Summertime Fresh Fruit Salad

Source: Cooking Light
3 tablespoons apricot preserves
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, order minced
2 bone-in chicken breast halves, website like this skinned
2 bone-in chicken thighs, skinned
2 chicken drumsticks, skinned
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Source: Cooking Light
3 tablespoons apricot preserves
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, order minced
2 bone-in chicken breast halves, website like this skinned
2 bone-in chicken thighs, skinned
2 chicken drumsticks, skinned
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Long about March the produce section at the supermarket was looking, more about well… pretty drab. Apples were out of season. The onions looked like they had traveled a great distance. I was so excited when the local fruit stands started opening up.

I love everything about summer, the warmth, the surf, picnics, being outdoors and the colorful array of fruits. These sweet gifts of nature look brillant in a fruit salad. So many dabs of color and texture. Fruit salad makes a wonderful end to an evening meal or a healthy homecoming after school snack.

Serves 8-10 generously
1 small Watermelon, cubed
1/2 Pineapple, cubed
1 Peach, 1/4-inch slices
1 Red Plumb, 1/4-inch slices
1 pint Raspberries
2 Kiwi, sliced

Place pieces of fruit in a large bowl and toss.

Best eaten the same day. If the leftovers seem dry and tasteless, add enough fruit juice to coat. Let sit a few minutes to absorb.

Watermelon Frost Popsicles

I have dubbed my oldest son the official watermelon picker. I was certainly not gifted my Aunt Ruth’s talent for choosing sweet ripe watermelon. The trait was passed on to my son. After we had our fill of watermelon we made watermelon popsicles. A request from my son who liked the watermelon flavored ice water I made the week before. I happened to have a container of juice concentrate I was planning to use to flavor snow cones with. You can substitute pomegranate or cranberry juice for the concentrate, information pills adding a little sugar if the mixture is not sweet enough.

Source: Two Peas in a Bucket

4-5 cups seeded cubed watermelon
6 strawberries, optional
6 ounces frozen berry fruit punch concentrate

Puree watermelon and fruit concentrate in blender. Divide among 16 small popsicle molds and freeze.

The Mighty Blueberry

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, treatment parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, rec-hall, park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, treatment parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, rec-hall, park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, page parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, viagra dosage rec-hall, seek park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, treatment parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, rec-hall, park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, page parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, viagra dosage rec-hall, seek park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

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http://www.celiac.com/articles/572/1/A-Summary-of-Celiac-Disease-and-Gluten-Intolerance-by-Scott-Adams/Page1.html
Take out soy & corn while you’re testing out gluten. Soy especially can act
like dairy in the system, symptoms so if you haven’t removed soy you may not be getting
your best results from dairy-free.

Gluten free ready mixes: Don’t fall into the trap of thinking it’s safe just
because it says GF

Get some GF oatmeal, pharm rice flour, search potato flour, & tapioca starch — those are
your best foundation grain substitutes. A mix of the rice, potato, & tapioca
(can use 2:1:1 or other ratio if you find a better one for you) to get a good
substitute for your wheat. My kids love pancakes with this — and if you use
the rice milk to make them it almost comes out like crepes!

My favorite trick is to add a teaspoon of gelatin when I’m making cake or bread
— it adds moisture. Best results are when you make the bread or cake the day
of or day before you’re going to use it. After a couple of days it dries out
and it just doesn’t refrigerate well. Someone else may have had better success
on this, but I haven’t figured out a trick yet for these things to ‘keep’ like
wheat does.

coconut flour and almond flour; you can do web searches on
those. Also, any “grain-free” recipes are by definition gluten-free. I found I
prefered those to the white rice-tapioca starch mixes.

Oats have traditionally been considered to be toxic to celiacs, but recent scientific studies have shown otherwise. This research is ongoing, however, and it may be too early to draw solid conclusions. SOme do well to remove oats from their diet until their systems are clean and then slowly reintroduce it.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, treatment parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, rec-hall, park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, page parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, viagra dosage rec-hall, seek park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

http://glutenfreehomemaker.com/
http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/
http://www.elanaspantry.com/
http://www.thespunkycoconut.com/
http://www.celiac.com/articles/572/1/A-Summary-of-Celiac-Disease-and-Gluten-Intolerance-by-Scott-Adams/Page1.html
Take out soy & corn while you’re testing out gluten. Soy especially can act
like dairy in the system, symptoms so if you haven’t removed soy you may not be getting
your best results from dairy-free.

Gluten free ready mixes: Don’t fall into the trap of thinking it’s safe just
because it says GF

Get some GF oatmeal, pharm rice flour, search potato flour, & tapioca starch — those are
your best foundation grain substitutes. A mix of the rice, potato, & tapioca
(can use 2:1:1 or other ratio if you find a better one for you) to get a good
substitute for your wheat. My kids love pancakes with this — and if you use
the rice milk to make them it almost comes out like crepes!

My favorite trick is to add a teaspoon of gelatin when I’m making cake or bread
— it adds moisture. Best results are when you make the bread or cake the day
of or day before you’re going to use it. After a couple of days it dries out
and it just doesn’t refrigerate well. Someone else may have had better success
on this, but I haven’t figured out a trick yet for these things to ‘keep’ like
wheat does.

coconut flour and almond flour; you can do web searches on
those. Also, any “grain-free” recipes are by definition gluten-free. I found I
prefered those to the white rice-tapioca starch mixes.

Oats have traditionally been considered to be toxic to celiacs, but recent scientific studies have shown otherwise. This research is ongoing, however, and it may be too early to draw solid conclusions. SOme do well to remove oats from their diet until their systems are clean and then slowly reintroduce it.
Take out soy & corn while you’re testing out gluten. Soy especially can act
like dairy in the system, this so if you haven’t removed soy you may not be getting
your best results from dairy-free.

Gluten free ready mixes: Don’t fall into the trap of thinking it’s safe just
because it says GF

Get some GF oatmeal, more about rice flour, potato flour, & tapioca starch — those are
your best foundation grain substitutes. A mix of the rice, potato, & tapioca
(can use 2:1:1 or other ratio if you find a better one for you) to get a good
substitute for your wheat. My kids love pancakes with this — and if you use
the rice milk to make them it almost comes out like crepes!

My favorite trick is to add a teaspoon of gelatin when I’m making cake or bread
— it adds moisture. Best results are when you make the bread or cake the day
of or day before you’re going to use it. After a couple of days it dries out
and it just doesn’t refrigerate well. Someone else may have had better success
on this, but I haven’t figured out a trick yet for these things to ‘keep’ like
wheat does.

coconut flour and almond flour; you can do web searches on
those. Also, any “grain-free” recipes are by definition gluten-free. I found I
prefered those to the white rice-tapioca starch mixes.

Oats have traditionally been considered to be toxic to celiacs, but recent scientific studies have shown otherwise. This research is ongoing, however, and it may be too early to draw solid conclusions. SOme do well to remove oats from their diet until their systems are clean and then slowly reintroduce it.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, treatment parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, rec-hall, park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, page parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, viagra dosage rec-hall, seek park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

http://glutenfreehomemaker.com/
http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/
http://www.elanaspantry.com/
http://www.thespunkycoconut.com/
http://www.celiac.com/articles/572/1/A-Summary-of-Celiac-Disease-and-Gluten-Intolerance-by-Scott-Adams/Page1.html
Take out soy & corn while you’re testing out gluten. Soy especially can act
like dairy in the system, symptoms so if you haven’t removed soy you may not be getting
your best results from dairy-free.

Gluten free ready mixes: Don’t fall into the trap of thinking it’s safe just
because it says GF

Get some GF oatmeal, pharm rice flour, search potato flour, & tapioca starch — those are
your best foundation grain substitutes. A mix of the rice, potato, & tapioca
(can use 2:1:1 or other ratio if you find a better one for you) to get a good
substitute for your wheat. My kids love pancakes with this — and if you use
the rice milk to make them it almost comes out like crepes!

My favorite trick is to add a teaspoon of gelatin when I’m making cake or bread
— it adds moisture. Best results are when you make the bread or cake the day
of or day before you’re going to use it. After a couple of days it dries out
and it just doesn’t refrigerate well. Someone else may have had better success
on this, but I haven’t figured out a trick yet for these things to ‘keep’ like
wheat does.

coconut flour and almond flour; you can do web searches on
those. Also, any “grain-free” recipes are by definition gluten-free. I found I
prefered those to the white rice-tapioca starch mixes.

Oats have traditionally been considered to be toxic to celiacs, but recent scientific studies have shown otherwise. This research is ongoing, however, and it may be too early to draw solid conclusions. SOme do well to remove oats from their diet until their systems are clean and then slowly reintroduce it.
Take out soy & corn while you’re testing out gluten. Soy especially can act
like dairy in the system, this so if you haven’t removed soy you may not be getting
your best results from dairy-free.

Gluten free ready mixes: Don’t fall into the trap of thinking it’s safe just
because it says GF

Get some GF oatmeal, more about rice flour, potato flour, & tapioca starch — those are
your best foundation grain substitutes. A mix of the rice, potato, & tapioca
(can use 2:1:1 or other ratio if you find a better one for you) to get a good
substitute for your wheat. My kids love pancakes with this — and if you use
the rice milk to make them it almost comes out like crepes!

My favorite trick is to add a teaspoon of gelatin when I’m making cake or bread
— it adds moisture. Best results are when you make the bread or cake the day
of or day before you’re going to use it. After a couple of days it dries out
and it just doesn’t refrigerate well. Someone else may have had better success
on this, but I haven’t figured out a trick yet for these things to ‘keep’ like
wheat does.

coconut flour and almond flour; you can do web searches on
those. Also, any “grain-free” recipes are by definition gluten-free. I found I
prefered those to the white rice-tapioca starch mixes.

Oats have traditionally been considered to be toxic to celiacs, but recent scientific studies have shown otherwise. This research is ongoing, however, and it may be too early to draw solid conclusions. SOme do well to remove oats from their diet until their systems are clean and then slowly reintroduce it.

Photo: Courtesy of Wiki Commons

July is National Blueberry Month. The honor was issued by the United States Department of Agriculture on May 8th, ed 1999. However, find blueberries have been recognized for their health benefits and as a major food staple for centuries.

Blueberry season is at its peak and there is much to celebrate about this plump little orb. The blueberry, medicine unlike apples which came from Europe, is indigenous to North America. Native Americans referred to them as ‘Star Berries’ for the five-pointed star that forms on the underside of the berry. It was believed that the Great Spirit sent the berry from the stars to sustain them, and the wild animals, during times of famine. The blueberry plant was utilized as a whole in various ways. The leaves and roots were steeped to make teas. The berry juice aided coughs and made excellent dyes for fabrics. The berries were eaten fresh, dried, and in powdered form in cultural dishes ranging from stews to seasoning for meats.

The blueberry contains the richest source of antioxidants among all fruits and vegetables. Scientists believe the high concentration of flavonoids in the blueberry just might hold the key to resolving some of the most serious threats to our optimal health- heart disease, obesity and various cancers.

Antioxidants are made up of minerals, vitamins and flavonoids. Antioxidants work to neutralize the cellular dammage caused by harmful molecules called free radicals. Free radicals have been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and blindness to name a few. The body is exposed to free radicals when burning sugars for fuel and other bodily functions; as well as from natural and chemical pollutants.

We get the purest form of antioxidants from eating raw fresh fruits and vegetables. The substance in blueberries, called polyphenols, is what gives the fruit its blue color and delicious flavor. Polyphenols are made up of two antioxidant compounds: non-flavonoids (ellagic acid in berries) and flavonoids (anthocyanins in fruit). Polyphenols are major contributors in cardiovascular health. Ellagic acid, when consumed regularly, has been shown to prevent against arterial hardening, or atherosclerosis. Moreover, the anthocyanins compound can inhibit the formation of new baby fat cells; thus, reducing triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood stream used for energy) and cholesterol.

Before running off to stock up on all things blueberry remember not all things are as they seem. Many of the foods advertised as containing blueberries are really synthetic knock-offs. Read the labels first to make sure the package actually contains real blueberries. As always nothing is better than the real deal. Stock up on fresh ripe berries this summer to enjoy later in the winter.

Pork with Savory Blueberry Sauce:
Mixed Greens with Feta, Almonds and Blueberries
Refrigerator Blueberry Jam:
Blueberry Pops:
Blueberry Pancakes:
Blueberry Sauce:
Blueberry Pie:
Blueberry Smoothie:
Blueberry Crisp:
Blueberry Scones:
Blueberry Bars:
Blueberry Muffins:
Maple Almond Granola With Dried Blueberries:

Garlic Ginger Pork

When our family decided to get away from processed foods one of my first hurdles of home baking was to make my mom’s cream puffs completely from scratch. Valentine’s day was on the horizon and I wanted to be able to make our traditional Valentine’s Day Cream Puffs. My favorite part of my mom’s cream puffs is the custard filling. I could just sit and eat a bowl of the stuff and forget the puffs altogether.

The secret recipe calls for vanilla pudding mixed with whipped cream. The result is creamy decadence.

Source: Schaeffer Girl’s Grub
1 pint heavy whipping cream
1/3 cup powdered sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Whip whipping cream and sugar on medium just until cream creates stiff peaks. Do not overwhip.

When our family decided to get away from processed foods one of my first hurdles of home baking was to make my mom’s cream puffs completely from scratch. Valentine’s day was on the horizon and I wanted to be able to make our traditional Valentine’s Day Cream Puffs. My favorite part of my mom’s cream puffs is the custard filling. I could just sit and eat a bowl of the stuff and forget the puffs altogether.

The secret recipe calls for vanilla pudding mixed with whipped cream. The result is creamy decadence.

Source: Schaeffer Girl’s Grub
1 pint heavy whipping cream
1/3 cup powdered sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Whip whipping cream and sugar on medium just until cream creates stiff peaks. Do not overwhip.

Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I won’t discount my own user errors. Recipes are so temperamental. One day they are a keeper. The next time a flop. My problem with sticky recipes was they were runny, more about salty and just like every other generic stir-fry recipe. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. I wanted less soy sauce and more tangy sweetness. I started with a recipe from a friend of mine. It was a typical Sticky Chicken recipe. With a pair of safety goggles and a science book I went to work to discover the secret of sticky sauces.

When a starch (such as flour, more about arrowroot, viagra corn starch, or potato starch) is added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Heat water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either harden (think lollipops).

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is boiled with a liquid (soy sauce) and a thickener (corn starch). The chemical reaction is much like as described above. The glucose molecules are broken down creating a sticky syrup. The corn starch then binds with the liquid syrup to thicken it.

For this concept to work perfectly the ratio of each ingredient is factored into the equation.
The formula for a simple sugar is as follows:
Thin simple syrup – 3:1 water to sugar (used to glaze cakes and cookies)
Medium simple syrup – 2:1 water to sugar (used to make sweeten beverages)
Thick ‘basic’ simple syrup – 1:1 or 1:2 water to sugar (used in cocktails, fruit beverages, flavored ice)

For a thicker syrup I used two parts sugar to one part soy sauce. I wanted the sweet golden flavor of the honey to stand out with the ginger as opposed to the saltiness of the soy sauce. As for the thickener many recipes call for 1 tablespoon corn starch. It seems to chalky for me. Cutting the starch in half was just enough to give the sauce the lift it needed without the taste. The measurements worked perfectly. Just the right amount of sweet and salt melded together with the perfect hint of ginger.

I use this garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. You can alter the ginger to your own tastes. Do watch the sauce closely as it cooks to prevent it from burning.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch or arrowroot
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

Family Togetherness: Family Reunions

Our version of Huevos Ranchos was adapted from Juanita Sorrez, cure a friend I met while in Freemont Texas. She calles this dish, order “the poor man’s breakfast”. She made hers with left over homemade flour tortillas, from the day before, torn into bite sized pieces, scrambled eggs, cheese and salsa. Juanita’s salsa was so hot, when she was a girl her father would tell her “Juanita, your salsa is so hot it would make the devil fart.” I always got a laugh out of that.

Juanita tried to teach me how to make her most sought after flour tortillas but I could never get them just right. Her tortillas are thick and soft and tender. Mine were always thick and crumbly. Making Juanita’s “poor man’s breakfast” with inferior tortillas just will not do. Then I came across a variation of huevos ranchos on Smitten Kitchen. She cooked the whole egg on top of the warmed tortilla. Try as I might it was a flop every time. Either the egg was over cooked or the tortilla. I liked the idea of a poached egg though. I also wanted the prep to be simple. My daughter was the final inspiration. While I tend to stick to designated breakfast type foods she can eat anything. Including a bean and cheese burrito with lettuce. I know that does not sound so odd as breakfast burritos are a weekly staple in this house. Although it is how a semi runny poached egged ended up on a bed of refried beans, cheese, and salsa. It is not Juanita’s but it is oh so delicioso!

6 Tortillas (taco sized flour or corn)
6 Eggs
1-2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons water
1 (15 ounce) can refried beans
1- 1 1/2 cups Colby cheese, shredded
Salsa
Cilantro

Heat a skillet, with a lid, over medium heat. Melt butter making sure to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the eggs. Once the whites have turned white add the water, reduce the heat to low or turn off, and cover. Continue to cook until desired doneness, about 2-5 minutes.

If using canned refried beans pour contents into a pan over medium-low heat. Add a few tablespoons of water and mix throughly. Reduce heat to low.

Heat corn tortillas in a little oil. When it’s brown, flip it over. Warm flour tortillas on a dry skillet.

To serve, spread each tortilla with some beans, sprinkle with cheese, a drizzle of salsa (or more) and top with the egg. Garnish with a little cheese, salsa and cilantro.

Serves 6

Variations:
– Replace the egg with scrambled eggs
– Additional toppings:
Black Beans
Chopped tomatoes
Sour Cream
Avocado
Onions
Jalapenos
Our version of Huevos Ranchos was adapted from Juanita Sorrez, cure a friend I met while in Freemont Texas. She calles this dish, order “the poor man’s breakfast”. She made hers with left over homemade flour tortillas, from the day before, torn into bite sized pieces, scrambled eggs, cheese and salsa. Juanita’s salsa was so hot, when she was a girl her father would tell her “Juanita, your salsa is so hot it would make the devil fart.” I always got a laugh out of that.

Juanita tried to teach me how to make her most sought after flour tortillas but I could never get them just right. Her tortillas are thick and soft and tender. Mine were always thick and crumbly. Making Juanita’s “poor man’s breakfast” with inferior tortillas just will not do. Then I came across a variation of huevos ranchos on Smitten Kitchen. She cooked the whole egg on top of the warmed tortilla. Try as I might it was a flop every time. Either the egg was over cooked or the tortilla. I liked the idea of a poached egg though. I also wanted the prep to be simple. My daughter was the final inspiration. While I tend to stick to designated breakfast type foods she can eat anything. Including a bean and cheese burrito with lettuce. I know that does not sound so odd as breakfast burritos are a weekly staple in this house. Although it is how a semi runny poached egged ended up on a bed of refried beans, cheese, and salsa. It is not Juanita’s but it is oh so delicioso!

6 Tortillas (taco sized flour or corn)
6 Eggs
1-2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons water
1 (15 ounce) can refried beans
1- 1 1/2 cups Colby cheese, shredded
Salsa
Cilantro

Heat a skillet, with a lid, over medium heat. Melt butter making sure to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the eggs. Once the whites have turned white add the water, reduce the heat to low or turn off, and cover. Continue to cook until desired doneness, about 2-5 minutes.

If using canned refried beans pour contents into a pan over medium-low heat. Add a few tablespoons of water and mix throughly. Reduce heat to low.

Heat corn tortillas in a little oil. When it’s brown, flip it over. Warm flour tortillas on a dry skillet.

To serve, spread each tortilla with some beans, sprinkle with cheese, a drizzle of salsa (or more) and top with the egg. Garnish with a little cheese, salsa and cilantro.

Serves 6

Variations:
– Replace the egg with scrambled eggs
– Additional toppings:
Black Beans
Chopped tomatoes
Sour Cream
Avocado
Onions
Jalapenos
Dianne Craft was the key note speaker at a local two day conference for educators. No one had heard of her before. Surprisingly after the first 15 minutes she had all of us memorized and enthusiastic about returning on day two. Attendance had doubled the next day.

Dianne (with two N’s) holds a Master’s Degree in special education and is a Certified Natural Health Professional. She has 35 years of experience working with children. Many of whom are labeled autistic, and asberger, ambulance adhd, page add, ocd, in addition to those who are bright but have no desire to learn. Rather than mask the problems these children experience with drugs or excuses, she looks for viable methods of treatment to help them succeed. Dianne discovered there was a lot more going on in the little brain of each child. Slowly she started to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

Children who hate to write or read. Children who seem lazy or too tired. They refuse to sit up in their chair to do their work. Are labeled difficult, lazy, and deemed a problem child. Dianne realized that these children through no fault of their own or their parents lacked the normal sensory input/output that enables us to function.

When I was girl the playgrounds featured teeter totters, slides, tubes, bars, merry-go-rounds. We ran the neighborhood until twilight. Rode our bikes. Learned to skate. Played tag and kickball according to our own rules. We skipped, climbed, and jumped. I rarely see children outside playing today. The merry-go-round and teeter totter were removed to deter lawsuits. The children were brought indoors for safety. Signed up for organized sports with adults overseeing every detail of play. Skipping is no longer an accomplishment on the kindergarten report card. Multiplication is a requirement of first grade. We rarely understand what our actions will reap until too late.

But it is not too late.
Our version of Huevos Ranchos was adapted from Juanita Sorrez, cure a friend I met while in Freemont Texas. She calles this dish, order “the poor man’s breakfast”. She made hers with left over homemade flour tortillas, from the day before, torn into bite sized pieces, scrambled eggs, cheese and salsa. Juanita’s salsa was so hot, when she was a girl her father would tell her “Juanita, your salsa is so hot it would make the devil fart.” I always got a laugh out of that.

Juanita tried to teach me how to make her most sought after flour tortillas but I could never get them just right. Her tortillas are thick and soft and tender. Mine were always thick and crumbly. Making Juanita’s “poor man’s breakfast” with inferior tortillas just will not do. Then I came across a variation of huevos ranchos on Smitten Kitchen. She cooked the whole egg on top of the warmed tortilla. Try as I might it was a flop every time. Either the egg was over cooked or the tortilla. I liked the idea of a poached egg though. I also wanted the prep to be simple. My daughter was the final inspiration. While I tend to stick to designated breakfast type foods she can eat anything. Including a bean and cheese burrito with lettuce. I know that does not sound so odd as breakfast burritos are a weekly staple in this house. Although it is how a semi runny poached egged ended up on a bed of refried beans, cheese, and salsa. It is not Juanita’s but it is oh so delicioso!

6 Tortillas (taco sized flour or corn)
6 Eggs
1-2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons water
1 (15 ounce) can refried beans
1- 1 1/2 cups Colby cheese, shredded
Salsa
Cilantro

Heat a skillet, with a lid, over medium heat. Melt butter making sure to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the eggs. Once the whites have turned white add the water, reduce the heat to low or turn off, and cover. Continue to cook until desired doneness, about 2-5 minutes.

If using canned refried beans pour contents into a pan over medium-low heat. Add a few tablespoons of water and mix throughly. Reduce heat to low.

Heat corn tortillas in a little oil. When it’s brown, flip it over. Warm flour tortillas on a dry skillet.

To serve, spread each tortilla with some beans, sprinkle with cheese, a drizzle of salsa (or more) and top with the egg. Garnish with a little cheese, salsa and cilantro.

Serves 6

Variations:
– Replace the egg with scrambled eggs
– Additional toppings:
Black Beans
Chopped tomatoes
Sour Cream
Avocado
Onions
Jalapenos
Dianne Craft was the key note speaker at a local two day conference for educators. No one had heard of her before. Surprisingly after the first 15 minutes she had all of us memorized and enthusiastic about returning on day two. Attendance had doubled the next day.

Dianne (with two N’s) holds a Master’s Degree in special education and is a Certified Natural Health Professional. She has 35 years of experience working with children. Many of whom are labeled autistic, and asberger, ambulance adhd, page add, ocd, in addition to those who are bright but have no desire to learn. Rather than mask the problems these children experience with drugs or excuses, she looks for viable methods of treatment to help them succeed. Dianne discovered there was a lot more going on in the little brain of each child. Slowly she started to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

Children who hate to write or read. Children who seem lazy or too tired. They refuse to sit up in their chair to do their work. Are labeled difficult, lazy, and deemed a problem child. Dianne realized that these children through no fault of their own or their parents lacked the normal sensory input/output that enables us to function.

When I was girl the playgrounds featured teeter totters, slides, tubes, bars, merry-go-rounds. We ran the neighborhood until twilight. Rode our bikes. Learned to skate. Played tag and kickball according to our own rules. We skipped, climbed, and jumped. I rarely see children outside playing today. The merry-go-round and teeter totter were removed to deter lawsuits. The children were brought indoors for safety. Signed up for organized sports with adults overseeing every detail of play. Skipping is no longer an accomplishment on the kindergarten report card. Multiplication is a requirement of first grade. We rarely understand what our actions will reap until too late.

But it is not too late.

Artwork: ‘The Tree of Life’ by Fawaz Alolaiwat

Family reunions can be a source of great enjoyment. Each time I am able to make it across country to be with my family it feels like a family reunion. The last time I visited there was an intimate reunion at my cousin Kitty’s home. It was nice to see the cousins I had not seen for ages. Every summer the relatives on my dad’s side gather together in Georgia. It is such an amazing experience to connect with those whom I have never met before.

Reunions can be a social gathering to celebrate a holiday or special occasion. They can also be a once in a lifetime event to join generations of family together. To have a successful reunion all it takes is some advance planning and a few helping hands.

1. The Guest List: The first step to planning a reunion is figuring out who is invited? How far out on the family tree do you want to branch out? Is this going to be a small affair between immediate family (grandparents, pharmacy parents and grandchildren)? Or is this a once in a life time reunion to mingle with distant relatives?

2. Budget: Money is such an ugly word sometimes. Unfortunately cost is a pretty important aspect of organizing a family reunion. Keep in mind phone calls will need to be made. Invitations mailed. The venue: camping, rec-hall, park, garden, ect. Then there is the food, lodging, gas, decorations, games, and a myriad of other small details that can quickly add up. Reunions can last from one day up to three days. The general rule is the farther family have to travel the longer the reunion.

3. Buzz: Determine if there is any interest among targeted family members. Send out a survey to let relatives know a reunion is in the works (about a year or two in advance for larger get togethers). This allows those interested living a great distance away to start planning. Ask for feedback on possible dates, type of reunion (picnic, BBQ, resort, cabin, cruise), venue location, and interest in helping with the planning. Encourage them to respond back by a certain date. Use the survey to collect missing contact information.

4. The Team: The number of committee members will depend on the scale of the reunion. Divide the tasks up into categories and delegate if needed. Make sure each committee understands what their budget is and sticks to it.

  • Chairperson: The chairperson is usually the one who came up with the idea. Or find someone in the family who is responsible enough and enjoys planning and executing special events to help co-chair the project. The chairperson oversees the entire production to ensure that the event runs smoothly. They procure the location and keep tabs on each committee.
  • Finances: The finance committee works closely with the Chairperson and the fundraising committee (if using). They remind each sub-committee to stay on budget. They are also responsible for collecting the monetary contributions from each family.
  • Fundraising: If you plan to raise money for the reunion by way of auction, raffle, or other fund raising activity you will want to create a fundraising subcommittee.
  • Promotions: This group is in charge of collecting addresses, making phone calls, and printing and mailing invitations. The invitation should include: time, place, theme, cost person family, menu arrangements- particularly if a potluck dish required, request for photos and stories, accommodation information, and RSVP information. Follow up with those who RSVP a month before the scheduled reunion day.
  • Decorations/Setup/Cleanup: This group is in charge of ordering rental equipment, setting up the tables and chairs (if needed) and clean up. They also are responsible for coming up with ideas for decorating the welcoming table, the dinner tables and location.
  • Food: This group organizes the food whether it is ordering from a caterer, managing a pot luck, or making reservations at a restaurant.
  • Activities: The activities committee ensures everyone is having a good time. They plan the music, entertainment, games, sports, crafts, and activities for the kids as well as adults.
  • Accommodations: The accommodations committee is responsible for the lodging of any out of town guests. This may include reserving campsites, blocks of hotel rooms, or spaces in the homes of local relatives.
  • Photographer: After all the hard work and effort you want something to show for it all. The photographer is responsible for taking all the keepsake shots during the reunion.
  • Favors: The favors committee is responsible for the memorabilia. T-shirts and hats could be purchased to wear at the event. A completed family tree with picture/s from the event or newsletter may be mailed later.

5. The Venue: When choosing a location take into account the demographics of those attending. Children need room to run. Older people may prefer more shade when out of doors and comfortable seating. Some ideas for types of reunions include the following–

  • A Picnic / BBQ: This is the easiest and least expensive way to have a reunion. It is especially great for large groups. Choose between morning or late afternoon. Hold it in the backyard, at a park, the beach, or rec-center. Each family can be responsible for their own food or asked to bring a side dish.
  • Dinner Reception: This type of reunion is hassle free but more expensive. It is usually held at a nice restaurant, hotel, or resort where the hotel’s Events Planner can take care of most of the planning.
  • Camping: Camping trips are reserved for smaller groups typical of a more intimate family gathering. Rent cabins, an RV or camp in a tent. A good state park provides hours of fun: boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, golf courses, biking, ect. The only downside is the locale may not be suitable for some of the older family members.

Strawberry Shortcake Cookies

Nothing sounds better in 104 degree heat than a strawberry daiquiri.

Source: Ariane Hundt (Personal Trainer and Nutritionist)
5 ounces water
6-8 ice cubes
9-10 strawberries
3 tablespoons sugar

Mix ingredients in blender. Serve in individuals glasses with a garnish of strawberry and whipped cream.
Nothing sounds better in 104 degree heat than a strawberry daiquiri.

Source: Ariane Hundt (Personal Trainer and Nutritionist)
5 ounces water
6-8 ice cubes
9-10 strawberries
3 tablespoons sugar

Mix ingredients in blender. Serve in individuals glasses with a garnish of strawberry and whipped cream.

There is a fresh strawberry stand within biking distance from our home. The strawberries are always so juicy and sweet. Problem is I have two little ones who can down a whole flat of berries in one day. My daughter did not like the idea of using the strawberries she could be eating to make cookies. She went so far as to accuse me of making her starve to death. She reluctantly helped me chop the strawberries and prepare the batter. However, ambulance I did not hear a single complaint when it came time to eat them.

Strawberry shortcake cookies are similar to a scone or biscuit. I diced the pieces of strawberry about the size of a pea. I did not want a soggy cookie that can sometimes result from larger pieces of fruit. I also used raw sugar in the place of the sanding sugar. The effect was essentially the same just not as sparkly. If you do not have kosher salt you can substitute regular table salt decreasing the amount slightly.

Source: Martha Stewart
12 ounces strawberries, viagra sale hulled and cut into 1/4-inch dice (2 cups)
1 teaspoon fresh lemon or lime juice
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
2/3 cup heavy cream
Sanding sugar or raw sugar, for sprinkling

Preheat oven to 375F degrees. Line baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

In a small bowl, combine strawberries, lemon juice, and 2 tablespoons granulated sugar; set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt, and remaining 7 tablespoons of granulated sugar.

Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter, or two forks until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
Stir in the cream until dough starts to come together, then fold in the strawberry mixture, just until combined. Do not handle the dough to much. It will cause the cookies to become tough. If the mixture is too dry add another tablespoon of crea to the bottom of the bowl and fold in.

Using a 1 1/2-inch ice cream scoop or two tablespoons, drop dough onto parchment lined baking sheets, spacing evenly apart. Sprinkle with sanding sugar, if using.

Bake until golden brown, about 20 to 25 minutes; or until a light golden color. Remove from the oven and transfer cookies with a spatula to a wire rack, and let cool.

*These cookies are best served the day they are made, but can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 to 2 days.*

Yields: 3 dozen Cookies.

July Website Review: Teach by Magic

I use the garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon.

1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, sale minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/2 freshly grated
3 thick cut pork chops, sliced
Salt
Pepper
Garlic powder
1 tablespoon olive oil or sesame oil

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with a pinch each of the salt, pepper and garlic powder. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side. Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

I use the garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon.

1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, sale minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/2 freshly grated
3 thick cut pork chops, sliced
Salt
Pepper
Garlic powder
1 tablespoon olive oil or sesame oil

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with a pinch each of the salt, pepper and garlic powder. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side. Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.
Back to School Shopping
Back Packs and Lunch Boxes: We have a tradition once the kids start Kindergarten they get a new backpack and lunch box.
Special Breakfast: Try to avoid sugary foods that tend to cause the kids to crash. Fill their bellies and minds with hearty oatmeal or protein boosting eggs and toast.
Back to School Brunch: provide packages with needed supplies such as crayons, approved pencils, rulers, paper, ect.
Special Dinner: If breakfast is too rushed plan a dinner. Ice cream sundaes for dessert
1st day of School Photo
Decorations: Hang up balloons and streamers the night before.
Make Goals
Bake homemade cookies for when they get home. Nothing says love like fresh baked bread or cookies.
Fairy: Leave backpack filled with snacks and school supplies
German Shul

I use the garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon.

1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, sale minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/2 freshly grated
3 thick cut pork chops, sliced
Salt
Pepper
Garlic powder
1 tablespoon olive oil or sesame oil

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with a pinch each of the salt, pepper and garlic powder. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side. Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.
Back to School Shopping
Back Packs and Lunch Boxes: We have a tradition once the kids start Kindergarten they get a new backpack and lunch box.
Special Breakfast: Try to avoid sugary foods that tend to cause the kids to crash. Fill their bellies and minds with hearty oatmeal or protein boosting eggs and toast.
Back to School Brunch: provide packages with needed supplies such as crayons, approved pencils, rulers, paper, ect.
Special Dinner: If breakfast is too rushed plan a dinner. Ice cream sundaes for dessert
1st day of School Photo
Decorations: Hang up balloons and streamers the night before.
Make Goals
Bake homemade cookies for when they get home. Nothing says love like fresh baked bread or cookies.
Fairy: Leave backpack filled with snacks and school supplies
German Shul

I use garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. The problem stems from too much cornstarch and soy sauce but not enough sugar.

When a starch such as flour, look arrowroot, more about corn starch, this web or potato starch are added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches begin to gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Combine water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either burn or produce a hard based candy. Mix sugar with the right combination of eggs, flour, milk, and butter the result is a solid cake when heated.

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is combined with a thickener. Since honey is already a liquid it retains more moisture than granulated sugar. While honey may not be a refined sugar it is still considered a carbohydrate and therefore contains sugar.

Experiment: Mix sugar with some water. Leave the jar out for two to three days.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

I use the garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon.

1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, sale minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/2 freshly grated
3 thick cut pork chops, sliced
Salt
Pepper
Garlic powder
1 tablespoon olive oil or sesame oil

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with a pinch each of the salt, pepper and garlic powder. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side. Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.
Back to School Shopping
Back Packs and Lunch Boxes: We have a tradition once the kids start Kindergarten they get a new backpack and lunch box.
Special Breakfast: Try to avoid sugary foods that tend to cause the kids to crash. Fill their bellies and minds with hearty oatmeal or protein boosting eggs and toast.
Back to School Brunch: provide packages with needed supplies such as crayons, approved pencils, rulers, paper, ect.
Special Dinner: If breakfast is too rushed plan a dinner. Ice cream sundaes for dessert
1st day of School Photo
Decorations: Hang up balloons and streamers the night before.
Make Goals
Bake homemade cookies for when they get home. Nothing says love like fresh baked bread or cookies.
Fairy: Leave backpack filled with snacks and school supplies
German Shul

I use garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. The problem stems from too much cornstarch and soy sauce but not enough sugar.

When a starch such as flour, look arrowroot, more about corn starch, this web or potato starch are added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches begin to gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Combine water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either burn or produce a hard based candy. Mix sugar with the right combination of eggs, flour, milk, and butter the result is a solid cake when heated.

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is combined with a thickener. Since honey is already a liquid it retains more moisture than granulated sugar. While honey may not be a refined sugar it is still considered a carbohydrate and therefore contains sugar.

Experiment: Mix sugar with some water. Leave the jar out for two to three days.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

I use garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. The problem stems from too much cornstarch and soy sauce but not enough sugar.

When a starch such as flour, tadalafil arrowroot, corn starch, or potato starch are added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches begin to gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Combine water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either burn or produce a hard based candy. Mix sugar with the right combination of eggs, flour, milk, and butter the result is a solid cake when heated.

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is combined with a thickener. Honey is in a liquid form. Since honey retains more moisture than granulated sugar the . While honey may not be a refined sugar it is still considered a carbohydrate and therefore contains sugar.

Experiment: Mix sugar with some water. Leave the jar out for two to three days.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

I use garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. The problem stems from too much cornstarch and soy sauce but not enough sugar.

When a starch such as flour, decease try arrowroot, corn starch, or potato starch are added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches begin to gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Combine water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either burn or produce a hard based candy. Mix sugar with the right combination of eggs, flour, milk, and butter the result is a solid cake when heated.

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is combined with a thickener. Honey is in a liquid form. Since honey retains more moisture than granulated sugar the . While honey may not be a refined sugar it is still considered a carbohydrate and therefore contains sugar.

Experiment: Mix sugar with some water. Leave the jar out for two to three days.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

I use garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. The problem stems from too much cornstarch and soy sauce but not enough sugar.

When a starch such as flour, decease try arrowroot, corn starch, or potato starch are added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches begin to gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Combine water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either burn or produce a hard based candy. Mix sugar with the right combination of eggs, flour, milk, and butter the result is a solid cake when heated.

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is combined with a thickener. Honey is in a liquid form. Since honey retains more moisture than granulated sugar the . While honey may not be a refined sugar it is still considered a carbohydrate and therefore contains sugar.

Experiment: Mix sugar with some water. Leave the jar out for two to three days.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

I have dubbed my oldest son the official watermelon picker. I was certainly not gifted my Aunt Ruth’s talent for choosing sweet ripe watermelon. The trait was passed on to my son. After we had our fill of watermelon we made watermelon popsicles. A request from my son who liked the watermelon flavored ice water I made the week before. I happened to have a container of juice concentrate I was planning to use to flavor snow cones with. You can substitute pomegranate or cranberry juice for the concentrate, look adding a little sugar if the mixture is not sweet enough.

Source: Two Peas in a Bucket

4-5 cups seeded cubed watermelon
6 strawberries, optional
6 ounces frozen berry fruit punch concentrate

Puree watermelon and fruit concentrate in blender. Divide among 16 small popsicle molds and freeze.

I use garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. The problem stems from too much cornstarch and soy sauce but not enough sugar.

When a starch such as flour, decease try arrowroot, corn starch, or potato starch are added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches begin to gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Combine water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either burn or produce a hard based candy. Mix sugar with the right combination of eggs, flour, milk, and butter the result is a solid cake when heated.

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is combined with a thickener. Honey is in a liquid form. Since honey retains more moisture than granulated sugar the . While honey may not be a refined sugar it is still considered a carbohydrate and therefore contains sugar.

Experiment: Mix sugar with some water. Leave the jar out for two to three days.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

I have dubbed my oldest son the official watermelon picker. I was certainly not gifted my Aunt Ruth’s talent for choosing sweet ripe watermelon. The trait was passed on to my son. After we had our fill of watermelon we made watermelon popsicles. A request from my son who liked the watermelon flavored ice water I made the week before. I happened to have a container of juice concentrate I was planning to use to flavor snow cones with. You can substitute pomegranate or cranberry juice for the concentrate, look adding a little sugar if the mixture is not sweet enough.

Source: Two Peas in a Bucket

4-5 cups seeded cubed watermelon
6 strawberries, optional
6 ounces frozen berry fruit punch concentrate

Puree watermelon and fruit concentrate in blender. Divide among 16 small popsicle molds and freeze.
I have dubbed my oldest son the official watermelon picker. I was certainly not gifted my Aunt Ruth’s talent for choosing sweet ripe watermelon. The trait was passed on to my son. After we had our fill of watermelon we made watermelon popsicles. A request from my son who liked the watermelon flavored ice water I made the week before. I happened to have a container of juice concentrate I was planning to use to flavor snow cones with. You can substitute pomegranate or cranberry juice for the concentrate,
prescription adding a little sugar if the mixture is not sweet enough.

Source: Two Peas in a Bucket

4-5 cups seeded cubed watermelon
6 strawberries, optional
6 ounces frozen berry fruit punch concentrate

Puree watermelon and fruit concentrate in blender. Divide among 16 small popsicle molds and freeze.

I use garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. The problem stems from too much cornstarch and soy sauce but not enough sugar.

When a starch such as flour, decease try arrowroot, corn starch, or potato starch are added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches begin to gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Combine water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either burn or produce a hard based candy. Mix sugar with the right combination of eggs, flour, milk, and butter the result is a solid cake when heated.

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is combined with a thickener. Honey is in a liquid form. Since honey retains more moisture than granulated sugar the . While honey may not be a refined sugar it is still considered a carbohydrate and therefore contains sugar.

Experiment: Mix sugar with some water. Leave the jar out for two to three days.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

I have dubbed my oldest son the official watermelon picker. I was certainly not gifted my Aunt Ruth’s talent for choosing sweet ripe watermelon. The trait was passed on to my son. After we had our fill of watermelon we made watermelon popsicles. A request from my son who liked the watermelon flavored ice water I made the week before. I happened to have a container of juice concentrate I was planning to use to flavor snow cones with. You can substitute pomegranate or cranberry juice for the concentrate, look adding a little sugar if the mixture is not sweet enough.

Source: Two Peas in a Bucket

4-5 cups seeded cubed watermelon
6 strawberries, optional
6 ounces frozen berry fruit punch concentrate

Puree watermelon and fruit concentrate in blender. Divide among 16 small popsicle molds and freeze.
I have dubbed my oldest son the official watermelon picker. I was certainly not gifted my Aunt Ruth’s talent for choosing sweet ripe watermelon. The trait was passed on to my son. After we had our fill of watermelon we made watermelon popsicles. A request from my son who liked the watermelon flavored ice water I made the week before. I happened to have a container of juice concentrate I was planning to use to flavor snow cones with. You can substitute pomegranate or cranberry juice for the concentrate,
prescription adding a little sugar if the mixture is not sweet enough.

Source: Two Peas in a Bucket

4-5 cups seeded cubed watermelon
6 strawberries, optional
6 ounces frozen berry fruit punch concentrate

Puree watermelon and fruit concentrate in blender. Divide among 16 small popsicle molds and freeze.

Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I won’t discount my own user errors. Recipes are so temperamental. One day they are a keeper. The next time a flop. My problem with sticky recipes was they were runny, viagra order salty and just like every other generic stir-fry recipe. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. I wanted less soy sauce and more tangy sweetness. I started with a recipe from a friend of mine. It was a typical Sticky Chicken recipe. With a pair of safety goggles and a science book I went to work to discover the secret of sticky sauces.

When a starch (such as flour, physician arrowroot, corn starch, or potato starch) is added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Heat water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either harden (think lollipops).

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is boiled with a liquid (soy sauce) and a thickener (corn starch). The chemical reaction is much like as described above. The glucose molecules are broken down creating a sticky syrup. The corn starch then binds with the liquid syrup to thicken it.

For this concept to work perfectly the ratio of each ingredient is factored into the equation.
The formula for a simple sugar is as follows:
Thin simple syrup – 3:1 water to sugar (used to glaze cakes and cookies)
Medium simple syrup – 2:1 water to sugar (used to make sweeten beverages)
Thick ‘basic’ simple syrup – 1:1 or 1:2 water to sugar (used in cocktails, fruit beverages, flavored ice)

For a thicker syrup I used two parts sugar to one part soy sauce. I wanted the sweet golden flavor of the honey to stand out with the ginger as opposed to the saltiness of the soy sauce. As for the thickener many recipes call for 1 tablespoon corn starch. It seems to chalky for me. ICutting the starch in half was just enough to give the sauce the lift it needed without the taste. The measurements worked perfectly. Just the right amount of sweet and salt melded together with the perfect hint of ginger.

I use this garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. You can alter the ginger to your own tastes. Do watch the sauce closely as it cooks to prevent it from burning.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.
– Can substitute arrowroot for the corn starch.

I use garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. The problem stems from too much cornstarch and soy sauce but not enough sugar.

When a starch such as flour, decease try arrowroot, corn starch, or potato starch are added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches begin to gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Combine water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either burn or produce a hard based candy. Mix sugar with the right combination of eggs, flour, milk, and butter the result is a solid cake when heated.

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is combined with a thickener. Honey is in a liquid form. Since honey retains more moisture than granulated sugar the . While honey may not be a refined sugar it is still considered a carbohydrate and therefore contains sugar.

Experiment: Mix sugar with some water. Leave the jar out for two to three days.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.

I have dubbed my oldest son the official watermelon picker. I was certainly not gifted my Aunt Ruth’s talent for choosing sweet ripe watermelon. The trait was passed on to my son. After we had our fill of watermelon we made watermelon popsicles. A request from my son who liked the watermelon flavored ice water I made the week before. I happened to have a container of juice concentrate I was planning to use to flavor snow cones with. You can substitute pomegranate or cranberry juice for the concentrate, look adding a little sugar if the mixture is not sweet enough.

Source: Two Peas in a Bucket

4-5 cups seeded cubed watermelon
6 strawberries, optional
6 ounces frozen berry fruit punch concentrate

Puree watermelon and fruit concentrate in blender. Divide among 16 small popsicle molds and freeze.
I have dubbed my oldest son the official watermelon picker. I was certainly not gifted my Aunt Ruth’s talent for choosing sweet ripe watermelon. The trait was passed on to my son. After we had our fill of watermelon we made watermelon popsicles. A request from my son who liked the watermelon flavored ice water I made the week before. I happened to have a container of juice concentrate I was planning to use to flavor snow cones with. You can substitute pomegranate or cranberry juice for the concentrate,
prescription adding a little sugar if the mixture is not sweet enough.

Source: Two Peas in a Bucket

4-5 cups seeded cubed watermelon
6 strawberries, optional
6 ounces frozen berry fruit punch concentrate

Puree watermelon and fruit concentrate in blender. Divide among 16 small popsicle molds and freeze.

Many “Sticky Ginger Pork’ recipes have failed to produce the ‘sticky’ element. I won’t discount my own user errors. Recipes are so temperamental. One day they are a keeper. The next time a flop. My problem with sticky recipes was they were runny, viagra order salty and just like every other generic stir-fry recipe. I wanted the sauce to cling to the meat not run off. I wanted less soy sauce and more tangy sweetness. I started with a recipe from a friend of mine. It was a typical Sticky Chicken recipe. With a pair of safety goggles and a science book I went to work to discover the secret of sticky sauces.

When a starch (such as flour, physician arrowroot, corn starch, or potato starch) is added to a liquid the chemical compound of the ingredients change. If the mixture is heated the starches gelatinize and thicken. Starch base thickeners are useful in soups, stews, gravy and sauces.

When a sugar solid is heated it turns into a liquid. The sugar’s chemical structure changes allowing it to bind to the other materials. Heat water and sugar and you get a simple syrup. Simple syrups are used in lemonade, granitas and to brush the tops of cakes to keep them moist. On the other hand if sugar is boiled with corn syrup the result is candy. If the candy is heated for a short duration the ingredients will create a sticky base like a caramel. If heated too much the sugar will either harden (think lollipops).

To make a thick sticky syrup the sugar, in this case the honey, is boiled with a liquid (soy sauce) and a thickener (corn starch). The chemical reaction is much like as described above. The glucose molecules are broken down creating a sticky syrup. The corn starch then binds with the liquid syrup to thicken it.

For this concept to work perfectly the ratio of each ingredient is factored into the equation.
The formula for a simple sugar is as follows:
Thin simple syrup – 3:1 water to sugar (used to glaze cakes and cookies)
Medium simple syrup – 2:1 water to sugar (used to make sweeten beverages)
Thick ‘basic’ simple syrup – 1:1 or 1:2 water to sugar (used in cocktails, fruit beverages, flavored ice)

For a thicker syrup I used two parts sugar to one part soy sauce. I wanted the sweet golden flavor of the honey to stand out with the ginger as opposed to the saltiness of the soy sauce. As for the thickener many recipes call for 1 tablespoon corn starch. It seems to chalky for me. ICutting the starch in half was just enough to give the sauce the lift it needed without the taste. The measurements worked perfectly. Just the right amount of sweet and salt melded together with the perfect hint of ginger.

I use this garlic ginger sauce on everything from pork to salmon. You can alter the ginger to your own tastes. Do watch the sauce closely as it cooks to prevent it from burning.

1 tablespoon sesame oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup of honey
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
4 to 6 pork chops
Garlic powder
Salt
Pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the pork chops with the garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Place chops in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes per side (or thin cut chops) or 4-6 minutes per side (for thick cut chops). Remove chops from pan to rest.

Reduce heat to medium. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and soy sauce until smooth. Add to the pan, stirring constantly. When sauce has thicken slightly add the honey, garlic, and ginger. Bring just to a boil stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Return chops to the skillet with the sauce or place chops on a platter and pour sauce over top.

Serve with brown rice and steamed vegetables.

Variations:
– Replace pork with salmon or chicken.
– Use sauce as a marinade. Omit the cornstarch. Do not boil. Season chops as directed then place in a baggie with the other ingredients. Add the meat, turning the bag to coat and let sit at least and hour or up to overnight.
– Can substitute arrowroot for the corn starch.

Teach by magic is a fun innovative way to motivate kids to learn. Teach by Magic hires Magicians from all over the world to think of exciting magic tricks specifically designed to teach all age groups. What kid does not delight in a magic trick?

Simple tricks such as the Bottle Rock It – Challenge, try we just did for the Fourth of July, viagra 100mg teaches physics through learning how to draw a dollar bill from between two towering bottles of water. Teach by Magic covers everything from reading, sildenafil history to math. Enter a topic on the search bar and a list of videos on that topic spring up. If the kids are in need of a fun bordem buster this summer try a few magic tricks.

The videos are set up in two sessions. The first session the magician gives a brief explanation about the trick. . Session two shows the solution to the trick. The tricks range from fairly simple to moderate practice needed. Although trying to figure out how the trick works is the best part.

Free membership is available but with limited access. To gain full access purchase a membership for $50 a year. This gives you all the videos, answers, and worksheets. Half price memberships are available for a limited time by using the Friends Code: LFG. The Teach by Magic book is also available for purchase through Amazon.

My kids require a lot of hands on manipulatives. Teaching tools such as this has been an invaluable resource as more and more studies show that kids learn and retain information faster through play. Just be prepared to answer many thought provoking questions.

Dairy Free Amish Coleslaw

Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, hospital she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, viagra order a pound of flour, capsule a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, hospital she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, viagra order a pound of flour, capsule a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, search shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, hospital she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, viagra order a pound of flour, capsule a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, search shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, decease shredded
Sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas
Dip each side of a tortilla

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours.

Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, hospital she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, viagra order a pound of flour, capsule a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, search shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, decease shredded
Sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas
Dip each side of a tortilla

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours.

Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
One of our families favorite meals

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, information pills shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, more about chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, hospital she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, viagra order a pound of flour, capsule a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, search shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, decease shredded
Sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas
Dip each side of a tortilla

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours.

Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
One of our families favorite meals

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, information pills shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, more about chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
One of our families favorite meals

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, price shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, visit this chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, here until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Happy first day of summer!

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, here the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, symptoms the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, order art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, check the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, buy the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, what is ed art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.

“The Sun” by Cathy McClelland

As the southern hemisphere of the earth approaches winter the northern hemisphere is just beginning to welcome in summer. The first day of summer begins each year on June 21st, viagra approved the Summer Solstice. A solstice happens twice a year; in the winter when the sun reaches the southern most position in the sky and on the first day of summer when the sun is in its northern most position.

The Summer Solstice sun reaches its maximum height on the first day of summer. This is relatively the longest day of the year because the time lapse between sunrise and sunset is the longest. In fact the regions closest in proximity to the North Pole experience a 24-hour period of daylight called a “Polar Day”.

This extended period of sunlight continues to shorten the farther south you travel from the tip of the Arctic Circle. During the following two months the polar cap is bathed in continuous sunlight; meanwhile, the subarctic regions experience a shorter night beginning anywhere between 12am or 2am. As the summer progresses towards fall the path of the sun descends.

For centuries people have gathered together in various parts of the world to celebrate the Summer Solstice through music, art, dancing, and festivals. For our ancestors the Summer Solstice was a joyous occasion. Summer meant an abundance of crops as a result of the increased warmth and light from the sun. For that gift many gave thanks by way of celebration.

Our dependance on the sun and the earth’s resources is just as important to us today as it was for our ancient ancestors. In honoring an amazing phenomenon such as the summer solstice we teach our family to recognize the intricate details of nature and how to show appreciation for the many gifts our earth provides. With a focus on nature and giving here are some fun ideas to celebrate the first day of summer.

– Check the local newspaper or City website for celebrations in your area. Some businesses such as museums offer discounts to ring in the new season.

– Observe the sunrise or sunset.

– Create banners, sun masks (using paper plates, gold paints and jewels) and wreaths.

– Host a neighborhood parade or an impromptu music jam session in the park.

– Make fruit candles. Scoop out the insides of an orange or apple. Place a small candle inside or pour hot wax and add a wick.

– Have a fairy themed party.

– Have a campout in the back yard. Tell magical stories and let the imaginations run wild.

– Plant a garden. Set a place within for an enchanted fairy princess.

– Have a BBQ with a feast of roasted vegetables and fruits.

– Make individual sun shaped bread rolls.

– Make candle boats to release on the lake.

– Make a time capsule. Include pictures and drawings, things interested in, things everyone would like to change or goals. Seal the box or envelope until next year.

– Write a play to perform for friends and family.

– Find a You-Pick farm to pick berries.

– Come up with ways to save energy and water at home during the week.

– Help keep the earth beautiful by recycling and placing liter in garbage cans.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, thumb she can done a dress and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” She was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth would serve her pound cake with strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create its own syrup. She always had pint sized containers of strawberries in syrup and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, buy a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Frosting:
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is lighter in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. Add eggs to butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears. You can error on the side of when you see the egg turn into a long thin swirl.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold in the flour mixture to the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes.

**Tips:

— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.

— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.

— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.

— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods. If 350 seems to hot reduce the temperature to 325.

— There is not substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the frosting.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, viagra dosage she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, a pound of flour, a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
5 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
3 cups powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.
This week my son requested pound cake for dessert. I was surprised to find I have yet to post the recipe for my Aunt’s Sour Cream Pound Cake. My Aunt always had a round of her famous sour cream pound cake tucked away under the lid of the cake dome. I know I gush a lot over my great Aunt Ruth. She is an amazing woman. She is a strong classy lady with loads of common sense wisdom.

My Aunt Ruth can farm and hunt with the best of tom boys; yet, hospital she can done a gown and ballroom dance with a regal air. She has the purest heart. She never gossips or speaks ill of anyone. She believes in the saying “if you can’t say something nice do not say anything at all.” So you will find she does not talk too much. When she does she has so many adventurous stories to tell. My Great Aunt Ruth was unable to have children of her own but she was a loving mother to many. You can’t help but love her. She has an infectious smile with a down to earth personality. She is the most amazing cook too. Her meals are simple. No fluff. Just simple fresh ingredients.

My Aunt Ruth always served her pound cake with fresh chopped strawberries. The strawberries were tossed with sugar to draw out the juices to create a syrup. She always had pint sized containers of fresh picked strawberries and blueberries in the freezer ready to top pound cake or be made into a cobbler.

Pound cakes get their name from the weight of the ingredients used: a pound of butter, viagra order a pound of flour, capsule a pound of sugar and a pound of eggs. Always try to use the freshest good quality ingredients when preparing pound cake. Because pound gets the majority of its flavor from the butter there is no substitute for real butter. Use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury or a cake flour to keep the crumb tender.

Pound cakes do not use baking powder to give them rise. Instead they rely on the power of eggs and whipped air incorporated into the batter during the creaming and addition of the eggs. Over mixing the batter can result in a dense crumbly cake rather than a lighter moist version. In this recipe the butter, butter-sugar mixture, dry ingredients and egg whites are all whipped separately before combining them. It is equally important to mix each stage properly.

2 sticks butter, room temperature but still cool
2 3/4 cup sugar
6 large eggs, separated, room temperature
1 cup sour cream or plain yogurt, room temperature but still cool
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 tsp lemon flavoring (optional)

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour the bottom, sides and cone of a 10-inch tube pan.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Add the sugar; cream until light colored and fluffy. About 5-7 minutes.

**Do not stop beating sugar and butter too early. Continue beating until the mixture is light in color and fluffy not stiff and dull.**

Whip egg whites until just stiff. (about 2-3 minutes with a mixer) Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, alternating egg yolk then some egg white.

**Do not over mix each addition. Mix in each egg addition just until the color of the egg yolk or egg white disappears.**

In a small bowl sift the flour, salt and baking soda. Using a large spatula, fold the flour mixture into the egg mixture alternating sour cream then flour; mixing until just combined. Add the vanilla and lemon; fold in until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a greased and floured 10-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan to finish cooling on a wire rack.

To serve: top cake with glaze and a dusting of powdered sugar. Or omit the glaze and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with sliced berries, ice cream or whipped cream.

Glaze: Beat the following ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
8 ounce package cream cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 box powder sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

**Tips:
— Try to use a lighter aluminum tube pan. The darker pans tend to darken the sides and bottom of the cake more.
— Bake by instinct not time. Watch the cake at about the 1 hour mark. Test for doneness by pressing on the top. If it feels firm and bounces back the cake may be done. If it jiggles or feels fragile under pressure it is not done.
— If the cake is browning too fast cover the top with aluminum foil and place pan on a baking sheet. This will insulate the cake from further direct heat.
— Weather and ovens vary the end result of baked goods.
— There is no substitute for lemon extract. Lemon juice contains acids while the extract has more of an essential oil base. You could try a tablespoon of lemon zest, if in a pinch, added to the glaze.

If you are looking to really stretch a dollar enchiladas are the way to go. A little bit of shredded meat can really go a long way. Use left over cooked chicken or a roast for more savings and shorten cooking time. Double or even Triple the batch to freeze for a later date.

The spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Try ethnic markets or wearhouses to find good deals on spices and herbs.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, search shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Flour tortillas
Cojitas cheese, crumbled

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Spice Rub:
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, decease shredded
Sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas
Dip each side of a tortilla

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours.

Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
One of our families favorite meals

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, information pills shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, more about chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
One of our families favorite meals

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, price shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, visit this chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, here until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 pounds lean chuck roast
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon course salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup minced onion
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a deep casserole with lid or dutch oven, over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Add the beef broth, cilantro, garlic, and onion. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour or potato starch
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 3 cloves garlic minced
1/2 teaspoon onion powder or 2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cole slaw is a type of salad made with shredded cabbage (green and/or red varieties) and optional ingredients such as: shredded carrot and raisins; dressed with a mayo vinaigrette. Cole slaw has long been associated with the South; often viewed as a traditional Southern food typically served at picnics and barbecues. The truth is coleslaw has an extensive history expanding its roots to 4000 years ago in Ancient Asia.

There are many varieties of the cabbage plant. And although the name cabbage is French in dialect Ancient China was home to the cabbage plant. The cabbage cultivated by the Chinese, nurse and Medievale Europe, health was a loose leafy version closer in appearance to kale as opposed to the tightly wrapped head of cabbage that we see today. Cabbage was highly favored in Asian cuisine for its propensity to easily pickle. A preferred delicacy in ancient china was pickled cabbage leaves served over a bed of rice.

Around 600 BC pickled cabbage made its way into Roman and Greek cuisines. The Romans believed that cabbage held natural healing properties. Some of our understanding of these medicinal uses of herbs was handed down from ancient Greek Hippocrates in the form of a medical textbook called The Hippocratic Corpus. We know today that cabbage is beneficial in treating constipation, intestinal parasites, stomach ulcers, the common cold, whooping cough, frostbite, mental depression, and irritability. It is no surprise that the Dutch carried sauerkraut with them when on extended voyages to prevent scurvy and gangrene.

Cabbage continued to spread from Asia across Europe by way of Irish Celtic wanders. The Celts returned to Ireland from China and began cultivating the Chinese variety of cabbage. Favored uses of cabbage included pickled with vinegar or a brine, raw salads, and soups. Pickled cabbage, or sauerkraut, remains a mainstay of the German diet. The term ‘Coleslaw’ however, is of Dutch origin, referred to as ‘koolsla’, dating back to the Medieval period. Dutch settlers later introduced koolsla to the American settlers in the 18th century. However, the addition of mayonnaise is only about 200 years old.

I choose this version of coleslaw because Stephen is not a fan of mayo. It took some coaxing to get him to try it but well worth the effort. He was just as pleased as I was.

Source: an old Baptist cookbook
1 medium head of cabbage, shredded
1 onion, thinly sliced (use red or yellow)
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup white vinegar
2/3 cups canola oil
1 teaspoon celery seed
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dry mustard

In a small sauce pan bring the sugar, vinegar, oil, celery seed, salt and mustard to a boil.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl mix the cabbage and onion.

Pour the boiling liquid over cabbage mixture while hot. Cover bowl and place in fridge for overnight or 24 hours before serving. Stir well before serving.

Variations:
– Mix in both regular green cabbage and red cabbage.
– Add any or all of the following: 1 carrot shredded, 1/2 cup raisins, 1/4 cup roasted pine nuts