Peach Crisp

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My kids love left over pasta, find enchiladas, what is ed pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra 100mg sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, this their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, pill sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, buy more about their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. Last summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We ran out of jam in the spring. So I made double batches of strawberry, search raspberry, healing and nectarine.
The jam lasted us well into this summer.

For raspberry jam see the post Beginners Raspberry Jam 101.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. Preferably someone who has some experience. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, pharmacy with insert
Small sauce pan for sterilizing lids
Large pot for cooking the jam in
Jar funnel
Canning Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

4 cups of peeled, pitted, and chopped nectarines or peaches (about 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
7 cups sugar
1 package powdered Pectin

Fill canning pot, sauce pan, and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, wash jars, rings, and lids.

Lower the temperature of the canning pot to a simmer. Set jars in canning pot.
until ready to use.

Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, pectin, and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning). Add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Return to a boil (it continues to boil even when stirred). Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a clean dish towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (*Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the canning pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 10 minutes. (**boil longer if at higher altitude*)

Turn off the heat. Carefully remove the lid. Use the canning tongs to remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Let the jar sit for an hour. If the jar has not sealed store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, order with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, store stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, about it or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My kids love left over pasta, viagra 100mg enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
My kids love left over pasta, find enchiladas, what is ed pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, erectile with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, healing  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, side effects blackberry jelly, shop pies, tarts, and juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter and the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill is ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, healing  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, side effects blackberry jelly, shop pies, tarts, and juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter and the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill is ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, view blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples during the fall apple harvest. I am reminded of Mouse with his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies to share.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, healing  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, side effects blackberry jelly, shop pies, tarts, and juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter and the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill is ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, view blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples during the fall apple harvest. I am reminded of Mouse with his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies to share.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, approved  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, buy information pills blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. [We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.] Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter to the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods, Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family to take part in throughout the apple harvest season. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill are ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
There is something so rewarding about reaching in to my pantry for a jar of homemade jam. This summer I made certain to stock the pantry well. We have strawberry and raspberry jams. And thanks to my mother-n-law and her neighbor we now have nectarine.

I was able to make two batches from the bag of nectarines Nadine sent home with me. One was a country twist with vanilla and the other was this classic. I like them both but I prefer the this version with toast or smeared on a pancake.

Making jam can seem daunting at first. But after a couple of tries the fear subsides. It is always easier to make jam for the first time with a friend. So grab a buddy and a bushel of fruit before the season is over.

Source: PickYourOwn.org
Equipment:
Large canning pot, cost sale with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

5 or 6 cups of peeled and chopped nectarines or peaches (5 pints or 3 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup water
*Sugar* (see notes at bottom of post)
1 1/4 packages *Pectin* (see notes at bottom of post)

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, information pills stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water of the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarines from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Stir 1/4 cup of sugar into the pectin. Add the pectin and 1/2 cup of water to the nectarines. Bring to a boil over high heat (stirring often to prevent burning); about 5 to 10 minutes. Boil for at least 5 minutes longer to thicken.

Add the rest of the sugar. Return to a boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, rx or longer. The jam is ready when a candy thermometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove. Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Return the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes. *boil longer if at higher altitude*

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealing. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Pectin and Sugar amounts to use:
Regular Jam: no-sugar or regular pectin= 7 cups sugar
Low Sugar Jam: no-sugar pectin= 4 1/2 cups sugar
Natural Jam: no sugar pectin = 3 cups fruit juice (grape, peach, apple or mixed)

Variation:
— 4 cups of mushed (slightly crushed) peaches, 1 cup of raspberries and 1 cup of blackberries.
— Interchange nectarines with peaches.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, visit this site I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, remedy like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burning their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run it is a cleaver way to save money. My kids love pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna and will often beg to eat leftovers for breakfast the next morning. Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. On the flip side making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I have learned to either freeze the leftovers, scale down the recipe, or try to transpose it into something new all together.

Soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com are a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, capsule in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, what is ed tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. I am not suggesting that we pitch our tents and go “country” (as Nelly, Laura’s nemesis, would say). However, we can learn much from their resourcefulness.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples is a cleaver way to save money. To avoid the waste from leftovers, freeze the extras (do not refreeze meats), scale down the recipe, or try to transpose leftovers into something new all together.

At the end of the week soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpieenchiladas, or tortilla soup.

— Drain the liquid from the chicken soup to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for. Freeze leftovers in ice cube trays or freezable containers.

— For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

— For enchiladas pick out the chicken. Drain in a colander for 10 minutes.

— For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients. Sites like GoJee.com provide a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when their stores of food were not to their liking or because they were too busy. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity.

Cooking on the dime requires some savvy planning skills that not only can save money, but time as well.

In our home the Sunday meal is the largest meal of the week. Some traditional menu ideas might include: lasagna, chili, roasted chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin. These are generally items that require a longer prep time than I have time for during the week. From there I plan my menu for the rest of the week.

When making dishes like stuffed shells or lasagna double, even triple, the recipe to freeze for another week.

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into a weeks worth of tasty meals: stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, price  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, purchase blackberry jelly, buy more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



Apple Treats:









1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones, Walnut Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 28. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney
One of my favorite children’s books is, dosage  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, approved blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples

One of my favorite children’s books is, drug  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, blackberry jelly, pies, tarts, and juice.

When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many fun things to make with apples. September marks the beginning of apple season. I cannot think of a better excuse for a party. An apple festival! There will be apple cider to drink, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce….

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, healing  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, side effects blackberry jelly, shop pies, tarts, and juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter and the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill is ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting- Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing
Apple Toss
Apple Darts- red balloons

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, view blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples during the fall apple harvest. I am reminded of Mouse with his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies to share.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples
One of my favorite children’s books is, approved  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. The Blackberry Mouse is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, buy information pills blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice. When I think of the fall apple harvest I am reminded of Mouse and his elaborate table laden with delectable goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples are already making their way to the market. [We love apples. We each have our own treasured favorite. Mine is the tart crunchy Granny Smith.] Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. At the Apple Fair in Sebastopol CA you will find all sorts of delicious eats, from apple cider to apple butter to the most tantalizing of all the Gravenstein Apple Fair fried apple fritter. A feast even Mr. Mouse would find worth the trip.

Over the hill and through the woods, Apple Hill Farms welcomes all to come and glean their share of the tasty apples and pears. The local ranches and businesses offer special classes and activities for the whole family to take part in throughout the apple harvest season. People come from all over to take part in the harvest festivities.

U-Pick It farms like Apple Hill are ideal for an adventurous family outing. The fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Create your own Apple Festival. Invite the neighborhood, just friends, or only family.

*For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Print Painting– Slice an apple in half lengthwise. Dip in paint and stamp on paper to make a grand masterpiece. The apple halves may be cut into shapes to add variation.
Apple Bobbing– Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.
Apple Toss– Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back.
Apple Darts– Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Tree

Apple stamps

Apple Treats:
Apple Pies
Apple Fritters
Apple Butter
Applesauce
Apple Cinnamon Flautas
Apple Muffins
Apple Cake
Apple Cider
Apple Juice
Apple Beer
Caramel Apples
Candied Apples

Upon their arrival, medical early American settlers had to make do with what they had. Common ingredients used back in England were in short supply or non existant in the new world. The colonists learned to use variations of fruits and meats available to them in traditional English recipes such as crisps, cobblers, Betty, grunts, and the like.

Crisps and cobblers were thought of as common food. They were reserved for the family. One would never serve a crisp to company. Pioneers traveling across the country ate cobblers for both breakfast and dinner. They were easier to make given the limited resources on the trail.

Crisps are just as popular today as they were in Medieval Europe. They are available at many restaurants and back yard barbecues. Crisps are often served with a dollop of ice cream or whipped cream.

Filling:
5 large ripe peaches, peeled and cut into bite-size pieces
Zest and juice from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons flour
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
pinch of salt

Topping:
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
8 Tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 chopped pecans
Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

To peel the peaches bring a stock pot filled with water to a boil. Cut a small X on the bottom of each peach. Add peaches to the boiling water and simmer for 30-60 seconds. Remove peaches from the pot and place in a bowl of ice water. Allow peaches to cool slightly. The skins should slip right off.

Filling:
Toss peaches with lemon juice and zest. Stir in flour, sugar, vanilla and salt. Divide evenly among ramekins or place in a 8X8 pan.

Topping:
Combine all the topping ingredients in a food processor. Pulse about 30 seconds until combined. Or mix with fingers until the mixture is clumpy and crumbly. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time if needed.

Top each ramekin or 8X8 inch pan with topping. Don’t pack too tightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, diagnosis  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, viagra order blackberry jelly, more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, diagnosis  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, viagra order blackberry jelly, more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, remedy  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, for sale blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:













1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, website like this  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, capsule blackberry jelly, rx blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, medications  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, link blackberry jelly, and blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, diagnosis  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, viagra order blackberry jelly, more about blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:


1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, remedy  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, for sale blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:



1. Apple Votive2. Apple Stamps3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp4. Apple Placemats5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats:













1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, sale  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, pill blackberry jelly, approved blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

Apple Treats:










1. Apple Butter 2. Fruit Leather 3. Applesauce 4. Apple Dip 5. Apple Cake 6. Apple Turnovers 7. Praline Apple Bread 8. Autumn Cheesecake 9. Caramel Apples (caramel sauce) 10. Apple Cider 11. Fried Apples Pies 12. Spiked Apple Cake 13. Apple Zeppole 14. Apple Cider Doughnuts 15. Apple shaped cupcakes 16. Apple Pie-rate Ship 17. Apple Crisp 18. Fried Apple Fritters 19. Apple Spiced Punch 20. Apple Muffins 21. Apple Scones 22. Apple Dumplings 23. Almond Apple Strudel Bars 24. Apple Pie 25. Candied Apples 26. Apple Strudel Bars 27. Pork Chops with Apple Chutney 28. Creamy Apple Chicken Chili 29. Curried Turkey Salad with Apple 30. Brussels Sprouts with Chopped Apple 31. Apple Salad with Greens

Frosted Apple Squares

Photo: Courtesy of Istock Photo

One of my favorite children’s books is, viagra  “The Blackberry Mouse” by Matthew Grimsdale. “The Blackberry Mouse” is a wonderful tale about a greedy young mouse who learns a valuable lesson about friendship. The story ends with Mouse and his neighborhood friends gathered together around the table enjoying a blackberry feast. There is blackberry jam, story blackberry jelly, blackberry pies, lots and lots of blackberry tarts, and blackberry juice.

September marks the beginning of apple season. Mounds of succulent apples have already made their way to the market. The fall apple harvest reminds me of Mouse’s elaborate table laden with delectable blackberry goodies. There are so many wonderful edible creations to make with apples. What better way to celebrate the fall apple harvest than with an Apple Feast.

Many apple farms across California open their orchards to the public to celebrate the apple harvest. U-Pick It farms are ideal for an adventurous family outing. Although, the fun need not stop once the basket is filled. The real excitement begins at home making apple cider, apple jelly, apple butter, applesauce, apple pie, apple turnovers… However, fanfare such as this should never be enjoyed alone.

Mouse, in the story Blackberry Mouse, recognized that blackberries are nice but even better when you share them. Preserved goods such as jams and butters make perfect gifts for Christmas or to say “Thank You”. Tasty cakes, muffins and turnovers make the grand beginnings for a family apple festival.

Photo: Courtesy of HomeMadeSimple.com

An Apple Festival can be a small intimate gathering with family and/or friends. Or a grand event involving the neighborhood or community. Fun activities and good food made with apples are a must to pull off a successful Apple Feast.

**For those with allergies to apples substitute pears.

Apple Festival Activities:
Apple Bobbing Fill a large container with water and apples. Bob for apples using only your mouth, no hands. Or attach apples to a string- participants must pull the apple from the string using only their mouth, no hands allowed.

Apple Toss Stand in two lines. Each person has a partner. Toss the apple to your partner. If they catch it you both take a step back. If you drop it you are out. Last couple standing wins.
Apple Darts Attach ‘red balloons’ to a board or wall. Participants throw darts to try to pop a balloon. If offering prizes place a ticket or several tickets in each balloon that can be exchanged for treats and prizes.
Apple Tasting- Display a variety of different types of apples. Place each variety on its own plate. Label. Keep a tally of who likes what best.

Apple Crafts:

1. Apple Votive 2. Apple Stamps 3. Apple Pumpkin Stamp 4. Apple Placemats 5. Mod Podge Apples 6. Recycled Bottle Apple 7. Crochet Apples 8. Recycled Apple Book Tute

Apple Treats: