Homemade Grout Cleaner

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, buy shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, store crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, buy shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, store crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, healing chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, buy shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, store crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, healing chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)
  • Attach a prize to each shamrock. (a coin, side effects a piece of candy, approved a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure.

I bought a package of chicken breasts on sale

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, hospital minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, symptoms boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, for sale or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.

On Valentine’s Day we express our love or appreciation to those we care about by exchanging cards and candy. This year I wanted to take it one step further. I wanted my family to know just how much I love them and what I appreciate most about them.

Each of us has a special gift or talent within us that when cultivated and allowed to blossom will make our homes a lovely place. The Valentine’s Day award is in recognition of the good ways we have used our talents over the past year.

The Festivities:

Good Eats-
Strawberry and milk smoothies with a dollop of whipped cream and chocolate covered strawberries.

The Awards-
Courageous Compassion Award:
My oldest son earned the award for Courageous Compassion. He has the ability to make others, visit adult and youth alike, more about feel accepted. He has the courage to include everyone in his play at school bringing children of all aptitude together. Moreover, treat he can sense when someone is hurting emotionally and help bring a smile to their sad face.

The Heart of Valor Award:
Our daughter earned the Heart of Valor award. She can recognize a need and willingly steps in to help. She is full of passion. She reminds us to view the mundane as a grand fairytale full of adventure. She teaches us to love everyone and even homework can be a delight.

The Radiant Heart Award: Our youngest earned the Radiant Heart award. He is warm and cuddly just like a giant teddy bear. He bares a gentle kindness. He is aware of other’s feelings and calmly goes about to give them comfort. If you say you are in pain he is there to rub your back. If you are sick or sad he will offer a hug.

The After Awards Party-
We watched the Wizard of OZ.

I bought a package of chicken breasts

I love to serve Garlic Cheddar Chicken right out of the oven. The butter creates this savory crunchy salty texture to the breading. Pair with steamed broccoli or a salad.

Source: adapted from Allrecipes
serves 4

3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, abortion minced
3 heaping tablespoons Panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves – sliced thin lengthwise to make four fillets

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Melt the butter in a cast iron skillet, or oven proof pan,  over medium-low heat. Cook the garlic until tender and fragrant, about a minute or two (do not burn).

In a shallow bowl, mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, parsley, oregano, pepper, and salt.

Dip each chicken breast in the garlic butter flipping to coat each side. Lay chicken in pan in a single layer. Top with cheese and panko mixture.

Bake 20-25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Serve immediately.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, malady cookies, brownies, or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
January was a cold and wet month here. I wanted something warm to serve the family for dinner, drug other than soup or stew. I love chicken paired with rice on such occasions. I think the feeling of comfort I get when I eat chicken and rice dates back to college. During the snowy cold wet months my friend Vanessa and I would head back to her apartment after a long tiresome day at work. She would always make chicken or pork with rice. It always seemed to wash the day away.

Mondays and Tuesdays have been my busiest days lately. I feel like I am running around in a million different directions. Consequently the dinner menu has lacked

Source: Martha Stewart
1 whole chicken (3 to 4 pounds), health cut into 10 pieces
Coarse salt and ground pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 small yellow onion, site diced medium
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
2 celery stalks, diced medium
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes
1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups broccoli florets (from 2 stalks)
6 scallions (white and light green parts only), thinly sliced
2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with rack in lower third. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat oil over high. Cook chicken, skin side down, until golden and crisp, 6 minutes. Flip chicken and cook until browned, 6 minutes. Transfer to a large plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add onion, garlic, and celery to pot. Cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits with a wooden spoon, until onion is translucent, 4 minutes. Stir in mustard, thyme, red-pepper flakes, and rice and cook 1 minute.

Add broccoli, scallions, and broth and season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken, skin side up, on top of rice mixture. Bring to a boil, cover pot, and place in oven. Bake until chicken is cooked through and liquid is absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.

Variations:
– Use a whole chicken for this one-pot meal, or buy a package of precut thighs or breasts.
A simple recipe for classic chocolate buttercream frosting. Perfect for frosting cakes, price cookies, website brownies, salve or cupcakes.

Source: Savory Sweet Life
1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 1/2 pound), softened not melted
3 1/2 cups confectioners (powdered) sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1 teaspoon almond extract
4 tablespoons milk or heavy cream

Cream butter for a few minutes in a mixer with the paddle attachment on medium speed. Turn off the mixer. Sift 3 cups powdered sugar and cocoa into the mixing bowl. Turn your mixer on the lowest speed (so the dry ingredients do not blow everywhere) until the sugar and cocoa are absorbed by the butter. Increase mixer speed to medium and add vanilla extract, salt, and milk/cream and beat for 3 minutes. If your frosting needs a more stiff consistency, add a little more sugar. If your frosting needs to be thinned out, add additional milk 1 tablespoon at a time.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure. Celebrate the day with wacky dancing and green fruits and vegetables.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays.

Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)

Attach a prize to each shamrock.
(a coin, shop a piece of candy, ailment a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, buy shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, store crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, healing chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
St. Patrick’s Day is another one of my favorite holidays. It is because of my children and my own inner child that I enjoy the magic of St. Patrick’s Day so much. I love the imagery of tiny Leprechaun’s guarding the treasure at the end of a rainbow. Being able to visit a world of fairies is any child’s secret dream.

This year we will celebrate the grand day with a shamrock hunt.

  • Make or buy 17 small or large shamrocks. (or enough for each child per day if sibling rivalry will be in question)
  • Attach a prize to each shamrock. (a coin, side effects a piece of candy, approved a ticket, trinket, snack)

Each day leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, (or save them all to find on the big day) hide a shamrock somewhere around the house or yard for the children to find. The prize is their treasure.

Photo Source: Property of Flooring Liquidators

Grout can become dingy pretty fast. It is important to seal grout, find with a penetrating sealer, visit web to help keep bacteria and grime out of the pores. Sealing the grout also helps to make it waterproof. Grout sealer stops the water from seeping through the pores of the grout and underneath the tile. To keep tile and grout looking it’s best here are several homemade cleaners that are affordable and actually work.

For Basic Cleaning:

Combine equal parts table salt, store baking soda and white vinegar into a bowl. Mix to form a paste. Use a sponge to scrub the mixture into the grout. Let it sit for a couple of minutes, then wipe the grout clean with a damp rag.

Mold and Mildew:

For Colored Grout: Dampen a rag with white vinegar and scrub. Let sit for a few minutes. Wash grout with soapy water and rinse.

For Light Colored Grout: 1:1 ratio of bleach or use Hydrogen Peroxide. Spray the peroxide onto the grout. Let it sit for five minutes, then wipe the grout clean with a wet rag.

Hard Core Grout Cleaner for Floors and Bathrooms:

Combine 1/2 cup baking soda, 1/3 cup household ammonia, 1/4 cup white vinegar, and 7 cups warm water. Scrub grout with mixture using a toothbrush or grout brush.

If this does not work, use Ajax Oxygen Bleach Cleaner Heavy Duty Formula. (This is the magic ingredient in the Magic Eraser.) Sprinkle Ajax on the grout. Use water to work up a lather. Let sit for 30 minutes. Wipe up cleaner. Mop the floor to remove any leftover residue.

How To Quick Soak Beans

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and source of this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, medical use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, hospital naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and source of this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, medical use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, hospital naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, visit use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, cheapest naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, capsule plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and source of this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, medical use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, hospital naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, visit use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, cheapest naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, capsule plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
Green beans are a true staple of the Americas. They may be eaten raw, see steamed, thumb blanched, thumb baked, or sautéed. The peak season for growing green beans is in the Spring and Fall, but they do well most of the year, depending on the area.

There are a variety of terms used for green beans but technically they are all the same.
– Pole beans require a support structure. The early Americans utilized the corn stalk by planting green beans along rows of corn. Allowing the bean vine to climb the stalk.
– Bush beans are identical to pole beans except that they grow on a bush.
– The snap bean refers to the snapping sound the beans make when broken.
– Earlier varieties of beans had a rough string of fiber along the side that had to be removed during preparation for cooking. Thus the name string bean.

Green beans grow in a variety of colors including yellow, purple and green. Combine the three for a beautiful presentation. Serve with baked pork chops or grilled salmon .

Source: Adapted from a recipe by Heather Murphy
1 1/2 pounds fresh green beans, washed and trimmed
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoon brown sugar
4 slices bacon, cut into ½ in pieces
1/4 of a large red onion, thinly sliced

Blanch the green beans, by placing them in salted boiling water for about 3 minutes. They should remain crisp but not tough. Remove the beans from the water. Immediately set them in a bowl of ice water to cool. Drain and set aside.

Cook bacon in a large saute pan on medium heat until done. Add onion and sauté until tender. Add the butter and sugar. Melt the butter. Saute the butter and brown sugar until it begins to thicken slightly. Add the green beans tossing to coat, warm through. Salt to taste.

Variations:
– use maple syrup instead of the brown sugar.
– 1 (16 ounce) bag of frozen green beans
– Add 1/4 cup broken walnut pieces. Saute with onions.

Photo: Property of “Not Without Salt

Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, prescription pharmacy but the masses demand chili. My children tend to shy away from soups with excessive amounts of broth. They would much prefer a heartier stew or chili.

As with most chili recipes this one also has some kick to it. It is just perfect for my milder taste buds. However, approved if you think it is not hot enough increase the red pepper flakes to 1/2 – 1 teaspoons.

Source: Not Without Salt
2 large yellow onions, medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– Replace the black beans with white beans and kidney beans.
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped.
– This recipe works great with leftover turkey from the holiday.
– For a vegetarian version omit the chicken and add 1/2 cup lentils.

Photo: Property of “Not Without Salt

Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, prescription pharmacy but the masses demand chili. My children tend to shy away from soups with excessive amounts of broth. They would much prefer a heartier stew or chili.

As with most chili recipes this one also has some kick to it. It is just perfect for my milder taste buds. However, approved if you think it is not hot enough increase the red pepper flakes to 1/2 – 1 teaspoons.

Source: Not Without Salt
2 large yellow onions, medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– Replace the black beans with white beans and kidney beans.
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped.
– This recipe works great with leftover turkey from the holiday.
– For a vegetarian version omit the chicken and add 1/2 cup lentils.
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, help but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, buy medium dice

2 Tbl butter

3 cloves garlic, link finely minced

2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes

2 15 oz cans black beans

1/4 cup minced cilantro stems

3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Variations:

Omit bell peppers, cilantro, black beans

Add 2 diced celery sticks

White beans and kidney

Photo: Property of “Not Without Salt

Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, prescription pharmacy but the masses demand chili. My children tend to shy away from soups with excessive amounts of broth. They would much prefer a heartier stew or chili.

As with most chili recipes this one also has some kick to it. It is just perfect for my milder taste buds. However, approved if you think it is not hot enough increase the red pepper flakes to 1/2 – 1 teaspoons.

Source: Not Without Salt
2 large yellow onions, medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– Replace the black beans with white beans and kidney beans.
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped.
– This recipe works great with leftover turkey from the holiday.
– For a vegetarian version omit the chicken and add 1/2 cup lentils.
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, help but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, buy medium dice

2 Tbl butter

3 cloves garlic, link finely minced

2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes

2 15 oz cans black beans

1/4 cup minced cilantro stems

3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Variations:

Omit bell peppers, cilantro, black beans

Add 2 diced celery sticks

White beans and kidney
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, information pills but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, thumb medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– White beans and kidney
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped

Photo: Property of “Not Without Salt

Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, prescription pharmacy but the masses demand chili. My children tend to shy away from soups with excessive amounts of broth. They would much prefer a heartier stew or chili.

As with most chili recipes this one also has some kick to it. It is just perfect for my milder taste buds. However, approved if you think it is not hot enough increase the red pepper flakes to 1/2 – 1 teaspoons.

Source: Not Without Salt
2 large yellow onions, medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– Replace the black beans with white beans and kidney beans.
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped.
– This recipe works great with leftover turkey from the holiday.
– For a vegetarian version omit the chicken and add 1/2 cup lentils.
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, help but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, buy medium dice

2 Tbl butter

3 cloves garlic, link finely minced

2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced

1 teaspoon chili powder

1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes

2 15 oz cans black beans

1/4 cup minced cilantro stems

3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Variations:

Omit bell peppers, cilantro, black beans

Add 2 diced celery sticks

White beans and kidney
Chicken chili is what you get when chicken cacciatori is on the menu, information pills but the masses demand chili.

2 large yellow onions, thumb medium dice
2 tablespoons butter
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and large-diced
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 (28-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
2 (15-ounce) cans black beans
1/4 cup minced cilantro stems
3 cups chicken cooked, shredded

Cook the onions in the butter over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the bell peppers, chili powder, cumin, red pepper flakes, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes and their juice to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add cooked chicken, black beans and cilantro stems to the chili and simmer, uncovered, for another 20 minutes. Serve with the cilantro and sour cream.

Variations:
– Add 2 diced celery sticks
– White beans and kidney
– Omit the bell peppers substituting 3 stalks celery finely chopped

Photo: Source Unavailable

There are two ways to buy beans; in the can or dried. The can is great because first of all the natural chemical in the bean’s coating, treatment that is known to give us gas, unhealthy is lessened during processing. Secondly, canned is a straight shot into the pot or salad.

The benefit of using dried beans is you control what goes into them. The downside to cooking with dried beans is the need to soak them. Soaking rehydrates the bean. Hydration is necessary to cut down on cooking time while preserving all the rich nutrients. Otherwise the beans will cook unevenly, the skins will slip off and you will have a giant soupy, mushy mess on your hands. Soaking is also used to clean the beans of pesticides, bug larva, and any other contaminates attached to the beans.

Soaking Overnight: (the best way to soak beans)
1. Clean the beans under cool tap water, removing damaged beans, debris and rocks.
2. Place beans in a non-reactive bowl, preferably glass.
3. Cover beans with three times the amount of water. (About 3-4 inches above layer of beans)
4. Cover and let sit for at least 4 hours or overnight. In warm weather refrigerate beans to prevent sprouting.
5. Drain the water. Rinse well.
6. Cover with water by 2 inches. Cook 30 minutes to 1 hour, until tender.
7. Proceed with recipe. Drain.

Quick Soak:
1. Clean the beans under cool tap water, removing damaged beans, debris and rocks.
2. Place beans in a stock pot.
3. Fill with three times water, about 3-4 inches above the layer of beans. (about 5 cups water per 1 cup beans.)
4. Bring to a boil. Boil beans in water for 3 minutes.
5. Remove from heat. Cover and set aside for 2 to 4 hours.
6. Drain water. Rinse beans and pot well.
7. Add fresh water. Cook until tender 30 minutes to 1 hour. Drain.
8. Proceed with recipe.

Pressure Soak: (for more easily digestible beans)
1. Clean the beans under cool tap water, removing damaged beans, debris and rocks.
2. Place beans in a pressure cooker.
4. Cover beans by 3 inches of water. Bring to pressure. Process 5 minutes.
5. Remove from heat; let pressure drop naturally.
6. Drain water. Rinse well.
7. Cover with water by 2 inches. Cook 30 minutes to 1 hour, until tender.
8. Proceed with recipe.

Favorite beans recipes:
White Bean Soup
Black Bean Soup
Black Bean Chicken Salad with Cilantro Vinaigrette

The Red Food Dye Nation

Homemade Orange Juice

My Grandma Penny lived on a farm on the outskirts of Clewiston Florida. Every time we visited we would fill sacks with oranges and tangerines to take home. One year we had a bucket full of oranges and my sister and I decided to make orange juice. We learned quick that it takes a lot of oranges to make one glass of orange juice.

Years later my dad brought home these little tubes that stick into the top of the orange allowing you to drink from the orange. We loved them. We would squeeze our oranges to get every last drop out then split them open and eat the insides. The tubes were a clever way to drink fresh orange juice straight from the source. I am surprised they did not survive the test of time.

I was reminded of my dad’s sacred find when the kids mentioned they would love a glass of orange juice. We did not have any orange juice in the house but we did have 4 oranges. The kids were shocked that they could drink orange juice from an orange. I know we have made fresh squeezed orange juice before.

What To Do:

1. Take an orange wash it then roll it on a cutting board pressing down firmly. This will break the little capsules that hold the juice.

2. Using a knife cut a small circular opening in the top of the orange. About 1/2 to 3/4-inches in width. Slide the knife tip downward into the hole then turn a few times.

3. Drink directly from the opening or use a straw. Squeeze the orange to draw out the juice while you slurp.

Homemade Orange Juice

My Grandma Penny lived on a farm on the outskirts of Clewiston Florida. Every time we visited we would fill sacks with oranges and tangerines to take home. One year we had a bucket full of oranges and my sister and I decided to make orange juice. We learned quick that it takes a lot of oranges to make one glass of orange juice.

Years later my dad brought home these little tubes that stick into the top of the orange allowing you to drink from the orange. We loved them. We would squeeze our oranges to get every last drop out then split them open and eat the insides. The tubes were a clever way to drink fresh orange juice straight from the source. I am surprised they did not survive the test of time.

I was reminded of my dad’s sacred find when the kids mentioned they would love a glass of orange juice. We did not have any orange juice in the house but we did have 4 oranges. The kids were shocked that they could drink orange juice from an orange. I know we have made fresh squeezed orange juice before.

What To Do:

1. Take an orange wash it then roll it on a cutting board pressing down firmly. This will break the little capsules that hold the juice.

2. Using a knife cut a small circular opening in the top of the orange. About 1/2 to 3/4-inches in width. Slide the knife tip downward into the hole then turn a few times.

3. Drink directly from the opening or use a straw. Squeeze the orange to draw out the juice while you slurp.

Washing dishes

To become a successful leader kids need to learn responsibility somewhere. That begins in the home when they are young by building their confidence through applauding small achievements. Some may have negative feelings toward chores because of the way they were brought up. I know I often felt like I was a slave rather than a kid but as I matured and gained insight I realized the responsibilities thrown at me as a kid has taught me how to be self-reliant as an adult.

Chores can be a positive and constructive way to build confidence and teach leadership through responsibility. Boys especially need chores. We are no longer a society that sends our boys out to work in the field all day. They relish the satisfaction of a job done well. Boys love to solve problems. They also need structure and to be held accountable. Give them a task and help them learn how to go about completing that task by giving them clear concise directions but with a little leeway for creativity and a consequence to hold them to it and they will radiate confidence.

Chores are also a way to teach our children how to one day care for their own homestead; moreover, help chores teach them to respect property and accountability. Boys should learn to cook, pilule clean, try do dishes and mend clothing just like girls should know how to care for their car, take out the trash, repairs and mow the law.

Know What Is Expected- Be Consistent.

I think we can agree that chores are not on our kids list of top priorities. Whenever my mom would ask my brother to clean up his reply was always “I am eating.” Somehow he was absolved without any further discussion. My daughter though she is three takes after he Uncle Todd. When asked to clean up she will lie down and feign she is oh so tired.

If you implement a system you have to be ready and willing to be consistent because they will fight you on it. They will push the boundaries a little to see how tough you are. Lay out the rules so they know what is expected of them and hold them to it. We are a team and we work together to keep the home functioning.

– Use a chore chart to help them keep track of the chores they are responsible for. There are a myriad of charts out there. Behavioral charts use motivational cues such as rewards. Chore charts can be a spinning wheel to cards. Just search Chore Charts in Google Images to find something that fits your family.

Set a time frame. Something like all their chores must be done before school or by dinnertime. For younger children the consequence might be if you have to pick up their toys you get to keep them. The next day when they ask to play with them you calmly remind them why they are put away and that they may have them tomorrow or they must earn them back. For teens you might take away a privilege. They can’t go out with their friends, play video games or watch TV.

A timer works well to keep them on task. If they insist they are too tired or hungry to do their chore set the timer for 15 minutes. Once the timer goes off they must complete the chore or there are consequences.

Play to the age group.

Create the habit of cleaning up by introducing the concept of chores at an early age. Kids can learn at one year of age how to pick up their toys and throw away their diaper. The little ones love to imitate mom and dad hard at work. Let them contribute in their own way even though you will have to go back later to “fix” the job. Little ones can help vacuum, sweep, wash dishes and help make the bed. As they grow look for tasks they are good at and those that will help improve developmental milestones.

Since our kids are young their chores are pretty simple. I help the two year old clean the loft, the three year old has to keep the downstairs free of toys and clothing (since she is the one who usually puts them there) and the five year old chooses a task to complete each day. It could be emptying the laundry baskets or shredding papers. They are also responsible for cleaning their own room as well as helping set and clear the table. It was interesting to note one day when our five year old left something downstairs and the three year old got onto him about it. She was showing accountability for her area.

Make a list then have them choose the one they would like to be responsible for. I mentioned that the two younger children have specific household chore they are responsible for overseeing each day while the oldest may choose. When dealing out chores the first criteria to take into consideration should be age and the second the child. Our oldest is five and a highly creative kinetic learner. We know that he performs best when given the leeway to do it his way. Our daughter does not like change. She prefers to know what is expected of her in advance.

Make chores fun.

Play to a child is their job. Some days it is a struggle to get the kids to finish their chores. Other days they beg me to let them help me with mine.

– The kitchen floor becomes a skating rink. Wrap wet rags around their feet and let them skate to mop the floor.

– The sink becomes a car wash. Little ones love to play in the suds. They may start out playing with their cars and end up washing dishes, the chairs, the cabinets and even you.

– Play a game under the blanket to make the bed. The kids can pretend they are in a cave. Spread the bedding out over them smoothing the edges to make the bed. Reaching in from the bottom of the bed grab their feet and pull them toward you and off the end of the bed. Then attack them with tickles and kisses. move on to the next bed.

As a mom I understand the biggest hurtle is time. School and extra-curricular activities do not leave much time for quality family time or responsibilities at home. Your plan and how it is carried out depends on your family dynamics and the specific chores. After a six hour day at school the last thing I want to ask of my child when he gets home from school is to complete his chore, especially if he has homework and sports practice. We have tried early morning chores before school. Before bed time did not work either. We have small children who go to bed early to ensure they get the maximum sleep needed. In the mornings it is a race to get everyone dressed, fed and out the door. We have found right before dinner works best in our home, if weekdays are too hectic schedule chores on the weekends.

Photo by: Hemera / Thinkstock

When our oldest was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with constant daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth.

A year ago I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, sildenafil more about mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not buy it for the kids. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily “brush your teeth” battle that had been going on the past four and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was flourescent red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh, this stuff is unnaturally red.” Normally I never gave dyes a second thought. Yet, for some reason there was something unnatural about that tube of toothpaste that I just could not let rest.

The question coming up a lot lately is, are food dyes ok? Do they spark behavioral issues in kids and health complaints in adults? Have dyes contributed to the rise of ADD, ADHD, and Autism in the past 40 years as a result of their increased consumption? For years the food administration has given their stamp of approval for the use of petroleum based dyes in food. Dyes that are in everything from cleaners to toothpaste to medicine.

In 2007 a study was forth coming siting the dangers of food dyes. As a result of the study the UK food administration required warning labels on all products containing petroleum dyes. The warning labels advised parents of the risk of hyperactivity due to the dyes. Industry leaders Kraft, Mars, Coca Cola and Wal-Mart skipped the warning labels choosing instead to make products shipped to the UK Sodium Benzoate and petroleum dye free. Yet here in the US these same companies continue to sell products for human consumption that harbor harmful petroleum based dyes and preservatives.

Clipart by: unknown

More recently in April 2011 the FDA held a hearing to once again determine if dyes contribute to hyperactivity. Advocates for the removal of all synthetic dyes from food products and medicines claim that non-food based dyes are unnecessary and cause hyperactivity in children. They gave compelling evidence that linked petroleum based preservatives and dyes to the increased number of children with allergies, ear infections, mood, cancer, ADHD, ADD, Autism, and other related spectrum disorders. The panel, minus one, agreed that dyes most likely cause a threat and yes warning labels should be required.

The battle was far from being won. Rather than give a statement based on their findings, the panel was required to answer a series of questions. Questions devised by crafty lawyers that when answered either way would be interpreted as, “food dyes do not cause hyperactivity or allergies in children.” Therefore, the FDA ruled that there was not enough evidence. Thus, companies were not required to post a warning label on consumable products here in America.

Color is beautiful!

After the April FDA ruling, dye advocates launched a campaign to gain support for the use of chemical dyes. The ads adopted images of gray popsicles calling, “a world without dyes…colorless.” Kantha Shelke, a food chemist and spokeswoman for the Institute of Food Technologists, stated, “Color is such a crucial part of the eating experience that banning dyes would take much of the pleasure out of life.”

Tattfoo Tan believes that Mother Nature has it all taken care of. Tattfoo Tan, is a Malaysian-born artist who resides in Staten Island. He developed The Nature Matching System “as a reminder to consume your [natural] daily recommended doses of color.” Tan wanted to understand the connection between the color of food and its nutritional value. Tan matched 88 natural colors using photographs of the fruits and vegetables found in the Union Square Green Market in New York and Photoshop’s eyedropper tool. Tan agrees “neon orange Cheetos is something spectacular to look at but the nutritional value is zilch.”

So what is the truth?

We know commercial food coloring is derived from coal tar oil, petroleum, and insects because it is cheaper to make; but, it comes with a price. The FDA is confident that all of the toxic proponents in the petroleum is eliminated during processing. They counter the accusations that dyed foods contain toxic chemicals from the petroleum, with: natural foods contain more petroleum from the fertilizer and the means of transporting crops than the amount of trace elements found in the actual dyes and preservatives.

We know that organic natural fruits and vegetables can be used to make an array of colorful dyes. The food industry refutes the idea of using natural dyes. They claim natural food dyes are too unstable, too muted and, uninteresting. They are convinced that no one will want to eat natural dyed foods. They believe that the public prefers the neon orange Cheetos to the pale peach natural Cheetos. The bright red strawberry Jello to a muted brown. Natural food companies such as India TreeSurf Sweets and Yummy Earth are determined to meet the need of color.

Who do we believe?

Voices from Dr. Feingold to Gwyneth Paltrow preach the benefits of a clean whole foods diet void of the unnecessary preservatives, artificial flavors, sweeteners and dyes. The FDA on the other hand in unison with countless doctors, scientists and organizations swear synthetic additives in food are not harmful. I decided to test the theory in my own home on our son who has Aspbegers.

The Test…

For one month we threw out all preservatives, artificial flavors and sweeteners, and dyes. It was very difficult at first because our city does not have a health food store and the kids are creatures of habits. They wanted their favorite foods.

Almost everything had to be made from scratch. Because companies are not required to list the ingredients in the products they use from outside sources I ordered the Feingold grocery list to help navigate the store isles when I needed something convient. Even though the label looks clean that is not always the case.

In one week I noticed a considerable change in my son. He could think more clearly. He was not bouncing off the walls in a rage. He was writing and reading without tantrums. The defiance leant way to a more agreeable attitude. He is happy and still full of life but the regular ticks are minimal.

The real test came on Easter Sunday. The kids ate a handful of jelly beans and for four days they were absolutely out of their minds. The defiance, screaming, and tantrums were back. The other children were moody, defiant and hyper.

I’d say from personal experience the answer for us is clear. Synthetic replacements in the form of preservatives [BHA (Butylated Hydroxyanisole), BHT (Burylated Hydroxytoluene), TBHQ (Tertiary Butylhydroquinone)], artificial flavors and sweeteners (aspartame and splenda), and dyes are indeed harmful and do cause adverse reactions; especially in individuals with predisposed allergies and learning disorders.

What now?

The next question is, will the FDA ever be responsible and require warning labels on products or warrant the elimination of such harmful chemicals? Nah, probably not. Or at least not in the near future. The pool of individuals sensitive to artificial flavors and colors is too small. If you call every one kid in 28 small. Fortunately there are reputable companies springing up to lead us into a colorful yet nutritious tomorrow.

Links:

–Visit Indie Candy and Natural Candy Store for natural baking supplies including food based dyes.
Eco Kids: for all natural craft supplies such as egg dye and playdough.
–Join the mission for Better School Food.
Spoonfed: Tips to help kids adopt a healthy diet comprised of fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean meats.
–Natural recipes for dyes: Rhythm of the Home, Natural Cookie Frosting, Natural Colored Rice Balls, Natural Easter Egg Dye, Darling Clementine, Homemade Playdough Dye, Natural Dyed Jello.

Biscuit 101- The History of…

http://factorytoursusa.com/
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb

How to Sear Roasts and Stew Meat

Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.
Caramel dip is one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, treat birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.
Caramel dip is one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, treat birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, tadalafil birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, mind softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.
Caramel dip is one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, treat birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, tadalafil birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, mind softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts, visit this purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
Flour
1 medium onion, sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.

Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.
Caramel dip is one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, treat birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, tadalafil birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

8 ounces cream cheese, mind softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

4 chicken breasts, visit this purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
Flour
1 medium onion, sliced
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 tbsp oil
3 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.
Is pan searing meat really worth it? You bet cha! Pan searing is vital when cooking roasts or making beef stews. First the high heat creates a wonderful caramelized brown crust that gives the meat a nice texture. Second the left over burnt bits in the pan are scraped up using juice, diagnosis broth or wine and then added to the roasting pan with the roast, purchase soup pot or crock pot to increase the flavor.

You can sear just about any type of beef, poultry, pork or seafood. Searing is not meant to fully cook the meat. When searing beef and seafood steaks in addition to chicken breast and pork chops, it is important to note that you will need to finish cooking the item at a lower heat. You can sear steaks on a grill by creating a higher temperature on one side of the grill and a lower temperature on the opposite side. When the steak is caramelized move it to the other side to continue to slowly cook. This method for cooking beef steaks can be done on the stove by covering the pan with tinfoil or a lid and turning off the heat. For items such as chicken, pork or tuna steaks ideally you can turn the heat down or place the pan in a 350 degree heated oven for 5-8 minutes or until no longer pink. When using the stove to oven method make sure the pan you intend to use is oven proof. My favorite pan to use when grilling or searing is a cast iron skillet. Cast Iron skillets hold the heat in better and distribute it more evenly. Non-stick pans are not recommended as they are not meant to with stand the high heat required for searing.

This tutorial will guide you through the basics of pan searing a roast and stew meat.

— Remove the meat from the refrigerator and let sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes.

— Heat a skillet over high heat.

— Season the meat with salt and pepper or any desired seasoning. (For stew meat dredge seasoned meat in flour coating well.)

— Add enough butter or vegetable oil to lightly coat the bottom of the skillet. (Avoid olive oil because it smokes to much at high temperatures.) When the oil ripples and runs like water when the pan is tiled the pan is hot enough to add the meat.

— Let the meat sit in the pan for a few minutes to allow the meat to caramelize. When the meat is initially placed in the pan it will have a fast high pitched sizzle. Check the meat when you start to hear the sizzle slow down. If it looks caramelized, nice and browned, then it is time to turn it. Use tongs to turn the meat browning all the sides. (Sear stew meat in batches so as to not overcrowd the pan.)

— After the meat is removed turn the heat off. Carefully pour 1/2 cup to 1 cup liquid in pan. Deglaze the pan by scraping the bottom of the pan to get all the burnt bits off. Use the broth to flavor the roast or stew or as a sauce.

The Science of Baking Cakes

home_family

I emerged from March into April feeling somewhat defeated and now quite possibly embarrassed. My goal to laugh more in January rewarded me with the ability to let things go. Life is a series of complications. It is how we react to those complications that determines our character. Learning to relinquish the guilt often times associated with being a mom gave me the freedom to accept what may come. The house did not have to be spotless all the time. Celebrations were less about the fluff and more about simple fun. If the kids had a meltdown in public I was under control. In return I became a more relaxed mom capable of giving more.

February’s goal was to express my love more. I am convinced that I could have accomplished my February goal without having successfully reached my goal in January. Research has shown that when we (parents) are high strung our kids tend to act out more. The more our kids act out the more frustrated we become and the less likely we want to tell them how amazing they are and how much we love them.

Then came March. I thought January and February were stressful. I playfully accused the Gods for trying to test my resolve. I certainly was not expecting what happened in March. March started out on the positive. We were still ill and unable to make plans with our friends most of the month. The times we could come out and play our friends were busy juggling hectic schedules. I was not successful in fulfilling my resolution and that worried me. As I write this I have come to the understanding that not all of March was a failure. We faced some pretty tough days had I been the business-like realistic perfectionist of 6 months ago I am not sure I would have escaped with only a terrible migraine. The ironic thing is I had to go through March to better understand my son so that in April I would know how to better meet his needs as his mom.

Which brings me to my April resolution- Family. In April my goal is to help my family reach their potential emotionally and mentally. Even the most loved kid or spouse will feel as though they do not matter. When we feel important and worthy we have the confidence to succeed. Knowing we are loved and that our feelings count is the first step to feeling important.

knight-with-dog-clipart

— Make sure they know they are loved. Express your love and admiration daily. Do not just say it….mean it!

— Leave little love notes filled with encouragement. Express what you admire most about them.

— Take time to really listen. It takes a loving ear to distinguish what is really going on.

— Linger a little longer. Make one on one time a priority. Allow your child to choose the activity. Keep the mood light and fun. This is not a time for reprimands. Value weekly dates with your spouse as a time to reconnect.

— Provide opportunities. Be cognizant of the hobbies, more about interests and talents your family members have an interest in. Provide opportunities to help them grow in these particular areas. If your son is into science you might want to search for science projects you can do together one on one or as a family. If your daughter dreams of being a ballet dancer rent movies or enroll her in dance class.

— Encouragement. For every time you have to correct negative behavior in a child you must find 5 positive things to praise them for. Be very careful that when correcting a child you do not cross over to criticism. Positive encouragement give them confidence to want to do better. A marriage and family counselor once said that men are actually weak inside. They need our encouragement to help strengthen them not our nagging and negativity.

home_family

I emerged from March into April feeling somewhat defeated and now quite possibly embarrassed. My goal to laugh more in January rewarded me with the ability to let things go. Life is a series of complications. It is how we react to those complications that determines our character. Learning to relinquish the guilt often times associated with being a mom gave me the freedom to accept what may come. The house did not have to be spotless all the time. Celebrations were less about the fluff and more about simple fun. If the kids had a meltdown in public I was under control. In return I became a more relaxed mom capable of giving more.

February’s goal was to express my love more. I am convinced that I could have accomplished my February goal without having successfully reached my goal in January. Research has shown that when we (parents) are high strung our kids tend to act out more. The more our kids act out the more frustrated we become and the less likely we want to tell them how amazing they are and how much we love them.

Then came March. I thought January and February were stressful. I playfully accused the Gods for trying to test my resolve. I certainly was not expecting what happened in March. March started out on the positive. We were still ill and unable to make plans with our friends most of the month. The times we could come out and play our friends were busy juggling hectic schedules. I was not successful in fulfilling my resolution and that worried me. As I write this I have come to the understanding that not all of March was a failure. We faced some pretty tough days had I been the business-like realistic perfectionist of 6 months ago I am not sure I would have escaped with only a terrible migraine. The ironic thing is I had to go through March to better understand my son so that in April I would know how to better meet his needs as his mom.

Which brings me to my April resolution- Family. In April my goal is to help my family reach their potential emotionally and mentally. Even the most loved kid or spouse will feel as though they do not matter. When we feel important and worthy we have the confidence to succeed. Knowing we are loved and that our feelings count is the first step to feeling important.

knight-with-dog-clipart

— Make sure they know they are loved. Express your love and admiration daily. Do not just say it….mean it!

— Leave little love notes filled with encouragement. Express what you admire most about them.

— Take time to really listen. It takes a loving ear to distinguish what is really going on.

— Linger a little longer. Make one on one time a priority. Allow your child to choose the activity. Keep the mood light and fun. This is not a time for reprimands. Value weekly dates with your spouse as a time to reconnect.

— Provide opportunities. Be cognizant of the hobbies, order drugs interests and talents your family members have an interest in. Provide opportunities to help them grow in these particular areas. If your son is into science you might want to search for science projects you can do together one on one or as a family. If your daughter dreams of being a ballet dancer rent movies or enroll her in dance class.

— Encouragement. For every time you have to correct negative behavior in a child you must find 5 positive things to praise them for. Be very careful that when correcting a child you do not cross over to criticism. Positive encouragement give them confidence to want to do better. A marriage and family counselor once said that men are actually weak inside. They need our encouragement to help strengthen them not our nagging and negativity.
Carrots have been used as as an inexpensive sweetener for cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages . The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts and remains as popular as it was then. The contents of carrot cake depends on region. For some folks additions like coconut, troche ambulance raisins, viagra order nuts and pineapple are a must have.

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html
Carrots have been used as as an inexpensive sweetener for cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages . The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts and remains as popular as it was then. The contents of carrot cake depends on region. For some folks additions like coconut, troche ambulance raisins, viagra order nuts and pineapple are a must have.

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html

savior-and-redeemer

Consolator by Carl Bloch

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, pharmacy Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), pilule Catholic lent, store and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Carrots have been used as as an inexpensive sweetener for cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages . The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts and remains as popular as it was then. The contents of carrot cake depends on region. For some folks additions like coconut, troche ambulance raisins, viagra order nuts and pineapple are a must have.

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html

savior-and-redeemer

Consolator by Carl Bloch

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, pharmacy Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), pilule Catholic lent, store and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Growing up, hospital we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, no rx Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, viagra so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temperature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Carrots have been used as as an inexpensive sweetener for cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages . The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts and remains as popular as it was then. The contents of carrot cake depends on region. For some folks additions like coconut, troche ambulance raisins, viagra order nuts and pineapple are a must have.

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html

savior-and-redeemer

Consolator by Carl Bloch

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, pharmacy Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), pilule Catholic lent, store and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Growing up, hospital we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, no rx Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, viagra so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temperature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Growing up, page we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, prostate Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temerature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Carrots have been used as as an inexpensive sweetener for cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages . The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts and remains as popular as it was then. The contents of carrot cake depends on region. For some folks additions like coconut, troche ambulance raisins, viagra order nuts and pineapple are a must have.

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html

savior-and-redeemer

Consolator by Carl Bloch

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, pharmacy Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), pilule Catholic lent, store and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Growing up, hospital we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, no rx Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, viagra so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temperature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Growing up, page we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, prostate Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temerature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

savior-and-redeemer

Savior and Redeemer (Author Unknown)

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, store Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), salve Catholic lent, and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Carrots have been used as as an inexpensive sweetener for cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages . The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts and remains as popular as it was then. The contents of carrot cake depends on region. For some folks additions like coconut, troche ambulance raisins, viagra order nuts and pineapple are a must have.

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html

savior-and-redeemer

Consolator by Carl Bloch

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, pharmacy Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), pilule Catholic lent, store and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Growing up, hospital we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, no rx Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, viagra so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temperature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Growing up, page we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, prostate Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temerature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

savior-and-redeemer

Savior and Redeemer (Author Unknown)

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, store Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), salve Catholic lent, and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Carrots were used in Europe as an inexpensive sweetener in cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages. It is no surprise baked goods sweetened and flavored with vegetables and fruits remain a favorite commodity. The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts. The beloved carrot cake can be found in tea houses throughout Britain and cafes across the American continent. The contents of the carrot cake vary with the region and the person making it. For some folks additions like coconut, story raisins, cialis 40mg nuts and pineapple are a must have. There are those who prefer a spongy moist cake, approved others a dense cake, a light cake, a plain cake, wheat-free cake, a sugar-free cake, less oil and the list goes on.

For the past three months I have put in countless hours researching this iconic dessert. My question? What makes the perfect carrot cake? Conclusion? There isn’t one. At least not a perfect carrot cake recipe to satisfy the majority of the masses. We all have our own taste. I could post a recipe from the internet with a following of rave reviews but where is the fun in that. I was curious if I could come up with a base recipe that would support the amount of substitutions people would want to make and still be pleasing.

One note I do want to expound on is substitutions. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce that we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce or buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions.

4 eggs
1 1/2 cups Sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar.
1 1/4 cups oil
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon powder
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves
1 cup walnuts or pecans, finely chopped
3 cups carrots, finely grated (about 6-7 medium sized)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.

Spread walnuts on a baking sheet. Bake for 6-8 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Finely chop nuts; set aside.

Wash and peel carrots. Using a box grater or food processor finely shred carrots; set aside.

In a large bowl, beat together eggs and sugars until completely incorporated. Drizzle oil in a steady stream while mixing constantly to emulsify.

In a small bowl sift flour, baking soda, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Add chopped nuts; mix to incorporate.

Gently fold dry ingredients into egg mixture until just combined. (Ribbons of flour are still noticeable.) Fold in carrots until completely combined. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 40-50 minutes until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.

Variations:
— Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk.*
— Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup.**
*The proteins in milk can produce a tougher crumb in cakes.
**Reducing the oil this much will result in a drier cake. We recommend reducing the oil no more that 1 cup.
— Substitute all-purpose flour for: 1 cup wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal and 3/4 white. OR substitute all wheat, spelt or a combination or whole grain flours.
— Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
— Replace sugar with equal amount of Xylitol or 1 1/2 cups honey or 2 cups applesauce.
— Use equal parts white and brown sugar or all white or all brown.
— Add 2 teaspoons vanilla. (add with eggs)
— Add 1 cup toasted coconut. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained and squeezed. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 cup raisins or sultanas – soaked in orange juice or rum. (add with carrots)
— Add 1/4 cup chopped Crystallized ginger. (add with carrots)
— Substitute allspice or pumpkin pie spice for nutmeg and cloves.

Notes:
— Our carrot cake was baked using a glass 9X13 baking dish. Dark metal or ceramic pans may vary baking time.
— If you live in a higher elevation you might need to make adjusts. Click here for helpful hints.
— To make cupcakes reduce baking time to 20-25 minutes.
Carrots have been used as as an inexpensive sweetener for cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages . The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts and remains as popular as it was then. The contents of carrot cake depends on region. For some folks additions like coconut, troche ambulance raisins, viagra order nuts and pineapple are a must have.

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html

savior-and-redeemer

Consolator by Carl Bloch

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, pharmacy Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), pilule Catholic lent, store and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Growing up, hospital we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, no rx Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, viagra so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temperature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Growing up, page we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, prostate Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temerature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

savior-and-redeemer

Savior and Redeemer (Author Unknown)

In our home we celebrate Easter in both secular and non-secular ways. For us the Easter Bunny is not an integral part of our Easter holiday but rather becomes a fun pass time for the children like hunting for eggs while waiting for the Easter feast to cook. Historically Easter coincides with a few other cultural traditions such as the Iranian New Year, store Jewish Passover (that recounts the escape of the Israelites from Egypt in addition to the removal of all leaven bread), salve Catholic lent, and the celebration of the Spring Equinox. Worldwide traditions provide a cache of ideas to pluck from religious and secular alike.

womenatjesustomb

Women at the Tomb (Author unknown)

The Journey:
Holidays that originate in another country have educational potential. We can learn about the traditions, customs, types of food they ate, their sleeping conditions and games they played. On the Eve of Easter we take a journey back in time. We unpack the tent and roll out our sleeping bags for an indoor family camp out. We sing, dance and play an ancient Roman game of Knucklebones (similar to Jacks) using pebbles. For dinner we enjoy an earthy Eastern meal followed by a short devotional recapping the last few days of Christ’s mortal life.

spring-bunny-carolyn-bell

“Spring Bunny” by Carolyn Bell

The Spring Bunny:
The Easter Bunny was first introduced in the US by German immigrants. Their culture believed the egg to be a symbol of rebirth. The idea for the Spring Bunny came from a friend of mine. To keep the spirit of Easter focused on Christ the “Spring Bunny” comes hopping around their home on the morning of the first day of Spring. He delivers eggs filled with money and baskets filled with candy and surprises. For Stephen it is a sacrilege not having the Easter Bunny on Easter morning. To appease us both we agreed to adopt the name “Spring Bunny” leaving Easter out of it.

Our Spring Bunny will arrive Easter morning to hide plastic eggs filled with stickers, beads for our reward system and money. The baskets contain a few pieces of candy, a wind up toy (to have races with), bubbles and a small something geared toward each child like a bucket and shovel, a ball, stuffed animals or a book. The idea is to keep it light and fun.

The Easter Feast:
Our Easter table is laden with the fresh bounties that spring has to offer. A white linen tablecloth, symbolic of the cloth that Christ’s body was wrapped in, drapes the table. A bouquet of herbs adorns the table in recognition of the spices that were carried to the tomb to dress the body of Christ. Our meal is meager with spring vegetables, crusty bread and a fruit flavored pork roast.

norman-millauer-getty

Photo of  painted Czech Easter eggs by: Norman Millauer/Getty

Easter Delights:
After Easter service the kids are thrilled to paint Easter eggs, bake cookies, make crafts and hunt for eggs. After hours of hiding and finding eggs we all sit down to watch “Veggie Tales: An Easter Carol.” Before we had kids we always watched “Jesus of Nazareth,” directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Robert Powell is amazing in his gripping portrayal of Jesus the Christ.

A few ideas for families with older kids are:
–Plan a Spring picnic. Pack a lunch and head to the park or country.

–Watch the sunrise. Climb to the roof of your building or set out for the mountains. Bring along some nibbles for breakfast and some blankets.

–Plant a garden. Gather some of your neighbors to plant a neighborhood garden or keep it private in your own backyard.

–Make an advent calender using plastic eggs and an egg carton. Fill the eggs with a scripture from the last days preceding Christ’s death and an item represented in that scripture; leaving the last one empty). Read one each night beginning 12 days before Easter. Some items to include might be 3 dimes, a cross, white linen and so on.

–Make fun decorations like a banner or a special tablecloth.

–Host a neighborhood parade or festival.

–Devise an Easter egg scavenger hunt.

–Play egg relays.

–Pin the tail on the bunny.

–Make oversized Easter Bonnets to wear in the parade.

–Buy a new spring outfit for church.

–Take a family portrait.
Carrots were used in Europe as an inexpensive sweetener in cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages. It is no surprise baked goods sweetened and flavored with vegetables and fruits remain a favorite commodity. The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts. The beloved carrot cake can be found in tea houses throughout Britain and cafes across the American continent. The contents of the carrot cake vary with the region and the person making it. For some folks additions like coconut, story raisins, cialis 40mg nuts and pineapple are a must have. There are those who prefer a spongy moist cake, approved others a dense cake, a light cake, a plain cake, wheat-free cake, a sugar-free cake, less oil and the list goes on.

For the past three months I have put in countless hours researching this iconic dessert. My question? What makes the perfect carrot cake? Conclusion? There isn’t one. At least not a perfect carrot cake recipe to satisfy the majority of the masses. We all have our own taste. I could post a recipe from the internet with a following of rave reviews but where is the fun in that. I was curious if I could come up with a base recipe that would support the amount of substitutions people would want to make and still be pleasing.

One note I do want to expound on is substitutions. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce that we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce or buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions.

4 eggs
1 1/2 cups Sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar.
1 1/4 cups oil
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon powder
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves
1 cup walnuts or pecans, finely chopped
3 cups carrots, finely grated (about 6-7 medium sized)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.

Spread walnuts on a baking sheet. Bake for 6-8 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Finely chop nuts; set aside.

Wash and peel carrots. Using a box grater or food processor finely shred carrots; set aside.

In a large bowl, beat together eggs and sugars until completely incorporated. Drizzle oil in a steady stream while mixing constantly to emulsify.

In a small bowl sift flour, baking soda, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Add chopped nuts; mix to incorporate.

Gently fold dry ingredients into egg mixture until just combined. (Ribbons of flour are still noticeable.) Fold in carrots until completely combined. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 40-50 minutes until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.

Variations:
— Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk.*
— Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup.**
*The proteins in milk can produce a tougher crumb in cakes.
**Reducing the oil this much will result in a drier cake. We recommend reducing the oil no more that 1 cup.
— Substitute all-purpose flour for: 1 cup wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal and 3/4 white. OR substitute all wheat, spelt or a combination or whole grain flours.
— Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
— Replace sugar with equal amount of Xylitol or 1 1/2 cups honey or 2 cups applesauce.
— Use equal parts white and brown sugar or all white or all brown.
— Add 2 teaspoons vanilla. (add with eggs)
— Add 1 cup toasted coconut. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained and squeezed. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 cup raisins or sultanas – soaked in orange juice or rum. (add with carrots)
— Add 1/4 cup chopped Crystallized ginger. (add with carrots)
— Substitute allspice or pumpkin pie spice for nutmeg and cloves.

Notes:
— Our carrot cake was baked using a glass 9X13 baking dish. Dark metal or ceramic pans may vary baking time.
— If you live in a higher elevation you might need to make adjusts. Click here for helpful hints.
— To make cupcakes reduce baking time to 20-25 minutes.
Carrots were used in Europe as an inexpensive sweetener in cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages. The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts. The beloved carrot cake can be found in cafes of Britain and co
The contents of carrot cake depends on the region. For some folks additions like coconut, sildenafil raisins, tadalafil nuts and pineapple are a must have.

For the past two months I have put in countless hours researching this iconic food. My question? What makes the perfect carrot cake? Conclusion? There is not one perfect carrot cake recipe to satisfy the majority of the masses. We all have different likes and dislikes. Some prefer a spongy moist cake, nurse others a dense cake, a light cake, a plain cake, a cake filled with extras, a wheat-free cake, a sugar-free cake and the list goes on.
The flour in your cake give it structure. The gluten in the flour coagulates during baking providing the support for the oils and sugar.

Sugar tenderizes the gluten and acts as a sweetener (Mmmmm…..). It also carmelizes during baking giving us the delious brown crusty top. Furthermore, the sugar retains moisture and keeps your cake moist and savory for days.

Baking powder acts as the leavening agent creating gas vapors that create the volume in your cake.

Oils help incorporate air into the cake giving it volume. (It’ s cake not a cookie!)

Eggs help the flour in providing structure to the cake by coagulating during baking.

The liquid in the cake (milk) serves to dissovle the sugar, provides consistency for the batter and controls the temperature in the oven.

CAKES DEPEND ON MANY FACTORS SUCH AS INGREDIENTS USED, MIXING METHOD, BATTER TEMPERATURE, BAKING,

Sugar is considered a tenderizer because of its tenderizing effect resulting from the softening action on flour proteins.

Flour is the primary structure builder in most cakes.

Sugar helps to retain moisture left in the baked cake after baking thereby keeping the cake moist and edible for several days.

A portion (about 50 percent) but not all of the sugar may be replaced with sirup. When this is done, the liquid content of the sirup must be deducted from the liquid going into the mix.

If not enough liquid is used to dissolve the sugar, the cake will collapse in the center.

The proteins in the eggs coagulates during baking and assists the flour as a structure builder.
If a weak flour is used, the eggs can be increased. If the percentage of shortening (a tenderizer) called for in the formula is increased, the eggs must be increased also. It is important to know the percentages of fat, moisture, and protein content of eggs when balancing cake formulas.
Milk solids have a binding effect on the protein of the flour, thereby increasing the toughness in a cake.
proteins in milk, adds food value and flavor to the cake, and helps to retain moisture in the cake.

Incorporation of air during mixing, chemically leavened and vapor pressure created in the oven. The manner of leavening depends upon the type of cake being made in regard richness of formula, consistency of batter and baking temperature. Cakes low in water and high in ennriching ingredients get a larger amount of leavening during mixing and require less chemical leaveners than cakes made from lean formulas high in liquids. In addition to leavening the cake, chemical leaveners control the eating qualities of the cake.

Liquids in some form is required in every cake formula. The liquid may be in the form of water, liquid milk, eggs or any other ingredient which contain water. Water has several functions in cake production. It developes the gluten, dissolves the sugar, makes the function of baking powder possible, regulates the batter consistency, and controls the temperature of the batter. It is possible to carefully regulate the water portion of the formula by figuring the liquid content of any liquid ingredient used in the batter. The amount of water going into the cake formula is partially controlled by the type of shortening used. An emulsified type shortening will carry considerably more water in the mix, thus allowing the use of more sugar such as in High Ratio Cakes The total liquids (Liquid in the form of water and the liquid contained in the eggs) should always equal or exceed the weight of the sugar in the formula, because all of the sugar in the formula must be dissolved to produce a quality cake.

Formula Balance. In order to create a cake batter that will produce high quality cakes, certain amounts of the different ingredients have to be put together in a definite sequence at controlled mixing speed, time and temperature. The general relationship of ingredients that have to be brought into balance, differ according to the type of cake to be produced. In other words, the formula balance for batter cakes differs considerably from that of the foam type cake (Sponge cake and Angel food cake). These will be discussed separately. The following general rules apply to Batter type cakes:

RULE 1. The weight of the sugar should equal or exceed the weight of the flour. There is a top limit, of course in the amount of sugar which can go into a cake. For White and Yellow Layer Cakes, 145 percent sugar-flour ratio seems to be about the generally accepted practical top limit. Higher sugar-flour ratios are possible in cakes containing cocoa or chocolate. The more cocoa or chocolate used in the formula, the higher the sugar-flour ratio can be. The amount of liquid also become significant in determining the amount of sugar to use. When RULE NO. 1 is applied and a specific amount of sugar is selected, both the amount of sugar and the amount of flour become fixed. To set up the formula, it then becomes necessary to consider the amount of shortening, eggs and liquid which can be used. As the percentage of shortening is increased, the percentage of eggs must be increased by the same amount. This is due to the fact that shortening is a tenderizer and to keep the cake from being over tenderized, additional structure in the form of eggs is needed.

RULE 2. The weight of eggs should equal or exceed the weight of the shortening. In applying this rule, the type of cake desired must be considered. For example, a true pound cake will have equal parts of shortening or butter, sugar.flour and eggs. A high ratio layer cake will have about 50 or 60 percent as much shortening as flour and the eggs should at least equal the amount of shortening in the mix. Eggs generally exceed the shortening by 5 or 10 percent. Since shortening carries air into the batter, a cake with a high percentage of shortening will be classified as a rich formula. The air carried by the shortening will result in less chemical leavening being needed.

RULE 3. The combined weight of the eggs plus the liquid, should equal or exceed the weight of the sugar. In layer type cakes, the weight of the liquids usually exceed the sugar by 20 t0 30 percent. In devils food cake, the liquids usually exceed the sugar by 40 to 50 percent. In pound cakes, best results are obtained if the liquids and sugar are nearly equal because pound cake batter needs to be slightly thicker.

And so the carrot cake debate rings on .

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with
Crsytalized ginger

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html
Carrots were used in Europe as an inexpensive sweetener in cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages. The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts. The beloved carrot cake can be found in cafes of Britain and co
The contents of carrot cake depends on the region. For some folks additions like coconut, no rx about it raisins, cheapest nuts and pineapple are a must have.

For the past two months I have put in countless hours researching this iconic food. My question? What makes the perfect carrot cake? Conclusion? There is not one perfect carrot cake recipe to satisfy the majority of the masses. We all have different likes and dislikes. Some prefer a spongy moist cake, visit this others a dense cake, a light cake, a plain cake, a cake filled with extras, a wheat-free cake, a sugar-free cake and the list goes on.
The flour in your cake give it structure. The gluten in the flour coagulates during baking providing the support for the oils and sugar.

Sugar tenderizes the gluten and acts as a sweetener (Mmmmm…..). It also carmelizes during baking giving us the delious brown crusty top. Furthermore, the sugar retains moisture and keeps your cake moist and savory for days.

Baking powder acts as the leavening agent creating gas vapors that create the volume in your cake.

Oils help incorporate air into the cake giving it volume. (It’ s cake not a cookie!)

Eggs help the flour in providing structure to the cake by coagulating during baking.

The liquid in the cake (milk) serves to dissovle the sugar, provides consistency for the batter and controls the temperature in the oven.

CAKES DEPEND ON MANY FACTORS SUCH AS INGREDIENTS USED, MIXING METHOD, BATTER TEMPERATURE, BAKING,

Sugar is considered a tenderizer because of its tenderizing effect resulting from the softening action on flour proteins.

Flour is the primary structure builder in most cakes.

Sugar helps to retain moisture left in the baked cake after baking thereby keeping the cake moist and edible for several days.

A portion (about 50 percent) but not all of the sugar may be replaced with sirup. When this is done, the liquid content of the sirup must be deducted from the liquid going into the mix.

If not enough liquid is used to dissolve the sugar, the cake will collapse in the center.

The proteins in the eggs coagulates during baking and assists the flour as a structure builder.
If a weak flour is used, the eggs can be increased. If the percentage of shortening (a tenderizer) called for in the formula is increased, the eggs must be increased also. It is important to know the percentages of fat, moisture, and protein content of eggs when balancing cake formulas.
Milk solids have a binding effect on the protein of the flour, thereby increasing the toughness in a cake.
proteins in milk, adds food value and flavor to the cake, and helps to retain moisture in the cake.

Incorporation of air during mixing, chemically leavened and vapor pressure created in the oven. The manner of leavening depends upon the type of cake being made in regard richness of formula, consistency of batter and baking temperature. Cakes low in water and high in ennriching ingredients get a larger amount of leavening during mixing and require less chemical leaveners than cakes made from lean formulas high in liquids. In addition to leavening the cake, chemical leaveners control the eating qualities of the cake.

Liquids in some form is required in every cake formula. The liquid may be in the form of water, liquid milk, eggs or any other ingredient which contain water. Water has several functions in cake production. It developes the gluten, dissolves the sugar, makes the function of baking powder possible, regulates the batter consistency, and controls the temperature of the batter. It is possible to carefully regulate the water portion of the formula by figuring the liquid content of any liquid ingredient used in the batter. The amount of water going into the cake formula is partially controlled by the type of shortening used. An emulsified type shortening will carry considerably more water in the mix, thus allowing the use of more sugar such as in High Ratio Cakes The total liquids (Liquid in the form of water and the liquid contained in the eggs) should always equal or exceed the weight of the sugar in the formula, because all of the sugar in the formula must be dissolved to produce a quality cake.

Formula Balance. In order to create a cake batter that will produce high quality cakes, certain amounts of the different ingredients have to be put together in a definite sequence at controlled mixing speed, time and temperature. The general relationship of ingredients that have to be brought into balance, differ according to the type of cake to be produced. In other words, the formula balance for batter cakes differs considerably from that of the foam type cake (Sponge cake and Angel food cake). These will be discussed separately. The following general rules apply to Batter type cakes:

RULE 1. The weight of the sugar should equal or exceed the weight of the flour. There is a top limit, of course in the amount of sugar which can go into a cake. For White and Yellow Layer Cakes, 145 percent sugar-flour ratio seems to be about the generally accepted practical top limit. Higher sugar-flour ratios are possible in cakes containing cocoa or chocolate. The more cocoa or chocolate used in the formula, the higher the sugar-flour ratio can be. The amount of liquid also become significant in determining the amount of sugar to use. When RULE NO. 1 is applied and a specific amount of sugar is selected, both the amount of sugar and the amount of flour become fixed. To set up the formula, it then becomes necessary to consider the amount of shortening, eggs and liquid which can be used. As the percentage of shortening is increased, the percentage of eggs must be increased by the same amount. This is due to the fact that shortening is a tenderizer and to keep the cake from being over tenderized, additional structure in the form of eggs is needed.

RULE 2. The weight of eggs should equal or exceed the weight of the shortening. In applying this rule, the type of cake desired must be considered. For example, a true pound cake will have equal parts of shortening or butter, sugar.flour and eggs. A high ratio layer cake will have about 50 or 60 percent as much shortening as flour and the eggs should at least equal the amount of shortening in the mix. Eggs generally exceed the shortening by 5 or 10 percent. Since shortening carries air into the batter, a cake with a high percentage of shortening will be classified as a rich formula. The air carried by the shortening will result in less chemical leavening being needed.

RULE 3. The combined weight of the eggs plus the liquid, should equal or exceed the weight of the sugar. In layer type cakes, the weight of the liquids usually exceed the sugar by 20 t0 30 percent. In devils food cake, the liquids usually exceed the sugar by 40 to 50 percent. In pound cakes, best results are obtained if the liquids and sugar are nearly equal because pound cake batter needs to be slightly thicker.

And so the carrot cake debate rings on .

I want to clear up a few myths about making substitutions in baking. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly with out a replacement in most recipes without effecting the final product too much. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce, or as we did in this recipe with buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions. We have tried to list substitutions that will benefit most people.

4 eggs
1 1/4 cup oil, 3/4 cups
2 cups sugar , 1 1/2 cups
2 cups flour, 1 wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal, 3/4 white
1 tsp soda
1/2 salt
2 tsp powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cloves
3 cups coarsely grated carrots
1 cup toasted nuts, optional

Variations:
Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk. Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup omitting the buttermilk.
To substitute flour, replace all or part with wheat flour or half wheat half all-purpose, all spelt, 1/4 cup flaxseed meal.
Add 1 cup toasted coconut.
Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained, omit one egg and reduce sugar by 1/2 cup.
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla.
Add 1 cup raisins – soaked in orange juice or rum.
Sugar- Xylitol, reduce sugar to 3/4 to 1 1/2 cups, use equal parts white and brown sugar, 1 1/2 white and 1/2 brown, replace sugar with
Crsytalized ginger

# Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.
# In a large bowl, beat together eggs, oil, white sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Mix in flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Stir in carrots. Fold in pecans. Pour into prepared pan.
# Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

Wheat Free Birthday Cake Recipes – Carrot Cake (this recipe is also sugar free)

1 1/2 sticks 6oz (3/4 cup) butter (softened)
3 large eggs, beaten
6oz (3/4 cup) sultanas (golden Raisins)
8oz (1 cup) carrot, peeled and grated, 1 firmly packed cup finely grated, 3 carrots
1 large apple 9oz (1 1/8 cup) apple, peeled, cored and chopped
9oz (2 1/4 cup) wheat free, all purpose flour
2tsp baking powder
2tsp nutmeg
2tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Before you start…

Steam the apple chunks (or simmer in a little water) until tender, then drain and puree.
Preheat the oven to 375 deg F, 190 deg C.
Take the eggs from the refrigerator to bring them closer to room temperature.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter, then beat in the eggs, one at a time.
Stir in the apple puree, sultanas and grated carrot.
Add the flour, baking powder, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt, then carefully fold them into the mixture (a palette knife comes in handy here!). The object of folding in the dry ingredients rather than simply stirring them in is to avoid losing the air you incorporated into the mixture by beating it.
Line a 7″ cake tin with baking parchment and gently spoon in the mixture.
Bake for around one hour, until a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Read more: http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.com/wheat-free-birthday-cake-recipes.html#ixzz0gbVsFYw9
Mom’s Carrot CakeBased on v monte’s recipe on allrecipes.com
6 carrots, quartered (don’t peel them leave all the skin nutrients on)
2 cups white wheat flour (or 1 3/4 flour and 1/4 cup ground flax seed)
2 cups sugar
2 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
3 eggs
2 tsp ground cinnamon
¾ cup grapeseed oil
2 tsp vanilla extract
¾ cup buttermilk
8 oz crushed pineapple with juice
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup organic raisins (or 3.5 oz flaked coconut)

Frosting
4oz softened cream cheese
¼ cup melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

Cook the carrots in a small saucepan covered with water. Bring water to boil and cook until tender, approximately 15 minutes. Fork mash them and let cool. Meanwhile beat eggs, add oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla. Add flour, soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix in pineapple, mashed carrots-(I like bigish chunks so you can see a nice orange color in the final product), nuts and raisins or coconut. Pour into 2 round 9” cake pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until cake tests done (insert toothpick in center, it should come out clean). For 13×9 pan bake for 55 minutes. Place cake on plate and allow to cool before frosting.

Frosting: Combine cream cheese, melted butter, vanilla and powdered sugar.
Spread on cooled cake. Cake tastes better after overnight refrigeration. I make a double batch of icing to ice the rounds, you need more to ice the middle layer and sides.

http://foodwithkidappeal.blogspot.com/2009/04/whole-grain-birthday-carrot-cake.html

Classic Carrot Cake

Carrots were used in Europe as an inexpensive sweetener in cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages. It is no surprise baked goods sweetened and flavored with vegetables and fruits remain a favorite commodity. The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts. The beloved carrot cake can be found in tea houses throughout Britain and cafes across the American continent. The contents of the carrot cake vary with the region and the person making it. For some folks additions like coconut, stuff buy information pills raisins, more about nuts and pineapple are a must have. There are those who prefer a spongy moist cake, cost others a dense cake, a light cake, a plain cake, wheat-free cake, a sugar-free cake, less oil and the list goes on.

For the past three months I have put in countless hours researching this iconic dessert. My question? What makes the perfect carrot cake? Conclusion? There isn’t one. At least not a perfect carrot cake recipe to satisfy the majority of the masses. We all have our own taste. I could post a recipe from the internet with a following of rave reviews but where is the fun in that. I was curious if I could come up with a base recipe that would support the amount of substitutions people would want to make and still be pleasing.

One note I do want to expound on is substitutions. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce that we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce or buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions.

4 eggs
1 1/2 cups Sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/4 cups oil
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon powder
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves
1 cup walnuts or pecans, finely chopped
3 cups carrots, finely grated (about 6-7 medium sized)
Cream Cheese frosting

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.

Spread walnuts on a baking sheet. Bake for 6-8 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Finely chop nuts; set aside.

Wash and peel carrots. Using a box grater or food processor finely shred carrots; set aside.

In a large bowl, beat together eggs and sugars until completely incorporated. Drizzle oil in a steady stream while mixing constantly to emulsify.

In a small bowl sift flour, baking soda, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Add chopped nuts; mix to incorporate. Gently fold dry ingredients into egg mixture until just combined. (Ribbons of flour are still noticeable.) Fold in carrots until completely combined. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 40-50 minutes until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.

Variations:
— Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk.*
— Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup.**
*The proteins in milk can produce a tougher crumb in cakes.
**Reducing the oil this much will result in a drier cake. We recommend reducing the oil no more that 1 cup.
— Substitute all-purpose flour for: 1 cup wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal and 3/4 white. OR substitute all wheat, spelt or a combination or whole grain flours.
— Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
— Replace sugar with equal amount of Xylitol or 1 1/2 cups honey or 2 cups applesauce.
— Use equal parts white and brown sugar or all white or all brown.
— Add 2 teaspoons vanilla. (add with eggs)
— Add 1 cup toasted coconut. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained and squeezed. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 cup raisins or sultanas – soaked in orange juice or rum. (add with carrots)
— Add 1/4 cup chopped Crystallized ginger. (add with carrots)
— Substitute allspice or pumpkin pie spice for nutmeg and cloves.

Notes:
— Our carrot cake was baked using a glass 9X13 baking dish. Dark metal or ceramic pans may vary baking time.
— If you live in a higher elevation you might need to make adjusts. Click here for helpful hints.
— To make cupcakes reduce baking time to 20-25 minutes.

Classic Carrot Cake

Carrots were used in Europe as an inexpensive sweetener in cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages. It is no surprise baked goods sweetened and flavored with vegetables and fruits remain a favorite commodity. The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts. The beloved carrot cake can be found in tea houses throughout Britain and cafes across the American continent. The contents of the carrot cake vary with the region and the person making it. For some folks additions like coconut, stuff buy information pills raisins, more about nuts and pineapple are a must have. There are those who prefer a spongy moist cake, cost others a dense cake, a light cake, a plain cake, wheat-free cake, a sugar-free cake, less oil and the list goes on.

For the past three months I have put in countless hours researching this iconic dessert. My question? What makes the perfect carrot cake? Conclusion? There isn’t one. At least not a perfect carrot cake recipe to satisfy the majority of the masses. We all have our own taste. I could post a recipe from the internet with a following of rave reviews but where is the fun in that. I was curious if I could come up with a base recipe that would support the amount of substitutions people would want to make and still be pleasing.

One note I do want to expound on is substitutions. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce that we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce or buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions.

4 eggs
1 1/2 cups Sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/4 cups oil
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon powder
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves
1 cup walnuts or pecans, finely chopped
3 cups carrots, finely grated (about 6-7 medium sized)
Cream Cheese frosting

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.

Spread walnuts on a baking sheet. Bake for 6-8 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Finely chop nuts; set aside.

Wash and peel carrots. Using a box grater or food processor finely shred carrots; set aside.

In a large bowl, beat together eggs and sugars until completely incorporated. Drizzle oil in a steady stream while mixing constantly to emulsify.

In a small bowl sift flour, baking soda, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Add chopped nuts; mix to incorporate. Gently fold dry ingredients into egg mixture until just combined. (Ribbons of flour are still noticeable.) Fold in carrots until completely combined. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 40-50 minutes until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.

Variations:
— Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk.*
— Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup.**
*The proteins in milk can produce a tougher crumb in cakes.
**Reducing the oil this much will result in a drier cake. We recommend reducing the oil no more that 1 cup.
— Substitute all-purpose flour for: 1 cup wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal and 3/4 white. OR substitute all wheat, spelt or a combination or whole grain flours.
— Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
— Replace sugar with equal amount of Xylitol or 1 1/2 cups honey or 2 cups applesauce.
— Use equal parts white and brown sugar or all white or all brown.
— Add 2 teaspoons vanilla. (add with eggs)
— Add 1 cup toasted coconut. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained and squeezed. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 cup raisins or sultanas – soaked in orange juice or rum. (add with carrots)
— Add 1/4 cup chopped Crystallized ginger. (add with carrots)
— Substitute allspice or pumpkin pie spice for nutmeg and cloves.

Notes:
— Our carrot cake was baked using a glass 9X13 baking dish. Dark metal or ceramic pans may vary baking time.
— If you live in a higher elevation you might need to make adjusts. Click here for helpful hints.
— To make cupcakes reduce baking time to 20-25 minutes.

home_family

I emerged from March into April feeling somewhat defeated and now quite possibly embarrassed. My goal to laugh more in January rewarded me with the ability to let things go. Life is a series of complications. It is how we react to those complications that determines our character. Learning to relinquish the guilt often times associated with being a mom gave me the freedom to accept what may come. The house did not have to be spotless all the time. Celebrations were less about the fluff and more about simple fun. If the kids had a meltdown in public I was under control. In return I became a more relaxed mom capable of giving more.

February’s goal was to express my love more. I am convinced that I could not have accomplished my February goal without having successfully reached my goal in January. Research has shown that when we (parents) are high strung our kids tend to act out more. The more our kids act out the more frustrated we become and the less likely we want to tell them how amazing they are and how much we love them.

Then came March. I thought January and February were stressful. I playfully accused the Gods for trying to test my resolve. I certainly was not expecting what happened in March. March started out on the positive. We were still ill and unable to make plans with our friends most of the month. The times we could come out and play our friends were busy juggling hectic schedules. I was not successful in fulfilling my resolution and that worried me. As I write this I have come to the understanding that not all of March was a failure. We faced some pretty tough days. Had I been the business-like realistic perfectionist of 6 months ago I am not sure I would have escaped with only a terrible migraine. The ironic thing is I had to go through March to better understand my son so that in April I would know how to better meet his needs as his mom.

Which brings me to my April resolution- Family. In April my goal is to help my family reach their potential emotionally and mentally. Even the most loved kid or spouse will feel as though they do not matter. When we feel important and worthy we have the confidence to succeed. Knowing we are loved and that our feelings count is the first step to feeling important.

knight-with-dog-clipart

— Make sure they know they are loved. Express your love and admiration daily. Do not just say it….mean it! For some this may not be an easy feat. With practice you will begin to find the words and the emotions needed to connect with your loved ones.

— Leave little love notes filled with encouragement. Express what you admire most about them.

— Take time to really listen. It takes a loving ear to distinguish what is really going on.

— Linger a little longer. Make one on one time a priority. Allow your child to choose the activity. Keep the mood light and fun. This is not a time for reprimands. Value weekly dates with your spouse as a time to reconnect.

— Provide opportunities. Be cognizant of the hobbies, order interests and talents your family members have an interest in. Provide opportunities to help them grow in these particular areas. If your son is into science you might want to search for science projects you can do together one on one or as a family. If your daughter dreams of being a ballet dancer rent movies or enroll her in dance class.

— Encouragement. For every time you have to correct negative behavior in a child you must find 5 positive things to praise them for. Be very careful when correcting a child that you do not cross over into criticism. Positive encouragement gives them the confidence to want to do better. A marriage and family counselor once said that men are actually weak inside. They need our encouragement to help strengthen them not our nagging and negativity.

Classic Carrot Cake

Carrots were used in Europe as an inexpensive sweetener in cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages. It is no surprise baked goods sweetened and flavored with vegetables and fruits remain a favorite commodity. The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts. The beloved carrot cake can be found in tea houses throughout Britain and cafes across the American continent. The contents of the carrot cake vary with the region and the person making it. For some folks additions like coconut, stuff buy information pills raisins, more about nuts and pineapple are a must have. There are those who prefer a spongy moist cake, cost others a dense cake, a light cake, a plain cake, wheat-free cake, a sugar-free cake, less oil and the list goes on.

For the past three months I have put in countless hours researching this iconic dessert. My question? What makes the perfect carrot cake? Conclusion? There isn’t one. At least not a perfect carrot cake recipe to satisfy the majority of the masses. We all have our own taste. I could post a recipe from the internet with a following of rave reviews but where is the fun in that. I was curious if I could come up with a base recipe that would support the amount of substitutions people would want to make and still be pleasing.

One note I do want to expound on is substitutions. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce that we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce or buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions.

4 eggs
1 1/2 cups Sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/4 cups oil
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon powder
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves
1 cup walnuts or pecans, finely chopped
3 cups carrots, finely grated (about 6-7 medium sized)
Cream Cheese frosting

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.

Spread walnuts on a baking sheet. Bake for 6-8 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Finely chop nuts; set aside.

Wash and peel carrots. Using a box grater or food processor finely shred carrots; set aside.

In a large bowl, beat together eggs and sugars until completely incorporated. Drizzle oil in a steady stream while mixing constantly to emulsify.

In a small bowl sift flour, baking soda, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Add chopped nuts; mix to incorporate. Gently fold dry ingredients into egg mixture until just combined. (Ribbons of flour are still noticeable.) Fold in carrots until completely combined. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 40-50 minutes until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.

Variations:
— Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk.*
— Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup.**
*The proteins in milk can produce a tougher crumb in cakes.
**Reducing the oil this much will result in a drier cake. We recommend reducing the oil no more that 1 cup.
— Substitute all-purpose flour for: 1 cup wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal and 3/4 white. OR substitute all wheat, spelt or a combination or whole grain flours.
— Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
— Replace sugar with equal amount of Xylitol or 1 1/2 cups honey or 2 cups applesauce.
— Use equal parts white and brown sugar or all white or all brown.
— Add 2 teaspoons vanilla. (add with eggs)
— Add 1 cup toasted coconut. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained and squeezed. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 cup raisins or sultanas – soaked in orange juice or rum. (add with carrots)
— Add 1/4 cup chopped Crystallized ginger. (add with carrots)
— Substitute allspice or pumpkin pie spice for nutmeg and cloves.

Notes:
— Our carrot cake was baked using a glass 9X13 baking dish. Dark metal or ceramic pans may vary baking time.
— If you live in a higher elevation you might need to make adjusts. Click here for helpful hints.
— To make cupcakes reduce baking time to 20-25 minutes.

home_family

I emerged from March into April feeling somewhat defeated and now quite possibly embarrassed. My goal to laugh more in January rewarded me with the ability to let things go. Life is a series of complications. It is how we react to those complications that determines our character. Learning to relinquish the guilt often times associated with being a mom gave me the freedom to accept what may come. The house did not have to be spotless all the time. Celebrations were less about the fluff and more about simple fun. If the kids had a meltdown in public I was under control. In return I became a more relaxed mom capable of giving more.

February’s goal was to express my love more. I am convinced that I could not have accomplished my February goal without having successfully reached my goal in January. Research has shown that when we (parents) are high strung our kids tend to act out more. The more our kids act out the more frustrated we become and the less likely we want to tell them how amazing they are and how much we love them.

Then came March. I thought January and February were stressful. I playfully accused the Gods for trying to test my resolve. I certainly was not expecting what happened in March. March started out on the positive. We were still ill and unable to make plans with our friends most of the month. The times we could come out and play our friends were busy juggling hectic schedules. I was not successful in fulfilling my resolution and that worried me. As I write this I have come to the understanding that not all of March was a failure. We faced some pretty tough days. Had I been the business-like realistic perfectionist of 6 months ago I am not sure I would have escaped with only a terrible migraine. The ironic thing is I had to go through March to better understand my son so that in April I would know how to better meet his needs as his mom.

Which brings me to my April resolution- Family. In April my goal is to help my family reach their potential emotionally and mentally. Even the most loved kid or spouse will feel as though they do not matter. When we feel important and worthy we have the confidence to succeed. Knowing we are loved and that our feelings count is the first step to feeling important.

knight-with-dog-clipart

— Make sure they know they are loved. Express your love and admiration daily. Do not just say it….mean it! For some this may not be an easy feat. With practice you will begin to find the words and the emotions needed to connect with your loved ones.

— Leave little love notes filled with encouragement. Express what you admire most about them.

— Take time to really listen. It takes a loving ear to distinguish what is really going on.

— Linger a little longer. Make one on one time a priority. Allow your child to choose the activity. Keep the mood light and fun. This is not a time for reprimands. Value weekly dates with your spouse as a time to reconnect.

— Provide opportunities. Be cognizant of the hobbies, order interests and talents your family members have an interest in. Provide opportunities to help them grow in these particular areas. If your son is into science you might want to search for science projects you can do together one on one or as a family. If your daughter dreams of being a ballet dancer rent movies or enroll her in dance class.

— Encouragement. For every time you have to correct negative behavior in a child you must find 5 positive things to praise them for. Be very careful when correcting a child that you do not cross over into criticism. Positive encouragement gives them the confidence to want to do better. A marriage and family counselor once said that men are actually weak inside. They need our encouragement to help strengthen them not our nagging and negativity.

home_family

I emerged from March into April feeling somewhat defeated and now quite possibly embarrassed. My goal to laugh more in January rewarded me with the ability to let things go. Life is a series of complications. It is how we react to those complications that determines our character. Learning to relinquish the guilt often times associated with being a mom gave me the freedom to accept what may come. The house did not have to be spotless all the time. Celebrations were less about the fluff and more about simple fun. If the kids had a meltdown in public I was under control. In return I became a more relaxed mom capable of giving more.

February’s goal was to express my love more. I am convinced that I could not have accomplished my February goal without having successfully reached my goal in January. Research has shown that when we (parents) are high strung our kids tend to act out more. The more our kids act out the more frustrated we become and the less likely we want to tell them how amazing they are and how much we love them.

Then came March. I thought January and February were stressful. I playfully accused the Gods for trying to test my resolve. I certainly was not expecting what happened in March. March started out on the positive. We were still ill and unable to make plans with our friends most of the month. The times we could come out and play our friends were busy juggling hectic schedules. I was not successful in fulfilling my resolution and that worried me. As I write this I have come to the understanding that not all of March was a failure. We faced some pretty tough days. Had I been the business-like realistic perfectionist of 6 months ago I am not sure I would have escaped with only a terrible migraine. The ironic thing is I had to go through March to better understand my son so that in April I would know how to better meet his needs as his mom.

Which brings me to my April resolution- Family. In April my goal is to help my family reach their potential emotionally and mentally. Even the most loved kid or spouse will feel as though they do not matter. When we feel important and worthy we have the confidence to succeed. Knowing we are loved and that our feelings count is the first step to feeling important.

knight-with-dog-clipart

— Make sure they know they are loved. Express your love and admiration daily. Do not just say it….mean it!

— Leave little love notes filled with encouragement. Express what you admire most about them.

— Take time to really listen. It takes a loving ear to distinguish what is really going on.

— Linger a little longer. Make one on one time a priority. Allow your child to choose the activity. Keep the mood light and fun. This is not a time for reprimands. Value weekly dates with your spouse as a time to reconnect.

— Provide opportunities. Be cognizant of the hobbies, help interests and talents your family members have an interest in. Provide opportunities to help them grow in these particular areas. If your son is into science you might want to search for science projects you can do together one on one or as a family. If your daughter dreams of being a ballet dancer rent movies or enroll her in dance class.

— Encouragement. For every time you have to correct negative behavior in a child you must find 5 positive things to praise them for. Be very careful that when correcting a child you do not cross over to criticism. Positive encouragement give them confidence to want to do better. A marriage and family counselor once said that men are actually weak inside. They need our encouragement to help strengthen them not our nagging and negativity.

Classic Carrot Cake

Carrots were used in Europe as an inexpensive sweetener in cakes and puddings dating far back as the Middle Ages. It is no surprise baked goods sweetened and flavored with vegetables and fruits remain a favorite commodity. The Classic Carrot Cake arrived in America in the 20th century as a “healthy alternative” to traditional desserts. The beloved carrot cake can be found in tea houses throughout Britain and cafes across the American continent. The contents of the carrot cake vary with the region and the person making it. For some folks additions like coconut, stuff buy information pills raisins, more about nuts and pineapple are a must have. There are those who prefer a spongy moist cake, cost others a dense cake, a light cake, a plain cake, wheat-free cake, a sugar-free cake, less oil and the list goes on.

For the past three months I have put in countless hours researching this iconic dessert. My question? What makes the perfect carrot cake? Conclusion? There isn’t one. At least not a perfect carrot cake recipe to satisfy the majority of the masses. We all have our own taste. I could post a recipe from the internet with a following of rave reviews but where is the fun in that. I was curious if I could come up with a base recipe that would support the amount of substitutions people would want to make and still be pleasing.

One note I do want to expound on is substitutions. Often times we make the rationale when replacing part of the oil with applesauce that we are making the cake healthier. Fact is the opposite is true. While it is correct that applesauce reduces the fat content it inadvertently increases the sugar content. Ideally if you choose to replace the oil with applesauce or buttermilk, remember to reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.

Be sure to scroll down to the Variations section for alternative suggestions.

4 eggs
1 1/2 cups Sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/4 cups oil
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon powder
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves
1 cup walnuts or pecans, finely chopped
3 cups carrots, finely grated (about 6-7 medium sized)
Cream Cheese frosting

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a 9×13 inch pan.

Spread walnuts on a baking sheet. Bake for 6-8 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. Finely chop nuts; set aside.

Wash and peel carrots. Using a box grater or food processor finely shred carrots; set aside.

In a large bowl, beat together eggs and sugars until completely incorporated. Drizzle oil in a steady stream while mixing constantly to emulsify.

In a small bowl sift flour, baking soda, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Add chopped nuts; mix to incorporate. Gently fold dry ingredients into egg mixture until just combined. (Ribbons of flour are still noticeable.) Fold in carrots until completely combined. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 40-50 minutes until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.

Variations:
— Replace 3/4 cup of oil with 3/4 cup buttermilk.*
— Reduce the oil to 3/4 cup to 1 cup.**
*The proteins in milk can produce a tougher crumb in cakes.
**Reducing the oil this much will result in a drier cake. We recommend reducing the oil no more that 1 cup.
— Substitute all-purpose flour for: 1 cup wheat, 1/4 flax seed meal and 3/4 white. OR substitute all wheat, spelt or a combination or whole grain flours.
— Reduce the sugar by 1/2 cup.
— Replace sugar with equal amount of Xylitol or 1 1/2 cups honey or 2 cups applesauce.
— Use equal parts white and brown sugar or all white or all brown.
— Add 2 teaspoons vanilla. (add with eggs)
— Add 1 cup toasted coconut. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 (8-oz) can pineapple, drained and squeezed. (add with carrots)
— Add 1 cup raisins or sultanas – soaked in orange juice or rum. (add with carrots)
— Add 1/4 cup chopped Crystallized ginger. (add with carrots)
— Substitute allspice or pumpkin pie spice for nutmeg and cloves.

Notes:
— Our carrot cake was baked using a glass 9X13 baking dish. Dark metal or ceramic pans may vary baking time.
— If you live in a higher elevation you might need to make adjusts. Click here for helpful hints.
— To make cupcakes reduce baking time to 20-25 minutes.

home_family

I emerged from March into April feeling somewhat defeated and now quite possibly embarrassed. My goal to laugh more in January rewarded me with the ability to let things go. Life is a series of complications. It is how we react to those complications that determines our character. Learning to relinquish the guilt often times associated with being a mom gave me the freedom to accept what may come. The house did not have to be spotless all the time. Celebrations were less about the fluff and more about simple fun. If the kids had a meltdown in public I was under control. In return I became a more relaxed mom capable of giving more.

February’s goal was to express my love more. I am convinced that I could not have accomplished my February goal without having successfully reached my goal in January. Research has shown that when we (parents) are high strung our kids tend to act out more. The more our kids act out the more frustrated we become and the less likely we want to tell them how amazing they are and how much we love them.

Then came March. I thought January and February were stressful. I playfully accused the Gods for trying to test my resolve. I certainly was not expecting what happened in March. March started out on the positive. We were still ill and unable to make plans with our friends most of the month. The times we could come out and play our friends were busy juggling hectic schedules. I was not successful in fulfilling my resolution and that worried me. As I write this I have come to the understanding that not all of March was a failure. We faced some pretty tough days. Had I been the business-like realistic perfectionist of 6 months ago I am not sure I would have escaped with only a terrible migraine. The ironic thing is I had to go through March to better understand my son so that in April I would know how to better meet his needs as his mom.

Which brings me to my April resolution- Family. In April my goal is to help my family reach their potential emotionally and mentally. Even the most loved kid or spouse will feel as though they do not matter. When we feel important and worthy we have the confidence to succeed. Knowing we are loved and that our feelings count is the first step to feeling important.

knight-with-dog-clipart

— Make sure they know they are loved. Express your love and admiration daily. Do not just say it….mean it! For some this may not be an easy feat. With practice you will begin to find the words and the emotions needed to connect with your loved ones.

— Leave little love notes filled with encouragement. Express what you admire most about them.

— Take time to really listen. It takes a loving ear to distinguish what is really going on.

— Linger a little longer. Make one on one time a priority. Allow your child to choose the activity. Keep the mood light and fun. This is not a time for reprimands. Value weekly dates with your spouse as a time to reconnect.

— Provide opportunities. Be cognizant of the hobbies, order interests and talents your family members have an interest in. Provide opportunities to help them grow in these particular areas. If your son is into science you might want to search for science projects you can do together one on one or as a family. If your daughter dreams of being a ballet dancer rent movies or enroll her in dance class.

— Encouragement. For every time you have to correct negative behavior in a child you must find 5 positive things to praise them for. Be very careful when correcting a child that you do not cross over into criticism. Positive encouragement gives them the confidence to want to do better. A marriage and family counselor once said that men are actually weak inside. They need our encouragement to help strengthen them not our nagging and negativity.

home_family

I emerged from March into April feeling somewhat defeated and now quite possibly embarrassed. My goal to laugh more in January rewarded me with the ability to let things go. Life is a series of complications. It is how we react to those complications that determines our character. Learning to relinquish the guilt often times associated with being a mom gave me the freedom to accept what may come. The house did not have to be spotless all the time. Celebrations were less about the fluff and more about simple fun. If the kids had a meltdown in public I was under control. In return I became a more relaxed mom capable of giving more.

February’s goal was to express my love more. I am convinced that I could not have accomplished my February goal without having successfully reached my goal in January. Research has shown that when we (parents) are high strung our kids tend to act out more. The more our kids act out the more frustrated we become and the less likely we want to tell them how amazing they are and how much we love them.

Then came March. I thought January and February were stressful. I playfully accused the Gods for trying to test my resolve. I certainly was not expecting what happened in March. March started out on the positive. We were still ill and unable to make plans with our friends most of the month. The times we could come out and play our friends were busy juggling hectic schedules. I was not successful in fulfilling my resolution and that worried me. As I write this I have come to the understanding that not all of March was a failure. We faced some pretty tough days. Had I been the business-like realistic perfectionist of 6 months ago I am not sure I would have escaped with only a terrible migraine. The ironic thing is I had to go through March to better understand my son so that in April I would know how to better meet his needs as his mom.

Which brings me to my April resolution- Family. In April my goal is to help my family reach their potential emotionally and mentally. Even the most loved kid or spouse will feel as though they do not matter. When we feel important and worthy we have the confidence to succeed. Knowing we are loved and that our feelings count is the first step to feeling important.

knight-with-dog-clipart

— Make sure they know they are loved. Express your love and admiration daily. Do not just say it….mean it!

— Leave little love notes filled with encouragement. Express what you admire most about them.

— Take time to really listen. It takes a loving ear to distinguish what is really going on.

— Linger a little longer. Make one on one time a priority. Allow your child to choose the activity. Keep the mood light and fun. This is not a time for reprimands. Value weekly dates with your spouse as a time to reconnect.

— Provide opportunities. Be cognizant of the hobbies, help interests and talents your family members have an interest in. Provide opportunities to help them grow in these particular areas. If your son is into science you might want to search for science projects you can do together one on one or as a family. If your daughter dreams of being a ballet dancer rent movies or enroll her in dance class.

— Encouragement. For every time you have to correct negative behavior in a child you must find 5 positive things to praise them for. Be very careful that when correcting a child you do not cross over to criticism. Positive encouragement give them confidence to want to do better. A marriage and family counselor once said that men are actually weak inside. They need our encouragement to help strengthen them not our nagging and negativity.

Photograph by: Romulo Yanes
Photograph by: Romulo Yanes

It is said that baking is not only an art but more importantly it is a science. First let’s take a look at the science of baking a cake for each main ingredient in a recipe serves an important purpose. The basic carrot cake recipes are all pretty much the same, advice 2 cups sugar, treat 2 cups flour, purchase 1 1/2 cups oil, 4 eggs and 3 cups carrots.

  • Every carrot cake recipe I found called for 2 to 2 1/2 cups of flour. Flour is the primary structure builder in most cakes. The gluten in the flour reacts with the leavening agent (baking soda and baking powder and oil) during baking to make the cake rise.
  • The second ingredient is sugar. The first rule in baking states that the sugar should weigh slightly more or equal to the amount of flour used. This is because the sugar is needed to tenderize the gluten in the flour and acts as a sweetener and preservative to keep the cake moist for several days. About 50 percent of the sugar may be replaced with a liquid substitute; although, when replacing granular sugar for the liquid form, the liquid content of the recipe must be reduced slightly by a couple of tablespoons to a ¼ cup to compensate. The combined weight of the liquid (eggs, fats, milk water, fruits, vegetables, ect) should equal or exceed the weight of the sugar.
  • The third ingredient is oil. Oil like sugar acts as a tenderizing agent to keep the cake from drying out while baking. Oil is also used in correlation with baking soda and powder as a leavening agent. When the oil is mixed into the batter it helps to incorporate air into the cake giving it volume.
  • The fourth main ingredient is eggs. Eggs react with the flour and oil in providing structure and strength. Because of the tenderizing properties of oil the proteins in eggs are necessary to give the cake support. Therefore, the weight of the eggs should equal or exceed the weight of the oil.

Other things to consider:
It is necessary to consider the amount of fat, eggs and liquid used in a recipe. The liquid in the cake (milk, water, milk, eggs, vegetable, fruit, vanilla) serves to develop the gluten, dissolves the sugar, ignites the baking powder and regulates the temperature of the batter while in the oven. Liquids should always equal or exceed the weight of the sugar. If not enough liquid is used to dissolve the sugar, the cake will collapse in the center. If there is too much flour there will not be enough liquid to dissolve the sugar. The amount of liquid is partially controlled by the type of fat used as oils, margarine and shortening vary in the amount of water they contain.

In our carrot cake recipe we need 50-60 percent as much oil as flour. The weight of the eggs should equal or slightly exceed the weight of the oil. The combined weight of the eggs plus the liquid (fats, milk water, fruits, vegetables, ect) should equal or exceed the weight of the sugar. The weight of the sugar should equal the weight of the flour.

On to Substitutions:
I have just given you the rules based on the science of baking a cake. Now let’s discuss the exceptions to the rules. Theoretically the sugar and oil can be reduced slightly without a replacement in most recipes. Substitutions are not ideal especially when baking delicate foods such as pastries. Quick breads like banana bread or carrot cake offer a little more room for error.

baking science

Cake Baking Science Project:

Put science to the test with this cake science project. Learn about chemical reactions by baking 4 small cakes leaving one important ingredient out of 3 of them. The ingredients are only for 1 cake, so you’ll need to measure and mix 4 times.

What you’ll need:
• A small soup or cereal bowl
• Several layers of aluminum foil
• A pie pan
• Cooking oil to grease the “cake pans”
• Measuring spoons
• A cup or small bowl for the egg
• A small mixing bowl
• Your science journal

Ingredients:
• 6 tablespoons flour
• 3 tablespoons sugar
• Pinch of salt
• 2 or 3 pinches baking powder
• 2 tablespoons milk
• 2 tablespoons cooking oil
• 1/4 teaspoon vanilla
• Part of an egg
(Break egg into a cup, beat until mixed.
Use 1/3 of it. Save the rest for 2 of the other cakes.)

What to do:
1. Wrap several layers of aluminum foil around the outside of a cereal or soup bowl to form a mold.
2. Remove your foil “pan” and put it in a pie pan for support.
3. Oil the “inside” of your foil pan with cooking oil so the cake doesn’t stick.
4. Turn the oven on to 350 degrees.
5. Mix all of the dry ingredients together. Add the wet ones (only use 1/3 of the egg). Stir until smooth and all the same color.
6. Pour batter into the “pan.”
7. Bake for 15 minutes.
8. Bake 3 more cakes:
Leave the oil out of one.
Leave the egg out of another.
Leave the baking powder out of the third.
Cut each cake in half and look at the insides.
Do they look different?
Do they taste different?
9. Write about, or draw pictures of, what you see and taste.
Heat helps some chemical reactions to occur as the cake bakes:
It helps baking powder produce tiny bubbles of gas making the cake light and fluffy (this is called leavening).
It causes protein from the egg to change and make the cake firm.
Oil keeps the heat from drying out the cake.

The Many Uses Of Vinegar

Art: The Children Were Nestled by Pat White

I remember as a girl when my dad went out of town for work related conferences my mom would let us sleep with her in her room. We wished we could have slumber parties all the time. I shared a room with my sisters so it was not that we were afraid of being alone. There was something comforting about being with mom.

My young kids share my own enthusiasm for slumber parties. We often find one of the kids lying on the floor in the hall by our room or at the bottom of the stairs waiting for us to go to bed. When dad is out of town the kids and I camp out in the family room or in my bed. We tell stories, abortion sing but mostly they giggle. I know it is going to be a late night because they are so excited it is hard to calm them down. That is why slumber parties are usually reserved for Friday nights when there is no school the next day. We do not have them every week. The kids have to earn them by going to bed when asked every night. Friday night is also movie night so it makes for a fun filled evening of family togetherness. We watch a movie, check serve up popcorn and the kids get to eat a small treat.

Camping is a fun option for a family slumber party if you have older children. Roast marshmallows over the fire. Tell scary ghost stories. Camping is fun both in the summer as well as in the winter. You can even set the tent up inside or out in the back yard. Some families have a family slumber party once a year on Christmas Eve. Everyone sleeps in the family room around the Christmas tree. Tell spirited Christmas stories while sipping on a warm cup of hot chocolate.

Family slumber parties are great fun and a budget friendly way of getting the team together for family time.

Art: The Children Were Nestled by Pat White

I remember as a girl when my dad went out of town for work related conferences my mom would let us sleep with her in her room. We wished we could have slumber parties all the time. I shared a room with my sisters so it was not that we were afraid of being alone. There was something comforting about being with mom.

My young kids share my own enthusiasm for slumber parties. We often find one of the kids lying on the floor in the hall by our room or at the bottom of the stairs waiting for us to go to bed. When dad is out of town the kids and I camp out in the family room or in my bed. We tell stories, abortion sing but mostly they giggle. I know it is going to be a late night because they are so excited it is hard to calm them down. That is why slumber parties are usually reserved for Friday nights when there is no school the next day. We do not have them every week. The kids have to earn them by going to bed when asked every night. Friday night is also movie night so it makes for a fun filled evening of family togetherness. We watch a movie, check serve up popcorn and the kids get to eat a small treat.

Camping is a fun option for a family slumber party if you have older children. Roast marshmallows over the fire. Tell scary ghost stories. Camping is fun both in the summer as well as in the winter. You can even set the tent up inside or out in the back yard. Some families have a family slumber party once a year on Christmas Eve. Everyone sleeps in the family room around the Christmas tree. Tell spirited Christmas stories while sipping on a warm cup of hot chocolate.

Family slumber parties are great fun and a budget friendly way of getting the team together for family time.
parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, generic explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.

Georgia Douglas Johnson that I heard at a Yale open house (before they rejected me =p):

Your World

Your world is as big as you make it
I know, buy information pills for I used to abide
In the narrowest nest in a corner
My wings pressing close to my side

But I sighted the distant horizon
Where the sky-line encircled the sea
And I throbbed with a burning desire
To travel this immensity.

I battered the cordons around me
And cradled my wings on the breeze
Then soared to the uttermost reaches
with rapture, mind with power, with ease!

We believe sharing our stories gives us roots and wings ….

… a sense of family and connection

… a sense of identity, knowing who you are and what you stand for

… a feeling of possibility and freedom

… a sense of being part of history, part of a community.

Art: The Children Were Nestled by Pat White

I remember as a girl when my dad went out of town for work related conferences my mom would let us sleep with her in her room. We wished we could have slumber parties all the time. I shared a room with my sisters so it was not that we were afraid of being alone. There was something comforting about being with mom.

My young kids share my own enthusiasm for slumber parties. We often find one of the kids lying on the floor in the hall by our room or at the bottom of the stairs waiting for us to go to bed. When dad is out of town the kids and I camp out in the family room or in my bed. We tell stories, abortion sing but mostly they giggle. I know it is going to be a late night because they are so excited it is hard to calm them down. That is why slumber parties are usually reserved for Friday nights when there is no school the next day. We do not have them every week. The kids have to earn them by going to bed when asked every night. Friday night is also movie night so it makes for a fun filled evening of family togetherness. We watch a movie, check serve up popcorn and the kids get to eat a small treat.

Camping is a fun option for a family slumber party if you have older children. Roast marshmallows over the fire. Tell scary ghost stories. Camping is fun both in the summer as well as in the winter. You can even set the tent up inside or out in the back yard. Some families have a family slumber party once a year on Christmas Eve. Everyone sleeps in the family room around the Christmas tree. Tell spirited Christmas stories while sipping on a warm cup of hot chocolate.

Family slumber parties are great fun and a budget friendly way of getting the team together for family time.
parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, generic explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.

Georgia Douglas Johnson that I heard at a Yale open house (before they rejected me =p):

Your World

Your world is as big as you make it
I know, buy information pills for I used to abide
In the narrowest nest in a corner
My wings pressing close to my side

But I sighted the distant horizon
Where the sky-line encircled the sea
And I throbbed with a burning desire
To travel this immensity.

I battered the cordons around me
And cradled my wings on the breeze
Then soared to the uttermost reaches
with rapture, mind with power, with ease!

We believe sharing our stories gives us roots and wings ….

… a sense of family and connection

… a sense of identity, knowing who you are and what you stand for

… a feeling of possibility and freedom

… a sense of being part of history, part of a community.

Uses of vinegar

Photo by Greener Loudoun

Vinegar came into existence, order by mere chance, buy information pills more than 10,000 years ago when a cask of wine had over-reached its expiration date. Centuries later in 1964, Scientist Louis Pasteur, discovered that it was the fermentation of natural sugars into alcohol followed by a secondary fermentation that resulted in the product vinegar.

Throughout the time that vinegar has been known to man the substance has been distilled using ingredients such as molasses, dates, fruits, berries, melons, coconut, honey, beer, maple syrup, potatoes, beets, malt, grains and whey. Consequently, the flavors and varieties of vinegars available are just as vast and unique as the substances it is made from.

Since the first accidental discovery this inexpensive kitchen staple has been used in remarkable capacities. Recorded historical uses of vinegar began as far back as 5,000 BC.
-Babylonians used it as a preservative; flavoring the liquid with herbs and spices.
-Roman legionnaires consumed it as a beverage. In ancient Egypt, -Cleopatra used vinegar as a solvent dissolving pearls in it to win a wager that she could consume a fortune in a single meal.
-The Ancient Physician Hippocrates, discovered its medicinal qualities using it as a stringent and cough remedy.
-The Greeks used it for culinary purposes in pickling vegetables and meats.
-Hannibal, a great general, gained access across the Alps by heating a barrier of boulders and then doused them with vinegar. The boulders cracked and crumbled paving a path for his army to cross through.
-During the American Civil War, vinegar was used to treat scurvy.
-During World War I, vinegar was used to treat wounds.

Today we continue to enjoy the benefits of this ancient sour wine in cleaning, household projects, medicinal remedies, organic agriculture, and the culinary arts. The following tips use ordinary distilled white vinegar. This list is just a sample of the many uses of vinegar. For more fun facts and tips visit VinegarTips.com for 1001 Uses for White Distilled Vinegar.

uses-vinegar

Photo By: This Old House

CLEANING:

  • Make your own cleaning solution by combining 1/2 cup vinegar, 1 cup Ammonia, 1/4 cup baking soda and 1 gallon hot water.
  • Use vinegar to clean hard water stains from tub/shower stalls. Mix 1/2 cup vinegar and 1 cup fabric softener with 1 quart warm water. Spray glass shower door with furniture polish or lemon oil to prevent build up. For basic cleaning of tubs and sinks wipe with vinegar and then scrub with baking soda. Rinse clean with water.
  • Whiten Grout. Scrub grout with a stiff brush dipped in vinegar. For extra fighting power add baking soda to make a paste.
  • Remove mineral deposits from showerheads. Pour 1/2 cup of warm water into a resealable plastic bag. Drop in the showerhead, seal and let sit 1 hour. Rinse clean and wipe dry.
  • Make the toilet bowl sparkle. Drop 1 denture cleaner tablet into the toilet with 1 cup vinegar. Let sit 30 minutes. Scrub with baking soda.
  • Wipe glass doors and windows streak free. Mix 1/2 cup to 1 cup vinegar with 1/2 gallon of water. Pour into a spray bottle.
  • Wash no-wax floors. Add 1/2 cup vinegar to a 1/2 gallon warm water.
    Carpet stain removal. (for the removal of fresh non-oily carpet stains) mix 1 teaspoon liquid detergent and 1 teaspoon of vinegar in a pint of warm water. Apply solution to the stain with a soft brush or towel and rub gently. Rinse with a towel moistened with clean water; blot dry. Repeat until the stain is gone. Then dry quickly, using a fan or hair dryer.
  • Wipe out water rings on wood furniture by rubbing with a mixture of equal parts vinegar and olive oil. Rub with the grain and polish for the best results.
  • Sanitize the refrigerator. Wipe with a solution of equal parts water and vinegar. Remove odor by placing 1 cup apple cider vinegar in a glass and place it in the refrigerator for a few days.
  • Disinfect cutting boards; a nice alternative to using bleach. Wipe with full strength vinegar.
  • Shine stainless steel appliances and sinks. Apply vinegar with a soft cloth to remove streaks from stainless steel appliances. (Try in an inconspicuous place first) You can also use lemon oil.
  • Keep garbage disposals fresh and clean. Make vinegar cubes by filling an ice tray with a mixture of 1 cup of vinegar and enough water to fill the ice tray; freeze. Run the mixture through the disposal, and then flush it with cold water for a minute or so. The ice sharpens the blades while the vinegar disinfects.
  • Dishes and glasses. Pour 1 ½ cup to 2 cups vinegar in the bottom of the dishwasher. Add soap and wash full cycle. Use this technique instead of bleach to fight off the flu.
  • Kill Germs in the Laundry. Add 1 tsp salt and 1/4 cup vinegar to wash.
  • Fabric Softener. Add 1/4-1/2 cup to fabric softener dispenser. Especially great on baby clothes and towels.
  • Deodorant stains. Rub with vinegar and wash as usual. For tough stains make a paste of vinegar and baking soda. Rub into stain. Leave garment in the sun. Wash as usual.
  • Wine stains. Remove wine stains from 100% cotton, cotton polyester and permanent press fabrics within 24 hours. Sponge vinegar directly onto the stain and gently rub away the spots. Then clean according to the directions on the manufacturer’s tag.
  • Keeping colors fast:
    To hold colors in fabrics, which tend to run, soak them for a few minutes in white distilled vinegar before washing.
    When color dyeing fabrics, add 1 cup of vinegar to the last rinse water to help set the color.
  • Cleaning Vintage Lace. Soak the lace in cold water, rinsing it several times. Next, hand-wash with Woolite. Remove stains with equal parts vinegar and hot water.
  • Unclog a steam iron. Pour equal amounts of vinegar and water into the iron’s water chamber. Turn to steam and leave the iron on for 5 minutes in an upright position. Then unplug and allow to cool. Any loose particles should come out when you empty the water.
    To remove the burn mark on the iron plate, heat equal parts vinegar and salt in a small pan. Rub the solution on the cooled iron surface.
  • Shine brass, copper and pewter. Dissolve 1 teaspoon salt in 1 cup of vinegar. Stir in flour to make a paste. Apply paste to the metals and let stand for about 15 minutes. Rinse with clean warm water and polish until dry.
    Mix olive oil and vinegar in a one-to-one ratio and polish with a soft cloth. Try in an inconspicuous place first.
  • Remove the blackened soot on fireplace glass doors. Wash fireplaces with a 50/50 ratio of water and vinegar to. Wipe dry with newspaper.
  • Clean Gold Jewelry. Submerge jewelry in one cup apple cider vinegar; let sit 15 minutes. Remove and dry with cloth.
  • Clean DVDs. Wipe smudged CDs and DVDs with vinegar. Dry completely before reinserting into player.

uses-vinegar

Photo By: This Old House

HOUSEHOLD:

  • Non-poisonous ant solution. Dab a cotton ball with vinegar. Swab areas the ants trail. Heat a pot of vinegar then pour over ant hills.
  • Fruit fly deterrent. Place a bowl filled with 1/2 quart water, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons. apple cider vinegar and a couple drops dish soap.
  • Banish stickiness. Remove stickers and price tags from glass, wood and plastic. Dab vinegar on stubborn stickers; scrap surface clean.
  • Clean paint brushes by soaking them 30 minutes in hot vinegar. Wash in hot soapy water, cleaning off paint.
  • Rust Remover. Soak rusted tools in vinegar for a few days. Rinse with water.

GARDENING:

  • Increase soil acidity: In hard water areas, add a cup of vinegar to a gallon of tap water. Great for rhododendrons, gardenias or azaleas.
  • Keep flowers fresh longer. Add 2 tablespoons sugar and 2 tablespoons vinegar with 1-quart water. Trim stems and change water every five days.
  • Grass and weed control. To kill grass on sidewalks and driveways, pour full strength vinegar on it.
    For weeds, spray full strength vinegar on tops of weeds. Reapply on any new growth until plants have starved.
  • Plant food. Mix vinegar and water in a ratio of one part vinegar to 8 parts water. Mix a separate solution of 1 part sugar to 8 parts water. Combine the vinegar and sugar mixtures.

article-apple-cider-vinegar

Photo By: AppleCiderVinegarWeightloss.com

CULINARY:

  • For burnt on food, submerge the area in vinegar and soak overnight. Clean with hot soapy water.
  • To control weight swap out creamy salad dressings for a sprinkle of vinegar. Use flavors such as Champagne, Balsamic, Red Wine and seasoned.
  • Flavor soups and stews using a tablespoon of your favorite vinegar.
  • Meat tenderizer. Combine 1/2 cup of your favorite vinegar to 1 cup of bouillon or 1/4 cup oil. Rub into meat; let sit two hours.
  • For sweeter more tender fish soak fish in vinegar and water before cooking. Add 1 tablespoon vinegar to water when poaching fish to keep it from crumbling.
  • Add a little vinegar to the water when poaching or boiling eggs. It helps to keep the whites together.
  • Prevent oxidation of potatoes. Peeled potatoes left sitting begin to oxidize and turn dark. Add a teaspoon of white distilled vinegar or cider vinegar to the pot of water.
  • Fruit and vegetable wash. Freshen and wash vegetables by adding 2 tablespoons vinegar to 1 pint water; wash, then rinse thoroughly.
  • Before frying doughnuts, add 1/2 teaspoon of vinegar to hot oil to prevent doughnuts soaking up extra grease. Use caution when adding the vinegar to the hot oil.

cleaning-table with vinegar

Photo By: Planet Green

MISCELLANEOUS TIPS:

  • Remove fruit or berry stains from your hands by cleaning them with vinegar.
  • To keep pets free of fleas and ticks mix 1teaspoon vinegar to each quart of drinking water. This solution is for a forty pound animal, Always get the approval of your pets doctor before trying natural home remedies.
  • Smelly dog odor. Rinse the dog with fresh water. Saturate the dogs coat with a mixture of 1 cup vinegar and 2 gallons water. Do not rinse. Dry completely.
  • Potty Accidents for both people and animals. Sprinkle area with vinegar. Wait a few minutes and sponge from the center outward. Blot up with a dry cloth. Repeat if necessary. (Test carpet in an inconspicuous place before trying)
  • Frosted windows:
    For those rare winter mornings when there is frost on the car, wipe the windows the night before with a solution of one part water to three parts white distilled vinegar. They won’t frost over.
  • Freshen lunch boxes by dampening a piece of bread with vinegar and enclose in the lunch box overnight.
  • Freshen the kitchen. Odors can linger after cooking meats or with oil. Simmer an equal mix of water and vinegar until smell dissolves.

foot with pedicure

MEDICAL:

  • Clean Calcium Deposits and Sanitize Humidifiers. Heat 1 ¾ vinegar. Pour vinegar into reservoir and replace cap. Let sit for 1 hour. Remove vinegar. Reservoir should be clean and calcium free. Contact manufacturer before cleaning with this method or review manufacturer’s directions.
  • Soothe a bee or jellyfish sting. Douse with vinegar to soothe irritation and relieve itching. (You can also use tobacco. Make a paste with tobacco from a cigar and water. Tape in place over hole.)
    Relieve sunburn. Lightly rub white distilled or cider vinegar on area. Reapply as needed.
  • For other types of burns, apply ice-cold vinegar right away to prevent blisters.
  • Relieve dry and itchy skin such as Psoriasis. Add 2 tablespoons of vinegar to your bath water. (A compress of seaweed works well too) For dry scalp, after shampooing, rinse with a solution of 1/2 cup vinegar and 2 cups of warm water.
  • Stop Itching. Apply a paste of vinegar and cornstarch. Keep on until itch disappears.
  • Toenail fungus. Soak toes in a solution of vinegar and water, using 1 part vinegar to 2 parts water, 15 minutes per day.
  • Soften callused cracked Feet. Combine 1 cup vinegar to 2 gallons warm water. Soak feet for 45 minutes then use a pumice stone or file to remove dead skin from heels and callused areas of feet.
  • Wart Remover. Mix warm water with 1 cup vinegar. Soak area for 20 minutes everyday until wart disappears.
  • Soothe a sore throat. There are several ways to do this. Put a teaspoon of vinegar in a glass of water; gargle, then swallow. Mix 1 cup hot water, 2 tablespoons honey, 1 teaspoon vinegar, gargle then drink. (Mix 1/2 tsp salt to 2 cups water, add 1 tablespoon peroxide. Heat in the microwave until warm. Gargle, do not drink.)
  • Treat sinus infections and chest colds. Add 1/4 cup or more vinegar to a vaporizer. Add water as needed per unit instructions.
  • Chest congestion. Inhale a vapor mist from a steaming pot containing water and several spoonfuls of vinegar.
  • Calm a queasy stomach. If you can stomach the smell and taste try downing some apple cider vinegar in water, with a little honey.

easter_eggs-midiman

Photo By: My Little Cottage in the Making

FUN KIDS STUFF:

  • Coloring Easter eggs. Mix 1 teaspoon of vinegar with each 1/2 cup hot water; add food coloring.
  • Naked eggs. Magically remove the shell of an egg. This project takes two days to complete.
    Place eggs in a container so the eggs are not touching. Add enough vinegar to cover the eggs. Cover the container, put in the refrigerator and let sit for 24 hours. Use a slotted spoon to carefully scoop out the eggs. Dump out the vinegar. Put the eggs back in the container and cover with fresh vinegar. Leave the eggs in the refrigerator for another 24 hours. Scoop the eggs out again and rinse carefully. Throw away any eggs with broken membranes. Now you should have egg without a shell.
  • Volcano. Make the cone of the volcano by mixing 6 cups flour, 2 cups salt, 4 tablespoons cooking oil and 2 cups of water. Mix until smooth and firm. Stand a soda bottle in a baking pan and mold the dough around it into a volcano shape. Do not cover the hole or drop dough into it. Fill the bottle most of the way with warm water and a few drops of red food coloring. Add 6 drops of detergent to the bottle contents. Add 2 tablespoons baking soda to the liquid. Slowly pour vinegar into the bottle.
  • Berry ink pens. 1/2 cup ripe berries, 1/2 teaspoon vinegar, 1/2 teaspoon salt and feather.
    Fit a strainer over a bowl. Place berries in strainer. Using the back of a wooden spoon, crush the berries against the strainer. Keep pressing until most of the juice has been strained out and only pulp remains. Add the salt and vinegar to the berry juice. If the berry ink is too thick, add a tablespoon of water. Store in a baby food jar sealed tightly. Cut the tip of the feather at an angle. Cut a slit in the tip. Dip the tip into the berry ink; dap on paper towel. Repeat as needed.
  • Magic Potion. Pour 2 tablespoons vinegar into a shallow bowl or cup set on a baking sheet. Add 1 tablespoon baking soda.
    Hot Air Balloon. Pour 4 tablespoons vinegar into a bottle. Pour 2 tablespoons baking soda into a balloon that isn’t blown up (make a siphon out of cone of paper). Without tipping the baking soda into the vinegar, put the balloon over the top of the container. Use your hand or a rubber band to hold the seal. Jiggle the balloon so the baking soda is dumped in.

How To Grate Fresh Nutmeg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1c1iNYEE4BA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1c1iNYEE4BA

Nutmeg Seed

There are two spices derived from the fruit of the Myristica fragrans tree, drug nutmeg and mace. The spices were originally derived from the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Mace comes from the red lacy covering of the stone-like seed, while nutmeg is made from the seed itself.

I have only ever used the ground form of nutmeg. Foodies profess they only use freshly grated nutmeg. I finally decided to try it out to see what all the hype was about. I purchased a bottle of Spice Island Whole nutmeg. It is not gourmet from Whole Foods, it was the only brand the market carried. I started with my favorite holiday recipe Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I was all set to go with my Microplane in one hand and a nutmeg seed in the other. Problem was I was uncertain what to do. Was I supposed to crack the seed open? Is the seed it? I turned to the internet but could not find anything on grating nutmeg. I concluded I would grate the seed and hope for the best.

The only difference I could tell was that the freshly grated nutmeg seemed to blend in in a silky smooth way. The powdered form of nutmeg can sometimes be overpowering. I paid $6.59 for a bottle of 14 seeds. Cost-wise it is a good deal. I made two recipes and barley used a quarter of the seed. Grated nutmeg may be substituted for ground simply by adding a smidgen less of the fresh stuff.

To grate nutmeg gently rub against the sharp edges of a microplane in a back and forth motion. Keep the hollow side turned up to catch the shavings. It makes it easier to see how much you have grated.

How to Make Turkey Stock

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.
Every year it is the same dilemma, pills “what to do with the left over turkey!” We always have turkey soup on Sunday. Then there is cranberry stuffed turkey rolls with left over stuffing and turkey pot pie. Turkey Tetrazzini is another comfort food favorite. I like to use left over mashed potatoes, tadalafil if there are any, physician in place of the noodles.

Source: Rosy Little Things
1 lb. button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
4 cup milk
10 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 cup flour
1 cup turkey gravy (or however much you have left over, if less than that)
1 to 2 cups leftover turkey meat, shredded into bite-sized chunks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 lb. spaghetti
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in large saute pan and saute mushrooms until soft and slightly browned. Set aside.

Make bechamel sauce: Over medium heat, melt remaining butter in large saucepan, add flour, and whisk over medium heat for several minutes. Whisk milk into butter/flour mixture gradually until all milk is incorporated. Simmer sauce until it is thickened slightly and very velvety. Add turkey gravy and mushrooms and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in boiling water until a minute or two before al dente. Drain and return to pot. Mix in half of sauce and stir to coat. Pour spaghetti into 9″ x 13″ pan and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 30 minutes until top is bubbling and delicious-looking. Add turkey pieces to sauce and serve over slices of spaghetti casserole. Enjoy thoroughly.

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.
Every year it is the same dilemma, pills “what to do with the left over turkey!” We always have turkey soup on Sunday. Then there is cranberry stuffed turkey rolls with left over stuffing and turkey pot pie. Turkey Tetrazzini is another comfort food favorite. I like to use left over mashed potatoes, tadalafil if there are any, physician in place of the noodles.

Source: Rosy Little Things
1 lb. button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
4 cup milk
10 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 cup flour
1 cup turkey gravy (or however much you have left over, if less than that)
1 to 2 cups leftover turkey meat, shredded into bite-sized chunks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 lb. spaghetti
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in large saute pan and saute mushrooms until soft and slightly browned. Set aside.

Make bechamel sauce: Over medium heat, melt remaining butter in large saucepan, add flour, and whisk over medium heat for several minutes. Whisk milk into butter/flour mixture gradually until all milk is incorporated. Simmer sauce until it is thickened slightly and very velvety. Add turkey gravy and mushrooms and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in boiling water until a minute or two before al dente. Drain and return to pot. Mix in half of sauce and stir to coat. Pour spaghetti into 9″ x 13″ pan and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 30 minutes until top is bubbling and delicious-looking. Add turkey pieces to sauce and serve over slices of spaghetti casserole. Enjoy thoroughly.
A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, view normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies, so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” I was unsuccessful in my attempt to locate cannoli shells. The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.
Every year it is the same dilemma, pills “what to do with the left over turkey!” We always have turkey soup on Sunday. Then there is cranberry stuffed turkey rolls with left over stuffing and turkey pot pie. Turkey Tetrazzini is another comfort food favorite. I like to use left over mashed potatoes, tadalafil if there are any, physician in place of the noodles.

Source: Rosy Little Things
1 lb. button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
4 cup milk
10 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 cup flour
1 cup turkey gravy (or however much you have left over, if less than that)
1 to 2 cups leftover turkey meat, shredded into bite-sized chunks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 lb. spaghetti
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in large saute pan and saute mushrooms until soft and slightly browned. Set aside.

Make bechamel sauce: Over medium heat, melt remaining butter in large saucepan, add flour, and whisk over medium heat for several minutes. Whisk milk into butter/flour mixture gradually until all milk is incorporated. Simmer sauce until it is thickened slightly and very velvety. Add turkey gravy and mushrooms and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in boiling water until a minute or two before al dente. Drain and return to pot. Mix in half of sauce and stir to coat. Pour spaghetti into 9″ x 13″ pan and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 30 minutes until top is bubbling and delicious-looking. Add turkey pieces to sauce and serve over slices of spaghetti casserole. Enjoy thoroughly.
A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, view normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies, so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” I was unsuccessful in my attempt to locate cannoli shells. The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, approved is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, ailment it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, visit this May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.
Every year it is the same dilemma, pills “what to do with the left over turkey!” We always have turkey soup on Sunday. Then there is cranberry stuffed turkey rolls with left over stuffing and turkey pot pie. Turkey Tetrazzini is another comfort food favorite. I like to use left over mashed potatoes, tadalafil if there are any, physician in place of the noodles.

Source: Rosy Little Things
1 lb. button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
4 cup milk
10 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 cup flour
1 cup turkey gravy (or however much you have left over, if less than that)
1 to 2 cups leftover turkey meat, shredded into bite-sized chunks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 lb. spaghetti
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in large saute pan and saute mushrooms until soft and slightly browned. Set aside.

Make bechamel sauce: Over medium heat, melt remaining butter in large saucepan, add flour, and whisk over medium heat for several minutes. Whisk milk into butter/flour mixture gradually until all milk is incorporated. Simmer sauce until it is thickened slightly and very velvety. Add turkey gravy and mushrooms and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in boiling water until a minute or two before al dente. Drain and return to pot. Mix in half of sauce and stir to coat. Pour spaghetti into 9″ x 13″ pan and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 30 minutes until top is bubbling and delicious-looking. Add turkey pieces to sauce and serve over slices of spaghetti casserole. Enjoy thoroughly.
A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, view normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies, so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” I was unsuccessful in my attempt to locate cannoli shells. The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, approved is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, ailment it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, visit this May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.

Quinoa Stuffed Red Peppers

Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers makes for a delectable main dish paired with a side of garlic toast or a light salad. It is one of those feel good meals I would choose over a piece of chocolate any day. Please Do Not let the bell peppers deter you from trying the quinoa stuffing. If bell peppers are not your thing try a bed of arugula, abortion a stuffed zucchini or serve the stuffing by itself like you would a casserole. As for serving sizes Katie suggests 1 pepper if you have an accompanying side. Otherwise 1 whole pepper would be considered a serving.

Now, lets talk ingredients. I found a small package of quinoa at the supermarket for $10.99. I ended up purchasing the same amount at the health food store for .99 cents a pound. A huge savings. The poblano pepper is the new hot chili pepper fad right now. I could not find a poblano pepper in the produce section at the market. When I asked the produce manager for a suitable replacement he admitted he had heard of them but did not know what a poblano pepper was. Poblano peppers are used to make chile relleno in the place of pasilla peppers and they are also used in mole. Cook’s Thesaurus suggests using Anaheim or Ancho as a substitute. I tried half of an Anaheim but because I used a Monterey Jack and Cheddar blend cheese instead of pepper jack I could have used the whole pepper. Definitely season well with salt and pepper. You could use broth instead of water to cook the quinoa for more flavor too.

Source: GoodLifeEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 3/4 cups water or broth
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Heat oil in a large pan with a lid over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper cooking 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic; sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Meanwhile bring the quinoa, carrots and water to a boil in a covered sauce pan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 20 minutes or until quinoa is tender.

Add the quinoa to the onion mixture. Toss in the black beans and 1 cup of cheese.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.
Every year it is the same dilemma, pills “what to do with the left over turkey!” We always have turkey soup on Sunday. Then there is cranberry stuffed turkey rolls with left over stuffing and turkey pot pie. Turkey Tetrazzini is another comfort food favorite. I like to use left over mashed potatoes, tadalafil if there are any, physician in place of the noodles.

Source: Rosy Little Things
1 lb. button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
4 cup milk
10 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 cup flour
1 cup turkey gravy (or however much you have left over, if less than that)
1 to 2 cups leftover turkey meat, shredded into bite-sized chunks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 lb. spaghetti
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in large saute pan and saute mushrooms until soft and slightly browned. Set aside.

Make bechamel sauce: Over medium heat, melt remaining butter in large saucepan, add flour, and whisk over medium heat for several minutes. Whisk milk into butter/flour mixture gradually until all milk is incorporated. Simmer sauce until it is thickened slightly and very velvety. Add turkey gravy and mushrooms and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in boiling water until a minute or two before al dente. Drain and return to pot. Mix in half of sauce and stir to coat. Pour spaghetti into 9″ x 13″ pan and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 30 minutes until top is bubbling and delicious-looking. Add turkey pieces to sauce and serve over slices of spaghetti casserole. Enjoy thoroughly.
A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, view normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies, so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” I was unsuccessful in my attempt to locate cannoli shells. The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, approved is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, ailment it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, visit this May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.

Quinoa Stuffed Red Peppers

Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers makes for a delectable main dish paired with a side of garlic toast or a light salad. It is one of those feel good meals I would choose over a piece of chocolate any day. Please Do Not let the bell peppers deter you from trying the quinoa stuffing. If bell peppers are not your thing try a bed of arugula, abortion a stuffed zucchini or serve the stuffing by itself like you would a casserole. As for serving sizes Katie suggests 1 pepper if you have an accompanying side. Otherwise 1 whole pepper would be considered a serving.

Now, lets talk ingredients. I found a small package of quinoa at the supermarket for $10.99. I ended up purchasing the same amount at the health food store for .99 cents a pound. A huge savings. The poblano pepper is the new hot chili pepper fad right now. I could not find a poblano pepper in the produce section at the market. When I asked the produce manager for a suitable replacement he admitted he had heard of them but did not know what a poblano pepper was. Poblano peppers are used to make chile relleno in the place of pasilla peppers and they are also used in mole. Cook’s Thesaurus suggests using Anaheim or Ancho as a substitute. I tried half of an Anaheim but because I used a Monterey Jack and Cheddar blend cheese instead of pepper jack I could have used the whole pepper. Definitely season well with salt and pepper. You could use broth instead of water to cook the quinoa for more flavor too.

Source: GoodLifeEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 3/4 cups water or broth
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Heat oil in a large pan with a lid over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper cooking 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic; sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Meanwhile bring the quinoa, carrots and water to a boil in a covered sauce pan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 20 minutes or until quinoa is tender.

Add the quinoa to the onion mixture. Toss in the black beans and 1 cup of cheese.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.

Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli

A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, doctor normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies and pumpkin pie bars, story so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” Cannoli shells can be found in the bakery section of the market . The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. Mascarpone cheese is a thick spreadable cheese similar to cream cheese. It comes in a small tub usually found in the deli with the gourmet cheese. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Cannoli Shells

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

Filling pumpkin pistachio Cannoli*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.
Every year it is the same dilemma, pills “what to do with the left over turkey!” We always have turkey soup on Sunday. Then there is cranberry stuffed turkey rolls with left over stuffing and turkey pot pie. Turkey Tetrazzini is another comfort food favorite. I like to use left over mashed potatoes, tadalafil if there are any, physician in place of the noodles.

Source: Rosy Little Things
1 lb. button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
4 cup milk
10 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 cup flour
1 cup turkey gravy (or however much you have left over, if less than that)
1 to 2 cups leftover turkey meat, shredded into bite-sized chunks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 lb. spaghetti
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in large saute pan and saute mushrooms until soft and slightly browned. Set aside.

Make bechamel sauce: Over medium heat, melt remaining butter in large saucepan, add flour, and whisk over medium heat for several minutes. Whisk milk into butter/flour mixture gradually until all milk is incorporated. Simmer sauce until it is thickened slightly and very velvety. Add turkey gravy and mushrooms and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in boiling water until a minute or two before al dente. Drain and return to pot. Mix in half of sauce and stir to coat. Pour spaghetti into 9″ x 13″ pan and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 30 minutes until top is bubbling and delicious-looking. Add turkey pieces to sauce and serve over slices of spaghetti casserole. Enjoy thoroughly.
A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, view normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies, so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” I was unsuccessful in my attempt to locate cannoli shells. The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, approved is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, ailment it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, visit this May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.

Quinoa Stuffed Red Peppers

Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers makes for a delectable main dish paired with a side of garlic toast or a light salad. It is one of those feel good meals I would choose over a piece of chocolate any day. Please Do Not let the bell peppers deter you from trying the quinoa stuffing. If bell peppers are not your thing try a bed of arugula, abortion a stuffed zucchini or serve the stuffing by itself like you would a casserole. As for serving sizes Katie suggests 1 pepper if you have an accompanying side. Otherwise 1 whole pepper would be considered a serving.

Now, lets talk ingredients. I found a small package of quinoa at the supermarket for $10.99. I ended up purchasing the same amount at the health food store for .99 cents a pound. A huge savings. The poblano pepper is the new hot chili pepper fad right now. I could not find a poblano pepper in the produce section at the market. When I asked the produce manager for a suitable replacement he admitted he had heard of them but did not know what a poblano pepper was. Poblano peppers are used to make chile relleno in the place of pasilla peppers and they are also used in mole. Cook’s Thesaurus suggests using Anaheim or Ancho as a substitute. I tried half of an Anaheim but because I used a Monterey Jack and Cheddar blend cheese instead of pepper jack I could have used the whole pepper. Definitely season well with salt and pepper. You could use broth instead of water to cook the quinoa for more flavor too.

Source: GoodLifeEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 3/4 cups water or broth
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Heat oil in a large pan with a lid over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper cooking 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic; sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Meanwhile bring the quinoa, carrots and water to a boil in a covered sauce pan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 20 minutes or until quinoa is tender.

Add the quinoa to the onion mixture. Toss in the black beans and 1 cup of cheese.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.

Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli

A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, doctor normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies and pumpkin pie bars, story so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” Cannoli shells can be found in the bakery section of the market . The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. Mascarpone cheese is a thick spreadable cheese similar to cream cheese. It comes in a small tub usually found in the deli with the gourmet cheese. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Cannoli Shells

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

Filling pumpkin pistachio Cannoli*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

Cornbread Omelets

In this post we begin with a recipe for an omelet made from a cornbread batter as opposed to eggs. I could not find white cornmeal mix in our local grocery store. Instead I used plain yellow cornmeal in place of the mix. Not completely satisfied I decided to try a few more variations. I found a lovely recipe for cornmeal cakes on Cow Girl Chef and learned how to make my own chorizo.

If you cannot find cornmeal mix then use the recipe below for cornmeal cakes.

Cornbread Omelets:
Source: Southern Living September 2009

3/4 pound Chorizo sausage, patient castings removes (about 3 links), or see recipe below
6 tbsp butter, divided
3 green onions, chopped
1 small red bell pepper, chopped
1-2 jalapeno peppers, minced
1 cup self-rising white cornmeal mix (such as Martha White)
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup flour
1 large egg, lightly beaten
Cooking spray
1 cup shredded Mexican cheese blend

Sauté chorizo in an 8-inch nonstick omelet pan or skillet with sloped sides 7 to 10 minutes or until browned. Remove from skillet, and drain on paper towels. Wipe skillet clean.

Melt 1 tablespoon butter in skillet, and sauté green onions, bell pepper, and jalapeño peppers over medium-high heat 3 to 5 minutes or until tender. Transfer to a bowl; stir in chorizo. Wipe skillet clean.

Whisk together cornmeal mix, buttermilk, milk, all-purpose flour, and 1 large egg.

Coat skillet with cooking spray; melt 1 tablespoon butter in skillet over medium-high heat, rotating pan to coat bottom evenly. Pour about 1/3 cup cornmeal mixture into skillet. Tilt pan so uncooked portion flows around to coat bottom of pan, cooking until almost set, bubbles form, and edges are dry (about 1 1/2 minutes). Gently flip with a spatula.

Sprinkle 1 side of omelet with about 1/2 cup onion mixture and about 3 tablespoons cheese. Fold omelet in half; cook 30 seconds or until cheese is melted. Transfer to a serving plate; keep warm. Repeat procedure 4 times with remaining butter, cornmeal mixture, onion mixture, and cheese. Serve immediately.

Makes 5 servings

Cow Girl Chef Cornmeal Batter Cakes:
1 cup cultured buttermilk
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2/3 cup white cornmeal
2/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons melted butter or bacon fat

Pour the buttermilk into a bowl and stir in the baking soda. Whisk in the egg, and gradually whisk in the cornmeal, then the salt and fat and 1/4 cup water.

Cowgirl Homemade Chorizo:
If you have your butcher grind your pork, ask him to include some fat, and to grind it coarsely for a nicer texture. You can use any type of paprika although the Spanish variety has a wonderful smokey flavor that adds depth to the chorizo. To watch a video on how to make chorizo follow this link.

2 pounds ground pork
2 tbsp chili powder
2 tbsp Spanish paprika
1 tsp dried Mexican oregano, stems removed
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp cinnamon
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tsp sea salt

Mix everything together in a big bowl with your hands. (Taste for seasonings by making a small patty and cooking it in the skillet.) Form into patties and cook  over medium-high heat until browned and cooked through.

Freeze for 1-2 months or refrigerate for 1-2 days, or simply freeze the uncooked chorizo for 1-2 months, and thaw and cook when ready to use.

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.
Every year it is the same dilemma, pills “what to do with the left over turkey!” We always have turkey soup on Sunday. Then there is cranberry stuffed turkey rolls with left over stuffing and turkey pot pie. Turkey Tetrazzini is another comfort food favorite. I like to use left over mashed potatoes, tadalafil if there are any, physician in place of the noodles.

Source: Rosy Little Things
1 lb. button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
4 cup milk
10 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 cup flour
1 cup turkey gravy (or however much you have left over, if less than that)
1 to 2 cups leftover turkey meat, shredded into bite-sized chunks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 lb. spaghetti
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in large saute pan and saute mushrooms until soft and slightly browned. Set aside.

Make bechamel sauce: Over medium heat, melt remaining butter in large saucepan, add flour, and whisk over medium heat for several minutes. Whisk milk into butter/flour mixture gradually until all milk is incorporated. Simmer sauce until it is thickened slightly and very velvety. Add turkey gravy and mushrooms and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in boiling water until a minute or two before al dente. Drain and return to pot. Mix in half of sauce and stir to coat. Pour spaghetti into 9″ x 13″ pan and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 30 minutes until top is bubbling and delicious-looking. Add turkey pieces to sauce and serve over slices of spaghetti casserole. Enjoy thoroughly.
A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, view normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies, so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” I was unsuccessful in my attempt to locate cannoli shells. The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, approved is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, ailment it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, visit this May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.

Quinoa Stuffed Red Peppers

Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers makes for a delectable main dish paired with a side of garlic toast or a light salad. It is one of those feel good meals I would choose over a piece of chocolate any day. Please Do Not let the bell peppers deter you from trying the quinoa stuffing. If bell peppers are not your thing try a bed of arugula, abortion a stuffed zucchini or serve the stuffing by itself like you would a casserole. As for serving sizes Katie suggests 1 pepper if you have an accompanying side. Otherwise 1 whole pepper would be considered a serving.

Now, lets talk ingredients. I found a small package of quinoa at the supermarket for $10.99. I ended up purchasing the same amount at the health food store for .99 cents a pound. A huge savings. The poblano pepper is the new hot chili pepper fad right now. I could not find a poblano pepper in the produce section at the market. When I asked the produce manager for a suitable replacement he admitted he had heard of them but did not know what a poblano pepper was. Poblano peppers are used to make chile relleno in the place of pasilla peppers and they are also used in mole. Cook’s Thesaurus suggests using Anaheim or Ancho as a substitute. I tried half of an Anaheim but because I used a Monterey Jack and Cheddar blend cheese instead of pepper jack I could have used the whole pepper. Definitely season well with salt and pepper. You could use broth instead of water to cook the quinoa for more flavor too.

Source: GoodLifeEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 3/4 cups water or broth
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Heat oil in a large pan with a lid over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper cooking 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic; sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Meanwhile bring the quinoa, carrots and water to a boil in a covered sauce pan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 20 minutes or until quinoa is tender.

Add the quinoa to the onion mixture. Toss in the black beans and 1 cup of cheese.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.

Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli

A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, doctor normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies and pumpkin pie bars, story so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” Cannoli shells can be found in the bakery section of the market . The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. Mascarpone cheese is a thick spreadable cheese similar to cream cheese. It comes in a small tub usually found in the deli with the gourmet cheese. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Cannoli Shells

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

Filling pumpkin pistachio Cannoli*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

Cornbread Omelets

In this post we begin with a recipe for an omelet made from a cornbread batter as opposed to eggs. I could not find white cornmeal mix in our local grocery store. Instead I used plain yellow cornmeal in place of the mix. Not completely satisfied I decided to try a few more variations. I found a lovely recipe for cornmeal cakes on Cow Girl Chef and learned how to make my own chorizo.

If you cannot find cornmeal mix then use the recipe below for cornmeal cakes.

Cornbread Omelets:
Source: Southern Living September 2009

3/4 pound Chorizo sausage, patient castings removes (about 3 links), or see recipe below
6 tbsp butter, divided
3 green onions, chopped
1 small red bell pepper, chopped
1-2 jalapeno peppers, minced
1 cup self-rising white cornmeal mix (such as Martha White)
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup flour
1 large egg, lightly beaten
Cooking spray
1 cup shredded Mexican cheese blend

Sauté chorizo in an 8-inch nonstick omelet pan or skillet with sloped sides 7 to 10 minutes or until browned. Remove from skillet, and drain on paper towels. Wipe skillet clean.

Melt 1 tablespoon butter in skillet, and sauté green onions, bell pepper, and jalapeño peppers over medium-high heat 3 to 5 minutes or until tender. Transfer to a bowl; stir in chorizo. Wipe skillet clean.

Whisk together cornmeal mix, buttermilk, milk, all-purpose flour, and 1 large egg.

Coat skillet with cooking spray; melt 1 tablespoon butter in skillet over medium-high heat, rotating pan to coat bottom evenly. Pour about 1/3 cup cornmeal mixture into skillet. Tilt pan so uncooked portion flows around to coat bottom of pan, cooking until almost set, bubbles form, and edges are dry (about 1 1/2 minutes). Gently flip with a spatula.

Sprinkle 1 side of omelet with about 1/2 cup onion mixture and about 3 tablespoons cheese. Fold omelet in half; cook 30 seconds or until cheese is melted. Transfer to a serving plate; keep warm. Repeat procedure 4 times with remaining butter, cornmeal mixture, onion mixture, and cheese. Serve immediately.

Makes 5 servings

Cow Girl Chef Cornmeal Batter Cakes:
1 cup cultured buttermilk
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2/3 cup white cornmeal
2/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons melted butter or bacon fat

Pour the buttermilk into a bowl and stir in the baking soda. Whisk in the egg, and gradually whisk in the cornmeal, then the salt and fat and 1/4 cup water.

Cowgirl Homemade Chorizo:
If you have your butcher grind your pork, ask him to include some fat, and to grind it coarsely for a nicer texture. You can use any type of paprika although the Spanish variety has a wonderful smokey flavor that adds depth to the chorizo. To watch a video on how to make chorizo follow this link.

2 pounds ground pork
2 tbsp chili powder
2 tbsp Spanish paprika
1 tsp dried Mexican oregano, stems removed
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp cinnamon
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tsp sea salt

Mix everything together in a big bowl with your hands. (Taste for seasonings by making a small patty and cooking it in the skillet.) Form into patties and cook  over medium-high heat until browned and cooked through.

Freeze for 1-2 months or refrigerate for 1-2 days, or simply freeze the uncooked chorizo for 1-2 months, and thaw and cook when ready to use.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, view biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cheap cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, medications sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.

mp_1083805maypole-dancing-at-wishford-wiltshire-posters

Photo: Maypole Dancing at Wishford, sildenafil Wiltshire

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, click is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.
Every year it is the same dilemma, pills “what to do with the left over turkey!” We always have turkey soup on Sunday. Then there is cranberry stuffed turkey rolls with left over stuffing and turkey pot pie. Turkey Tetrazzini is another comfort food favorite. I like to use left over mashed potatoes, tadalafil if there are any, physician in place of the noodles.

Source: Rosy Little Things
1 lb. button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
4 cup milk
10 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 cup flour
1 cup turkey gravy (or however much you have left over, if less than that)
1 to 2 cups leftover turkey meat, shredded into bite-sized chunks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 lb. spaghetti
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in large saute pan and saute mushrooms until soft and slightly browned. Set aside.

Make bechamel sauce: Over medium heat, melt remaining butter in large saucepan, add flour, and whisk over medium heat for several minutes. Whisk milk into butter/flour mixture gradually until all milk is incorporated. Simmer sauce until it is thickened slightly and very velvety. Add turkey gravy and mushrooms and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, cook spaghetti in boiling water until a minute or two before al dente. Drain and return to pot. Mix in half of sauce and stir to coat. Pour spaghetti into 9″ x 13″ pan and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for 30 minutes until top is bubbling and delicious-looking. Add turkey pieces to sauce and serve over slices of spaghetti casserole. Enjoy thoroughly.
A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, view normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies, so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” I was unsuccessful in my attempt to locate cannoli shells. The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

One of my favorite childhood memories I have, approved is watching my mom and the other ladies from church weave ribbons in and around the May Pole. If I remember correctly, ailment it was usually done during our Easter celebration rather than May 1st. The picture of festive celebrations is what I cherish most about the experience.

May day is an ancient holiday celebrated in many countries around the world. In some places, visit this May 1st is known as a Labor Day, while in other places, the day is a celebration of the turning tide of spring equinox into summer solstice. The traditions we recognize still today is flowers and the May pole.

May Pole: Decorate a pole or tall stick with brightly colored ribbon or paper streamers. Add flowers and balloons. Then, dance around the May pole, holding the ends of the streamers or ribbon.

May Day Basket of Flowers: Hang a basket full of spring flowers on a neighbor’s doorknob. Use real flowers or make your own out of felt, paper, colored craft sticks or egg cartons.

Quinoa Stuffed Red Peppers

Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers makes for a delectable main dish paired with a side of garlic toast or a light salad. It is one of those feel good meals I would choose over a piece of chocolate any day. Please Do Not let the bell peppers deter you from trying the quinoa stuffing. If bell peppers are not your thing try a bed of arugula, abortion a stuffed zucchini or serve the stuffing by itself like you would a casserole. As for serving sizes Katie suggests 1 pepper if you have an accompanying side. Otherwise 1 whole pepper would be considered a serving.

Now, lets talk ingredients. I found a small package of quinoa at the supermarket for $10.99. I ended up purchasing the same amount at the health food store for .99 cents a pound. A huge savings. The poblano pepper is the new hot chili pepper fad right now. I could not find a poblano pepper in the produce section at the market. When I asked the produce manager for a suitable replacement he admitted he had heard of them but did not know what a poblano pepper was. Poblano peppers are used to make chile relleno in the place of pasilla peppers and they are also used in mole. Cook’s Thesaurus suggests using Anaheim or Ancho as a substitute. I tried half of an Anaheim but because I used a Monterey Jack and Cheddar blend cheese instead of pepper jack I could have used the whole pepper. Definitely season well with salt and pepper. You could use broth instead of water to cook the quinoa for more flavor too.

Source: GoodLifeEats
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 ribs celery, finely chopped
1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup quinoa
1 3/4 cups water or broth
1 1/2 cups grated carrot
1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

Heat oil in a large pan with a lid over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper cooking 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic; sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

Meanwhile bring the quinoa, carrots and water to a boil in a covered sauce pan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 20 minutes or until quinoa is tender.

Add the quinoa to the onion mixture. Toss in the black beans and 1 cup of cheese.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.

Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli

A couple Friday’s ago Stephen brought home a pumpkin muffin with strussel topping. I was gracious for his thoughtfulness. Now, doctor normally a pumpkin muffin would have sounded appetizing but I just was not that interested. You see last year I went pumpkin crazy. I finally found the much sought after Pumpkin Chip Cookie recipe. Then I went in search for the best Pumpkin Bread recipe. Along the way I found a couple recipes for Pumpkin Pound Cake. Then there was the traditional Pumpkin Roll and Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving in addition to a scrumptious Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie. I cannot forget the Pumpkin Whoopie Cookies and pumpkin pie bars, story so divine. Lastly, this past spring I found an wonderful recipe for Pumpkin Apple Muffins. I suppose this is why I have been focusing so much on apples this fall.

Still, this recipe for Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli has been nagging at me. “Please make me!” Cannoli shells can be found in the bakery section of the market . The recipe states that tortillas may be substituted. Tortillas are surprisingly versatile. Mascarpone cheese is a thick spreadable cheese similar to cream cheese. It comes in a small tub usually found in the deli with the gourmet cheese. So grab the kids and get messy making Pumpkin Pistachio Cannoli.

Cannoli Shells

Source: Better Homes and Gardens
1/2 of an 8-ounce carton Mascarpone cheese
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup chopped roasted pistachio nuts or toasted pecans
1/2 cup whipping cream
12 purchased Cannoli shells*
Powdered sugar or granulated sugar

In a large bowl stir together Mascarpone cheese, powdered sugar, pumpkin, ricotta, and pumpkin pie spice until smooth. Stir in 1/4 cup of the nuts. Set aside.

In a chilled mixing bowl beat cream with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. If desired, cover and chill up to 4 hours To serve, spoon pumpkin mixture into a self-sealing plastic bag. Snip a 3/4-inch hole in one corner. Pipe filling into cannoli shells so pumpkin filling extends from ends. Sprinkle cannoli ends with remaining nuts. Arrange on a serving platter; sprinkle with sugar. Makes 12 servings.

Filling pumpkin pistachio Cannoli*Note: If purchased cannoli shells are not available, brush one side of sixteen 4-inch flour tortillas (trim larger tortillas if necessary) with cooking oil. Roll, forming a tube shape; secure with a wooden toothpick. Gently place a rolled piece of foil in the center for support. Place on a baking sheet; brush outside with oil and bake in a 375 degree F oven about 15 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a wire rack to cool. Remove foil and toothpicks; fill with pumpkin mixture. Makes 16 shells (allows for breakage).

Cornbread Omelets

In this post we begin with a recipe for an omelet made from a cornbread batter as opposed to eggs. I could not find white cornmeal mix in our local grocery store. Instead I used plain yellow cornmeal in place of the mix. Not completely satisfied I decided to try a few more variations. I found a lovely recipe for cornmeal cakes on Cow Girl Chef and learned how to make my own chorizo.

If you cannot find cornmeal mix then use the recipe below for cornmeal cakes.

Cornbread Omelets:
Source: Southern Living September 2009

3/4 pound Chorizo sausage, patient castings removes (about 3 links), or see recipe below
6 tbsp butter, divided
3 green onions, chopped
1 small red bell pepper, chopped
1-2 jalapeno peppers, minced
1 cup self-rising white cornmeal mix (such as Martha White)
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup flour
1 large egg, lightly beaten
Cooking spray
1 cup shredded Mexican cheese blend

Sauté chorizo in an 8-inch nonstick omelet pan or skillet with sloped sides 7 to 10 minutes or until browned. Remove from skillet, and drain on paper towels. Wipe skillet clean.

Melt 1 tablespoon butter in skillet, and sauté green onions, bell pepper, and jalapeño peppers over medium-high heat 3 to 5 minutes or until tender. Transfer to a bowl; stir in chorizo. Wipe skillet clean.

Whisk together cornmeal mix, buttermilk, milk, all-purpose flour, and 1 large egg.

Coat skillet with cooking spray; melt 1 tablespoon butter in skillet over medium-high heat, rotating pan to coat bottom evenly. Pour about 1/3 cup cornmeal mixture into skillet. Tilt pan so uncooked portion flows around to coat bottom of pan, cooking until almost set, bubbles form, and edges are dry (about 1 1/2 minutes). Gently flip with a spatula.

Sprinkle 1 side of omelet with about 1/2 cup onion mixture and about 3 tablespoons cheese. Fold omelet in half; cook 30 seconds or until cheese is melted. Transfer to a serving plate; keep warm. Repeat procedure 4 times with remaining butter, cornmeal mixture, onion mixture, and cheese. Serve immediately.

Makes 5 servings

Cow Girl Chef Cornmeal Batter Cakes:
1 cup cultured buttermilk
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2/3 cup white cornmeal
2/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons melted butter or bacon fat

Pour the buttermilk into a bowl and stir in the baking soda. Whisk in the egg, and gradually whisk in the cornmeal, then the salt and fat and 1/4 cup water.

Cowgirl Homemade Chorizo:
If you have your butcher grind your pork, ask him to include some fat, and to grind it coarsely for a nicer texture. You can use any type of paprika although the Spanish variety has a wonderful smokey flavor that adds depth to the chorizo. To watch a video on how to make chorizo follow this link.

2 pounds ground pork
2 tbsp chili powder
2 tbsp Spanish paprika
1 tsp dried Mexican oregano, stems removed
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp cinnamon
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tsp sea salt

Mix everything together in a big bowl with your hands. (Taste for seasonings by making a small patty and cooking it in the skillet.) Form into patties and cook  over medium-high heat until browned and cooked through.

Freeze for 1-2 months or refrigerate for 1-2 days, or simply freeze the uncooked chorizo for 1-2 months, and thaw and cook when ready to use.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, view biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cheap cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, medications sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.

basic turkey stock

Photo by: Chow.com

When I make soups I use a product I buy at Costco called Better Than Bullion. Basically it is stock that has been boiled down into a concentrated paste. I like it better than bullion or canned broth but it does not compare to the real stuff. I made a pot roast the other day and saved the juices to make beef stew. It was ten times better than anything from a can. Stock can be made using the drippings from a roast pan or by boiling the leftover turkey or chicken carcasses.

To make turkey stock:

– De-bone the turkey by removing all the meat from the bones.

– Chop up the turkey to fit in a large pot. Cover with water about 1-inch or so above the turkey. Bring the water to a boil then turn down the heat to low; cover and simmer for 2-3 hours. Occasionally skim the foam from the top.

Variations:
– Strain the broth into a large bowl or container using a thin kitchen cloth or cheese cloth placed on a strainer. Let cool. Skim the fat from the top. Freeze. This version does not have much flavor. It is best used in soups.

– Once the water has simmered for an hour add chopped onions, buy carrots, malady celery with the leaves, whole garlic cloves, parsnips, thyme, parsley and peppercorns. This version has flavor and can be used in soups, sauces or in anything else chicken or turkey stock is called for.

– Add the turkey neck and giblets to the pot with the turkey.

Should make about 3-4 quarts of stock.