Fall Afternoon Snacks

Muffin Tin- http://michellesjournalcorner.blogspot.com/2009/09/muffin-tin-monday_14.html

Apple Smile-http://workmanfamily.typepad.com/our_life/2010/10/quick-halloween-treats.html

People-http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/activities/outdoor/apple-picking/?page=7

Crunchy Apple Sandwhich-http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/2535
Muffin Tin- http://michellesjournalcorner.blogspot.com/2009/09/muffin-tin-monday_14.html

Apple Smile-http://workmanfamily.typepad.com/our_life/2010/10/quick-halloween-treats.html

People-http://www.parents.com/toddlers-preschoolers/activities/outdoor/apple-picking/?page=7

Crunchy Apple Sandwhich-http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/2535
Fall is my favorite time of the year. Ok, viagra maybe a very close runner up to Spring, but for different reasons. I love the smell of Fall the most. Like an aged book or worn leather. It feels warm and cosy. I especially enjoy the crisp tendrils of wind encircling about, announcing the encroaching presence of Fall. I love sweaters, soup, hats and scarfs. As much as I have enjoyed summer this year I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Fall. Fall is being quite timid this year. We had a few chilly days followed by several muggy hot ones.

I have been working tirelessly trying to organize our home in preparation for the winter. The whole house goes toppsy turvy as we work to clean up the yard, trimming trees and bushes, and washing down the windows and the exterior.  Our goal to declutter the inside has been a month long project. There are not enough hours in a day anymore with all the schooling and extra curricular activities going on during the school session.

Making snacks is one item of business that cannot be put on hold. With all the ingredients my kids have allergies to we have to make the majority of our meals from scratch. Here are a few of our favorite Fall after school snacks that do not require too much time to make.

Muffin Tin– My favorite way to serve snacks is in a muffin tin. If you want your kids to eat fruits and veggies try putting them in a muffin tin. The Muffin Tin Mom has loads of exciting edible creations to serve in a muffin tin.

Apple Smile– You have probably seen these on Family Fun. I love the ghastly teeth for Halloween. We use peanut butter instead of the butterscotch chips.

Apple People– Little kids love to make apple creations. Place all the materials in a muffin tin or on a baking sheet and let them decorate.

Crunchy Apple Sandwich– There are serval variations to this snack. We use pears or whole grain crackers in place of the apple. Replace the peanut butter and serve with just jam.

Fig Newtons– Berry newtons are a nice alternative for children who dislike figs.

Bear cookies– On Fridays we like to make cookies for movie night. It signifies the week is over. Time to relax. The recipe calls for a boxed brownie mix. You can make your own cookies from a brownie recipe. I have not figure it out just yet. So we use a chocolate brownie cookie recipe instead.

Spider Crackers– Substitute your preferred cracker. We use Triscuits because they are on our approved list. Substitute real spreadable cheddar cheese for the peanut butter. Chocolate chips, frosting or nuts for the eyes.

Fluffer Nutter Bites– We buy our gluten free ricemallow cream from Natural Candy. I have not tried the vegan marshmallows yet. You can also make it following step by step instructions on Ginger Lemon Girl.

Vanilla Nectarine Jam

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most of their methods for repurposing every little bit; however, pharmacy I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stews. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, malady like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

Farmers living on the prairie during the 1800’s had to be resourceful for their survival. Every little bit was utilized with very little waste. Laura Ingals, in the book “Little House in the Big Woods”, tells about the day Pa butchered their pig. Pa promised the girls the pig’s bladder, to use as a balloon, and the pig’s tail for a tasty treat. The pig’s tail was skewered on a stick then held over hot coals to cook. When it was nicely browned they ate it. The hot sizzling juices burned their tongues. We can learn much from their resourcefulness.

Present day cooking shows on the Food Network such as “Chopped” and “Master Chef” capitalize on the concept of resourcefulness with the mystery box challenges. Contestant’s skills are tested when they are required to come up with something amazing from a limited group of ingredients.

GoJee.com is a stockpile of personalized recipes. Plug in any allergies or a list of ingredients and get a collection of recipes tailored to your needs.

Ma and Pa did not have the luxury of running to the grocery store or In & out Burger when stores of food were low or they were bored with the regular fare. Nor did they have the connivence of the internet for that matter. Ma surely had to prepare well and use a bit of creative ingenuity. Learning to be resourceful with leftovers and pantry staples can be somewhat time consuming. Yet, in the long run is a cleaver way to save money.

Stephen despises leftovers and I get bored with the same ole dish every week. Leftovers generally made their way into the trash bin. Making a new recipe every night for dinner is costly. To avoid waste I either freeze the leftovers or scale down the recipe.  Or try to transpose it into something new all together. My siblings and I learned as youth how to use what was available to make something edible. My creations might not impress Chef Ramsey, but it fills bellies without my having to run to the store.

My kids love left over pasta, enchiladas, pizza, and lasagna for breakfast the next morning. They are not big into soups. Yet, soups are an economical way to utilize vegetables and meat before they go bad. Most soups can be frozen (do not refreeze meat) or repurposed into another meal. For example, turn left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

Drain the liquid to use as broth for rice or for whenever broth or water is called for.

For chicken pot pie make the sauce and pastry dough. Use the drained vegetables and chicken.

For enchiladas pick out the chicken and mix with taco seasoning.

For tortilla soup use the broth and chicken.

To

The ingredients used in shredded beef enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast (meal #1 Beef roast with seasoned roasted vegetables). Season with a pinch each of the enchilada spice rub to flavor (meal #2 shredded beef enchiladas). Reserve the pan juices for stew (menu #3 beef stew or vegetable stew with beans).

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.
August and September is stone fruit season. Our little tree in the backyard had a nice bumper crop of nectarines last year. I scarcely knew what to do with them all. This year, viagra sadly our little tree developed curl leaf in the spring. My plan to can nectarine jam this summer was thwarted.

One day while at Stephen’s parents house, their neighbor brought over a hefty supply of nectarines. I took several pounds home with me to make into jam. Trying to decide which recipe to use was quite a chore. I settled on this recipe with vanilla and a more traditional recipe.

This recipe for vanilla nectarine jam is more like a chutney. It is thick and lighter in color. It lacks the glossy brightness of a classic jam. I found it an amazing compliment to chicken or pork. Just add a little cinnamon and butter or light oil and bake.

Source: Canning for a New Generation
Equipment:
Large canning pot, with insert
Large stock pot
Jar funnel
Tongs
Ladle
4-5 sterilized 1/2 pint jars with lids and rings

3 pounds ripened nectarines
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla or 1 whole vanilla bean

Fill both canning pot and stock pot with water. Bring to a boil.

Wash jars and lids. Set jars in canning pot with simmering water until ready to use. Put the lids in a small sauce pan with water. Bring to a boil. Turn off the heat. Leave the lids in the hot water until ready to use.

Wash the fruit removing any mushy fruit, stems and leaves. Cut a shallow X on the bottom of each nectarine. Place fruit in the boiling water in the stock pot. Let process for a minute (if ripe) or longer (if unripe). Drain water. Pour ice cold water and ice over gently over nectarines. Cover with a lid for 1 to 2 minutes. The skins should easily peel off.

Remove the nectarine from the pot. Rinse pot.
Cut fruit into quarters and dice. Place back in stock pot. Mash fruit slightly leaving some whole bits.

Combine nectarines, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla; bring to a boil over high heat.

Boil for at least 5 minutes to thicken. The jam is ready when a candy themometer reads about 220.

* To Test: place a spoon in the freezer. Dip the spoon into the jam. Set on an ice cube to cool. If the jam begins to conceal it is done.

Turn off heat and remove from stove.

Remove jars and lids from the water and place on a towel.

Skim off any foam from the top of the jam. (Use the sugary foam to sweeten popsicles or smoothies.)

Place the funnel in the mouth of a jar. Use the ladle to pour hot jam into prepared jars; filling up no higher than a 1/4-inch from the top of the jar. Wipe the rim of the jar with a warm wet cloth or paper towel to remove any syrup.

Cap with the lid and screw on the ring. Return the filled jars to the pot of water. Adjust the water level to cover the jars by 1 to 2 inches. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover and process (boil) for 5 minutes.

Carefully remove the jars from the water bath. (Let sit overnight on a towel.) The lids should immediately make popping sounds. This indicates that the jars are sealed. Test each lid by pressing down in the middle of the lid. If there is a slight bump that is raised and pops back up when pressed, the jar is not sealed. Store the jar in the refrigerator. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry.

Old Fashioned Homestead Cornbread

School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, page she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, order a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, page she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, order a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, medical she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, approved a pound of flour, cialis 40mg a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, page she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, order a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, medical she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, approved a pound of flour, cialis 40mg a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, viagra nothing fancy, mind powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, store drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, page she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, order a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, medical she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, approved a pound of flour, cialis 40mg a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, viagra nothing fancy, mind powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, store drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, pill nothing fancy, powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked. I think the site was allrecipes.com.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, page she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, order a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, medical she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, approved a pound of flour, cialis 40mg a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, viagra nothing fancy, mind powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, store drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, pill nothing fancy, powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked. I think the site was allrecipes.com.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.
Dianne Craft was the key note speaker at a local two day conference for educators. No one had heard of her before. Surprisingly after the first 15 minutes she had all of us memorized and enthusiastic about returning on day two. Attendance had doubled the next day.

Dianne (with two N’s) holds a Master’s Degree in special education and is a Certified Natural Health Professional. She has 35 years of experience working with children. Many of whom are labeled autistic, diagnosis asberger, information pills adhd, this site add, ocd, in addition to those who are bright but have no desire to learn. Rather than mask the problems these children experience with drugs or excuses, she looks for viable methods of treatment to help them succeed. Dianne discovered there was a lot more going on in the little brain of each child. Slowly she started to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

Children who hate to write or read. Children who seem lazy or too tired. They refuse to sit up in their chair to do their work. Are labeled difficult, lazy, and deemed a problem child. Dianne realized that these children through no fault of their own or their parents lacked the normal sensory input/output that enables us to function.

When I was girl the playgrounds featured teeter totters, slides, tubes, bars, merry-go-rounds. We ran the neighborhood until twilight. Rode our bikes. Learned to skate. Played tag and kickball according to our own rules. We skipped, climbed, and jumped. I rarely see children outside playing today. The merry-go-round and teeter totter were removed to deter lawsuits. The children were brought indoors for safety. Signed up for organized sports with adults overseeing every detail of play. Skipping is no longer an accomplishment on the kindergarten report card. Multiplication is a requirement of first grade. We rarely understand what our actions will reap until too late.

But it is not too late.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, page she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, order a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, medical she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, approved a pound of flour, cialis 40mg a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, viagra nothing fancy, mind powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, store drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, pill nothing fancy, powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked. I think the site was allrecipes.com.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.
Dianne Craft was the key note speaker at a local two day conference for educators. No one had heard of her before. Surprisingly after the first 15 minutes she had all of us memorized and enthusiastic about returning on day two. Attendance had doubled the next day.

Dianne (with two N’s) holds a Master’s Degree in special education and is a Certified Natural Health Professional. She has 35 years of experience working with children. Many of whom are labeled autistic, diagnosis asberger, information pills adhd, this site add, ocd, in addition to those who are bright but have no desire to learn. Rather than mask the problems these children experience with drugs or excuses, she looks for viable methods of treatment to help them succeed. Dianne discovered there was a lot more going on in the little brain of each child. Slowly she started to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

Children who hate to write or read. Children who seem lazy or too tired. They refuse to sit up in their chair to do their work. Are labeled difficult, lazy, and deemed a problem child. Dianne realized that these children through no fault of their own or their parents lacked the normal sensory input/output that enables us to function.

When I was girl the playgrounds featured teeter totters, slides, tubes, bars, merry-go-rounds. We ran the neighborhood until twilight. Rode our bikes. Learned to skate. Played tag and kickball according to our own rules. We skipped, climbed, and jumped. I rarely see children outside playing today. The merry-go-round and teeter totter were removed to deter lawsuits. The children were brought indoors for safety. Signed up for organized sports with adults overseeing every detail of play. Skipping is no longer an accomplishment on the kindergarten report card. Multiplication is a requirement of first grade. We rarely understand what our actions will reap until too late.

But it is not too late.
This recipe is from the Martha Stewart website. Tastes similar to a punch I have had at many party’s. The one with ice cream and ginger-ale. This recipe calls for raspberry or strawberry sorbet. We tried it with a mix of lime, search raspberry and orange. Cheers.

Lemonade
Raspberry or strawberry Sorbet

Use a melon baller to make scoops from sorbet. Drop sorbet into individual glasses of lemonade.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, page she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, order a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, medical she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, approved a pound of flour, cialis 40mg a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, viagra nothing fancy, mind powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, store drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, pill nothing fancy, powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked. I think the site was allrecipes.com.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.
Dianne Craft was the key note speaker at a local two day conference for educators. No one had heard of her before. Surprisingly after the first 15 minutes she had all of us memorized and enthusiastic about returning on day two. Attendance had doubled the next day.

Dianne (with two N’s) holds a Master’s Degree in special education and is a Certified Natural Health Professional. She has 35 years of experience working with children. Many of whom are labeled autistic, diagnosis asberger, information pills adhd, this site add, ocd, in addition to those who are bright but have no desire to learn. Rather than mask the problems these children experience with drugs or excuses, she looks for viable methods of treatment to help them succeed. Dianne discovered there was a lot more going on in the little brain of each child. Slowly she started to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

Children who hate to write or read. Children who seem lazy or too tired. They refuse to sit up in their chair to do their work. Are labeled difficult, lazy, and deemed a problem child. Dianne realized that these children through no fault of their own or their parents lacked the normal sensory input/output that enables us to function.

When I was girl the playgrounds featured teeter totters, slides, tubes, bars, merry-go-rounds. We ran the neighborhood until twilight. Rode our bikes. Learned to skate. Played tag and kickball according to our own rules. We skipped, climbed, and jumped. I rarely see children outside playing today. The merry-go-round and teeter totter were removed to deter lawsuits. The children were brought indoors for safety. Signed up for organized sports with adults overseeing every detail of play. Skipping is no longer an accomplishment on the kindergarten report card. Multiplication is a requirement of first grade. We rarely understand what our actions will reap until too late.

But it is not too late.
This recipe is from the Martha Stewart website. Tastes similar to a punch I have had at many party’s. The one with ice cream and ginger-ale. This recipe calls for raspberry or strawberry sorbet. We tried it with a mix of lime, search raspberry and orange. Cheers.

Lemonade
Raspberry or strawberry Sorbet

Use a melon baller to make scoops from sorbet. Drop sorbet into individual glasses of lemonade.
This recipe is from the Martha Stewart website. Tastes similar to a punch I have had at many party’s. The one with ice cream and ginger-ale. This recipe calls for raspberry or strawberry sorbet. We tried it with a mix of lime, thumb raspberry and orange. Cheers.

Lemonade
Raspberry or strawberry Sorbet

Use a melon baller to make scoops from sorbet. Drop sorbet into individual glasses of lemonade.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Ducks:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn
Cotton candy

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, treatment bed sheets, look plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

Invitations:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.

Booths:
Fish:
Duck Pond:

Ring Toss:

Tin Can Dart Gun:
Clothes Pin Drop:
Face Painting:
Bing Bag Toss:
Balloon Darts:

started field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.

Races:
Three-legged:
Egg on a Spoon:
Potato Sack:

Prizes:

Snacks:
Cup cakes
Lemonade
Hot dogs
Popcorn: Scoop into individual popcorn bags.
Cotton candy

Hot Dog Wraps: 1 pkg hot dogs. 1 pkg refrigerated biscuit dough. Cut each hot dog and biscuit in half. Wrap 1 piece of dough around the hot dog sealing the edge. Bake at 425 degress

Krispy Treats with colorful sprinkles: Make according to the original directions. Before they have completely cooled cut into small bite sized pieces. Then dip in colorful sprinkles.

Apple Peanut Butter Granola Apples: Cut into wedges. Spread inside flesh with peanut butter. Dip in granola.

Decorations:
Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, side effects bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.
Food Tent: if using a portable awning or umbrella, string twine from the
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, and octopus, thumb and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, story or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Pecan Sour Cream Buttermilk pancakes

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a breakfast fanatic. I could eat breakfast foods for every meal if I let myself. The idea for pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes came from a book I was reading about a woman who loves to cook, cheapest a hitman for the US government, order her best friend’s conniving vicious mother and the Italian Mob. Every morning Agnes gets out of bed and makes breakfast for her friends and family who have gathered around her place in anticipation of her God daughter’s wedding. Her specialty is sour cream and buttermilk pancakes studded with pecans. I have been thinking about those pancakes ever since. Cook’s Illustrated was the closest match combining melted butter, sour cream, buttermilk and two eggs.

These pancakes are amazing. The sour cream gives the flavor a boost that other buttermilk pancake recipes lack. They are tender and thick but not mushy. Agnes served hers with a fried ham steak.

Grazie Agnes il mio amico. Buon appetito

Stack of pecan sour cream buttermilk pancakes

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 large eggs
3 Tbsp butter, melted and cooled slightly
1-2 tsp vegetable oil
Pecans, broken or whole

Whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and baking soda. In a second bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, sour cream and melted butter. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the wet ingredients into the well. Gently stir until just combined; it will be lumpy and thick. Let sit for 10 minutes

Using 1/4-cup measurement pour batter on the medium heat hot griddle. Dot with pecans. Cook until bubbles form on top, about 1-2 minutes then flip. Continue to cook about 1 minute longer or until bottoms are golden brown.

Makes 16 four-inch pancakes

Variations:
-For this recipe use Gold Medal or Pillsbury. If using a higher protein flour such as King Arthur, use an extra two Tbsp of buttermilk.

Tips: Do not over mix the batter. It will become too runny. It is still edible but for fluffier pancakes gently fold the wet ingredients into the dry just until combined.
I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, approved the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes

It is not very often our five year old volunteers to help cook. This morning he was eager to take position as my assistant chef.  He mashed the bananas, page whisked the dry ingredients and then combined the two. This helpful streak of his has been going on all week. He has jumped in tackling tasks without being asked and even though it is not perfect it is a job completed. I love the words, viagra 40mg “Can I Help?”.

Whole wheat baked goods often have a pungent after taste and are dense. Many bakers use honey to tone down the robust flavor. The King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking Cookbook recommends adding orange juice. In this recipe for whole wheat banana pancakes use half wheat and half all-purpose flours. The pancakes are still light and fluffy and the bananas are not over powered by the wheat.  For true whole wheat pancakes use 1 cup whole wheat flour omitting the all-purpose flour.

Make sure the griddle is not too hot or else they will burn.

Source: The Kitchen Witch
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt
2 tbsp melted butter
1 large egg
2 mashed bananas (about 3/4 cup)
Extra sliced bananas
Maple syrup

In large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, sugar and salt. In separate bowl, whisk together buttermilk or yogurt, butter or oil, egg and bananas.

Make well in center of dry ingredients and add banana mixture. Stir with fork until barely moistened.

Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes stacked

Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat. Spray with cooking spray. Pour a 1/4 cup batter for each 4-inch pancake. When bubbles rise and break surface, turn over. Cook about 2 minutes, until nicely browned. Transfer to plate. Keep pancakes warm in preheated 200 degree oven.

To serve, top with sliced bananas, walnuts and maple syrup.

Makes 12 pancakes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, price sausage, website like this fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, adiposity Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Yum, site yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, drugs lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, order when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
A friend of mine and her family has a special weekly tradition. Every Monday night, treatment everyone (friends and family) go to the Grandparents house for crapes and stories. Set up a pancake, store waffle or crepe bar with your family’s favorite fruits and nuts. You could give each member a small bowl with pancake batter and let them choose what to mix in the batter. Or, after you have poured the batter on the skillet, let them sprinkle their favorite toppings. Banana and nuts, blueberries, strawberries, chocolate chips or try a sprinkle of cheese and bacon.

PANCAKES:
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 egg
1 cup milk

Melt the butter in a small pan on low heat. In a bowl, using a wire whisk or sifter, sift in the flour, powder, salt and sugar. Add the eggs and half of the milk. Mix until it gets pasty. Add the rest of the milk and the butter. Beating until creamy. Pour onto heated griddle. Cook until tops are bubbly about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, pumpkin butter and cream cheese, jam, fruit or nuts. Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour. For a real treat add a teaspoon of juice from an orange.
-Replace part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat, oat flour or coconut flour.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons protein powder.
-Add 1-2 tablespoons ground flaxseed meal.

waffles

WAFFLES:
2 cup flour
1 1/2 c buttermilk
2 eggs, separated
2 tbsp sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter, melted

Sift flour, sugar, salt and powder. In another bowl beat egg yolks and milk. Slowly add flour. Beat until smooth. Mix in melted butter. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold into batter. Cook.

Variations:
-Serve with syrup, yogurt and fruit, cream cheese, jam and fruit.
-Make an egg sandwich.
-Substitute all or part of the flour with white wheat flour.

I think I found this recipe on allrecipes.com. Amazingly to me, cheap the pancakes taste like I am eating apple pie. Try them with Buttermilk Syrup or with flavored yogurt and fruit.

2 eggs
1 2/3 cups milk
8 oz plain yogurt
1/4 cup applesauce
1 cup oatmeal
1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

In a large bowl, stir together the eggs, milk, yogurt and oil until well blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon, stir into the milk mixture until smooth. Fold in chopped apple.
Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each cake. Cook until bubbles form in the cakes and the bottoms are golden brown. Flip and cook the other side. Serve warm with syrup or jam.

Variations:
Substitute some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour and wheat germ.
The recipe calls for diced apples however
The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because I load it up with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack bread to bring when we are hiking or in a school lunchbox.

This is a recipe for fluffy melt in the mouth pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking powder.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. One can never have too many pancake recipes. Our hearty basic pancake recipe is just that. It sticks to the ribs. I would never take this delicate cake on a hike. Fluffy pancakes are light and porous allowing the syrup to soak in. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together in a sauce pan or microwave oven.

Source: Dekota Kelly’s Grandma

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tablespoons butter, melted

Heat a skillet over medium heat.

In a small sauce pan heat the milk and butter until the butter is almost melted. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a medium bowl combine the flour, powder, and salt.

Whisk eggs slightly in a small bowl or cup. Add eggs to flour mixture. Stir in milk mixture until just combined.

Spray or butter the skillet. Add 1/3 cupfuls batter to skillet. Once bubbles appear on top of pancake check to see if the underside is golden brown. Flip over to brown topside.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, viagra buy flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.
It is no secret that I love pancakes. We have them once a week for breakfast on Wednesday mornings. I like to change them up a bit every now and then so I am always on the hunt for something new. The basic pancake recipe that we normally use is heavier. Mostly because it is loaded with wheat, order flaxseed and wheat germ. The recipe makes a nice healthy snack to bring when we are hiking.

This is a recipe for fluffy pancakes. It is a basic buttermilk pancake recipe without the buttermilk. Instead it uses the power of baking soda.  I considered replacing our basic pancake recipe with this one but decided against it. First, order this recipe does not take the addition of the wheat and flaxseed combo very well. Our hearty basic pancake mix is just that. It sticks to the ribs. Fluffy pancakes are light. They are not meant to be altered.

It is very important when making any pancake recipe that all the ingredients are at room temperature. This crucial step will ensure the lightest fluffiest pancakes. Cold ingredients will cause the batter to congeal and become thicker. One tip I found to be successful is to heat the milk and butter together.

Source:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, page she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, order a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the stainless steel cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, medical she can don a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, approved a pound of flour, cialis 40mg a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound cake gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, viagra nothing fancy, mind powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, store drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.

I bought a huge bag of lemons with the idea that it would be fun to make lemonade with the kids. I only have a hand reamer, pill nothing fancy, powerful or fast. My son was anxious to get to the good part, drinking it. We tried several ratios to get it just right. First we started with 1 1/2 cups of lemon juice (my son wanted to use all the lemons) plus 1 cup of sugar and 1 3/4 cups water. Then we tried 1 cup sugar and 4 cups of water but the little chef thought it was still too bitter. Finally, we went to the internet and found a recipe and it worked. I think the site was allrecipes.com.

1 3/4 cups sugar
8 cups water
1 1/2 cups lemon juice (about 8-10 lemons)

In a small saucepan, combine sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to boil and stir to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until chilled.

Remove seeds from lemon juice. In a pitcher, stir together chilled syrup, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups water.

Alternatives:
Pink Lemonade – 1/4 cup cranberry juice

Ginger ale

Strawberry Lemonade – 1 pint strawberries, 8 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons superfine sugar. Puree strawberries and sugar in a blender.

Try making Lemonade Floats or set up a Lemonade Bar. Set out the simple syrup, lemon juice, water and ice. Grab a glass and make your own cup of lemonade.
Dianne Craft was the key note speaker at a local two day conference for educators. No one had heard of her before. Surprisingly after the first 15 minutes she had all of us memorized and enthusiastic about returning on day two. Attendance had doubled the next day.

Dianne (with two N’s) holds a Master’s Degree in special education and is a Certified Natural Health Professional. She has 35 years of experience working with children. Many of whom are labeled autistic, diagnosis asberger, information pills adhd, this site add, ocd, in addition to those who are bright but have no desire to learn. Rather than mask the problems these children experience with drugs or excuses, she looks for viable methods of treatment to help them succeed. Dianne discovered there was a lot more going on in the little brain of each child. Slowly she started to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

Children who hate to write or read. Children who seem lazy or too tired. They refuse to sit up in their chair to do their work. Are labeled difficult, lazy, and deemed a problem child. Dianne realized that these children through no fault of their own or their parents lacked the normal sensory input/output that enables us to function.

When I was girl the playgrounds featured teeter totters, slides, tubes, bars, merry-go-rounds. We ran the neighborhood until twilight. Rode our bikes. Learned to skate. Played tag and kickball according to our own rules. We skipped, climbed, and jumped. I rarely see children outside playing today. The merry-go-round and teeter totter were removed to deter lawsuits. The children were brought indoors for safety. Signed up for organized sports with adults overseeing every detail of play. Skipping is no longer an accomplishment on the kindergarten report card. Multiplication is a requirement of first grade. We rarely understand what our actions will reap until too late.

But it is not too late.
This recipe is from the Martha Stewart website. Tastes similar to a punch I have had at many party’s. The one with ice cream and ginger-ale. This recipe calls for raspberry or strawberry sorbet. We tried it with a mix of lime, search raspberry and orange. Cheers.

Lemonade
Raspberry or strawberry Sorbet

Use a melon baller to make scoops from sorbet. Drop sorbet into individual glasses of lemonade.
This recipe is from the Martha Stewart website. Tastes similar to a punch I have had at many party’s. The one with ice cream and ginger-ale. This recipe calls for raspberry or strawberry sorbet. We tried it with a mix of lime, thumb raspberry and orange. Cheers.

Lemonade
Raspberry or strawberry Sorbet

Use a melon baller to make scoops from sorbet. Drop sorbet into individual glasses of lemonade.
Cornbread as we know it today is a modern interpretation to the flat cakes of the 17th century. Corn, here or Maize, drugs was once a form of wild grass called Teosinte used by the ancient peoples of Central America 6000 to 10, medical 000 years ago. The Teosinte kernels were small and unfused. In fact Biologist were certain that the Teosinte plant was a relative to rice. There was no possible way corn could have mutated from the Teosinte plant. Upon further investigation the science community discovered that the Native Americans selected particular Teosinte plants and developed the first hybrid corn plant through genetic modification. The hybrid was a shorter replica of the modern ear of corn.

Corn was a staple in the Native American diet. It was easy to cultivate as it grew well in the soils of South America. The Native Americans learned to dry and grind corn into corn meal for food. The husks were used to make shoes, baskets and mats. When the British Colonist arrived, in the 17th century, they taught the settlers how to grow and harvest the corn. Corn plants were planted with bean plants to provide support for one another. The spaces in between the mounds of earth were filled with ground covering melons. This method of planting provided an abundant supply of food in a small space. Cornmeal became a substitute for traditionally used grains of wheat and oats.

The type of cornbread depends on the area and family. Most culinary enthusiasts claim there are two factions of cornbread, Southern and Northern. Southern cornbread is made using bacon grease and little to no sugar. It is grainier and crumbly. Northern cornbread is a sweet cake-like bread with added sugar. Still there are more varieties of corn breads. Yeasted cornbread has a bread like texture. Savory cornbread mixes in fruits, vegetables and herbs. Skillet cornbread, or hoe cakes, are fast fried in fat before putting the pan in the oven. Corn Pone is a fried corn dough. Johnny cakes are corn pancakes.

This recipe for cornbread is a Northern cake-like bread. It is sweet and has a significant rise similar to a cake. I like to serve it as a dessert with honey butter.

Be sure to check out the variations after the recipe for some yummy alternatives.

Source: Patricia Bergstrom
1 1/2 cups cornmeal
2 1/2 cups milk
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup white sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup vegetable oil

Honey Butter:
1/2 cup butter, softened
1/3 cup honey or maple syrup

For Honey Butter: Whip 1/2 cup butter with 1/3 cup honey until smooth.

For Cornbread:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Grease a 9×13 inch baking pan.

In a small bowl, combine cornmeal and milk; let stand for 5 minutes. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Mix in the cornmeal mixture, eggs and oil until smooth, about 5 minutes on low speed. Pour batter into prepared pan.

Bake in preheated oven for 30 to 35 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center of the cornbread comes out clean. Serve with a dab of fresh whipped honey butter.

Variations:
– Substitute the white sugar with half white and half light brown sugar.
– If using a glass pyrex reduce oven temp by 25 degrees.
– For muffins bake 25 minutes
– For more corn flavor use 2 cups cornmeal and 1 1/2 cups flour.
– For a gluten free alternative replace all-purpose flour with amaranth flour using 2 cups cornmeal and 1 1/2 cups amaranth.
– Melt 1 tablespoon bacon grease in a 10 or 12-inch cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. When the grease is sizzling hot add the cornbread batter to the pan. Smooth the batter. Place in the oven for 15-20 minutes. This creates a nice crispy outside.
– If you are looking to incorporate more whole grains into your diet try grinding your own cornmeal from popcorn. You read right, yes popcorn. Since popcorn is extremely hard a professional grinder like the WonderMill is recommended. (Grind with the dial turned as far to the right as it can go.)

Family Togetherness: After Dinner Jaunt

Nothing sounds better in 104 degree heat than a strawberry daiquiri.

Source: Ariane Hundt (Personal Trainer and Nutritionist)
5 ounces water
6-8 ice cubes
9-10 strawberries
3 tablespoons sugar

Mix ingredients in blender. Serve in individuals glasses with a garnish of strawberry and whipped cream.
Nothing sounds better in 104 degree heat than a strawberry daiquiri.

Source: Ariane Hundt (Personal Trainer and Nutritionist)
5 ounces water
6-8 ice cubes
9-10 strawberries
3 tablespoons sugar

Mix ingredients in blender. Serve in individuals glasses with a garnish of strawberry and whipped cream.

There is a fresh strawberry stand within biking distance from our home. The strawberries are always so juicy and sweet. Problem is I have two little ones who can down a whole flat of berries in one day. My daughter did not like the idea of using the strawberries she could be eating to make cookies. She went so far as to accuse me of making her starve to death. She reluctantly helped me chop the strawberries and prepare the batter. However, ambulance I did not hear a single complaint when it came time to eat them.

Strawberry shortcake cookies are similar to a scone or biscuit. I diced the pieces of strawberry about the size of a pea. I did not want a soggy cookie that can sometimes result from larger pieces of fruit. I also used raw sugar in the place of the sanding sugar. The effect was essentially the same just not as sparkly. If you do not have kosher salt you can substitute regular table salt decreasing the amount slightly.

Source: Martha Stewart
12 ounces strawberries, viagra sale hulled and cut into 1/4-inch dice (2 cups)
1 teaspoon fresh lemon or lime juice
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
2/3 cup heavy cream
Sanding sugar or raw sugar, for sprinkling

Preheat oven to 375F degrees. Line baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

In a small bowl, combine strawberries, lemon juice, and 2 tablespoons granulated sugar; set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt, and remaining 7 tablespoons of granulated sugar.

Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter, or two forks until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
Stir in the cream until dough starts to come together, then fold in the strawberry mixture, just until combined. Do not handle the dough to much. It will cause the cookies to become tough. If the mixture is too dry add another tablespoon of crea to the bottom of the bowl and fold in.

Using a 1 1/2-inch ice cream scoop or two tablespoons, drop dough onto parchment lined baking sheets, spacing evenly apart. Sprinkle with sanding sugar, if using.

Bake until golden brown, about 20 to 25 minutes; or until a light golden color. Remove from the oven and transfer cookies with a spatula to a wire rack, and let cool.

*These cookies are best served the day they are made, but can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 to 2 days.*

Yields: 3 dozen Cookies.
Nothing sounds better in 104 degree heat than a strawberry daiquiri.

Source: Ariane Hundt (Personal Trainer and Nutritionist)
5 ounces water
6-8 ice cubes
9-10 strawberries
3 tablespoons sugar

Mix ingredients in blender. Serve in individuals glasses with a garnish of strawberry and whipped cream.

There is a fresh strawberry stand within biking distance from our home. The strawberries are always so juicy and sweet. Problem is I have two little ones who can down a whole flat of berries in one day. My daughter did not like the idea of using the strawberries she could be eating to make cookies. She went so far as to accuse me of making her starve to death. She reluctantly helped me chop the strawberries and prepare the batter. However, ambulance I did not hear a single complaint when it came time to eat them.

Strawberry shortcake cookies are similar to a scone or biscuit. I diced the pieces of strawberry about the size of a pea. I did not want a soggy cookie that can sometimes result from larger pieces of fruit. I also used raw sugar in the place of the sanding sugar. The effect was essentially the same just not as sparkly. If you do not have kosher salt you can substitute regular table salt decreasing the amount slightly.

Source: Martha Stewart
12 ounces strawberries, viagra sale hulled and cut into 1/4-inch dice (2 cups)
1 teaspoon fresh lemon or lime juice
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
2/3 cup heavy cream
Sanding sugar or raw sugar, for sprinkling

Preheat oven to 375F degrees. Line baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

In a small bowl, combine strawberries, lemon juice, and 2 tablespoons granulated sugar; set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt, and remaining 7 tablespoons of granulated sugar.

Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter, or two forks until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
Stir in the cream until dough starts to come together, then fold in the strawberry mixture, just until combined. Do not handle the dough to much. It will cause the cookies to become tough. If the mixture is too dry add another tablespoon of crea to the bottom of the bowl and fold in.

Using a 1 1/2-inch ice cream scoop or two tablespoons, drop dough onto parchment lined baking sheets, spacing evenly apart. Sprinkle with sanding sugar, if using.

Bake until golden brown, about 20 to 25 minutes; or until a light golden color. Remove from the oven and transfer cookies with a spatula to a wire rack, and let cool.

*These cookies are best served the day they are made, but can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 to 2 days.*

Yields: 3 dozen Cookies.
Source: Martha Stewart
12 ounces strawberries, ed hulled and cut into 1/4-inch dice (2 cups)
1 teaspoon fresh lemon or lime juice
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, mind cut into small pieces
2/3 cup heavy cream
Sanding sugar or raw sugar, cialis 40mg for sprinkling

Preheat oven to 375F degrees. Line baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

In a small bowl, combine strawberries, lemon juice, and 2 tablespoons granulated sugar; set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt, and remaining 7 tablespoons of granulated sugar.

Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter, or two forks until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
Stir in the cream until dough starts to come together, then stir in the strawberry mixture, just until combined.

Using a 1 1/2-inch ice cream scoop or two tablespoons, drop dough onto parchment lined baking sheets, spacing evenly apart. Sprinkle with sanding sugar, if using.

Bake until golden brown, 20 to 25 minutes.
Remove from the oven and transfer cookies with a spatula to a wire rack, and let cool.
These cookies are best served the day they are made, but can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 to 2 days.

Yields: 3 dozen Cookies.

Artwork: “Evening Stroll”, search buy by Ludmila Korol

My summers as a kid were fantastic. It was not all about getting away from the confines of school; although, pharm I am sure that was a great source of my happiness. I was glad to have the wind in my hair and the grass between my toes. The majority of each summer was spent alternating between my Aunt Sandra’s house and my Aunt Ruth’s; both lived in rural areas of Florida. My Aunt Sandra lived north of Tampa in the small town of Brooksville. Her house was nestled on a spacious piece of land on the outskirts of town. When we were younger my cousin Jean boarded a horse on part of the land. It was a real treat to feed the horse sugar cubes and carrots. The horse was old; still Jean would let us climb on for a short jaunt around the yard.

During the week when my Aunt had to work the house served as a base station for our mini day trips. The days we stayed in were spent lounging around watching movie rentals, playing games, or listening to music. At night after dinner we would take a walk around “the loop”. The exercise helped to ease digestion after stuffing our bellies. It also served as an outlet for our wiggles. During the cooler months with flash lights in hand we half-jogged and half-walked the mile long loop. Crazy as it may seem of the many memories I have while visiting my Aunt’s house, walking the loop is one of my favorites. It was sort of a mini adventure, walking around in the darkness.

My son has been begging to go on an after dark excursion. In the fall when the sunsets earlier in the evening the kids get so excited when they get to take their flashlights with them. Walks are not only to help wear out the kids for bedtime. They can be a free date night activity and a form of stress management.

Even though walking is a form of exercise it is a relaxing way to improve energy levels and boost your mood. Walking in the evening helps to unwind the body relieving the stresses of the day. The soothing rhythmic motion can clear away negative thoughts. It gives the mind time to resolve problems.

It is uncanny how a simple tradition of walking can create a lifetime of fond memories. Not to mention a happy soul and healthy color.

Shredded Beef Enchiladas

Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, hospital she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, viagra order a pound of flour, capsule a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, hospital she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, viagra order a pound of flour, capsule a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, search shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

September Website Review: Khan Academy and Discovery Streaming

4 cod fillets

Olive Oil

Salt

Pepper

Italian Seasoning

Garlic

Lemon

Place cod in a shallow baking dish. Squeeze the juice from half of the lemon over fillets. Drizzle with oil. Season with salt and pepper and Italian seasoning. Sprinkle with chopped garlic. Cover with tin foil. Bake in 400 degree oven for 15-20 minutes. Until easily flakes with a fork.

Serve with baked sweet potato and a spinach salad.
4 cod fillets

Olive Oil

Salt

Pepper

Italian Seasoning

Garlic

Lemon

Place cod in a shallow baking dish. Squeeze the juice from half of the lemon over fillets. Drizzle with oil. Season with salt and pepper and Italian seasoning. Sprinkle with chopped garlic. Cover with tin foil. Bake in 400 degree oven for 15-20 minutes. Until easily flakes with a fork.

Serve with baked sweet potato and a spinach salad.

The question is not

HOW

it is done but rather, viagra sale

WHY

does this work!

Science is fascinating. I hate math. But, shop science is fascinating to me. I can’t get enough. Sites such as Khan Academy, viagra 60mg Discovery Education Streaming, and Math Magic offer amazing educational videos…for FREE.

I am a visual learning as is my son. Digital media is an invaluable tool we use at home to learn to cook, understand science and keep up with current events. If you have a child who is struggling to grasp the WHY, show them a video. Conduct your own experiments. Khan Academy, Discovery Education Streaming and Math Magic are the means to do and learn just about anything.

Discovery Education and Khan Academy is set up for use by both teacher and parent.

Clipart Source: Scientopia.org

Khan Academy is a self paced learning tool for math, science, and history. The site offers an extensive video library, practice exercises, and the ability to monitor each student’s progress from any computer anywhere. Kids can track their work on a really cool spider grid and earn badges for the completion of subjects.

Discovery Education is a learning site that provides both students and teachers with access to thousands of videos and webinars. The webinars are great. Sign up to listen to scholars around the world. When you sign up for the free webinar session your child has the opportunity to submit a question to be answered by the speaker during a Q&A after the webinar. Teachers and parents can use the building tool to create lesson plans, quizes, search for thematic ideas and keep track of each students progress. My kids love the Spaced Out! videos in the video streaming area of the site. Here you can search a vast library of videos by topic and/or grade level.

Pork with Balsamic Cherry Compote

When I was a youth I loved scavenger hunts. The hunts involved having to bag of road kill, buy information pills singing in a public place, more about or visiting a shop or spooky cemetery in the dark for the next clue. It was pretty outrageous. My little ones mirror my enthusiasm for scavenger hunts. Our hunts are a bit more tame such collecting a purple flower or black bobby pin.

Scavenger hunts are a great learning tool for preschoolers. Send them off looking for 1 worm, 2 pebbles, 3 flowers, 4 leaves, and so on up to 5 or 10. When the kids were little I drew pictures to illustrate the article to be found on a large sheet of paper. As they found the items they taped them to the paper next to the picture.

Lately the kids have been fascinated with taking pictures and movies using the camera. Why not turn it into a game.

1. Make a list of items such as objects or places. Work as a team or separate into groups depending on the number of cameras available. Take stills of each object.

Here are some suggestions to add to the list:
Picture of a team
Flag
Swing
Statue
Garden sculpture
Museum
Glass building
Wooden bridge
Forest
Cemetery
Worm
Butterfly
Fire
Rain
Cloud animal
An ant hill
Chicken
Cow patty
Political activity
Map
Mailbox
Bus
Keys
Graffiti art
Roadside memorial or shrine
Types of food

2. Organize the photos to make a movie or collage. If there are multiple teams hold an art exhibit or screening to judge the best works of art. Offer rewards based on the most comical, serious, original, ect.

Variations:
– This concept may also be used to illustrate the various elements of photography: warmth, strong, light, shadows, lines, and so on.
– For a fine art rendition try to find examples of Abstract, Deco, Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, Renaissance, in addition to depictions of famous artists.

When I was a youth I loved scavenger hunts. The hunts involved having to bag of road kill, buy information pills singing in a public place, more about or visiting a shop or spooky cemetery in the dark for the next clue. It was pretty outrageous. My little ones mirror my enthusiasm for scavenger hunts. Our hunts are a bit more tame such collecting a purple flower or black bobby pin.

Scavenger hunts are a great learning tool for preschoolers. Send them off looking for 1 worm, 2 pebbles, 3 flowers, 4 leaves, and so on up to 5 or 10. When the kids were little I drew pictures to illustrate the article to be found on a large sheet of paper. As they found the items they taped them to the paper next to the picture.

Lately the kids have been fascinated with taking pictures and movies using the camera. Why not turn it into a game.

1. Make a list of items such as objects or places. Work as a team or separate into groups depending on the number of cameras available. Take stills of each object.

Here are some suggestions to add to the list:
Picture of a team
Flag
Swing
Statue
Garden sculpture
Museum
Glass building
Wooden bridge
Forest
Cemetery
Worm
Butterfly
Fire
Rain
Cloud animal
An ant hill
Chicken
Cow patty
Political activity
Map
Mailbox
Bus
Keys
Graffiti art
Roadside memorial or shrine
Types of food

2. Organize the photos to make a movie or collage. If there are multiple teams hold an art exhibit or screening to judge the best works of art. Offer rewards based on the most comical, serious, original, ect.

Variations:
– This concept may also be used to illustrate the various elements of photography: warmth, strong, light, shadows, lines, and so on.
– For a fine art rendition try to find examples of Abstract, Deco, Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, Renaissance, in addition to depictions of famous artists.

When I was a youth I loved scavenger hunts. The hunts involved having to bag of road kill, for sale singing in a public place, illness or visiting a shop or spooky cemetery in the dark for the next clue. It was pretty outrageous. My little ones mirror my enthusiasm for scavenger hunts. Our hunts are a bit more tame such collecting a purple flower or black bobby pin.

Scavenger hunts are a great learning tool for preschoolers. Send them off looking for 1 worm, web 2 pebbles, 3 flowers, 4 leaves, and so on up to 5 or 10. When the kids were little I drew pictures to illustrate the article to be found on a large sheet of paper. As they found the items they taped them to the paper next to the picture.

Lately the kids have been fascinated with taking pictures and movies using the camera. Why not turn it into a game.

1. Make a list of items such as objects or places. Work as a team or separate into groups depending on the number of cameras available. Take stills of each object.

Here are some suggestions to add to the list:
Picture of a team
Flag
Swing
Statue
Garden sculpture
Museum
Glass building
Wooden bridge
Forest
Cemetery
Worm
Butterfly
Fire
Rain
Cloud animal
An ant hill
Chicken
Cow patty
Political activity
Map
Mailbox
Bus
Keys
Graffiti art
Roadside memorial or shrine
Types of food

2. Organize the photos to make a movie or collage. If there are multiple teams hold an art exhibit or screening to judge the best works of art. Offer rewards based on the most comical, serious, original, ect.

Variations:
– This concept may also be used to illustrate the various elements of photography: warmth, strong, light, shadows, lines, and so on.
– For a fine art rendition try to find examples of Abstract, Deco, Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, Renaissance, in addition to depictions of famous artists.

When I was a youth I loved scavenger hunts. The hunts involved having to bag of road kill, buy information pills singing in a public place, more about or visiting a shop or spooky cemetery in the dark for the next clue. It was pretty outrageous. My little ones mirror my enthusiasm for scavenger hunts. Our hunts are a bit more tame such collecting a purple flower or black bobby pin.

Scavenger hunts are a great learning tool for preschoolers. Send them off looking for 1 worm, 2 pebbles, 3 flowers, 4 leaves, and so on up to 5 or 10. When the kids were little I drew pictures to illustrate the article to be found on a large sheet of paper. As they found the items they taped them to the paper next to the picture.

Lately the kids have been fascinated with taking pictures and movies using the camera. Why not turn it into a game.

1. Make a list of items such as objects or places. Work as a team or separate into groups depending on the number of cameras available. Take stills of each object.

Here are some suggestions to add to the list:
Picture of a team
Flag
Swing
Statue
Garden sculpture
Museum
Glass building
Wooden bridge
Forest
Cemetery
Worm
Butterfly
Fire
Rain
Cloud animal
An ant hill
Chicken
Cow patty
Political activity
Map
Mailbox
Bus
Keys
Graffiti art
Roadside memorial or shrine
Types of food

2. Organize the photos to make a movie or collage. If there are multiple teams hold an art exhibit or screening to judge the best works of art. Offer rewards based on the most comical, serious, original, ect.

Variations:
– This concept may also be used to illustrate the various elements of photography: warmth, strong, light, shadows, lines, and so on.
– For a fine art rendition try to find examples of Abstract, Deco, Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, Renaissance, in addition to depictions of famous artists.

When I was a youth I loved scavenger hunts. The hunts involved having to bag of road kill, for sale singing in a public place, illness or visiting a shop or spooky cemetery in the dark for the next clue. It was pretty outrageous. My little ones mirror my enthusiasm for scavenger hunts. Our hunts are a bit more tame such collecting a purple flower or black bobby pin.

Scavenger hunts are a great learning tool for preschoolers. Send them off looking for 1 worm, web 2 pebbles, 3 flowers, 4 leaves, and so on up to 5 or 10. When the kids were little I drew pictures to illustrate the article to be found on a large sheet of paper. As they found the items they taped them to the paper next to the picture.

Lately the kids have been fascinated with taking pictures and movies using the camera. Why not turn it into a game.

1. Make a list of items such as objects or places. Work as a team or separate into groups depending on the number of cameras available. Take stills of each object.

Here are some suggestions to add to the list:
Picture of a team
Flag
Swing
Statue
Garden sculpture
Museum
Glass building
Wooden bridge
Forest
Cemetery
Worm
Butterfly
Fire
Rain
Cloud animal
An ant hill
Chicken
Cow patty
Political activity
Map
Mailbox
Bus
Keys
Graffiti art
Roadside memorial or shrine
Types of food

2. Organize the photos to make a movie or collage. If there are multiple teams hold an art exhibit or screening to judge the best works of art. Offer rewards based on the most comical, serious, original, ect.

Variations:
– This concept may also be used to illustrate the various elements of photography: warmth, strong, light, shadows, lines, and so on.
– For a fine art rendition try to find examples of Abstract, Deco, Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, Renaissance, in addition to depictions of famous artists.
School starts incredibly early this year. A back to school carnival is a delightful way to end the summer and get the kids pumped for school. I have been dying to throw a carnival bash for years now. I am so glad I waited because the kids are all at the right age to thoroughly enjoy it.
Make it a neighborhood block party or invite a group of friends. Hand out play money or tickets to be used to buy snacks and game tickets. Provide prizes for the winners of the races.

INVITATIONS:
Use bright vibrant colors with bold antique lettering. Include an admission ticket to get in. Here are a few styles for inspiration.



BOOTHS:
–Fish: Tie a magnet to one end of a piece of string. Tie the other end of the string to a yardstick or pole. Cut fish, here octopus, capsule and shark shapes from foam sheets or paper. Attach a paperclip to each fish. Mark each creature with a color to represent a number of tickets for a prize. Build a booth with a barrier so that the fish are not visible to the children. The magnet, approved or hook, is tossed behind the barrier to catch a fish. The booth worker tugs the string lightly when the child has caught a fish.
–Duck Pond: Fill a small pool with water. Purchase rubber duckies from a discount supply store such as oriental trading co. Use a permanent marker or paint to mark each duck on the bottom. Use a different color for the type of prize. Red=1 ticket, Black=nothing, blue=2 tickets, ect.
–Lollipop Ring Toss: Take a large square of plywood. Drill holes the size of a lollipop stick.
–Bottle Ring Toss: Use a crate of coke bottles to toss rings onto. Three tries each. Award a ticket or prize if a ring makes it.
–Clothespin Drop: Place a large jar on the ground. Three tries to drop all the pins in the bottle.
–Tin Can Blast: Set up a pyramid tower of empty tin cans. Toss a bing bag or shoot darts.
–Spray-Away Game:
Take a length of foam board and insert 6-8 golf tees in a straight line down the board. Place ping pong balls on each peg. Use a water gun to squirt the ball off the peg. Award tickets according to how many balls were successfully shot off.
–Bing Bag Toss: Using plywood or a piece of canvas, cut 1 hole or a few circles to toss the bags into. Three tries. If all bags make it tickets are rewarded.
–Balloon Darts: Attach inflated balloons to a large piece of cardboard or cork board. Mark a line on the ground using painters tape several feet away form the balloons. Use darts to pop a balloon. Award tickets according to the color of balloon popped.
–Ping Pong Ball Toss: Set up drinking glasses in a triangle formation on a low table. Place a colored bead or foam circle in each glass to represent the number of tickets awarded. Fill each glass with water.

ACTIVITIES:
–Balloon or Ball Tent: Set up a small tent with streamers and balloons inside for the younger kids to play in.
–Silly House: Tape large cardboard boxes together to make a string of houses. Decorate the outside with funny characters or paint to look like houses. Cut doors to enter from the front and to tunnel through on the inside.
–Face Painting: Set up a face painting station.
–Arts and Crafts: Set up long tables with arts and craft supplies.

RACES:
Start field games to keep kids occupied once they had cashed in their tickets.
Three-legged, Egg on a Spoon, Potato Sack, Body Boppers

PRIZES:
So many tickets per prize. Check Oriental Trading Co and the Dollar Store for cheap toys.
Some kid favorites include: Mini Plastic Insects, Mini Plastic Animals, Clown Noses, Bubbles, Whistles, Rings, Kazoos, Balls, Candy, Flags, Pencils, Yo-Yo, Army Men.

SNACKS:
Cup cakes, Lemonade Stand, Hot dogs, Popcorn (scoop into individual popcorn bags), Cotton candy
Hot Dog Wraps, Krispy Treats with colorful sprinklesApple Peanut Butter Granola Apple Wedges,
Ice Cream Cone Baked Cupcakes.

DECORATIONS:
Colorful Balloons and Streamers
— Make colorful signs for each booth.
–Ticket Booth: Paint a tall cardboard box with vertical red and white stripes. Cut a ticket window. Paint the words Ticket Booth below the window. Use to collect tickets as guests arrive.
–Booths: Use large pieces of colorful fabric, bed sheets, plastic or, painted cardboard to designate each booth. Hang on a piece of twine strung between trees. Or use poles stuck into the ground tying the fabric to the poles.

Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies

I have searched and searched for THE sugar cookie recipe. Some are too wet to handle. Others too bland. Still more are good but I want a keeper. One that will be passed down. For Halloween the kids wanted to make Halloween shaped sugar cookies. So determined with a purpose I set out to uncover a decent sugar cookie recipe. It is so hard to know if a recipe is worth the trouble. Especially if there are not any comments from tried and true viewers and then there is always the difference of taste and opinion.

I decided on this recipe because of the caption, web and “after trying dozens of sugar cookies that are too bland…” I figured she was in the same boat of I was. We do not like frosting or icing on our sugar cookies so the basic cookie has to be soft with a hint of crispness and just the right amount of sweetness. The dough came together nicely. It was firm enough to roll out right away but I went ahead and chilled it as the directions stated.

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup white sugar
1 cup butter
1 egg, sick lightly beaten
3 tbsp cream, or milk
1 tsp vanilla, or almond extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Sift together all-purpose flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Cut in butter and blend with a pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Stir in lightly beaten egg, vanilla and cream. Blend well. Chill dough for one hour for easier rolling.

On a floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into shapes. Place on ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar (optional). Bake for 6 – 8 minutes, or until the bottoms turn lightly brown. Do not over bake.

Icing:
1/3 cup softened butter
3 1/2 cups of powdered sugar
2 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup milk

Beat ingredients until smooth. Divide the icing into separate bowls, and add food colorings to each to the preferred color intensity. Paint the icing onto the cookies or pipe with decorator icing tubes and tips. Top with candy decorator balls, holiday sprinkles or any other festive design.

Joe’s Sugar Cookies:
This is a family recipe from my sister-n-law Emily. This particular recipe produces a lovely buttery sugar cookie that has a nice crisp bite on the outside. The dough is rather sticky; therefore, refrigerating for the 2 hours is a must. If the kids cannot wait try the scoop and drop method.

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup softened butter
1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cream of tartar

In a large bowl mix butter, sugar, vanilla, and egg. Mix well. Add flour, soda, and tartar. Wrap dough in plastic wrap or waxed paper and refrigerate for at least two hours.
Roll out on floured surface to 1/4 to 1/8 inch thick. Cut to shape, place on a cookie sheet and bake at 350°F until lightly brown, about 8 minutes.

Icing:
2 teaspoons milk
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
assorted food coloring colors

Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies

I have searched and searched for THE sugar cookie recipe. Some are too wet to handle. Others too bland. Still more are good but I want a keeper. One that will be passed down. For Halloween the kids wanted to make Halloween shaped sugar cookies. So determined with a purpose I set out to uncover a decent sugar cookie recipe. It is so hard to know if a recipe is worth the trouble. Especially if there are not any comments from tried and true viewers and then there is always the difference of taste and opinion.

I decided on this recipe because of the caption, web and “after trying dozens of sugar cookies that are too bland…” I figured she was in the same boat of I was. We do not like frosting or icing on our sugar cookies so the basic cookie has to be soft with a hint of crispness and just the right amount of sweetness. The dough came together nicely. It was firm enough to roll out right away but I went ahead and chilled it as the directions stated.

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup white sugar
1 cup butter
1 egg, sick lightly beaten
3 tbsp cream, or milk
1 tsp vanilla, or almond extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Sift together all-purpose flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Cut in butter and blend with a pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Stir in lightly beaten egg, vanilla and cream. Blend well. Chill dough for one hour for easier rolling.

On a floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into shapes. Place on ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar (optional). Bake for 6 – 8 minutes, or until the bottoms turn lightly brown. Do not over bake.

Icing:
1/3 cup softened butter
3 1/2 cups of powdered sugar
2 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup milk

Beat ingredients until smooth. Divide the icing into separate bowls, and add food colorings to each to the preferred color intensity. Paint the icing onto the cookies or pipe with decorator icing tubes and tips. Top with candy decorator balls, holiday sprinkles or any other festive design.

Joe’s Sugar Cookies:
This is a family recipe from my sister-n-law Emily. This particular recipe produces a lovely buttery sugar cookie that has a nice crisp bite on the outside. The dough is rather sticky; therefore, refrigerating for the 2 hours is a must. If the kids cannot wait try the scoop and drop method.

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup softened butter
1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cream of tartar

In a large bowl mix butter, sugar, vanilla, and egg. Mix well. Add flour, soda, and tartar. Wrap dough in plastic wrap or waxed paper and refrigerate for at least two hours.
Roll out on floured surface to 1/4 to 1/8 inch thick. Cut to shape, place on a cookie sheet and bake at 350°F until lightly brown, about 8 minutes.

Icing:
2 teaspoons milk
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
assorted food coloring colors

Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies

I have searched and searched for THE sugar cookie recipe. Some are too wet to handle. Others too bland. Still more are good but I want a keeper. One that will be passed down. For Halloween the kids wanted to make Halloween shaped sugar cookies. So determined with a purpose I set out to uncover a decent sugar cookie recipe. It is so hard to know if a recipe is worth the trouble. Especially if there are not any comments from tried and true viewers and then there is always the difference of taste and opinion.

I decided on this recipe because of the caption, sick “after trying dozens of sugar cookies that are too bland…” I figured she was in the same boat of I was. We do not like frosting or icing on our sugar cookies so the basic cookie has to be soft with a hint of crispness and just the right amount of sweetness. The dough came together nicely. It was firm enough to roll out right away but I went ahead and chilled it as the directions stated.

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup white sugar
1 cup butter
1 egg, buy information pills lightly beaten
3 tbsp cream
1 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Sift together all-purpose flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Cut in butter and blend with a pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Stir in lightly beaten egg, vanilla and cream. Blend well. Chill dough for one hour for easier rolling.

On a floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into shapes. Place on ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar (optional). Bake for 6 – 8 minutes, or until the bottoms turn lightly brown. Do not over bake.

Icing:
2 teaspoons milk
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
assorted food coloring colors

In a small bowl, stir together the milk and confectioners sugar until smooth. Beat in corn syrup and the vanilla extract until icing is smooth and glossy. If the icing is too thick, add additional corn syrup to thin slightly. Divide the icing into separate bowls, and add food colorings to each to the preferred color intensity. Paint the icing onto the cookies or pipe with decorator icing tubes and tips. Top with candy decorator balls, holiday sprinkles or any other festive design.

Joe’s Sugar Cookies:
This is a family recipe from my sister-n-law. I have tried this version before. I found a similar recipe when I was experimenting with making Loft Cookies. The puffy colorful ones from the grocery store. It was not an exact match but still good. This particular recipe produces a nice soft puffier cookie than the traditional sugar cookie. The dough was rather sticky for me so rather than rolling them out I used the scoop and drop method.

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup softened butter
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda

In a large bowl mix butter, sugar, vanilla, and egg. Mix well. Add flour and soda. Divide dough in two parts. Wrap each in wax paper and refrigerate for at least two hours.
Roll out on floured surface to 1/8 inch thick. Cut to shape, place on a cookie sheet and bake at 375°F until lightly brown.

Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies

I have searched and searched for THE sugar cookie recipe. Some are too wet to handle. Others too bland. Still more are good but I want a keeper. One that will be passed down. For Halloween the kids wanted to make Halloween shaped sugar cookies. So determined with a purpose I set out to uncover a decent sugar cookie recipe. It is so hard to know if a recipe is worth the trouble. Especially if there are not any comments from tried and true viewers and then there is always the difference of taste and opinion.

I decided on this recipe because of the caption, web and “after trying dozens of sugar cookies that are too bland…” I figured she was in the same boat of I was. We do not like frosting or icing on our sugar cookies so the basic cookie has to be soft with a hint of crispness and just the right amount of sweetness. The dough came together nicely. It was firm enough to roll out right away but I went ahead and chilled it as the directions stated.

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup white sugar
1 cup butter
1 egg, sick lightly beaten
3 tbsp cream, or milk
1 tsp vanilla, or almond extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Sift together all-purpose flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Cut in butter and blend with a pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Stir in lightly beaten egg, vanilla and cream. Blend well. Chill dough for one hour for easier rolling.

On a floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into shapes. Place on ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar (optional). Bake for 6 – 8 minutes, or until the bottoms turn lightly brown. Do not over bake.

Icing:
1/3 cup softened butter
3 1/2 cups of powdered sugar
2 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup milk

Beat ingredients until smooth. Divide the icing into separate bowls, and add food colorings to each to the preferred color intensity. Paint the icing onto the cookies or pipe with decorator icing tubes and tips. Top with candy decorator balls, holiday sprinkles or any other festive design.

Joe’s Sugar Cookies:
This is a family recipe from my sister-n-law Emily. This particular recipe produces a lovely buttery sugar cookie that has a nice crisp bite on the outside. The dough is rather sticky; therefore, refrigerating for the 2 hours is a must. If the kids cannot wait try the scoop and drop method.

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup softened butter
1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cream of tartar

In a large bowl mix butter, sugar, vanilla, and egg. Mix well. Add flour, soda, and tartar. Wrap dough in plastic wrap or waxed paper and refrigerate for at least two hours.
Roll out on floured surface to 1/4 to 1/8 inch thick. Cut to shape, place on a cookie sheet and bake at 350°F until lightly brown, about 8 minutes.

Icing:
2 teaspoons milk
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
assorted food coloring colors

Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies

I have searched and searched for THE sugar cookie recipe. Some are too wet to handle. Others too bland. Still more are good but I want a keeper. One that will be passed down. For Halloween the kids wanted to make Halloween shaped sugar cookies. So determined with a purpose I set out to uncover a decent sugar cookie recipe. It is so hard to know if a recipe is worth the trouble. Especially if there are not any comments from tried and true viewers and then there is always the difference of taste and opinion.

I decided on this recipe because of the caption, sick “after trying dozens of sugar cookies that are too bland…” I figured she was in the same boat of I was. We do not like frosting or icing on our sugar cookies so the basic cookie has to be soft with a hint of crispness and just the right amount of sweetness. The dough came together nicely. It was firm enough to roll out right away but I went ahead and chilled it as the directions stated.

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup white sugar
1 cup butter
1 egg, buy information pills lightly beaten
3 tbsp cream
1 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Sift together all-purpose flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Cut in butter and blend with a pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Stir in lightly beaten egg, vanilla and cream. Blend well. Chill dough for one hour for easier rolling.

On a floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into shapes. Place on ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar (optional). Bake for 6 – 8 minutes, or until the bottoms turn lightly brown. Do not over bake.

Icing:
2 teaspoons milk
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
assorted food coloring colors

In a small bowl, stir together the milk and confectioners sugar until smooth. Beat in corn syrup and the vanilla extract until icing is smooth and glossy. If the icing is too thick, add additional corn syrup to thin slightly. Divide the icing into separate bowls, and add food colorings to each to the preferred color intensity. Paint the icing onto the cookies or pipe with decorator icing tubes and tips. Top with candy decorator balls, holiday sprinkles or any other festive design.

Joe’s Sugar Cookies:
This is a family recipe from my sister-n-law. I have tried this version before. I found a similar recipe when I was experimenting with making Loft Cookies. The puffy colorful ones from the grocery store. It was not an exact match but still good. This particular recipe produces a nice soft puffier cookie than the traditional sugar cookie. The dough was rather sticky for me so rather than rolling them out I used the scoop and drop method.

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup softened butter
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda

In a large bowl mix butter, sugar, vanilla, and egg. Mix well. Add flour and soda. Divide dough in two parts. Wrap each in wax paper and refrigerate for at least two hours.
Roll out on floured surface to 1/8 inch thick. Cut to shape, place on a cookie sheet and bake at 375°F until lightly brown.
Dianne Craft was the key note speaker at a local two day conference for educators. No one had heard of her before. Surprisingly after the first 15 minutes she had all of us memorized and enthusiastic about returning on day two. Attendance was doubled the next day.

Dianne (with two N’s) has worked with a degree of children for 35 years. Many of whom are labeled autistic, buy asberger, adhd, add, ocd, and so on. Rather than mask the problems these children experience with drugs or excuses, she looks for viable methods of treatment to help them succeed.

Children who hate to write or read.

Children who seem lazy or too tired.

They cannot sit up in their chair to do their work.

Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies

I have searched and searched for THE sugar cookie recipe. Some are too wet to handle. Others too bland. Still more are good but I want a keeper. One that will be passed down. For Halloween the kids wanted to make Halloween shaped sugar cookies. So determined with a purpose I set out to uncover a decent sugar cookie recipe. It is so hard to know if a recipe is worth the trouble. Especially if there are not any comments from tried and true viewers and then there is always the difference of taste and opinion.

I decided on this recipe because of the caption, web and “after trying dozens of sugar cookies that are too bland…” I figured she was in the same boat of I was. We do not like frosting or icing on our sugar cookies so the basic cookie has to be soft with a hint of crispness and just the right amount of sweetness. The dough came together nicely. It was firm enough to roll out right away but I went ahead and chilled it as the directions stated.

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup white sugar
1 cup butter
1 egg, sick lightly beaten
3 tbsp cream, or milk
1 tsp vanilla, or almond extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Sift together all-purpose flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Cut in butter and blend with a pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Stir in lightly beaten egg, vanilla and cream. Blend well. Chill dough for one hour for easier rolling.

On a floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into shapes. Place on ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar (optional). Bake for 6 – 8 minutes, or until the bottoms turn lightly brown. Do not over bake.

Icing:
1/3 cup softened butter
3 1/2 cups of powdered sugar
2 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup milk

Beat ingredients until smooth. Divide the icing into separate bowls, and add food colorings to each to the preferred color intensity. Paint the icing onto the cookies or pipe with decorator icing tubes and tips. Top with candy decorator balls, holiday sprinkles or any other festive design.

Joe’s Sugar Cookies:
This is a family recipe from my sister-n-law Emily. This particular recipe produces a lovely buttery sugar cookie that has a nice crisp bite on the outside. The dough is rather sticky; therefore, refrigerating for the 2 hours is a must. If the kids cannot wait try the scoop and drop method.

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup softened butter
1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cream of tartar

In a large bowl mix butter, sugar, vanilla, and egg. Mix well. Add flour, soda, and tartar. Wrap dough in plastic wrap or waxed paper and refrigerate for at least two hours.
Roll out on floured surface to 1/4 to 1/8 inch thick. Cut to shape, place on a cookie sheet and bake at 350°F until lightly brown, about 8 minutes.

Icing:
2 teaspoons milk
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
assorted food coloring colors

Old Fashioned Sugar Cookies

I have searched and searched for THE sugar cookie recipe. Some are too wet to handle. Others too bland. Still more are good but I want a keeper. One that will be passed down. For Halloween the kids wanted to make Halloween shaped sugar cookies. So determined with a purpose I set out to uncover a decent sugar cookie recipe. It is so hard to know if a recipe is worth the trouble. Especially if there are not any comments from tried and true viewers and then there is always the difference of taste and opinion.

I decided on this recipe because of the caption, sick “after trying dozens of sugar cookies that are too bland…” I figured she was in the same boat of I was. We do not like frosting or icing on our sugar cookies so the basic cookie has to be soft with a hint of crispness and just the right amount of sweetness. The dough came together nicely. It was firm enough to roll out right away but I went ahead and chilled it as the directions stated.

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup white sugar
1 cup butter
1 egg, buy information pills lightly beaten
3 tbsp cream
1 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Sift together all-purpose flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Cut in butter and blend with a pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Stir in lightly beaten egg, vanilla and cream. Blend well. Chill dough for one hour for easier rolling.

On a floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into shapes. Place on ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar (optional). Bake for 6 – 8 minutes, or until the bottoms turn lightly brown. Do not over bake.

Icing:
2 teaspoons milk
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
assorted food coloring colors

In a small bowl, stir together the milk and confectioners sugar until smooth. Beat in corn syrup and the vanilla extract until icing is smooth and glossy. If the icing is too thick, add additional corn syrup to thin slightly. Divide the icing into separate bowls, and add food colorings to each to the preferred color intensity. Paint the icing onto the cookies or pipe with decorator icing tubes and tips. Top with candy decorator balls, holiday sprinkles or any other festive design.

Joe’s Sugar Cookies:
This is a family recipe from my sister-n-law. I have tried this version before. I found a similar recipe when I was experimenting with making Loft Cookies. The puffy colorful ones from the grocery store. It was not an exact match but still good. This particular recipe produces a nice soft puffier cookie than the traditional sugar cookie. The dough was rather sticky for me so rather than rolling them out I used the scoop and drop method.

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup softened butter
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
2 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda

In a large bowl mix butter, sugar, vanilla, and egg. Mix well. Add flour and soda. Divide dough in two parts. Wrap each in wax paper and refrigerate for at least two hours.
Roll out on floured surface to 1/8 inch thick. Cut to shape, place on a cookie sheet and bake at 375°F until lightly brown.
Dianne Craft was the key note speaker at a local two day conference for educators. No one had heard of her before. Surprisingly after the first 15 minutes she had all of us memorized and enthusiastic about returning on day two. Attendance was doubled the next day.

Dianne (with two N’s) has worked with a degree of children for 35 years. Many of whom are labeled autistic, buy asberger, adhd, add, ocd, and so on. Rather than mask the problems these children experience with drugs or excuses, she looks for viable methods of treatment to help them succeed.

Children who hate to write or read.

Children who seem lazy or too tired.

They cannot sit up in their chair to do their work.
When I was girl the playgrounds featured teeter totters, buy more about slides, buy tubes, here bars, merry-go-rounds. We ran the neighborhood until twilight. Rode our bikes. Learned to skate. Climbed trees. Played tag and kickball according to our own rules. We skipped, climbed, and jumped. Skipping was an actual accomplishment on kindergarten report cards. I rarely see children playing outside today. The merry-go-round and teeter totter were removed to deter lawsuits. The children were brought indoors due to safety concerns. They are signed up for organized sports with adults overseeing every detail of play. Nature study made way for technology.

A year ago I attended a K-1 workshop that offered fun playful ways to teach kindergarteners and first graders. We played with clay and made Abe Lincoln among other things. I came home with a score of papers detailing many wonderful ideas for writing and math. The part I loved the most was all the stories and information pertaining to Perceptual Motor Skills. 

Anatomy and Physiology was my best subject while in school. I love everything about the inner workings of the body. My father always thought I should have become a nurse. The concept of perceptual motor skills (PMS) as related to the brain is thoroughly fascinating. I started reading books and more books on PMS. I found websites on sensory dysfunction and unopened learning gates. The more I learned I realized how crucial this stuff is yet not very many people know about it.

I was fortunate to have found a pediatrician who believed in play. When my oldest child was born I was clueless. I asked his pediatrician, what do I do with him all day. She told me to let hi