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
Source: Better Homes and Gardens
4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
1 cup water
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp packed brown sugar
2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp peach preserves
1 tbsp horseradish mustard
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

Makes 4 servings.

The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
Source: Better Homes and Gardens
4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
1 cup water
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp packed brown sugar
2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp peach preserves
1 tbsp horseradish mustard
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

Makes 4 servings.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, seek sausage, approved fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh or Gala, more about cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
1 cup flour
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp baking powder
A pinch of salt
2 eggs
Milk 1 1/4 cup

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and a little milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter.

Heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 6 large pancakes

The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
Source: Better Homes and Gardens
4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
1 cup water
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp packed brown sugar
2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp peach preserves
1 tbsp horseradish mustard
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

Makes 4 servings.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, seek sausage, approved fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh or Gala, more about cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
1 cup flour
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp baking powder
A pinch of salt
2 eggs
Milk 1 1/4 cup

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and a little milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter.

Heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 6 large pancakes

Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, viagra 100mg

Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, what is ed “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.” The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

With the final exam approaching fast, nurse I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

–If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
–Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
–Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
–Learn that new hobby or trade.
–Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
–Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
Host a dinner party.
–Simplify your life and home.
–Reconnect severed ties with family.
–Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
–Break off unhealthy relationships.
–Go back to school.
–Stand up to a bully.
–Be positive.

The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
Source: Better Homes and Gardens
4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
1 cup water
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp packed brown sugar
2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp peach preserves
1 tbsp horseradish mustard
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

Makes 4 servings.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, seek sausage, approved fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh or Gala, more about cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
1 cup flour
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp baking powder
A pinch of salt
2 eggs
Milk 1 1/4 cup

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and a little milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter.

Heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 6 large pancakes

Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, viagra 100mg

Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, what is ed “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.” The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

With the final exam approaching fast, nurse I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

–If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
–Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
–Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
–Learn that new hobby or trade.
–Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
–Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
Host a dinner party.
–Simplify your life and home.
–Reconnect severed ties with family.
–Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
–Break off unhealthy relationships.
–Go back to school.
–Stand up to a bully.
–Be positive.
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, more about she has meet since we moved, are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Dazzledish Favorites:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

Moments of Mommy-hood
http://momentsofmommyhood.blogspot.com/search/label/alphabet%20book

Dazzledish Favorites:
ABC Book

Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to reach inside each home to give each parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station.

http://love2learn2day.blogspot.com/
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, for sale dosage she has meet since we moved, more about are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Dazzledish Favorites:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

Moments of Mommy-hood
http://momentsofmommyhood.blogspot.com/search/label/alphabet%20book

Dazzledish Favorites:
ABC Book

Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to reach inside each home to give each parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station.

http://love2learn2day.blogspot.com/
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, for sale dosage she has meet since we moved, more about are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Dazzledish Favorites:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

Moments of Mommy-hood
http://momentsofmommyhood.blogspot.com/search/label/alphabet%20book

Dazzledish Favorites:
ABC Book

Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to reach inside each home to give each parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station.

http://love2learn2day.blogspot.com/
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, price she has meet since we moved, are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, for sale dosage she has meet since we moved, more about are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Dazzledish Favorites:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

Moments of Mommy-hood
http://momentsofmommyhood.blogspot.com/search/label/alphabet%20book

Dazzledish Favorites:
ABC Book

Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to reach inside each home to give each parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station.

http://love2learn2day.blogspot.com/
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, price she has meet since we moved, are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, nurse she has meet since we moved, are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, for sale dosage she has meet since we moved, more about are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Dazzledish Favorites:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

Moments of Mommy-hood
http://momentsofmommyhood.blogspot.com/search/label/alphabet%20book

Dazzledish Favorites:
ABC Book

Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to reach inside each home to give each parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station.

http://love2learn2day.blogspot.com/
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, price she has meet since we moved, are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies
Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, nurse she has meet since we moved, are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies

I love zucchini. I love roasting them, dicing them up in sauces and who cannot resist a tempting loaf of zucchini bread. But, malady I am bored with this little green courgette. I needed something new to use my last zucchini in. Ironically I was thinking about the fried zucchini my mom and enjoyed once but quickly moved on because I did not want anything fried and now here I am making fried zucchini patties. The daughter loved hers until she found out what was in them. I countered her saying “but you eat them in zucchini bread!” She would not budge. Zucchini Patties or fritters as I call them are really tasty with salsa or Spicy Dipping Sauce. Serve them as an h’orderve or as a side with a salad or grilled fish or chicken.

Source: Allrecipes
2 cups grated zucchini
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
Salt to taste
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

In a medium bowl, combine the zucchini, eggs, onion, flour, Parmesan cheese, mozzarella cheese, and salt. Stir well enough to distribute ingredients evenly.

Heat a small amount of oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Drop zucchini mixture by heaping tablespoonfuls, and cook for a few minutes on each side until golden.

Caramel Apple Brickle Dip

Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

Cheesy Broccoli and Potato Soup

A couple of years ago I bought a recipe book for kids. You know the one that shows you how to transform food into edible art? Supposedly kids will gobble down sandwiches in the shape of a caterpillar or a bowl of soup with a roll in the shape of a pig. Maybe my kids are not in the norm. They will go for ants on a log (celery, visit this site peanut butter and raisins) but not the vegetable shark.

Tonight an interesting thing happened at dinner. Our oldest decided he was not going to eat the soup because it was green. We tried coming up with a clever title for the soup but he was not buying it.
I reminded him of our rules. You have to take at least one bite of something new. Eventually he survived the agony of slurping one spoonful of green stuff only to declare it “disgusting.” Soon the kids went outside to play while I started to clear the table. I was loading the dishwasher when I noticed Mason hiding by the table dipping a roll into the pot of soup and eating it.

I really enjoyed this version of a potato soup. The soup uses broth in the place of milk resulting in a lovely light yet filling soup. Serve with a nice green salad. Cheesy broccoli potato soup would also pair well with a main course of grilled fish.

Source: Adapted from an unknown magazine clipping
Serves 4 generously
1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 onion, this chopped
3 cloves garlic broken into pieces
1 medium potato, peeled and diced into 1/2-inch pieces
3 cups broccoli, chopped
3 cups low sodium vegetable or chicken stock
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 cup reduced-fat Monterey Jack cheese, shredded

Tips:
-If using finely shredded cheese add a heaping cup full.
-Use the whole broccoli crown and stem. Peel the tough outer skin off before chopping.
-Can use broth, stock or bullion.
-If you like a little more texture do not puree the soup too much leaving plenty of bit sized potato pieces.

In a large stockpot, heat oil and saute the onion for 5-7 minutes over low to medium heat. Add potatoes, broccoli and stock; bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook, covered for 12-15 minutes or until broccoli and potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork.

Remove the mixture from stove top; allow to cool a bit. Pour into a blender and puree or use a handheld blender mixing right in the pot.
A couple of years ago I bought a recipe book for kids. You know the one that shows you how to transform food into edible art? Supposedly kids will gobble down sandwiches in the shape of a caterpillar or a bowl of soup with a roll in the shape of a pig. Maybe my kids are not in the norm. They will go for ants on a log (celery, visit this site peanut butter and raisins) but not the vegetable shark.

Tonight an interesting thing happened at dinner. Our oldest decided he was not going to eat the soup because it was green. We tried coming up with a clever title for the soup but he was not buying it.
I reminded him of our rules. You have to take at least one bite of something new. Eventually he survived the agony of slurping one spoonful of green stuff only to declare it “disgusting.” Soon the kids went outside to play while I started to clear the table. I was loading the dishwasher when I noticed Mason hiding by the table dipping a roll into the pot of soup and eating it.

I really enjoyed this version of a potato soup. The soup uses broth in the place of milk resulting in a lovely light yet filling soup. Serve with a nice green salad. Cheesy broccoli potato soup would also pair well with a main course of grilled fish.

Source: Adapted from an unknown magazine clipping
Serves 4 generously
1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 onion, this chopped
3 cloves garlic broken into pieces
1 medium potato, peeled and diced into 1/2-inch pieces
3 cups broccoli, chopped
3 cups low sodium vegetable or chicken stock
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 cup reduced-fat Monterey Jack cheese, shredded

Tips:
-If using finely shredded cheese add a heaping cup full.
-Use the whole broccoli crown and stem. Peel the tough outer skin off before chopping.
-Can use broth, stock or bullion.
-If you like a little more texture do not puree the soup too much leaving plenty of bit sized potato pieces.

In a large stockpot, heat oil and saute the onion for 5-7 minutes over low to medium heat. Add potatoes, broccoli and stock; bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook, covered for 12-15 minutes or until broccoli and potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork.

Remove the mixture from stove top; allow to cool a bit. Pour into a blender and puree or use a handheld blender mixing right in the pot.

cheesy broccoli and potato soup

A couple of years ago I bought a recipe book for kids. You know the one that shows you how to transform food into edible art? Supposedly kids will gobble down sandwiches in the shape of a caterpillar or a bowl of soup with a roll in the shape of a pig. Maybe my kids are not in the norm. They will go for ants on a log (celery, drugs peanut butter and raisins) but not the vegetable shark.

Tonight an interesting thing happened at dinner. Our oldest decided he was not going to eat the soup because it was green. We tried coming up with a clever title for the soup but he was not buying it.
I reminded him of our rules. You have to take at least one bite of something new. Eventually he survived the agony of slurping one spoonful of green stuff only to declare it “disgusting.” Soon the kids went outside to play while I started to clear the table. I was loading the dishwasher when I noticed Mason hiding by the table dipping a roll into the pot of soup and eating it.

I really enjoyed this version of a potato soup. The soup uses broth in the place of milk resulting in a lovely light yet filling soup. Serve with a nice green salad. Cheesy broccoli potato soup would also pair well with a main course of grilled fish.

Source: Adapted from an unknown magazine clipping
Serves 4 generously
1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 onion, viagra chopped
3 cloves garlic broken into pieces
1 medium potato, page peeled and diced into 1/2-inch pieces
3 cups broccoli, chopped
3 cups low sodium vegetable or chicken stock
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 cup reduced-fat Monterey Jack cheese, shredded

Tips:
-If using finely shredded cheese add a heaping cup full.
-Use the whole broccoli crown and stem. Peel the tough outer skin off before chopping.
-Can use broth, stock or bullion.
-If you like a little more texture do not puree the soup too much leaving plenty of bit sized potato pieces.

In a large stockpot, heat oil and saute the onion for 5-7 minutes over low to medium heat. Add potatoes, broccoli and stock; bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook, covered for 12-15 minutes or until broccoli and potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork.

Remove the mixture from stove top; allow to cool a bit. Pour into a blender and puree or use a handheld blender mixing right in the pot.

Mini Pigs in a Blanket

When it is 109 degrees outside the last thing I want to do is stand in the hot kitchen cooking. This week our meals have mostly consisted of dinner salads. They are fast, ambulance easy and there is not a lot of clean up.

In this recipe the chicken and potatoes are simmered in a brine giving them flavor without all the extra fat. The dressing may be a little powerful for some tastes. If that is the case your favorite salad dressing could make an excellent substitution.

Source: Adapted from Health
1 pound new potatoes
2 tbsp salt, thumb divided
1 1/2 pounds boneless, site skinless chicken breast
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbsp white Dijon mustard
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
1/4 tsp pepper
4-6 cups spinach, stems removed
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, shaved

Bring potatoes to a boil in a large pot. Add 1 tablespoon salt, reduce heat and simmer 15-18 minutes or until tender. Drain and run under cool water to cool.

Fill a saucepan halfway with water. Bring to a boil. Add 1 tablespoon salt. Add chicken, reduce heat to medium; gently simmer 12-14 minutes or until cooked through. Let rest 15 minutes before shredding.

To make the dressing, whisk together the oil, mustard, vinegar and pepper; set aside.

When it is 109 degrees outside the last thing I want to do is stand in the hot kitchen cooking. This week our meals have mostly consisted of dinner salads. They are fast, ambulance easy and there is not a lot of clean up.

In this recipe the chicken and potatoes are simmered in a brine giving them flavor without all the extra fat. The dressing may be a little powerful for some tastes. If that is the case your favorite salad dressing could make an excellent substitution.

Source: Adapted from Health
1 pound new potatoes
2 tbsp salt, thumb divided
1 1/2 pounds boneless, site skinless chicken breast
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbsp white Dijon mustard
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
1/4 tsp pepper
4-6 cups spinach, stems removed
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, shaved

Bring potatoes to a boil in a large pot. Add 1 tablespoon salt, reduce heat and simmer 15-18 minutes or until tender. Drain and run under cool water to cool.

Fill a saucepan halfway with water. Bring to a boil. Add 1 tablespoon salt. Add chicken, reduce heat to medium; gently simmer 12-14 minutes or until cooked through. Let rest 15 minutes before shredding.

To make the dressing, whisk together the oil, mustard, vinegar and pepper; set aside.

Deviled eggs are as different as the humans making them. I for one am a traditionalist. While shrimp or chipotle deviled eggs sound divine I prefer the basic taste of deviled eggs I have grown up eating at every Easter feast and picnic.

The past few years the project of making deviled eggs has been assigned to me. Every year I panic because I forgot how I made them the year before. This year I remembered to write it down. I used a recipe from Paula Dean as a base. I figure the woman is from the South she should know how to make basic eggs.

Source: Adapted from Paula Dean
12 large eggs, sickness boiled
1/4 cup Mayo
1 tsp Dijon Horseradish
2 tbsp sweet relish
3-4 shakes Tabasco sauce
Salt and Pepper
Paprika

Slice the eggs lengthwise. Scoop out the yolk and put in a bowl. Set aside the whites. Mash the yolks completely with a fork. Add mayo, viagra mustard, symptoms relish, Tabasco, salt and pepper.

Scrap the mixture into a plastic sandwich baggie. Cut one of the corners off. Squeeze the mixture into the hollow of each egg white. Sprinkle lightly with paprika.

**To boil Eggs place eggs in a sauce pan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off heat and let sit 10 minutes. Drain and run under cold water.

When it is 109 degrees outside the last thing I want to do is stand in the hot kitchen cooking. This week our meals have mostly consisted of dinner salads. They are fast, ambulance easy and there is not a lot of clean up.

In this recipe the chicken and potatoes are simmered in a brine giving them flavor without all the extra fat. The dressing may be a little powerful for some tastes. If that is the case your favorite salad dressing could make an excellent substitution.

Source: Adapted from Health
1 pound new potatoes
2 tbsp salt, thumb divided
1 1/2 pounds boneless, site skinless chicken breast
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbsp white Dijon mustard
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
1/4 tsp pepper
4-6 cups spinach, stems removed
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, shaved

Bring potatoes to a boil in a large pot. Add 1 tablespoon salt, reduce heat and simmer 15-18 minutes or until tender. Drain and run under cool water to cool.

Fill a saucepan halfway with water. Bring to a boil. Add 1 tablespoon salt. Add chicken, reduce heat to medium; gently simmer 12-14 minutes or until cooked through. Let rest 15 minutes before shredding.

To make the dressing, whisk together the oil, mustard, vinegar and pepper; set aside.

Deviled eggs are as different as the humans making them. I for one am a traditionalist. While shrimp or chipotle deviled eggs sound divine I prefer the basic taste of deviled eggs I have grown up eating at every Easter feast and picnic.

The past few years the project of making deviled eggs has been assigned to me. Every year I panic because I forgot how I made them the year before. This year I remembered to write it down. I used a recipe from Paula Dean as a base. I figure the woman is from the South she should know how to make basic eggs.

Source: Adapted from Paula Dean
12 large eggs, sickness boiled
1/4 cup Mayo
1 tsp Dijon Horseradish
2 tbsp sweet relish
3-4 shakes Tabasco sauce
Salt and Pepper
Paprika

Slice the eggs lengthwise. Scoop out the yolk and put in a bowl. Set aside the whites. Mash the yolks completely with a fork. Add mayo, viagra mustard, symptoms relish, Tabasco, salt and pepper.

Scrap the mixture into a plastic sandwich baggie. Cut one of the corners off. Squeeze the mixture into the hollow of each egg white. Sprinkle lightly with paprika.

**To boil Eggs place eggs in a sauce pan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off heat and let sit 10 minutes. Drain and run under cold water.

Ginger Sorbet Floats

Summery light sorbet floating in sparkling Ginger Ale. Ooo, medicine it just exudes summertime goodness. The ginger ale we used is Reed’s. It is a refreshing blend of honey, ginger root, pineapple, lemon and lime. This is powerful stuff.

Ginger ale
Flavored sorbet

Use a melon baller or ice cream scoop to fill a glass with balls of sorbet. Pour the ginger ale over the sorbet.
When it is 109 degrees outside the last thing I want to do is stand in the hot kitchen cooking. This week our meals have mostly consisted of dinner salads. They are fast, ambulance easy and there is not a lot of clean up.

In this recipe the chicken and potatoes are simmered in a brine giving them flavor without all the extra fat. The dressing may be a little powerful for some tastes. If that is the case your favorite salad dressing could make an excellent substitution.

Source: Adapted from Health
1 pound new potatoes
2 tbsp salt, thumb divided
1 1/2 pounds boneless, site skinless chicken breast
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbsp white Dijon mustard
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
1/4 tsp pepper
4-6 cups spinach, stems removed
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, shaved

Bring potatoes to a boil in a large pot. Add 1 tablespoon salt, reduce heat and simmer 15-18 minutes or until tender. Drain and run under cool water to cool.

Fill a saucepan halfway with water. Bring to a boil. Add 1 tablespoon salt. Add chicken, reduce heat to medium; gently simmer 12-14 minutes or until cooked through. Let rest 15 minutes before shredding.

To make the dressing, whisk together the oil, mustard, vinegar and pepper; set aside.

Deviled eggs are as different as the humans making them. I for one am a traditionalist. While shrimp or chipotle deviled eggs sound divine I prefer the basic taste of deviled eggs I have grown up eating at every Easter feast and picnic.

The past few years the project of making deviled eggs has been assigned to me. Every year I panic because I forgot how I made them the year before. This year I remembered to write it down. I used a recipe from Paula Dean as a base. I figure the woman is from the South she should know how to make basic eggs.

Source: Adapted from Paula Dean
12 large eggs, sickness boiled
1/4 cup Mayo
1 tsp Dijon Horseradish
2 tbsp sweet relish
3-4 shakes Tabasco sauce
Salt and Pepper
Paprika

Slice the eggs lengthwise. Scoop out the yolk and put in a bowl. Set aside the whites. Mash the yolks completely with a fork. Add mayo, viagra mustard, symptoms relish, Tabasco, salt and pepper.

Scrap the mixture into a plastic sandwich baggie. Cut one of the corners off. Squeeze the mixture into the hollow of each egg white. Sprinkle lightly with paprika.

**To boil Eggs place eggs in a sauce pan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off heat and let sit 10 minutes. Drain and run under cold water.

Ginger Sorbet Floats

Summery light sorbet floating in sparkling Ginger Ale. Ooo, medicine it just exudes summertime goodness. The ginger ale we used is Reed’s. It is a refreshing blend of honey, ginger root, pineapple, lemon and lime. This is powerful stuff.

Ginger ale
Flavored sorbet

Use a melon baller or ice cream scoop to fill a glass with balls of sorbet. Pour the ginger ale over the sorbet.

mini pigs in a blanket

Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, viagra you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

1 package refrigerated biscuits
1-2 packages hot dogs

Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

Variations:
– Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.