The Scoop on Icy Treats

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

The dog days of Summer are fast approaching. In many parts of our beautiful country sweltering temperatures can bring on the craving for a cool refreshing treat. A simple icy fruit cocktail such as a citrus spiked Granita can instantly placate a parched tongue. Ever wonder what exactly is a granita or how sorbet differs from ice cream? Keep reading for the 101 on these sweet frozen treats and more.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, website cream, sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Constant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Spumoni – resembles Neapolitan ice cream. It consists of three layers of different flavored ice cream: Chocolate, pistachio and cherry or raspberry. Unlike the ice cream version of Neapolitan spumoni has actual bits of fruit and nuts.

Gelato – begins with a base of sugar, milk, very little cream, and sometimes eggs. The Italian gelato differs from ice cream in three ways. First, it uses a lower proportion of cream. The reduced butterfat does not coat the tongue as ice cream tends to do producing a more intense flavor. Second, the gelato mixture is churned at a slower rate. Less churning equals less air and a more dense gelato. Thirdly, gelato is frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The higher freezing temperature results in a silkier and softer texture.

Sherbet– is often confused with sorbet. Sherbet differs from sorbet in that sherbet contains milk and sorbet is made with fruit.

Sorbet – is a frozen fruit puree made from fruit juice or frozen fruit, and simple syrup. A classic sorbet has alcohol in it and it may be used to cleanse the palate before the main course. To make sorbet all the ingredients are blended together in a blender or food processor; then poured into an ice cream maker. The churning process helps to create a very smooth fine texture. It is possible to make sorbet without an ice cream maker using a container and mixing periodically by hand.

Granita – is made with pureed fruit, a simple syrup, and a squeeze of lime or lemon juice to balance the flavors. The result is a refreshing ice. Unlike sorbet the liquid is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the mixture is scraped with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. Because the granita is not churned it is coarser than the sorbet in texture.

Snow Cones – (shaved ice) are coarse grainy cups of shaved ice flavored with sugary syrups. The Hawaiian shaved ice has a ball of ice cream in the center similar to a cream pop.

Italian Ice – is the American invention of the Italian Grattacheca. Grattacheca is similar to shaved ice except that the flavors are added before freezing. Italian Ice is sweetened with real fruit juices and bits of fruit. The ice is coarser than a sorbet and finer than a granita.

Water Ice – is also an American concoction often referred to as “Italian Ice”. Water ice is as smooth as a slushy yet firmer and is eaten with a spoon rather than sipped through a straw.

Slushy – (called slurpee/ICEE) is a frozen drink flavored with sugary syrup. The constant churning motion keeps the slushy smooth. You can make a slushy at home by putting a plastic bottle of soda in the freezer. Rotate the bottle every half hour to distribute the ice crystals evenly until chilled but not frozen.

Smoothie – is a fruit flavored drink. Fresh fruit is blended together with flavored water or fruit juice or milk.

Mochi – is a confectionary treat from Japan. Little ice cream balls are wrapped in soft fluffy dough called mochi, pounded rice cakes, and dusted with rice flour. They come in a variety of flavors but chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mango and green tea are the most commercial.

Spritzer – is a drink made with alcohol and carbonated water. Spritzers can also be made non-alcoholic by replacing the alcohol with fruit juice. Sub flavored syrup for the juice and you have an “Italian Soda” that is not so Italian but rather another American invention. Add a scoop to either one for a refreshing frozen treat similar to the “ice cream float”.

Lime Honeydew Sorbet

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

The dog days of Summer are fast approaching. In many parts of our beautiful country sweltering temperatures can bring on the craving for a cool refreshing treat. A simple icy fruit cocktail such as a citrus spiked Granita can instantly placate a parched tongue. Ever wonder what exactly is a granita or how sorbet differs from ice cream? Keep reading for the 101 on these sweet frozen treats and more.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, website cream, sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Constant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Spumoni – resembles Neapolitan ice cream. It consists of three layers of different flavored ice cream: Chocolate, pistachio and cherry or raspberry. Unlike the ice cream version of Neapolitan spumoni has actual bits of fruit and nuts.

Gelato – begins with a base of sugar, milk, very little cream, and sometimes eggs. The Italian gelato differs from ice cream in three ways. First, it uses a lower proportion of cream. The reduced butterfat does not coat the tongue as ice cream tends to do producing a more intense flavor. Second, the gelato mixture is churned at a slower rate. Less churning equals less air and a more dense gelato. Thirdly, gelato is frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The higher freezing temperature results in a silkier and softer texture.

Sherbet– is often confused with sorbet. Sherbet differs from sorbet in that sherbet contains milk and sorbet is made with fruit.

Sorbet – is a frozen fruit puree made from fruit juice or frozen fruit, and simple syrup. A classic sorbet has alcohol in it and it may be used to cleanse the palate before the main course. To make sorbet all the ingredients are blended together in a blender or food processor; then poured into an ice cream maker. The churning process helps to create a very smooth fine texture. It is possible to make sorbet without an ice cream maker using a container and mixing periodically by hand.

Granita – is made with pureed fruit, a simple syrup, and a squeeze of lime or lemon juice to balance the flavors. The result is a refreshing ice. Unlike sorbet the liquid is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the mixture is scraped with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. Because the granita is not churned it is coarser than the sorbet in texture.

Snow Cones – (shaved ice) are coarse grainy cups of shaved ice flavored with sugary syrups. The Hawaiian shaved ice has a ball of ice cream in the center similar to a cream pop.

Italian Ice – is the American invention of the Italian Grattacheca. Grattacheca is similar to shaved ice except that the flavors are added before freezing. Italian Ice is sweetened with real fruit juices and bits of fruit. The ice is coarser than a sorbet and finer than a granita.

Water Ice – is also an American concoction often referred to as “Italian Ice”. Water ice is as smooth as a slushy yet firmer and is eaten with a spoon rather than sipped through a straw.

Slushy – (called slurpee/ICEE) is a frozen drink flavored with sugary syrup. The constant churning motion keeps the slushy smooth. You can make a slushy at home by putting a plastic bottle of soda in the freezer. Rotate the bottle every half hour to distribute the ice crystals evenly until chilled but not frozen.

Smoothie – is a fruit flavored drink. Fresh fruit is blended together with flavored water or fruit juice or milk.

Mochi – is a confectionary treat from Japan. Little ice cream balls are wrapped in soft fluffy dough called mochi, pounded rice cakes, and dusted with rice flour. They come in a variety of flavors but chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mango and green tea are the most commercial.

Spritzer – is a drink made with alcohol and carbonated water. Spritzers can also be made non-alcoholic by replacing the alcohol with fruit juice. Sub flavored syrup for the juice and you have an “Italian Soda” that is not so Italian but rather another American invention. Add a scoop to either one for a refreshing frozen treat similar to the “ice cream float”.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

The dog days of Summer are fast approaching. In many parts of our beautiful country sweltering temperatures can bring on the craving for a cool refreshing treat. A simple icy fruit cocktail such as a citrus spiked Granita can instantly placate a parched tongue. Ever wonder what exactly is a granita or how sorbet differs from ice cream? Keep reading for the 101 on these sweet frozen treats and more.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, website cream, sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Constant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Spumoni – resembles Neapolitan ice cream. It consists of three layers of different flavored ice cream: Chocolate, pistachio and cherry or raspberry. Unlike the ice cream version of Neapolitan spumoni has actual bits of fruit and nuts.

Gelato – begins with a base of sugar, milk, very little cream, and sometimes eggs. The Italian gelato differs from ice cream in three ways. First, it uses a lower proportion of cream. The reduced butterfat does not coat the tongue as ice cream tends to do producing a more intense flavor. Second, the gelato mixture is churned at a slower rate. Less churning equals less air and a more dense gelato. Thirdly, gelato is frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The higher freezing temperature results in a silkier and softer texture.

Sherbet– is often confused with sorbet. Sherbet differs from sorbet in that sherbet contains milk and sorbet is made with fruit.

Sorbet – is a frozen fruit puree made from fruit juice or frozen fruit, and simple syrup. A classic sorbet has alcohol in it and it may be used to cleanse the palate before the main course. To make sorbet all the ingredients are blended together in a blender or food processor; then poured into an ice cream maker. The churning process helps to create a very smooth fine texture. It is possible to make sorbet without an ice cream maker using a container and mixing periodically by hand.

Granita – is made with pureed fruit, a simple syrup, and a squeeze of lime or lemon juice to balance the flavors. The result is a refreshing ice. Unlike sorbet the liquid is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the mixture is scraped with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. Because the granita is not churned it is coarser than the sorbet in texture.

Snow Cones – (shaved ice) are coarse grainy cups of shaved ice flavored with sugary syrups. The Hawaiian shaved ice has a ball of ice cream in the center similar to a cream pop.

Italian Ice – is the American invention of the Italian Grattacheca. Grattacheca is similar to shaved ice except that the flavors are added before freezing. Italian Ice is sweetened with real fruit juices and bits of fruit. The ice is coarser than a sorbet and finer than a granita.

Water Ice – is also an American concoction often referred to as “Italian Ice”. Water ice is as smooth as a slushy yet firmer and is eaten with a spoon rather than sipped through a straw.

Slushy – (called slurpee/ICEE) is a frozen drink flavored with sugary syrup. The constant churning motion keeps the slushy smooth. You can make a slushy at home by putting a plastic bottle of soda in the freezer. Rotate the bottle every half hour to distribute the ice crystals evenly until chilled but not frozen.

Smoothie – is a fruit flavored drink. Fresh fruit is blended together with flavored water or fruit juice or milk.

Mochi – is a confectionary treat from Japan. Little ice cream balls are wrapped in soft fluffy dough called mochi, pounded rice cakes, and dusted with rice flour. They come in a variety of flavors but chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mango and green tea are the most commercial.

Spritzer – is a drink made with alcohol and carbonated water. Spritzers can also be made non-alcoholic by replacing the alcohol with fruit juice. Sub flavored syrup for the juice and you have an “Italian Soda” that is not so Italian but rather another American invention. Add a scoop to either one for a refreshing frozen treat similar to the “ice cream float”.
You can’t beat homemade dressing. In this recipe alone I eliminated about a 1/3 cup of oil as called for decreasing the oil to 1/3 cup instead of 2/3. I also replaced the salted herbs with non-salted herbs and omitted the sugar.

This is a recipe for an Italian dressing powdered mix. Each mix makes about four 8-oz servings of dressing. I like to combine all of the ingredients in a jar and shake to combine. It is faster to use the jar than whisking in the oil separately.

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

Mix:
In a small bowl, dosage mix together the garlic salt, approved onion powder, prescription sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

For Dressing:
To prepare dressing, whisk together 1/4 cup white or red wine vinegar, 2/3 cup canola oil, 2 tablespoons water and 2 tablespoons of the dry mix. Store in the refrigerator.

**The oil will separate after sitting for a period of time. Just shake or whisk the dressing to incorporate the ingredients before serving.

Variations:
– Use orange juice in place of the water with red wine vinegar.
– Use half the oil reducing the amount to 1/3 cup.
– Use the powdered mix to marinade steaks, chicken, season popcorn and chips.
– Mix Italian dressing mix into 1/2 cup mayo and 1/2 cup sour cream to make a veggie dip.
– You can find a better deal on bulk spices and herbs at culinary shops like Smart & Final or club warehouses or Big Lots.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

The dog days of Summer are fast approaching. In many parts of our beautiful country sweltering temperatures can bring on the craving for a cool refreshing treat. A simple icy fruit cocktail such as a citrus spiked Granita can instantly placate a parched tongue. Ever wonder what exactly is a granita or how sorbet differs from ice cream? Keep reading for the 101 on these sweet frozen treats and more.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, website cream, sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Constant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Spumoni – resembles Neapolitan ice cream. It consists of three layers of different flavored ice cream: Chocolate, pistachio and cherry or raspberry. Unlike the ice cream version of Neapolitan spumoni has actual bits of fruit and nuts.

Gelato – begins with a base of sugar, milk, very little cream, and sometimes eggs. The Italian gelato differs from ice cream in three ways. First, it uses a lower proportion of cream. The reduced butterfat does not coat the tongue as ice cream tends to do producing a more intense flavor. Second, the gelato mixture is churned at a slower rate. Less churning equals less air and a more dense gelato. Thirdly, gelato is frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The higher freezing temperature results in a silkier and softer texture.

Sherbet– is often confused with sorbet. Sherbet differs from sorbet in that sherbet contains milk and sorbet is made with fruit.

Sorbet – is a frozen fruit puree made from fruit juice or frozen fruit, and simple syrup. A classic sorbet has alcohol in it and it may be used to cleanse the palate before the main course. To make sorbet all the ingredients are blended together in a blender or food processor; then poured into an ice cream maker. The churning process helps to create a very smooth fine texture. It is possible to make sorbet without an ice cream maker using a container and mixing periodically by hand.

Granita – is made with pureed fruit, a simple syrup, and a squeeze of lime or lemon juice to balance the flavors. The result is a refreshing ice. Unlike sorbet the liquid is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the mixture is scraped with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. Because the granita is not churned it is coarser than the sorbet in texture.

Snow Cones – (shaved ice) are coarse grainy cups of shaved ice flavored with sugary syrups. The Hawaiian shaved ice has a ball of ice cream in the center similar to a cream pop.

Italian Ice – is the American invention of the Italian Grattacheca. Grattacheca is similar to shaved ice except that the flavors are added before freezing. Italian Ice is sweetened with real fruit juices and bits of fruit. The ice is coarser than a sorbet and finer than a granita.

Water Ice – is also an American concoction often referred to as “Italian Ice”. Water ice is as smooth as a slushy yet firmer and is eaten with a spoon rather than sipped through a straw.

Slushy – (called slurpee/ICEE) is a frozen drink flavored with sugary syrup. The constant churning motion keeps the slushy smooth. You can make a slushy at home by putting a plastic bottle of soda in the freezer. Rotate the bottle every half hour to distribute the ice crystals evenly until chilled but not frozen.

Smoothie – is a fruit flavored drink. Fresh fruit is blended together with flavored water or fruit juice or milk.

Mochi – is a confectionary treat from Japan. Little ice cream balls are wrapped in soft fluffy dough called mochi, pounded rice cakes, and dusted with rice flour. They come in a variety of flavors but chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mango and green tea are the most commercial.

Spritzer – is a drink made with alcohol and carbonated water. Spritzers can also be made non-alcoholic by replacing the alcohol with fruit juice. Sub flavored syrup for the juice and you have an “Italian Soda” that is not so Italian but rather another American invention. Add a scoop to either one for a refreshing frozen treat similar to the “ice cream float”.
You can’t beat homemade dressing. In this recipe alone I eliminated about a 1/3 cup of oil as called for decreasing the oil to 1/3 cup instead of 2/3. I also replaced the salted herbs with non-salted herbs and omitted the sugar.

This is a recipe for an Italian dressing powdered mix. Each mix makes about four 8-oz servings of dressing. I like to combine all of the ingredients in a jar and shake to combine. It is faster to use the jar than whisking in the oil separately.

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

Mix:
In a small bowl, dosage mix together the garlic salt, approved onion powder, prescription sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

For Dressing:
To prepare dressing, whisk together 1/4 cup white or red wine vinegar, 2/3 cup canola oil, 2 tablespoons water and 2 tablespoons of the dry mix. Store in the refrigerator.

**The oil will separate after sitting for a period of time. Just shake or whisk the dressing to incorporate the ingredients before serving.

Variations:
– Use orange juice in place of the water with red wine vinegar.
– Use half the oil reducing the amount to 1/3 cup.
– Use the powdered mix to marinade steaks, chicken, season popcorn and chips.
– Mix Italian dressing mix into 1/2 cup mayo and 1/2 cup sour cream to make a veggie dip.
– You can find a better deal on bulk spices and herbs at culinary shops like Smart & Final or club warehouses or Big Lots.
This is a recipe for an Italian dressing mix. Each mix makes about three 8-oz serving of dressing. I like to combine all of the ingredients in a jar and shake to combine. It is faster to use the jar than whisking in the oil separately.

You can’t beat homemade dressing. In this recipe alone I eliminated about a 1/3 cup of oil as called for. I

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

Mix:
In a small bowl, information pills mix together the garlic salt, onion powder, sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

For Dressing:
To prepare dressing, whisk together 1/4 cup white wine vinegar, 2/3 cup canola oil, 2 tablespoons water and 2 tablespoons of the dry mix.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/ginger_pear_muffins.php
2-1/2 cups (625 mL) all-purpose flour
(1 cup white wheat, page 1 cup allpurpose, what is ed 1/2 cup flax seed meal)
1 tsp (5 mL) baking soda
1 tsp (5 mL) ground ginger
1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt
1/2 tsp (2 mL) cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) packed brown sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) vegetable oil
1 egg
1 cup (250 mL) buttermilk
2 cups (500 mL) chopped peeled pears (about 2 pears)

Topping:
1/3 cup (75 mL) packed brown sugar
2 tsp (10 mL) butter, this web melted
1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground ginger

For topping:
1/2 cup granola (oats)
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
3 T butter, chilled and cut into pieces

Toss first three ingredients. Add butter, mush around with hands until clumps form.

In bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, ginger, salt and cinnamon.

In separate bowl, whisk brown sugar with oil; whisk in egg and buttermilk. Pour over dry ingredients; sprinkle with pears and stir just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin cups.

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000291.html

Photo: Property of Mels Kitchen Cafe and my source for this recipe

Naan is a type of yeasted flat bread common in Northern India and the southern regions of Asia. For best results when making naan, approved use a low protein flour such as Pillsbury all-purpose flour. A higher protein flour will result in a dense bread that tastes ok and is a bit chewy.

In India, naan is made in a clay tandoori oven. I have had the best success using my panini press or a pizza stone in the oven. If using a panini press remove the naan from the press then brush on the butter. If baking in the oven brush with garlic butter before placing on a hot pizza stone in the oven.

Stand mixers are great for kneading doughs like naan and tortillas because it eliminates the mistake of adding too much flour. This dough should feel soft and smooth when kneaded.

Serve with grilled salmon or pork. Also goes great with a Moroccan stew.

Source: adapted from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter until creamy and smooth.
http://www.melskitchencafe.com/2009/01/naan.html

Source: adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes
2 3/4 cups flour, doctor plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and brush with garlic butter. Serve warm.

Garlic Butter:
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 garlic clove, minced

Combine garlic and butter. Let sit

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, discount learning patterns, viagra approved shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Naan- Indian Flat Bread – johanna
August 10th, malady 2010 | Filed under: ABOUT

http://mykitchencafe.blogspot.com/2009/01/naan.html
adapted slightly from Andrea’s Recipes

14 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour, thumb plus more for dusting
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 egg
1/2 cup plain lowfat yogurt (I only had vanilla yogurt and while it sounds like a bad substitution, clinic I used it and the bread tasted fabulous!)
1/2 cup milk

In the bowl of a stand mixer (or in a large bowl by hand), stir together the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, and yeast. In a small bowl, mix together the egg, yogurt, and milk. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and stir for about 1 minute, until the dry ingredients are completely incorporated into the wet ingredients.

Increase machine speed to 2 (or by hand) and knead the dough until it is smooth and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer and cover with a towel. Leave in a warm place to rise until the dough doubles in size, about an hour.

Put a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on the lowest rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475 degrees for at least 30 minutes prior to baking.

Divide the dough into eight pieces and form into teardrop (mine were more like oval) shapes with your hands, about 6 to 8 inches across.

Cook two or three pieces at a time. Drop the dough onto the hot stone and shut the oven door, watching until they are just starting to turn brown in places, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the naan and lay on a board. Serve warm with a nice curry. (The original recipe says to butter the naan with garlic butter after it comes out of the oven but I did this with the first batch and found it made the bread too greasy for my taste – we much preferred the bread soft and tender without the butter. Follow your tastes and do what you prefer!
The
blueberries may hold the key to resolving one of the largest threats to human health this century – overweight and obesity.
Scientists determined that extracts of the berry compound inhibited the formation of new baby fat cells (adipocytes) in a dose-dependent manner. Less adipocytes mean there are fewer `containers` to store triglycerides from the blood, viagra buy and this is an ultimately powerful mechanism to lower or help maintain body weight. Not only did blueberry extract supplementation reduce the number of adipocytes up to 73 percent, see but the compound was also found to assist in the breakdown of lipids and fats for removal from the body.
blueberries exert a powerful cardio-protective effect due to the high concentration of polyphenols found in the berry.

Polyphenols from blueberries have been shown to be effective in the fight against arterial hardening or atherosclerosis. Researchers writing in the Journal of Nutrition found that regular blueberry consumption can help prevent harmful plaques and lesions from increasing in size in coronary arteries.
Blueberries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants, the natural substances that fight damage caused by free radicals. In addition to helping prevent memory loss, these versatile and delicious berries have been shown to be effective in fighting chronic degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, muscular degeneration, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
The flavonoids contained in blueberries are thought to be responsible for these effects. Although it is not clear as to how flavonoids affect the brain, it has been shown that they are absorbed in the blood stream, crossing the blood/brain barrier. This enables them to influence regions involving memory and motor function. The researchers explained that it is thought to enhance neural connections, thereby improving cellular communication and stimulating neural regeneration.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028192_blueberries_memory.html
http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/health-benefits-of-blueberries/blueberry-nutrition/

The dog days of Summer are fast approaching. In many parts of our beautiful country sweltering temperatures can bring on the craving for a cool refreshing treat. A simple icy fruit cocktail such as a citrus spiked Granita can instantly placate a parched tongue. Ever wonder what exactly is a granita or how sorbet differs from ice cream? Keep reading for the 101 on these sweet frozen treats and more.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, website cream, sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Constant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Spumoni – resembles Neapolitan ice cream. It consists of three layers of different flavored ice cream: Chocolate, pistachio and cherry or raspberry. Unlike the ice cream version of Neapolitan spumoni has actual bits of fruit and nuts.

Gelato – begins with a base of sugar, milk, very little cream, and sometimes eggs. The Italian gelato differs from ice cream in three ways. First, it uses a lower proportion of cream. The reduced butterfat does not coat the tongue as ice cream tends to do producing a more intense flavor. Second, the gelato mixture is churned at a slower rate. Less churning equals less air and a more dense gelato. Thirdly, gelato is frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The higher freezing temperature results in a silkier and softer texture.

Sherbet– is often confused with sorbet. Sherbet differs from sorbet in that sherbet contains milk and sorbet is made with fruit.

Sorbet – is a frozen fruit puree made from fruit juice or frozen fruit, and simple syrup. A classic sorbet has alcohol in it and it may be used to cleanse the palate before the main course. To make sorbet all the ingredients are blended together in a blender or food processor; then poured into an ice cream maker. The churning process helps to create a very smooth fine texture. It is possible to make sorbet without an ice cream maker using a container and mixing periodically by hand.

Granita – is made with pureed fruit, a simple syrup, and a squeeze of lime or lemon juice to balance the flavors. The result is a refreshing ice. Unlike sorbet the liquid is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the mixture is scraped with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. Because the granita is not churned it is coarser than the sorbet in texture.

Snow Cones – (shaved ice) are coarse grainy cups of shaved ice flavored with sugary syrups. The Hawaiian shaved ice has a ball of ice cream in the center similar to a cream pop.

Italian Ice – is the American invention of the Italian Grattacheca. Grattacheca is similar to shaved ice except that the flavors are added before freezing. Italian Ice is sweetened with real fruit juices and bits of fruit. The ice is coarser than a sorbet and finer than a granita.

Water Ice – is also an American concoction often referred to as “Italian Ice”. Water ice is as smooth as a slushy yet firmer and is eaten with a spoon rather than sipped through a straw.

Slushy – (called slurpee/ICEE) is a frozen drink flavored with sugary syrup. The constant churning motion keeps the slushy smooth. You can make a slushy at home by putting a plastic bottle of soda in the freezer. Rotate the bottle every half hour to distribute the ice crystals evenly until chilled but not frozen.

Smoothie – is a fruit flavored drink. Fresh fruit is blended together with flavored water or fruit juice or milk.

Mochi – is a confectionary treat from Japan. Little ice cream balls are wrapped in soft fluffy dough called mochi, pounded rice cakes, and dusted with rice flour. They come in a variety of flavors but chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, mango and green tea are the most commercial.

Spritzer – is a drink made with alcohol and carbonated water. Spritzers can also be made non-alcoholic by replacing the alcohol with fruit juice. Sub flavored syrup for the juice and you have an “Italian Soda” that is not so Italian but rather another American invention. Add a scoop to either one for a refreshing frozen treat similar to the “ice cream float”.
You can’t beat homemade dressing. In this recipe alone I eliminated about a 1/3 cup of oil as called for decreasing the oil to 1/3 cup instead of 2/3. I also replaced the salted herbs with non-salted herbs and omitted the sugar.

This is a recipe for an Italian dressing powdered mix. Each mix makes about four 8-oz servings of dressing. I like to combine all of the ingredients in a jar and shake to combine. It is faster to use the jar than whisking in the oil separately.

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

Mix:
In a small bowl, dosage mix together the garlic salt, approved onion powder, prescription sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

For Dressing:
To prepare dressing, whisk together 1/4 cup white or red wine vinegar, 2/3 cup canola oil, 2 tablespoons water and 2 tablespoons of the dry mix. Store in the refrigerator.

**The oil will separate after sitting for a period of time. Just shake or whisk the dressing to incorporate the ingredients before serving.

Variations:
– Use orange juice in place of the water with red wine vinegar.
– Use half the oil reducing the amount to 1/3 cup.
– Use the powdered mix to marinade steaks, chicken, season popcorn and chips.
– Mix Italian dressing mix into 1/2 cup mayo and 1/2 cup sour cream to make a veggie dip.
– You can find a better deal on bulk spices and herbs at culinary shops like Smart & Final or club warehouses or Big Lots.
This is a recipe for an Italian dressing mix. Each mix makes about three 8-oz serving of dressing. I like to combine all of the ingredients in a jar and shake to combine. It is faster to use the jar than whisking in the oil separately.

You can’t beat homemade dressing. In this recipe alone I eliminated about a 1/3 cup of oil as called for. I

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

Mix:
In a small bowl, information pills mix together the garlic salt, onion powder, sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

For Dressing:
To prepare dressing, whisk together 1/4 cup white wine vinegar, 2/3 cup canola oil, 2 tablespoons water and 2 tablespoons of the dry mix.

The honeydew we bought at the local market was not at its peak. The not so flavorful orb sat in the refrigerator for a few days untouched before I could decide what to recycle it into. Lime honeydew sorbet was the perfect recipe to transform the tasteless melon into an extraordinary culinary treat. It can quell the heat on a hot summer’s day; yet, pharmacy it is elegant enough to serve at a wedding shower or afternoon tea party.

The sorbet is a beautiful blend of tart lime overtones with a hint of honeydew. I did not have an ice cream maker. Instead I poured the mixture into a chilled 9X9-inch square pan. I stirred and fluffed the mixture after an hour making sure to blend the harder edges into the softer center. I smoothed it and then repeated stirring again two more times. Our version was more icy similar to a granita than a sorbet but the flavor was surreal.

The sorbet is best if eaten the first two days. After that it starts to turn icy and loose flavor.

Source: Taste of Home Test Kitchen
3 cups cubed honeydew
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup lime juice
1 tablespoon sweet white wine or water
2 teaspoons grated lime peel

In a food processor or blender, hospital combine honeydew and sugar; cover and process until sugar is dissolved. Add the remaining ingredients; cover and process until blended.

Freeze in an ice cream freezer according to manufacturer’s directions. Spoon mixture into a freezer-safe container; cover and freeze in the refrigerator freezer 2-4 hours before serving.

Caesar Salad Dressing

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, here friendly games of frisbee, ailment catch, cure and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, here friendly games of frisbee, ailment catch, cure and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, visit web friendly games of frisbee, what is ed catch, and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, here friendly games of frisbee, ailment catch, cure and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, visit web friendly games of frisbee, what is ed catch, and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, ampoule friendly games of frisbee, this site catch, medications and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, here friendly games of frisbee, ailment catch, cure and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, visit web friendly games of frisbee, what is ed catch, and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, ampoule friendly games of frisbee, this site catch, medications and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, advice friendly games of frisbee, seek catch, and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxation and fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, here friendly games of frisbee, ailment catch, cure and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, visit web friendly games of frisbee, what is ed catch, and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, ampoule friendly games of frisbee, this site catch, medications and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxing fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.

Artwork: “A Picnic Party” by: Blacklock William Kay

Courtesy of RussianPaintings.net

My favorite area in San Francisco is the timeless scene of Golden Gate park. Upon entering the large grassy area we are greeted by dozens of blankets spread across the lawn. There are bicyclist, advice friendly games of frisbee, seek catch, and individuals practicing Tai Chi. But most of all the atmosphere is relaxed. I suppose the reason I enjoy it so much is because it reminds me of the long lost days spent at the beach as a child. We lived a mere five minutes from the beach providing a perfect afternoon of family fun. When we tired of building sand castles and riding the waves we could take a walk down the shore exploring the area for shells and wildlife.

A picnic at the park, lake or beach is always exciting. Schedule a family picnic once a week or once a month. Everyone will benefit from getting outdoors for some relaxation and fun.

Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch:
Pack a cooler with nourishing snacks and/or a healthy meal. Be sure to have lots of water especially if it is hot and sunny. Supply enough blankets so that everyone can lounge if needed.

If BBQ is on the menu do not forget wood/charcoal, lighter fluid and matches. The last thing you want is a bunch of hungry kids and no way to cook the main dish.

Pack safety items such as sunblock, hat, sunglasses and an umbrella for shade.

Bring activities and games to play together:
Soccer balls, Kick ball, Kite, Frisbees, Baseball- mit and bat, Horse Shoes, Card games, board games, Instruments, Art supplies, Books, swimming gear, bikes, scooter, fishing supplies, a favorite toy.

Other activities to do while on a family outing:
Watch the clouds, hunt for frogs, categorize birds-trees-flowers, sing songs, tell stories, have a race, play hide and seek.
Our oldest son announced one evening during dinner that he was moving to Mexico because he loves bean burritos so much. Can you tell tacos and burritos are a reoccurring weekly menu staple at our house?

This week I decided to change things up a bit by using a recipe for beef and bean chimichangas. I swapped the can of chili beans for a can of pinto. The flavor was a hit. We ate them as tacos the first night. Then in quesadillas for lunch the next day. We used up the remaining leftovers in a breakfast burrito the third day.

Source: For the Love of Cooking.net
1 tsp olive oil
1 lb of lean ground beef
1/2 sweet yellow onion, ask diced
3 cloves of garlic, price minced
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp oregano
Dash of red pepper flakes
Sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste
1 can of chili beans, drained

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the ground beef and break up the meat into crumbles. Add the onion and garlic as well as the seasonings then cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the drained can of chili beans to the beef mixture and stir until well combined. Set aside.

Variations:
-Swap the ground beef for ground turkey.
-Use pinto beans instead of chili beans. Or omit the beans all together.

Stephen loves Caesar salad. It is his all time favorite meal. Caesar salad used to be our traditional anniversary dinner. That was until we went to the Pasta Moon in, sick site our anniversary vacation spot, clinic Half Moon Bay and tried their Risotto Sea Scallops and tomato basil salad with whipped cheese. It is pretty pricey but well worth the experience.

Stephen was not feeling well when he returned from a week long business trip. We are not used to eating a lot of prepackaged foods or greasy fast food. I roasted a chicken the night before and decided to make his favorite feel good meal, discount Caesar salad.

I always prefer to make my own salad dressings. I think homemade dressings taste better. Plus you can control what goes into it eliminating some of the fat and the need for preservatives and everything else artificial. We love the flavor and the texture of this version of Caesar dressing adapted from Cooking Light. I have noted the anchovy paste as optional. We never add it simply because I rarely have it on hand.

Source: Cheap Heathly Good
1/3 cup plain fat-free yogurt
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon anchovy paste (optional)
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 garlic clove, minced

1) Whisk all ingredients together in a small bowl. Pour on salad. That’s it.

Variations:
-3 tbsp Mayo in the place of the yogurt.

The Red Food Dye Nation

Homemade Orange Juice

My Grandma Penny lived on a farm on the outskirts of Clewiston Florida. Every time we visited we would fill sacks with oranges and tangerines to take home. One year we had a bucket full of oranges and my sister and I decided to make orange juice. We learned quick that it takes a lot of oranges to make one glass of orange juice.

Years later my dad brought home these little tubes that stick into the top of the orange allowing you to drink from the orange. We loved them. We would squeeze our oranges to get every last drop out then split them open and eat the insides. The tubes were a clever way to drink fresh orange juice straight from the source. I am surprised they did not survive the test of time.

I was reminded of my dad’s sacred find when the kids mentioned they would love a glass of orange juice. We did not have any orange juice in the house but we did have 4 oranges. The kids were shocked that they could drink orange juice from an orange. I know we have made fresh squeezed orange juice before.

What To Do:

1. Take an orange wash it then roll it on a cutting board pressing down firmly. This will break the little capsules that hold the juice.

2. Using a knife cut a small circular opening in the top of the orange. About 1/2 to 3/4-inches in width. Slide the knife tip downward into the hole then turn a few times.

3. Drink directly from the opening or use a straw. Squeeze the orange to draw out the juice while you slurp.

Homemade Orange Juice

My Grandma Penny lived on a farm on the outskirts of Clewiston Florida. Every time we visited we would fill sacks with oranges and tangerines to take home. One year we had a bucket full of oranges and my sister and I decided to make orange juice. We learned quick that it takes a lot of oranges to make one glass of orange juice.

Years later my dad brought home these little tubes that stick into the top of the orange allowing you to drink from the orange. We loved them. We would squeeze our oranges to get every last drop out then split them open and eat the insides. The tubes were a clever way to drink fresh orange juice straight from the source. I am surprised they did not survive the test of time.

I was reminded of my dad’s sacred find when the kids mentioned they would love a glass of orange juice. We did not have any orange juice in the house but we did have 4 oranges. The kids were shocked that they could drink orange juice from an orange. I know we have made fresh squeezed orange juice before.

What To Do:

1. Take an orange wash it then roll it on a cutting board pressing down firmly. This will break the little capsules that hold the juice.

2. Using a knife cut a small circular opening in the top of the orange. About 1/2 to 3/4-inches in width. Slide the knife tip downward into the hole then turn a few times.

3. Drink directly from the opening or use a straw. Squeeze the orange to draw out the juice while you slurp.

Washing dishes

To become a successful leader kids need to learn responsibility somewhere. That begins in the home when they are young by building their confidence through applauding small achievements. Some may have negative feelings toward chores because of the way they were brought up. I know I often felt like I was a slave rather than a kid but as I matured and gained insight I realized the responsibilities thrown at me as a kid has taught me how to be self-reliant as an adult.

Chores can be a positive and constructive way to build confidence and teach leadership through responsibility. Boys especially need chores. We are no longer a society that sends our boys out to work in the field all day. They relish the satisfaction of a job done well. Boys love to solve problems. They also need structure and to be held accountable. Give them a task and help them learn how to go about completing that task by giving them clear concise directions but with a little leeway for creativity and a consequence to hold them to it and they will radiate confidence.

Chores are also a way to teach our children how to one day care for their own homestead; moreover, help chores teach them to respect property and accountability. Boys should learn to cook, pilule clean, try do dishes and mend clothing just like girls should know how to care for their car, take out the trash, repairs and mow the law.

Know What Is Expected- Be Consistent.

I think we can agree that chores are not on our kids list of top priorities. Whenever my mom would ask my brother to clean up his reply was always “I am eating.” Somehow he was absolved without any further discussion. My daughter though she is three takes after he Uncle Todd. When asked to clean up she will lie down and feign she is oh so tired.

If you implement a system you have to be ready and willing to be consistent because they will fight you on it. They will push the boundaries a little to see how tough you are. Lay out the rules so they know what is expected of them and hold them to it. We are a team and we work together to keep the home functioning.

– Use a chore chart to help them keep track of the chores they are responsible for. There are a myriad of charts out there. Behavioral charts use motivational cues such as rewards. Chore charts can be a spinning wheel to cards. Just search Chore Charts in Google Images to find something that fits your family.

Set a time frame. Something like all their chores must be done before school or by dinnertime. For younger children the consequence might be if you have to pick up their toys you get to keep them. The next day when they ask to play with them you calmly remind them why they are put away and that they may have them tomorrow or they must earn them back. For teens you might take away a privilege. They can’t go out with their friends, play video games or watch TV.

A timer works well to keep them on task. If they insist they are too tired or hungry to do their chore set the timer for 15 minutes. Once the timer goes off they must complete the chore or there are consequences.

Play to the age group.

Create the habit of cleaning up by introducing the concept of chores at an early age. Kids can learn at one year of age how to pick up their toys and throw away their diaper. The little ones love to imitate mom and dad hard at work. Let them contribute in their own way even though you will have to go back later to “fix” the job. Little ones can help vacuum, sweep, wash dishes and help make the bed. As they grow look for tasks they are good at and those that will help improve developmental milestones.

Since our kids are young their chores are pretty simple. I help the two year old clean the loft, the three year old has to keep the downstairs free of toys and clothing (since she is the one who usually puts them there) and the five year old chooses a task to complete each day. It could be emptying the laundry baskets or shredding papers. They are also responsible for cleaning their own room as well as helping set and clear the table. It was interesting to note one day when our five year old left something downstairs and the three year old got onto him about it. She was showing accountability for her area.

Make a list then have them choose the one they would like to be responsible for. I mentioned that the two younger children have specific household chore they are responsible for overseeing each day while the oldest may choose. When dealing out chores the first criteria to take into consideration should be age and the second the child. Our oldest is five and a highly creative kinetic learner. We know that he performs best when given the leeway to do it his way. Our daughter does not like change. She prefers to know what is expected of her in advance.

Make chores fun.

Play to a child is their job. Some days it is a struggle to get the kids to finish their chores. Other days they beg me to let them help me with mine.

– The kitchen floor becomes a skating rink. Wrap wet rags around their feet and let them skate to mop the floor.

– The sink becomes a car wash. Little ones love to play in the suds. They may start out playing with their cars and end up washing dishes, the chairs, the cabinets and even you.

– Play a game under the blanket to make the bed. The kids can pretend they are in a cave. Spread the bedding out over them smoothing the edges to make the bed. Reaching in from the bottom of the bed grab their feet and pull them toward you and off the end of the bed. Then attack them with tickles and kisses. move on to the next bed.

As a mom I understand the biggest hurtle is time. School and extra-curricular activities do not leave much time for quality family time or responsibilities at home. Your plan and how it is carried out depends on your family dynamics and the specific chores. After a six hour day at school the last thing I want to ask of my child when he gets home from school is to complete his chore, especially if he has homework and sports practice. We have tried early morning chores before school. Before bed time did not work either. We have small children who go to bed early to ensure they get the maximum sleep needed. In the mornings it is a race to get everyone dressed, fed and out the door. We have found right before dinner works best in our home, if weekdays are too hectic schedule chores on the weekends.

Photo by: Hemera / Thinkstock

When our oldest was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with constant daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth.

A year ago I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, sildenafil more about mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not buy it for the kids. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily “brush your teeth” battle that had been going on the past four and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was flourescent red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh, this stuff is unnaturally red.” Normally I never gave dyes a second thought. Yet, for some reason there was something unnatural about that tube of toothpaste that I just could not let rest.

The question coming up a lot lately is, are food dyes ok? Do they spark behavioral issues in kids and health complaints in adults? Have dyes contributed to the rise of ADD, ADHD, and Autism in the past 40 years as a result of their increased consumption? For years the food administration has given their stamp of approval for the use of petroleum based dyes in food. Dyes that are in everything from cleaners to toothpaste to medicine.

In 2007 a study was forth coming siting the dangers of food dyes. As a result of the study the UK food administration required warning labels on all products containing petroleum dyes. The warning labels advised parents of the risk of hyperactivity due to the dyes. Industry leaders Kraft, Mars, Coca Cola and Wal-Mart skipped the warning labels choosing instead to make products shipped to the UK Sodium Benzoate and petroleum dye free. Yet here in the US these same companies continue to sell products for human consumption that harbor harmful petroleum based dyes and preservatives.

Clipart by: unknown

More recently in April 2011 the FDA held a hearing to once again determine if dyes contribute to hyperactivity. Advocates for the removal of all synthetic dyes from food products and medicines claim that non-food based dyes are unnecessary and cause hyperactivity in children. They gave compelling evidence that linked petroleum based preservatives and dyes to the increased number of children with allergies, ear infections, mood, cancer, ADHD, ADD, Autism, and other related spectrum disorders. The panel, minus one, agreed that dyes most likely cause a threat and yes warning labels should be required.

The battle was far from being won. Rather than give a statement based on their findings, the panel was required to answer a series of questions. Questions devised by crafty lawyers that when answered either way would be interpreted as, “food dyes do not cause hyperactivity or allergies in children.” Therefore, the FDA ruled that there was not enough evidence. Thus, companies were not required to post a warning label on consumable products here in America.

Color is beautiful!

After the April FDA ruling, dye advocates launched a campaign to gain support for the use of chemical dyes. The ads adopted images of gray popsicles calling, “a world without dyes…colorless.” Kantha Shelke, a food chemist and spokeswoman for the Institute of Food Technologists, stated, “Color is such a crucial part of the eating experience that banning dyes would take much of the pleasure out of life.”

Tattfoo Tan believes that Mother Nature has it all taken care of. Tattfoo Tan, is a Malaysian-born artist who resides in Staten Island. He developed The Nature Matching System “as a reminder to consume your [natural] daily recommended doses of color.” Tan wanted to understand the connection between the color of food and its nutritional value. Tan matched 88 natural colors using photographs of the fruits and vegetables found in the Union Square Green Market in New York and Photoshop’s eyedropper tool. Tan agrees “neon orange Cheetos is something spectacular to look at but the nutritional value is zilch.”

So what is the truth?

We know commercial food coloring is derived from coal tar oil, petroleum, and insects because it is cheaper to make; but, it comes with a price. The FDA is confident that all of the toxic proponents in the petroleum is eliminated during processing. They counter the accusations that dyed foods contain toxic chemicals from the petroleum, with: natural foods contain more petroleum from the fertilizer and the means of transporting crops than the amount of trace elements found in the actual dyes and preservatives.

We know that organic natural fruits and vegetables can be used to make an array of colorful dyes. The food industry refutes the idea of using natural dyes. They claim natural food dyes are too unstable, too muted and, uninteresting. They are convinced that no one will want to eat natural dyed foods. They believe that the public prefers the neon orange Cheetos to the pale peach natural Cheetos. The bright red strawberry Jello to a muted brown. Natural food companies such as India TreeSurf Sweets and Yummy Earth are determined to meet the need of color.

Who do we believe?

Voices from Dr. Feingold to Gwyneth Paltrow preach the benefits of a clean whole foods diet void of the unnecessary preservatives, artificial flavors, sweeteners and dyes. The FDA on the other hand in unison with countless doctors, scientists and organizations swear synthetic additives in food are not harmful. I decided to test the theory in my own home on our son who has Aspbegers.

The Test…

For one month we threw out all preservatives, artificial flavors and sweeteners, and dyes. It was very difficult at first because our city does not have a health food store and the kids are creatures of habits. They wanted their favorite foods.

Almost everything had to be made from scratch. Because companies are not required to list the ingredients in the products they use from outside sources I ordered the Feingold grocery list to help navigate the store isles when I needed something convient. Even though the label looks clean that is not always the case.

In one week I noticed a considerable change in my son. He could think more clearly. He was not bouncing off the walls in a rage. He was writing and reading without tantrums. The defiance leant way to a more agreeable attitude. He is happy and still full of life but the regular ticks are minimal.

The real test came on Easter Sunday. The kids ate a handful of jelly beans and for four days they were absolutely out of their minds. The defiance, screaming, and tantrums were back. The other children were moody, defiant and hyper.

I’d say from personal experience the answer for us is clear. Synthetic replacements in the form of preservatives [BHA (Butylated Hydroxyanisole), BHT (Burylated Hydroxytoluene), TBHQ (Tertiary Butylhydroquinone)], artificial flavors and sweeteners (aspartame and splenda), and dyes are indeed harmful and do cause adverse reactions; especially in individuals with predisposed allergies and learning disorders.

What now?

The next question is, will the FDA ever be responsible and require warning labels on products or warrant the elimination of such harmful chemicals? Nah, probably not. Or at least not in the near future. The pool of individuals sensitive to artificial flavors and colors is too small. If you call every one kid in 28 small. Fortunately there are reputable companies springing up to lead us into a colorful yet nutritious tomorrow.

Links:

–Visit Indie Candy and Natural Candy Store for natural baking supplies including food based dyes.
Eco Kids: for all natural craft supplies such as egg dye and playdough.
–Join the mission for Better School Food.
Spoonfed: Tips to help kids adopt a healthy diet comprised of fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean meats.
–Natural recipes for dyes: Rhythm of the Home, Natural Cookie Frosting, Natural Colored Rice Balls, Natural Easter Egg Dye, Darling Clementine, Homemade Playdough Dye, Natural Dyed Jello.

Beef and Bean Chimichangas

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, view honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried them or worse were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage.

Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family that includes: broccoli, view  kale, cabbage, mustard, turnips, rutabagas,and wasabi and horseradish. They were believed to have originated in Belgium near Brussels (hence the name) but there is some uncertainty to the claim. Based on historical records we do know that they were first introduced to France and England during World War I where they continue to be a popular food. French settlers who settled in Louisiana in the 1800’s brought them to America. Today brussels sprouts are mainly produced in California and Europe. They are a hardy plant tolerant of poor soil. When eaten regularly they may help prevent certain cancers and improve circulation.

Never ever buy frozen brussel sprouts or asparagus for that matter. Always buy fresh. Sprouts still attached to the stalk are preferable. Avoid sprouts that are discolored (yellow or brown leaves) or loose. Choose instead the smaller sprouts that are green. Brussels sprouts have a very short shelf life. Try to use within a few days of purchase.

The best way to prepare sprouts is roasted with a little oil. First wash then trim the bottom root part off. Not too much that too many leaves fall off. Next slice in half. Toss with a little oil, season with salt and pepper. Some recipes like this one suggest steaming them first. I am not a fan of steamed because they tend to loose flavor and can quickly turn too soft and rubbery.

If you skip the steaming part it will take about 10 to 15 minutes to brown. Ideally I this is your first experience with brussel sprouts cook the onions and pancetta as called for then toss in the sprouts turning to coat. Transfer to an oven safe pan and cook in a 375 degree oven for about 20 minutes. They should be tender enough to pierce with a fork but not mushy.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried them or worse were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage.

Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family that includes: broccoli, view  kale, cabbage, mustard, turnips, rutabagas,and wasabi and horseradish. They were believed to have originated in Belgium near Brussels (hence the name) but there is some uncertainty to the claim. Based on historical records we do know that they were first introduced to France and England during World War I where they continue to be a popular food. French settlers who settled in Louisiana in the 1800’s brought them to America. Today brussels sprouts are mainly produced in California and Europe. They are a hardy plant tolerant of poor soil. When eaten regularly they may help prevent certain cancers and improve circulation.

Never ever buy frozen brussel sprouts or asparagus for that matter. Always buy fresh. Sprouts still attached to the stalk are preferable. Avoid sprouts that are discolored (yellow or brown leaves) or loose. Choose instead the smaller sprouts that are green. Brussels sprouts have a very short shelf life. Try to use within a few days of purchase.

The best way to prepare sprouts is roasted with a little oil. First wash then trim the bottom root part off. Not too much that too many leaves fall off. Next slice in half. Toss with a little oil, season with salt and pepper. Some recipes like this one suggest steaming them first. I am not a fan of steamed because they tend to loose flavor and can quickly turn too soft and rubbery.

If you skip the steaming part it will take about 10 to 15 minutes to brown. Ideally I this is your first experience with brussel sprouts cook the onions and pancetta as called for then toss in the sprouts turning to coat. Transfer to an oven safe pan and cook in a 375 degree oven for about 20 minutes. They should be tender enough to pierce with a fork but not mushy.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.
Granola is a combination of grains (particularly oats), health nuts, abortion dried seeds and fruits seasoned with spices. It makes a terrific breakfast cereal with yogurt or milk. Take some along for a quick pick-me-up snack. Homemade granola is not like the hard clusters found in cereal boxes on the grocery store shelves. Although mixed with a medium it can be made into a portable snack bar or nuggets. I love Jen’s recipe the best for cereal because it is light with a pleasant hint of vanilla. It is not overly sweetened either. The only place I could find unsweetened coconut and real coconut flavoring was at the health food store such as Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.

Jen’s Notes:
“This recipe can also be cooked on Low in a crockpot. It’ll take a couple of hours – stir frequently for even browning. I suppose you could make a half batch, viagra but since it stays good a while and we eat it for breakfast and snacks, I prefer to make a whole recipe.”

Source: Jennifer West
1/2 cup Honey
1 cup Oil
2 teaspoon Vanilla
2 teaspoon Coconut Flavoring
1 cup Dry Milk
3 cups Unsweetened Dried Coconut
7 cups Oats
1/4 cup brown sugar or 1/2 teaspoon Stevia

Combine the liquid ingredients (I use a glass measuring cup because it’s easier to pour into the dry ingredients in the next step) and heat in the microwave for a minute or so while you combine the remaining ingredients.

Stir together the dry ingredients until well mixed. Stir the liquid ingredients in the measuring cup to combine. Slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the oat and coconut mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir until liquid ingredients are evenly distributed.

Divide granola between two 13 x 9 baking pans. Smooth out tops for even browning. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir to ensure even browning. (I use a spatula to lift and turn the mixture onto itself, working around the outside of the pan, then lifting and turning the cereal in the center.) Redistribute evenly in the pans, smooth the tops and return to the oven. Bake 10 more minutes, and stir again. Bake another 5 minutes and stir. Bake another 5 minutes, if necessary – you want a nice golden brown, but not too dark. After removing from the oven, stir a final time (or the cereal that’s in contact with the pan will get too brown). Makes about 1 gallon.

Variations:
-Add 1/2 cup each type of chopped nuts if adding more than one: walnuts, almonds, pecans or whole pine nuts. Reduce oil to 3/4 cups.
– 1/2 cup sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds.
-Add 1/2 cup dried fruit such as raisins, cherries, blueberries, dates or cranberries. Dried fruit such as apricots will need to be chopped first.
-2 tablespoons wheat germ or flax meal.
-1 tablespoon cinnamon.
-1/2 teaspoon ground ginger.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried them or worse were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage.

Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family that includes: broccoli, view  kale, cabbage, mustard, turnips, rutabagas,and wasabi and horseradish. They were believed to have originated in Belgium near Brussels (hence the name) but there is some uncertainty to the claim. Based on historical records we do know that they were first introduced to France and England during World War I where they continue to be a popular food. French settlers who settled in Louisiana in the 1800’s brought them to America. Today brussels sprouts are mainly produced in California and Europe. They are a hardy plant tolerant of poor soil. When eaten regularly they may help prevent certain cancers and improve circulation.

Never ever buy frozen brussel sprouts or asparagus for that matter. Always buy fresh. Sprouts still attached to the stalk are preferable. Avoid sprouts that are discolored (yellow or brown leaves) or loose. Choose instead the smaller sprouts that are green. Brussels sprouts have a very short shelf life. Try to use within a few days of purchase.

The best way to prepare sprouts is roasted with a little oil. First wash then trim the bottom root part off. Not too much that too many leaves fall off. Next slice in half. Toss with a little oil, season with salt and pepper. Some recipes like this one suggest steaming them first. I am not a fan of steamed because they tend to loose flavor and can quickly turn too soft and rubbery.

If you skip the steaming part it will take about 10 to 15 minutes to brown. Ideally I this is your first experience with brussel sprouts cook the onions and pancetta as called for then toss in the sprouts turning to coat. Transfer to an oven safe pan and cook in a 375 degree oven for about 20 minutes. They should be tender enough to pierce with a fork but not mushy.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.
Granola is a combination of grains (particularly oats), health nuts, abortion dried seeds and fruits seasoned with spices. It makes a terrific breakfast cereal with yogurt or milk. Take some along for a quick pick-me-up snack. Homemade granola is not like the hard clusters found in cereal boxes on the grocery store shelves. Although mixed with a medium it can be made into a portable snack bar or nuggets. I love Jen’s recipe the best for cereal because it is light with a pleasant hint of vanilla. It is not overly sweetened either. The only place I could find unsweetened coconut and real coconut flavoring was at the health food store such as Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.

Jen’s Notes:
“This recipe can also be cooked on Low in a crockpot. It’ll take a couple of hours – stir frequently for even browning. I suppose you could make a half batch, viagra but since it stays good a while and we eat it for breakfast and snacks, I prefer to make a whole recipe.”

Source: Jennifer West
1/2 cup Honey
1 cup Oil
2 teaspoon Vanilla
2 teaspoon Coconut Flavoring
1 cup Dry Milk
3 cups Unsweetened Dried Coconut
7 cups Oats
1/4 cup brown sugar or 1/2 teaspoon Stevia

Combine the liquid ingredients (I use a glass measuring cup because it’s easier to pour into the dry ingredients in the next step) and heat in the microwave for a minute or so while you combine the remaining ingredients.

Stir together the dry ingredients until well mixed. Stir the liquid ingredients in the measuring cup to combine. Slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the oat and coconut mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir until liquid ingredients are evenly distributed.

Divide granola between two 13 x 9 baking pans. Smooth out tops for even browning. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir to ensure even browning. (I use a spatula to lift and turn the mixture onto itself, working around the outside of the pan, then lifting and turning the cereal in the center.) Redistribute evenly in the pans, smooth the tops and return to the oven. Bake 10 more minutes, and stir again. Bake another 5 minutes and stir. Bake another 5 minutes, if necessary – you want a nice golden brown, but not too dark. After removing from the oven, stir a final time (or the cereal that’s in contact with the pan will get too brown). Makes about 1 gallon.

Variations:
-Add 1/2 cup each type of chopped nuts if adding more than one: walnuts, almonds, pecans or whole pine nuts. Reduce oil to 3/4 cups.
– 1/2 cup sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds.
-Add 1/2 cup dried fruit such as raisins, cherries, blueberries, dates or cranberries. Dried fruit such as apricots will need to be chopped first.
-2 tablespoons wheat germ or flax meal.
-1 tablespoon cinnamon.
-1/2 teaspoon ground ginger.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, information pills we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, try all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried them or worse were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage.

Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family that includes: broccoli, view  kale, cabbage, mustard, turnips, rutabagas,and wasabi and horseradish. They were believed to have originated in Belgium near Brussels (hence the name) but there is some uncertainty to the claim. Based on historical records we do know that they were first introduced to France and England during World War I where they continue to be a popular food. French settlers who settled in Louisiana in the 1800’s brought them to America. Today brussels sprouts are mainly produced in California and Europe. They are a hardy plant tolerant of poor soil. When eaten regularly they may help prevent certain cancers and improve circulation.

Never ever buy frozen brussel sprouts or asparagus for that matter. Always buy fresh. Sprouts still attached to the stalk are preferable. Avoid sprouts that are discolored (yellow or brown leaves) or loose. Choose instead the smaller sprouts that are green. Brussels sprouts have a very short shelf life. Try to use within a few days of purchase.

The best way to prepare sprouts is roasted with a little oil. First wash then trim the bottom root part off. Not too much that too many leaves fall off. Next slice in half. Toss with a little oil, season with salt and pepper. Some recipes like this one suggest steaming them first. I am not a fan of steamed because they tend to loose flavor and can quickly turn too soft and rubbery.

If you skip the steaming part it will take about 10 to 15 minutes to brown. Ideally I this is your first experience with brussel sprouts cook the onions and pancetta as called for then toss in the sprouts turning to coat. Transfer to an oven safe pan and cook in a 375 degree oven for about 20 minutes. They should be tender enough to pierce with a fork but not mushy.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.
Granola is a combination of grains (particularly oats), health nuts, abortion dried seeds and fruits seasoned with spices. It makes a terrific breakfast cereal with yogurt or milk. Take some along for a quick pick-me-up snack. Homemade granola is not like the hard clusters found in cereal boxes on the grocery store shelves. Although mixed with a medium it can be made into a portable snack bar or nuggets. I love Jen’s recipe the best for cereal because it is light with a pleasant hint of vanilla. It is not overly sweetened either. The only place I could find unsweetened coconut and real coconut flavoring was at the health food store such as Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.

Jen’s Notes:
“This recipe can also be cooked on Low in a crockpot. It’ll take a couple of hours – stir frequently for even browning. I suppose you could make a half batch, viagra but since it stays good a while and we eat it for breakfast and snacks, I prefer to make a whole recipe.”

Source: Jennifer West
1/2 cup Honey
1 cup Oil
2 teaspoon Vanilla
2 teaspoon Coconut Flavoring
1 cup Dry Milk
3 cups Unsweetened Dried Coconut
7 cups Oats
1/4 cup brown sugar or 1/2 teaspoon Stevia

Combine the liquid ingredients (I use a glass measuring cup because it’s easier to pour into the dry ingredients in the next step) and heat in the microwave for a minute or so while you combine the remaining ingredients.

Stir together the dry ingredients until well mixed. Stir the liquid ingredients in the measuring cup to combine. Slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the oat and coconut mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir until liquid ingredients are evenly distributed.

Divide granola between two 13 x 9 baking pans. Smooth out tops for even browning. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir to ensure even browning. (I use a spatula to lift and turn the mixture onto itself, working around the outside of the pan, then lifting and turning the cereal in the center.) Redistribute evenly in the pans, smooth the tops and return to the oven. Bake 10 more minutes, and stir again. Bake another 5 minutes and stir. Bake another 5 minutes, if necessary – you want a nice golden brown, but not too dark. After removing from the oven, stir a final time (or the cereal that’s in contact with the pan will get too brown). Makes about 1 gallon.

Variations:
-Add 1/2 cup each type of chopped nuts if adding more than one: walnuts, almonds, pecans or whole pine nuts. Reduce oil to 3/4 cups.
– 1/2 cup sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds.
-Add 1/2 cup dried fruit such as raisins, cherries, blueberries, dates or cranberries. Dried fruit such as apricots will need to be chopped first.
-2 tablespoons wheat germ or flax meal.
-1 tablespoon cinnamon.
-1/2 teaspoon ground ginger.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, information pills we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, try all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.
Growing up in the south biscuits were common whereas in California rolls or bread usually accompany a meal. We rarely serve bread with a meal. The exception would be if we are having soup or a dinner salad. Biscuits are a great choice because they are fast. They do not require proofing yeast and then waiting 2 hours for the dough to rise. These biscuits go really well with chicken soup or tomato soup.

The recipe calls for 1 1/4 cups buttermilk plus more to brush the tops with. I found that I did not need all of the buttermilk in the dough. Take the time to slowly add the buttermilk testing the dough between each small addition. You only need enough to help the dough stick together.

I like to use a fork when adding the liquid. Once the dough starts to form by sticking together I use my hands to gather it together. Just be careful not to overwork the dough. I learned a great tip from my Baking Illustrated cookbook on how to gather the dough. Use a fork not a spoon to lightly work the milk in. Once the dough starts to come together into a ball there will be a small amount of flour on the bottom of the bowl. Add a little of the liquid to the flour and then incorporate it into the rest of the ball.

Source: Cooking with Shelburne  Farms
Makes 12 (2 1/2-inch) biscuits
3 cups flour
2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
6 tbsp col unsalted butter, sickness cut into small bits
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
2 tbsp chopped fresh thyme, price sage or rosemary leaves
1 1/4 cups cold buttermilk plus a little more to brush the biscuit tops with

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, powder, soda and salt.

With your fingers or two forks, work the butter into the flour mixture until the dough looks like fine gravel with a few larger butter bumps throughout. Stir in the cheddar and thyme. Add the buttermilk gradually, just until a pinch of dough comes together when you squeeze it between your fingers.

Lightly four the counter and dump the dough onto it. Knead it a few times to bring it together and then use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll the dough out to a 3/4-inch thicknesss. Cut out the biscuits with a 2 1/2-inch round cutter or glass.

Notes:
— You can reroll the scraps once but not more or the biscuits will be tough.
— Keep the ingredients as cold as possible and work with the dough as little as possible to ensure light flaky biscuits.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried them or worse were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage.

Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family that includes: broccoli, view  kale, cabbage, mustard, turnips, rutabagas,and wasabi and horseradish. They were believed to have originated in Belgium near Brussels (hence the name) but there is some uncertainty to the claim. Based on historical records we do know that they were first introduced to France and England during World War I where they continue to be a popular food. French settlers who settled in Louisiana in the 1800’s brought them to America. Today brussels sprouts are mainly produced in California and Europe. They are a hardy plant tolerant of poor soil. When eaten regularly they may help prevent certain cancers and improve circulation.

Never ever buy frozen brussel sprouts or asparagus for that matter. Always buy fresh. Sprouts still attached to the stalk are preferable. Avoid sprouts that are discolored (yellow or brown leaves) or loose. Choose instead the smaller sprouts that are green. Brussels sprouts have a very short shelf life. Try to use within a few days of purchase.

The best way to prepare sprouts is roasted with a little oil. First wash then trim the bottom root part off. Not too much that too many leaves fall off. Next slice in half. Toss with a little oil, season with salt and pepper. Some recipes like this one suggest steaming them first. I am not a fan of steamed because they tend to loose flavor and can quickly turn too soft and rubbery.

If you skip the steaming part it will take about 10 to 15 minutes to brown. Ideally I this is your first experience with brussel sprouts cook the onions and pancetta as called for then toss in the sprouts turning to coat. Transfer to an oven safe pan and cook in a 375 degree oven for about 20 minutes. They should be tender enough to pierce with a fork but not mushy.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.
Granola is a combination of grains (particularly oats), health nuts, abortion dried seeds and fruits seasoned with spices. It makes a terrific breakfast cereal with yogurt or milk. Take some along for a quick pick-me-up snack. Homemade granola is not like the hard clusters found in cereal boxes on the grocery store shelves. Although mixed with a medium it can be made into a portable snack bar or nuggets. I love Jen’s recipe the best for cereal because it is light with a pleasant hint of vanilla. It is not overly sweetened either. The only place I could find unsweetened coconut and real coconut flavoring was at the health food store such as Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.

Jen’s Notes:
“This recipe can also be cooked on Low in a crockpot. It’ll take a couple of hours – stir frequently for even browning. I suppose you could make a half batch, viagra but since it stays good a while and we eat it for breakfast and snacks, I prefer to make a whole recipe.”

Source: Jennifer West
1/2 cup Honey
1 cup Oil
2 teaspoon Vanilla
2 teaspoon Coconut Flavoring
1 cup Dry Milk
3 cups Unsweetened Dried Coconut
7 cups Oats
1/4 cup brown sugar or 1/2 teaspoon Stevia

Combine the liquid ingredients (I use a glass measuring cup because it’s easier to pour into the dry ingredients in the next step) and heat in the microwave for a minute or so while you combine the remaining ingredients.

Stir together the dry ingredients until well mixed. Stir the liquid ingredients in the measuring cup to combine. Slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the oat and coconut mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir until liquid ingredients are evenly distributed.

Divide granola between two 13 x 9 baking pans. Smooth out tops for even browning. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir to ensure even browning. (I use a spatula to lift and turn the mixture onto itself, working around the outside of the pan, then lifting and turning the cereal in the center.) Redistribute evenly in the pans, smooth the tops and return to the oven. Bake 10 more minutes, and stir again. Bake another 5 minutes and stir. Bake another 5 minutes, if necessary – you want a nice golden brown, but not too dark. After removing from the oven, stir a final time (or the cereal that’s in contact with the pan will get too brown). Makes about 1 gallon.

Variations:
-Add 1/2 cup each type of chopped nuts if adding more than one: walnuts, almonds, pecans or whole pine nuts. Reduce oil to 3/4 cups.
– 1/2 cup sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds.
-Add 1/2 cup dried fruit such as raisins, cherries, blueberries, dates or cranberries. Dried fruit such as apricots will need to be chopped first.
-2 tablespoons wheat germ or flax meal.
-1 tablespoon cinnamon.
-1/2 teaspoon ground ginger.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, information pills we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, try all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.
Growing up in the south biscuits were common whereas in California rolls or bread usually accompany a meal. We rarely serve bread with a meal. The exception would be if we are having soup or a dinner salad. Biscuits are a great choice because they are fast. They do not require proofing yeast and then waiting 2 hours for the dough to rise. These biscuits go really well with chicken soup or tomato soup.

The recipe calls for 1 1/4 cups buttermilk plus more to brush the tops with. I found that I did not need all of the buttermilk in the dough. Take the time to slowly add the buttermilk testing the dough between each small addition. You only need enough to help the dough stick together.

I like to use a fork when adding the liquid. Once the dough starts to form by sticking together I use my hands to gather it together. Just be careful not to overwork the dough. I learned a great tip from my Baking Illustrated cookbook on how to gather the dough. Use a fork not a spoon to lightly work the milk in. Once the dough starts to come together into a ball there will be a small amount of flour on the bottom of the bowl. Add a little of the liquid to the flour and then incorporate it into the rest of the ball.

Source: Cooking with Shelburne  Farms
Makes 12 (2 1/2-inch) biscuits
3 cups flour
2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
6 tbsp col unsalted butter, sickness cut into small bits
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
2 tbsp chopped fresh thyme, price sage or rosemary leaves
1 1/4 cups cold buttermilk plus a little more to brush the biscuit tops with

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, powder, soda and salt.

With your fingers or two forks, work the butter into the flour mixture until the dough looks like fine gravel with a few larger butter bumps throughout. Stir in the cheddar and thyme. Add the buttermilk gradually, just until a pinch of dough comes together when you squeeze it between your fingers.

Lightly four the counter and dump the dough onto it. Knead it a few times to bring it together and then use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll the dough out to a 3/4-inch thicknesss. Cut out the biscuits with a 2 1/2-inch round cutter or glass.

Notes:
— You can reroll the scraps once but not more or the biscuits will be tough.
— Keep the ingredients as cold as possible and work with the dough as little as possible to ensure light flaky biscuits.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried them or worse were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage.

Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family that includes: broccoli, view  kale, cabbage, mustard, turnips, rutabagas,and wasabi and horseradish. They were believed to have originated in Belgium near Brussels (hence the name) but there is some uncertainty to the claim. Based on historical records we do know that they were first introduced to France and England during World War I where they continue to be a popular food. French settlers who settled in Louisiana in the 1800’s brought them to America. Today brussels sprouts are mainly produced in California and Europe. They are a hardy plant tolerant of poor soil. When eaten regularly they may help prevent certain cancers and improve circulation.

Never ever buy frozen brussel sprouts or asparagus for that matter. Always buy fresh. Sprouts still attached to the stalk are preferable. Avoid sprouts that are discolored (yellow or brown leaves) or loose. Choose instead the smaller sprouts that are green. Brussels sprouts have a very short shelf life. Try to use within a few days of purchase.

The best way to prepare sprouts is roasted with a little oil. First wash then trim the bottom root part off. Not too much that too many leaves fall off. Next slice in half. Toss with a little oil, season with salt and pepper. Some recipes like this one suggest steaming them first. I am not a fan of steamed because they tend to loose flavor and can quickly turn too soft and rubbery.

If you skip the steaming part it will take about 10 to 15 minutes to brown. Ideally I this is your first experience with brussel sprouts cook the onions and pancetta as called for then toss in the sprouts turning to coat. Transfer to an oven safe pan and cook in a 375 degree oven for about 20 minutes. They should be tender enough to pierce with a fork but not mushy.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.
Granola is a combination of grains (particularly oats), health nuts, abortion dried seeds and fruits seasoned with spices. It makes a terrific breakfast cereal with yogurt or milk. Take some along for a quick pick-me-up snack. Homemade granola is not like the hard clusters found in cereal boxes on the grocery store shelves. Although mixed with a medium it can be made into a portable snack bar or nuggets. I love Jen’s recipe the best for cereal because it is light with a pleasant hint of vanilla. It is not overly sweetened either. The only place I could find unsweetened coconut and real coconut flavoring was at the health food store such as Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.

Jen’s Notes:
“This recipe can also be cooked on Low in a crockpot. It’ll take a couple of hours – stir frequently for even browning. I suppose you could make a half batch, viagra but since it stays good a while and we eat it for breakfast and snacks, I prefer to make a whole recipe.”

Source: Jennifer West
1/2 cup Honey
1 cup Oil
2 teaspoon Vanilla
2 teaspoon Coconut Flavoring
1 cup Dry Milk
3 cups Unsweetened Dried Coconut
7 cups Oats
1/4 cup brown sugar or 1/2 teaspoon Stevia

Combine the liquid ingredients (I use a glass measuring cup because it’s easier to pour into the dry ingredients in the next step) and heat in the microwave for a minute or so while you combine the remaining ingredients.

Stir together the dry ingredients until well mixed. Stir the liquid ingredients in the measuring cup to combine. Slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the oat and coconut mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir until liquid ingredients are evenly distributed.

Divide granola between two 13 x 9 baking pans. Smooth out tops for even browning. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir to ensure even browning. (I use a spatula to lift and turn the mixture onto itself, working around the outside of the pan, then lifting and turning the cereal in the center.) Redistribute evenly in the pans, smooth the tops and return to the oven. Bake 10 more minutes, and stir again. Bake another 5 minutes and stir. Bake another 5 minutes, if necessary – you want a nice golden brown, but not too dark. After removing from the oven, stir a final time (or the cereal that’s in contact with the pan will get too brown). Makes about 1 gallon.

Variations:
-Add 1/2 cup each type of chopped nuts if adding more than one: walnuts, almonds, pecans or whole pine nuts. Reduce oil to 3/4 cups.
– 1/2 cup sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds.
-Add 1/2 cup dried fruit such as raisins, cherries, blueberries, dates or cranberries. Dried fruit such as apricots will need to be chopped first.
-2 tablespoons wheat germ or flax meal.
-1 tablespoon cinnamon.
-1/2 teaspoon ground ginger.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, information pills we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, try all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.
Growing up in the south biscuits were common whereas in California rolls or bread usually accompany a meal. We rarely serve bread with a meal. The exception would be if we are having soup or a dinner salad. Biscuits are a great choice because they are fast. They do not require proofing yeast and then waiting 2 hours for the dough to rise. These biscuits go really well with chicken soup or tomato soup.

The recipe calls for 1 1/4 cups buttermilk plus more to brush the tops with. I found that I did not need all of the buttermilk in the dough. Take the time to slowly add the buttermilk testing the dough between each small addition. You only need enough to help the dough stick together.

I like to use a fork when adding the liquid. Once the dough starts to form by sticking together I use my hands to gather it together. Just be careful not to overwork the dough. I learned a great tip from my Baking Illustrated cookbook on how to gather the dough. Use a fork not a spoon to lightly work the milk in. Once the dough starts to come together into a ball there will be a small amount of flour on the bottom of the bowl. Add a little of the liquid to the flour and then incorporate it into the rest of the ball.

Source: Cooking with Shelburne  Farms
Makes 12 (2 1/2-inch) biscuits
3 cups flour
2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
6 tbsp col unsalted butter, sickness cut into small bits
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
2 tbsp chopped fresh thyme, price sage or rosemary leaves
1 1/4 cups cold buttermilk plus a little more to brush the biscuit tops with

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, powder, soda and salt.

With your fingers or two forks, work the butter into the flour mixture until the dough looks like fine gravel with a few larger butter bumps throughout. Stir in the cheddar and thyme. Add the buttermilk gradually, just until a pinch of dough comes together when you squeeze it between your fingers.

Lightly four the counter and dump the dough onto it. Knead it a few times to bring it together and then use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll the dough out to a 3/4-inch thicknesss. Cut out the biscuits with a 2 1/2-inch round cutter or glass.

Notes:
— You can reroll the scraps once but not more or the biscuits will be tough.
— Keep the ingredients as cold as possible and work with the dough as little as possible to ensure light flaky biscuits.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.
I don’t eat guacamole very often, online never at home, because no one around here likes it. Guacamole is reserved for the special occasions when we have company who might like it as a topping with a mexican dish or on Super Bowl Sunday with chips. I have made guacamole a few times in the past with dismal results. The first time I made it was at a dinner party. I arrived early to help the host with any last minute details. My task was to make the guacamole. Smash the avocados, season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon. All the subsequent times I have tried to reproduce the recipe resulted in failure. Then I found this recipe for guacamole and could fight the craving off any longer. I had to have another go. The guacamole turned out so delicious Stephen is now a convert.

The fresh lime juice and cumin really helped set the stage. Only use fresh quality ingredients for the best results.

2 ripe Haas avocados
2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 – 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
Juice from one half of a lime

Slice the avocados in half. Discard the pits and remove the flesh from the skins. Place the flesh in a small mixing bowl. Add the garlic, cumin, salt, cilantro,and lime juice. Mash it all up with a fork. Serve with tortilla chips.

Store any leftovers (!?) in an airtight container in the refrigerator placing a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the guacamole in order to prevent browning.

Yield: 1 1/4 cups
Prep time: 10 minutes

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried them or worse were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage.

Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family that includes: broccoli, view  kale, cabbage, mustard, turnips, rutabagas,and wasabi and horseradish. They were believed to have originated in Belgium near Brussels (hence the name) but there is some uncertainty to the claim. Based on historical records we do know that they were first introduced to France and England during World War I where they continue to be a popular food. French settlers who settled in Louisiana in the 1800’s brought them to America. Today brussels sprouts are mainly produced in California and Europe. They are a hardy plant tolerant of poor soil. When eaten regularly they may help prevent certain cancers and improve circulation.

Never ever buy frozen brussel sprouts or asparagus for that matter. Always buy fresh. Sprouts still attached to the stalk are preferable. Avoid sprouts that are discolored (yellow or brown leaves) or loose. Choose instead the smaller sprouts that are green. Brussels sprouts have a very short shelf life. Try to use within a few days of purchase.

The best way to prepare sprouts is roasted with a little oil. First wash then trim the bottom root part off. Not too much that too many leaves fall off. Next slice in half. Toss with a little oil, season with salt and pepper. Some recipes like this one suggest steaming them first. I am not a fan of steamed because they tend to loose flavor and can quickly turn too soft and rubbery.

If you skip the steaming part it will take about 10 to 15 minutes to brown. Ideally I this is your first experience with brussel sprouts cook the onions and pancetta as called for then toss in the sprouts turning to coat. Transfer to an oven safe pan and cook in a 375 degree oven for about 20 minutes. They should be tender enough to pierce with a fork but not mushy.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.
Granola is a combination of grains (particularly oats), health nuts, abortion dried seeds and fruits seasoned with spices. It makes a terrific breakfast cereal with yogurt or milk. Take some along for a quick pick-me-up snack. Homemade granola is not like the hard clusters found in cereal boxes on the grocery store shelves. Although mixed with a medium it can be made into a portable snack bar or nuggets. I love Jen’s recipe the best for cereal because it is light with a pleasant hint of vanilla. It is not overly sweetened either. The only place I could find unsweetened coconut and real coconut flavoring was at the health food store such as Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.

Jen’s Notes:
“This recipe can also be cooked on Low in a crockpot. It’ll take a couple of hours – stir frequently for even browning. I suppose you could make a half batch, viagra but since it stays good a while and we eat it for breakfast and snacks, I prefer to make a whole recipe.”

Source: Jennifer West
1/2 cup Honey
1 cup Oil
2 teaspoon Vanilla
2 teaspoon Coconut Flavoring
1 cup Dry Milk
3 cups Unsweetened Dried Coconut
7 cups Oats
1/4 cup brown sugar or 1/2 teaspoon Stevia

Combine the liquid ingredients (I use a glass measuring cup because it’s easier to pour into the dry ingredients in the next step) and heat in the microwave for a minute or so while you combine the remaining ingredients.

Stir together the dry ingredients until well mixed. Stir the liquid ingredients in the measuring cup to combine. Slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the oat and coconut mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir until liquid ingredients are evenly distributed.

Divide granola between two 13 x 9 baking pans. Smooth out tops for even browning. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir to ensure even browning. (I use a spatula to lift and turn the mixture onto itself, working around the outside of the pan, then lifting and turning the cereal in the center.) Redistribute evenly in the pans, smooth the tops and return to the oven. Bake 10 more minutes, and stir again. Bake another 5 minutes and stir. Bake another 5 minutes, if necessary – you want a nice golden brown, but not too dark. After removing from the oven, stir a final time (or the cereal that’s in contact with the pan will get too brown). Makes about 1 gallon.

Variations:
-Add 1/2 cup each type of chopped nuts if adding more than one: walnuts, almonds, pecans or whole pine nuts. Reduce oil to 3/4 cups.
– 1/2 cup sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds.
-Add 1/2 cup dried fruit such as raisins, cherries, blueberries, dates or cranberries. Dried fruit such as apricots will need to be chopped first.
-2 tablespoons wheat germ or flax meal.
-1 tablespoon cinnamon.
-1/2 teaspoon ground ginger.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, information pills we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, try all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.
Growing up in the south biscuits were common whereas in California rolls or bread usually accompany a meal. We rarely serve bread with a meal. The exception would be if we are having soup or a dinner salad. Biscuits are a great choice because they are fast. They do not require proofing yeast and then waiting 2 hours for the dough to rise. These biscuits go really well with chicken soup or tomato soup.

The recipe calls for 1 1/4 cups buttermilk plus more to brush the tops with. I found that I did not need all of the buttermilk in the dough. Take the time to slowly add the buttermilk testing the dough between each small addition. You only need enough to help the dough stick together.

I like to use a fork when adding the liquid. Once the dough starts to form by sticking together I use my hands to gather it together. Just be careful not to overwork the dough. I learned a great tip from my Baking Illustrated cookbook on how to gather the dough. Use a fork not a spoon to lightly work the milk in. Once the dough starts to come together into a ball there will be a small amount of flour on the bottom of the bowl. Add a little of the liquid to the flour and then incorporate it into the rest of the ball.

Source: Cooking with Shelburne  Farms
Makes 12 (2 1/2-inch) biscuits
3 cups flour
2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
6 tbsp col unsalted butter, sickness cut into small bits
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
2 tbsp chopped fresh thyme, price sage or rosemary leaves
1 1/4 cups cold buttermilk plus a little more to brush the biscuit tops with

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, powder, soda and salt.

With your fingers or two forks, work the butter into the flour mixture until the dough looks like fine gravel with a few larger butter bumps throughout. Stir in the cheddar and thyme. Add the buttermilk gradually, just until a pinch of dough comes together when you squeeze it between your fingers.

Lightly four the counter and dump the dough onto it. Knead it a few times to bring it together and then use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll the dough out to a 3/4-inch thicknesss. Cut out the biscuits with a 2 1/2-inch round cutter or glass.

Notes:
— You can reroll the scraps once but not more or the biscuits will be tough.
— Keep the ingredients as cold as possible and work with the dough as little as possible to ensure light flaky biscuits.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.
I don’t eat guacamole very often, online never at home, because no one around here likes it. Guacamole is reserved for the special occasions when we have company who might like it as a topping with a mexican dish or on Super Bowl Sunday with chips. I have made guacamole a few times in the past with dismal results. The first time I made it was at a dinner party. I arrived early to help the host with any last minute details. My task was to make the guacamole. Smash the avocados, season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon. All the subsequent times I have tried to reproduce the recipe resulted in failure. Then I found this recipe for guacamole and could fight the craving off any longer. I had to have another go. The guacamole turned out so delicious Stephen is now a convert.

The fresh lime juice and cumin really helped set the stage. Only use fresh quality ingredients for the best results.

2 ripe Haas avocados
2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 – 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
Juice from one half of a lime

Slice the avocados in half. Discard the pits and remove the flesh from the skins. Place the flesh in a small mixing bowl. Add the garlic, cumin, salt, cilantro,and lime juice. Mash it all up with a fork. Serve with tortilla chips.

Store any leftovers (!?) in an airtight container in the refrigerator placing a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the guacamole in order to prevent browning.

Yield: 1 1/4 cups
Prep time: 10 minutes
I don’t eat guacamole very often, this web never at home, try because no one around here likes it. Guacamole is reserved for the special occasions when we have company who might like it as a topping with a mexican dish or on Super Bowl Sunday with chips. I have made guacamole a few times in the past with dismal results. The first time I made it was at a dinner party. I arrived early to help the host with any last minute details. My task was to make the guacamole. Smash the avocados, season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon. All the subsequent times I have tried to reproduce the recipe resulted in failure. Then I found this recipe for guacamole and could fight the craving off any longer. I had to have another go. The guacamole turned out so delicious Stephen is now a convert.

The fresh lime juice and cumin really helped set the stage. Creating a nice subtle combination of flavors. Only use fresh ripe quality ingredients for the best results. Serve with tacos, corn chips or in sandwiches.

Source: Fix Me A Snack

2 ripe Haas avocados
3 medium cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 – 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
Juice from one half of a lime

Slice the avocados in half. Discard the pits and remove the flesh from the skins. Place the flesh in a small mixing bowl. Add the garlic, cumin, salt, cilantro,and lime juice. Mash it all up with a fork. Serve with tortilla chips.

Store any leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator placing a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the guacamole in order to prevent browning.

Yield: 1 1/4 cups
Prep time: 10 minutes

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with milk, website unhealthy honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, visit this cream cheese, viagra  cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

Serves 4

2 whole grain English muffins, separated

Yogurt

Fruit

Toast

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, order honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, there cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, approved honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, site cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried them or worse were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage.

Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family that includes: broccoli, view  kale, cabbage, mustard, turnips, rutabagas,and wasabi and horseradish. They were believed to have originated in Belgium near Brussels (hence the name) but there is some uncertainty to the claim. Based on historical records we do know that they were first introduced to France and England during World War I where they continue to be a popular food. French settlers who settled in Louisiana in the 1800’s brought them to America. Today brussels sprouts are mainly produced in California and Europe. They are a hardy plant tolerant of poor soil. When eaten regularly they may help prevent certain cancers and improve circulation.

Never ever buy frozen brussel sprouts or asparagus for that matter. Always buy fresh. Sprouts still attached to the stalk are preferable. Avoid sprouts that are discolored (yellow or brown leaves) or loose. Choose instead the smaller sprouts that are green. Brussels sprouts have a very short shelf life. Try to use within a few days of purchase.

The best way to prepare sprouts is roasted with a little oil. First wash then trim the bottom root part off. Not too much that too many leaves fall off. Next slice in half. Toss with a little oil, season with salt and pepper. Some recipes like this one suggest steaming them first. I am not a fan of steamed because they tend to loose flavor and can quickly turn too soft and rubbery.

If you skip the steaming part it will take about 10 to 15 minutes to brown. Ideally I this is your first experience with brussel sprouts cook the onions and pancetta as called for then toss in the sprouts turning to coat. Transfer to an oven safe pan and cook in a 375 degree oven for about 20 minutes. They should be tender enough to pierce with a fork but not mushy.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.
Granola is a combination of grains (particularly oats), health nuts, abortion dried seeds and fruits seasoned with spices. It makes a terrific breakfast cereal with yogurt or milk. Take some along for a quick pick-me-up snack. Homemade granola is not like the hard clusters found in cereal boxes on the grocery store shelves. Although mixed with a medium it can be made into a portable snack bar or nuggets. I love Jen’s recipe the best for cereal because it is light with a pleasant hint of vanilla. It is not overly sweetened either. The only place I could find unsweetened coconut and real coconut flavoring was at the health food store such as Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.

Jen’s Notes:
“This recipe can also be cooked on Low in a crockpot. It’ll take a couple of hours – stir frequently for even browning. I suppose you could make a half batch, viagra but since it stays good a while and we eat it for breakfast and snacks, I prefer to make a whole recipe.”

Source: Jennifer West
1/2 cup Honey
1 cup Oil
2 teaspoon Vanilla
2 teaspoon Coconut Flavoring
1 cup Dry Milk
3 cups Unsweetened Dried Coconut
7 cups Oats
1/4 cup brown sugar or 1/2 teaspoon Stevia

Combine the liquid ingredients (I use a glass measuring cup because it’s easier to pour into the dry ingredients in the next step) and heat in the microwave for a minute or so while you combine the remaining ingredients.

Stir together the dry ingredients until well mixed. Stir the liquid ingredients in the measuring cup to combine. Slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the oat and coconut mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir until liquid ingredients are evenly distributed.

Divide granola between two 13 x 9 baking pans. Smooth out tops for even browning. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir to ensure even browning. (I use a spatula to lift and turn the mixture onto itself, working around the outside of the pan, then lifting and turning the cereal in the center.) Redistribute evenly in the pans, smooth the tops and return to the oven. Bake 10 more minutes, and stir again. Bake another 5 minutes and stir. Bake another 5 minutes, if necessary – you want a nice golden brown, but not too dark. After removing from the oven, stir a final time (or the cereal that’s in contact with the pan will get too brown). Makes about 1 gallon.

Variations:
-Add 1/2 cup each type of chopped nuts if adding more than one: walnuts, almonds, pecans or whole pine nuts. Reduce oil to 3/4 cups.
– 1/2 cup sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds.
-Add 1/2 cup dried fruit such as raisins, cherries, blueberries, dates or cranberries. Dried fruit such as apricots will need to be chopped first.
-2 tablespoons wheat germ or flax meal.
-1 tablespoon cinnamon.
-1/2 teaspoon ground ginger.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, information pills we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, try all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.
Growing up in the south biscuits were common whereas in California rolls or bread usually accompany a meal. We rarely serve bread with a meal. The exception would be if we are having soup or a dinner salad. Biscuits are a great choice because they are fast. They do not require proofing yeast and then waiting 2 hours for the dough to rise. These biscuits go really well with chicken soup or tomato soup.

The recipe calls for 1 1/4 cups buttermilk plus more to brush the tops with. I found that I did not need all of the buttermilk in the dough. Take the time to slowly add the buttermilk testing the dough between each small addition. You only need enough to help the dough stick together.

I like to use a fork when adding the liquid. Once the dough starts to form by sticking together I use my hands to gather it together. Just be careful not to overwork the dough. I learned a great tip from my Baking Illustrated cookbook on how to gather the dough. Use a fork not a spoon to lightly work the milk in. Once the dough starts to come together into a ball there will be a small amount of flour on the bottom of the bowl. Add a little of the liquid to the flour and then incorporate it into the rest of the ball.

Source: Cooking with Shelburne  Farms
Makes 12 (2 1/2-inch) biscuits
3 cups flour
2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
6 tbsp col unsalted butter, sickness cut into small bits
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
2 tbsp chopped fresh thyme, price sage or rosemary leaves
1 1/4 cups cold buttermilk plus a little more to brush the biscuit tops with

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, powder, soda and salt.

With your fingers or two forks, work the butter into the flour mixture until the dough looks like fine gravel with a few larger butter bumps throughout. Stir in the cheddar and thyme. Add the buttermilk gradually, just until a pinch of dough comes together when you squeeze it between your fingers.

Lightly four the counter and dump the dough onto it. Knead it a few times to bring it together and then use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll the dough out to a 3/4-inch thicknesss. Cut out the biscuits with a 2 1/2-inch round cutter or glass.

Notes:
— You can reroll the scraps once but not more or the biscuits will be tough.
— Keep the ingredients as cold as possible and work with the dough as little as possible to ensure light flaky biscuits.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, find however, we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.
I don’t eat guacamole very often, online never at home, because no one around here likes it. Guacamole is reserved for the special occasions when we have company who might like it as a topping with a mexican dish or on Super Bowl Sunday with chips. I have made guacamole a few times in the past with dismal results. The first time I made it was at a dinner party. I arrived early to help the host with any last minute details. My task was to make the guacamole. Smash the avocados, season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon. All the subsequent times I have tried to reproduce the recipe resulted in failure. Then I found this recipe for guacamole and could fight the craving off any longer. I had to have another go. The guacamole turned out so delicious Stephen is now a convert.

The fresh lime juice and cumin really helped set the stage. Only use fresh quality ingredients for the best results.

2 ripe Haas avocados
2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 – 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
Juice from one half of a lime

Slice the avocados in half. Discard the pits and remove the flesh from the skins. Place the flesh in a small mixing bowl. Add the garlic, cumin, salt, cilantro,and lime juice. Mash it all up with a fork. Serve with tortilla chips.

Store any leftovers (!?) in an airtight container in the refrigerator placing a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the guacamole in order to prevent browning.

Yield: 1 1/4 cups
Prep time: 10 minutes
I don’t eat guacamole very often, this web never at home, try because no one around here likes it. Guacamole is reserved for the special occasions when we have company who might like it as a topping with a mexican dish or on Super Bowl Sunday with chips. I have made guacamole a few times in the past with dismal results. The first time I made it was at a dinner party. I arrived early to help the host with any last minute details. My task was to make the guacamole. Smash the avocados, season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon. All the subsequent times I have tried to reproduce the recipe resulted in failure. Then I found this recipe for guacamole and could fight the craving off any longer. I had to have another go. The guacamole turned out so delicious Stephen is now a convert.

The fresh lime juice and cumin really helped set the stage. Creating a nice subtle combination of flavors. Only use fresh ripe quality ingredients for the best results. Serve with tacos, corn chips or in sandwiches.

Source: Fix Me A Snack

2 ripe Haas avocados
3 medium cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 – 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
Juice from one half of a lime

Slice the avocados in half. Discard the pits and remove the flesh from the skins. Place the flesh in a small mixing bowl. Add the garlic, cumin, salt, cilantro,and lime juice. Mash it all up with a fork. Serve with tortilla chips.

Store any leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator placing a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the guacamole in order to prevent browning.

Yield: 1 1/4 cups
Prep time: 10 minutes
Our oldest son announced one evening during dinner that he was moving to Mexico because he loves bean burritos so much. Can you tell tacos and burritos are a reoccurring weekly menu staple at our house?

This week I decided to change things up a bit by using a recipe for beef and bean chimichangas. I swapped the can of chili beans for a can of pinto. The flavor was a hit. We ate them as tacos the first night. Then in quesadillas for lunch the next day. We used up the remaining leftovers in a breakfast burrito the third day.

Source: For the Love of Cooking.net
1 tsp olive oil
1 lb of lean ground beef
1/2 sweet yellow onion, healing diced
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp oregano
Dash of red pepper flakes
Sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, to taste
1 can of chili beans, drained

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the ground beef and break up the meat into crumbles. Add the onion and garlic as well as the seasonings then cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the drained can of chili beans to the beef mixture and stir until well combined. Set aside.

Variations:
-Swap the ground beef for ground turkey.
-Use pinto beans instead of chili beans. Or omit the beans all together.

Family Togetherness: Game Night

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, this fluffy, pill flaky, sale buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb
In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, this fluffy, pill flaky, sale buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, buy more about fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/wholewheathoneybread

Honey Whole Wheat Bread
makes two loaves
1 lb whole wheat flour
12 oz hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour
1 5 oz can evaporated milk (or milk, advice or more water or soy if you are vegan)
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast
an additional 1/2-1 cup flour, as necessary, to achieve the desired consistency

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

(My thought is that soaking the flour may help soften the bran and release some of the sugars in the wheat, though, truthfully, I don’t know for sure if it does).

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic (I put them in a plastic bag), and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/wholewheathoneybread

Honey Whole Wheat Bread
makes two loaves
1 lb whole wheat flour
12 oz hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour
1 5 oz can evaporated milk (or milk, advice or more water or soy if you are vegan)
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast
an additional 1/2-1 cup flour, as necessary, to achieve the desired consistency

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

(My thought is that soaking the flour may help soften the bran and release some of the sugars in the wheat, though, truthfully, I don’t know for sure if it does).

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic (I put them in a plastic bag), and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
With Summer heat fast approaching in many parts of our beautiful country comes the craving for cool refreshing treats.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, more about cream, look sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Consistant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Gelato – starts out with a similar ice cream custard base, but it’s churned slower and frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The slow churning incorporates less air, so the gelato is more dense. The higher freezing temperature means that the gelato stays silkier and softer. It’s also more likely for gelato to use a lower proportion of cream and eggs (or none at all) so that the main flavor ingredient shines through.
gelato is churned at a slower speed than ice cream, so it’s denser because not as much air is whipped into the mixture. less percent of butterfat than ice cream from whole milk and cream makes it creamier and the flavors more intense. less air equ

Sorbet – sorbet is very smooth and fine.
dairy-free and egg-free, sorbets are made from fruit juice or flavored water and simple syrup. They’re churned like ice cream to give them a soft and snowy texture. (Sherbet usually contains some amount of milk or cream in addition to the fruit juice.) were served as a pre-course to the main course iMost of the recipes I found contain some type of alcohol. Fruit juices can be substituted for a non-alcoholic dessert.

Granita – Granitas are exactly like sorbets except they’re made by hand. The liquid base is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the base is stirred or racked with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. The result is a frozen dessert with a coarse and flaky texture.

Italian Ice -Italian ice is more grainy and icy similar to shaved ice or snow conesItalian ice should always be smooth, and sweetening is usually sugar

Slushy Snow cones and shaved ice have syrupy flavors added over ice and are crunchy.

In my hometown where I grew up there was bread factory. The smell of delicious fresh baked bread permeated the still early morning air. It was a stark contrast from the pungent aroma of rotten oranges emanating from the orange juice factory on the opposite side of town. Accompanied by the fishy stench from the ocean side.

My experience with bread making has seen more failures than successes. Nevertheless I refuse to accept defeat. I now have a small arsenal of bread recipes. That despite my lack of talent tends to come out no matter what. In fact, help stuff the dough for Honey Whole Wheat Bread has never been the same every time I make it. Yet the final result is always the same.

My idea of a good bread recipe uses minimal ingredients and is user friendly. This recipe accomplishes both. The idea of letting the sponge (wheat flour and water) rest for an hour is genius. No bitter flavor here. I read once years ago that honey was used in wheat bread to offset the strong flavor of the wheat. However, dosage recipe honey can also contain an overpowering flavor. So often my whole wheat loaves were bitter due to the combination of honey and wheat bran. In the King Arthur Whole Grains cookbook the recipe for whole wheat sandwich bread calls for orange juice instead of honey. They claim the OJ placates the strong flavor from the wheat. Still the recipe involves the additional ingredients of potato flakes and dry milk. These three ingredients were not a common staple in the pantry. Thus, sickness the recipe did not meet my criteria for a good loaf of bread.

This recipe yields a tender crumb and no bitter taste. Yet it is a hearty loaf. This is not a recipe for a light airy wheat sandwich bread.

Source: The Fresh Loaf
makes two loaves
1 pound whole wheat flour (3 cups)
12 ounces hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour (2 cups)
1 5 ounces milk
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic or in a large plastic bag, and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/wholewheathoneybread

Honey Whole Wheat Bread
makes two loaves
1 lb whole wheat flour
12 oz hot water
8 ounces bread or all-purpose flour
1 5 oz can evaporated milk (or milk, advice or more water or soy if you are vegan)
1/3 cup honey
2 teaspoons salt
3 teaspoons instant yeast
an additional 1/2-1 cup flour, as necessary, to achieve the desired consistency

Mix the hot water and whole wheat flour together in a bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and set aside until around room temperature, at least 1 hour.

(My thought is that soaking the flour may help soften the bran and release some of the sugars in the wheat, though, truthfully, I don’t know for sure if it does).

Add the milk, honey, salt, yeast, and bread flour to the original mixture and mix until well combined. Add additional flour and knead by hand or in a stand mixer until a tacky but not completely sticky dough is formed. Place the ball of dough in a well-oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside to rise for 60 to 90 minutes.

Divide the dough in two and shape the loaves. Place the loaves in greased bread pans, cover the pans loosely with plastic (I put them in a plastic bag), and set aside to rise again for 90 minutes.

During the final 30 minutes of rising, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the pans into the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, rotating the pans once so that they brown evenly, until the internal temperature of the loaves is around 190 degrees and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.
With Summer heat fast approaching in many parts of our beautiful country comes the craving for cool refreshing treats.

Ice Cream – consists of milk, more about cream, look sugar, and sometimes egg yolks. Consistant churning during the cooling process incorporates air into the ice cream giving it a smooth light creamy texture.

Gelato – starts out with a similar ice cream custard base, but it’s churned slower and frozen at a slightly warmer temperature. The slow churning incorporates less air, so the gelato is more dense. The higher freezing temperature means that the gelato stays silkier and softer. It’s also more likely for gelato to use a lower proportion of cream and eggs (or none at all) so that the main flavor ingredient shines through.
gelato is churned at a slower speed than ice cream, so it’s denser because not as much air is whipped into the mixture. less percent of butterfat than ice cream from whole milk and cream makes it creamier and the flavors more intense. less air equ

Sorbet – sorbet is very smooth and fine.
dairy-free and egg-free, sorbets are made from fruit juice or flavored water and simple syrup. They’re churned like ice cream to give them a soft and snowy texture. (Sherbet usually contains some amount of milk or cream in addition to the fruit juice.) were served as a pre-course to the main course iMost of the recipes I found contain some type of alcohol. Fruit juices can be substituted for a non-alcoholic dessert.

Granita – Granitas are exactly like sorbets except they’re made by hand. The liquid base is poured into a shallow dish and frozen. At intervals, the base is stirred or racked with a fork to break up the ice crystals as they form. The result is a frozen dessert with a coarse and flaky texture.

Italian Ice -Italian ice is more grainy and icy similar to shaved ice or snow conesItalian ice should always be smooth, and sweetening is usually sugar

Slushy Snow cones and shaved ice have syrupy flavors added over ice and are crunchy.

Art by: Word Art World

A few months ago I attended a math workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an arsenal of fun game oriented ideas to teach math. One of the speakers brought up an interesting point. He told us that board games inadvertently teach our children math. (I guess I probably already knew that but sometimes I need someone else to say it for it to really sink in.) With preschool aged children board games can encourage counting, viagra order learning patterns, shapes and colors. As they grow they learn to take turns, cause and effect, and logic.

While it is wonderful that games offer an avenue to learn from, families can also benefit from the time spent together. Last year before we moved I sang with a woman’s choral ensamble. One evening I was surprised to learn that the director, whose children no longer live at home, was eager to make it home in time for game night with the family.

Game nights can be anything from sports to board games. Some nights game night is playing hide-and-seek. Our kids love “monster coming”. My son’s friend plays Dominoes when her extended family gets together. I have fond memories watching my mom play 10 pennies with her family. A friend from college always played cards with his family. We started game nights with the kids when they were young. It did not always go smooth. Sometimes we changed the rules around to fit their understanding.

Games nights teaches us to work together. If a team member draws poorly we can teach our kids that we do not criticize. We each have our own strengths and weaknesses. When we play games with our children we can mirror how we expect them to treat others. If we lose we do not shout and get angry. We can show respect for the other players and exhibit patience. The kids learn to take turns and the responsibility to be honest. As a family we can talk and listen and laugh together. The act of communicating while having fun is the fabric that strengthens family ties.

Here are some of our favorite games. What are your favorite board games?

  • Dominoes
  • War
  • Matching
  • UNO
  • Blokus
  • Chutes and Ladders
  • Go Fish
  • Chess
  • Checkers
  • Scrabble
  • Operation
  • Allowance
  • Clue
  • Life
  • Monopoly
  • Racko
  • Cards: Old Maid, Go Fish, Spoons,
  • Mario Wii
  • Scavenger Hunts
  • Soccer

Chuncky Guacamole

Image: Property of OMK

The month of April was established as national Military Child Month in honor of the families and their children for the daily sacrifices they make in supporting America’s Armed Forces. This month’s website review consists of two websites dedicated to serving the children and youth of military families.

In April of 2005 Operation Military Kids was launched. The OMK organization is instrumental in hosting events that focus on the children and youth of military families. Together Operation Military Kids along with local businesses and organizations join to provide community outreach programs that assists children and youth learning to cope with the absence and stresses of a deployed parent. During the month of April various organizations and Garrisons host field trips, order day camps and ceremonies directed toward the youth.

Deployment Kids is another fantastic resource for young children of a deployed parent/s. Deployment Kids and its parent site Surviving Deployment offer wonderful ideas on how to stay connected, relocating, youth programs, transitioning once a parent comes home and recovering from loss. There are craft and ideas, activities, books, speaking engagements and plenty of articles and links.

Although May is officially Military Appreciation month we can show our gratitude for our troops and especially their families all year round. Contact Operation Military Kids, your local Garrison, or Boys and Girls club to find out how you can help support our troops and their families.

Image: Property of OMK

The month of April was established as national Military Child Month in honor of the families and their children for the daily sacrifices they make in supporting America’s Armed Forces. This month’s website review consists of two websites dedicated to serving the children and youth of military families.

In April of 2005 Operation Military Kids was launched. The OMK organization is instrumental in hosting events that focus on the children and youth of military families. Together Operation Military Kids along with local businesses and organizations join to provide community outreach programs that assists children and youth learning to cope with the absence and stresses of a deployed parent. During the month of April various organizations and Garrisons host field trips, order day camps and ceremonies directed toward the youth.

Deployment Kids is another fantastic resource for young children of a deployed parent/s. Deployment Kids and its parent site Surviving Deployment offer wonderful ideas on how to stay connected, relocating, youth programs, transitioning once a parent comes home and recovering from loss. There are craft and ideas, activities, books, speaking engagements and plenty of articles and links.

Although May is officially Military Appreciation month we can show our gratitude for our troops and especially their families all year round. Contact Operation Military Kids, your local Garrison, or Boys and Girls club to find out how you can help support our troops and their families.

Image: Property of OMK

The month of April was established as national Military Child Month in honor of the families and their children for the daily sacrifices they make in supporting America’s Armed Forces. This month’s website review consists of two websites dedicated to serving the children and youth of military families.

In April of 2005 Operation Military Kids was launched. The OMK organization is instrumental in hosting events that focus on the children and youth of military families. Together Operation Military Kids along with local businesses and organizations join to provide community outreach programs that assists children and youth learning to cope with the absence and stresses of a deployed parent. During the month of April various organizations and Garrisons host field trips, nurse day camps and ceremonies directed toward the youth.

Deployment Kids is another fantastic resource for young children of a deployed parent/s. Deployment Kids and its parent site Surviving Deployment offer wonderful ideas on how to stay connected, relocating, youth programs, transitioning once a parent comes home and recovering from loss. There are craft and ideas, activities, books, speaking engagements and plenty of articles and links.

Although May is officially Military Appreciation month we can show our gratitude for our troops and especially their families all year round. Contact Operation Military Kids, your local Garrison, or Boys and Girls club to find out how you can help support our troops and their families.

Image: Property of OMK

The month of April was established as national Military Child Month in honor of the families and their children for the daily sacrifices they make in supporting America’s Armed Forces. This month’s website review consists of two websites dedicated to serving the children and youth of military families.

In April of 2005 Operation Military Kids was launched. The OMK organization is instrumental in hosting events that focus on the children and youth of military families. Together Operation Military Kids along with local businesses and organizations join to provide community outreach programs that assists children and youth learning to cope with the absence and stresses of a deployed parent. During the month of April various organizations and Garrisons host field trips, order day camps and ceremonies directed toward the youth.

Deployment Kids is another fantastic resource for young children of a deployed parent/s. Deployment Kids and its parent site Surviving Deployment offer wonderful ideas on how to stay connected, relocating, youth programs, transitioning once a parent comes home and recovering from loss. There are craft and ideas, activities, books, speaking engagements and plenty of articles and links.

Although May is officially Military Appreciation month we can show our gratitude for our troops and especially their families all year round. Contact Operation Military Kids, your local Garrison, or Boys and Girls club to find out how you can help support our troops and their families.

Image: Property of OMK

The month of April was established as national Military Child Month in honor of the families and their children for the daily sacrifices they make in supporting America’s Armed Forces. This month’s website review consists of two websites dedicated to serving the children and youth of military families.

In April of 2005 Operation Military Kids was launched. The OMK organization is instrumental in hosting events that focus on the children and youth of military families. Together Operation Military Kids along with local businesses and organizations join to provide community outreach programs that assists children and youth learning to cope with the absence and stresses of a deployed parent. During the month of April various organizations and Garrisons host field trips, nurse day camps and ceremonies directed toward the youth.

Deployment Kids is another fantastic resource for young children of a deployed parent/s. Deployment Kids and its parent site Surviving Deployment offer wonderful ideas on how to stay connected, relocating, youth programs, transitioning once a parent comes home and recovering from loss. There are craft and ideas, activities, books, speaking engagements and plenty of articles and links.

Although May is officially Military Appreciation month we can show our gratitude for our troops and especially their families all year round. Contact Operation Military Kids, your local Garrison, or Boys and Girls club to find out how you can help support our troops and their families.

The theme this year for National Nutrition month is, pill “Eat Right…With Color.” The challenge? To swap out calorie dense starches and fats for fruits, vegetables and whole grains. This month we have joined the leagues with the National Dietetic Association; in addition to, the many accompanying voices of dietetics from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans to promote healthy habits. We discussed ways to filter out the high calorie prepackaged foods by reading labels. The following week we posted links to help our pickiest eaters over come their food fears. We would like to wrap up National Nutrition Month with a guide to seasonal foods.

Eat the Color of the Rainbow“…”Eat Clean”…”Eat Seasonal”…What does this all mean? Food is fuel for our body. Each morsel of food contains within it nutrients and minerals our body needs to boost the immune system, help cells and organs function properly, and support growth and development. Eating a variety of foods (the color of the rainbow) is the best way to get all the vitamins and minerals our bodies need each day.

When fruits and vegetables are at their peak they contain abundant amounts of the vitamins and minerals our body craves. Over time these vitamins and minerals diminish. Eating seasonal fruits and vegetables ensures that we are getting the maximum benefit from our food. Choosing meals and snacks around what is in season keeps costs low. When foods are in season it means they are usually shipped locally. As a result prices are substantially lower and the taste is superb. Use this opportunity to stock up for later months. Find a farmers market near by for fresh produce and keep an eye out for sales on poultry and fish.

Eating clean is the practice of eating whole, natural foods and avoiding any manmade fats, sugars and preservatives. Let’s say one sweet potato has the same amount of carbs as a candy bar. Even though the potato is largely a carbohydrate it has less sugar and calories and more soluble fiber than the candy bar. The potato also has zero preservatives and dyes. The health benefits of a starchy potato far outweigh those of the candy bar. Whole, unprocessed, foods like seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, fish and lean meats provide the nutrients our bodies need to grow properly.

Refer to the chart above for seasonal foods listed by season.

Salud!

Additional Reading:

The Gracious Pantry: How Tiffany transformed her pantry filled with junk food to one that supports clean eating habits.

Nut Shell Nutrition: “Make a Rainbow on Your plate”, also be sure to peruse the site. Brittany has several informative posts on making health goals that might be of interest.

Dish on Dieting: A witty article describing the use of a GPS to guide us down the road of meal choices.

A Sprinkle of Sage: “What’s Your Nutrition Resolution?” The first of a month long series of tips to reach this month’s goal for optimal health.

Kleiner Nutrition: Great articles to help inspire us to stay on the path to better habits. Be sure to check out the interview with Hope Warshaw.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried tried them or were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage. Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, sickness website trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried tried them or were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage. Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, sickness website trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, pill honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried tried them or were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage. Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, sickness website trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, pill honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.
http://www.familyfreshcooking.com/2010/08/10/mozzarella-basil-tomato-grilled-cheese-bruschetta/

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, this perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, order Basil, page Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried tried them or were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage. Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, sickness website trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, pill honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.
http://www.familyfreshcooking.com/2010/08/10/mozzarella-basil-tomato-grilled-cheese-bruschetta/

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, this perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, order Basil, page Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, search perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, Basil, Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried tried them or were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage. Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, sickness website trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, pill honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.
http://www.familyfreshcooking.com/2010/08/10/mozzarella-basil-tomato-grilled-cheese-bruschetta/

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, this perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, order Basil, page Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, search perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, Basil, Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, viagra perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, click Basil, order Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

Brussels Sprouts notoriously have a bad wrap. Usually those claiming to despise them have never tried tried them or were scarred for life the first time they tried a mushy slimy sprout or cabbage. Brussels sprouts are small little cabbage like sprouts that grow on a stalk.

Source: Woman’s Day
1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, sickness website trimmed and halved
4 oz pancetta, diced
1 large onion, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
1?2 tsp kosher salt
1?4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar (optional)

Bring 1-inch of lightly salted water to a boil in a large, deep skillet. Add sprouts and simmer, covered, until crisp-tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain and run under cold water to cool.

Wipe out the skillet. Add pancetta and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towel–lined plate.

Add onion to drippings in skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add sprouts, salt and pepper, and cook, tossing, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add pancetta and vinegar, if using, and toss to combine.

*Get Ahead Cook the Brussels sprouts (step 1) and refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to make, bring to room temperature, then continue with step 2.

Yogurt is a beneficial alternative for our daughter who dislikes drinking milk. We always have a stock in the refrigerator or freezer for the kids to snack on. However not all yogurt is nutritious. While a high quality plain is the most wholesome choice it is not always a kid favorite. Look for yogurt brands without added artificial flavors and dyes or high fructose corn syrup. I love Chobani honey flavored Greek yogurt because it is made with only three ingredients: milk, pill honey and 6 strains of bacteria. Mountain High yogurt is my top choice because they use real hormone free milk and fresh fruit without the extra additives. Mountain High can be found in most Costcos and supermarkets.

Use yogurt in the place of sour cream, cream cheese, cream, butter, mayonnaise, milk, and whipped cream in most recipes for smoothies, dips, soups, toppings, and baked goods.

English muffins with fruit and yogurt is perfect for breakfast or as a hearty nutritious snack. Include this recipe as part of a buffet style brunch. Set out bowls with different flavors of yogurt, honey, nut butter and fruit. Add a sprinkle of wheat germ for extra goodness.

Serves 4
2 whole grain English muffins, separated
Yogurt
Fruit

Toast english muffins. Spread with choice of yogurt. Top with favorite fruit.

Forego the bread swapping it with pieces of fruit. Place sliced or chopped fruit in a small bowl or cup. Add yogurt and more fruit. Top with a dollop of yogurt or whipped cream for a parfait.
http://www.familyfreshcooking.com/2010/08/10/mozzarella-basil-tomato-grilled-cheese-bruschetta/

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, this perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, order Basil, page Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, search perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, Basil, Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, viagra perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, click Basil, order Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

http://www.familyfreshcooking.com/2010/08/10/mozzarella-basil-tomato-grilled-cheese-bruschetta/

I cut the circle shapes out of the sprouted grain bread with cookie cutters. If you choose to go smaller in cutter size, search perhaps an inch and a half in diameter you can have great little passed appetizers for parties. Instead of 3 cherry tomatoes on a 4 inch round you can put just one on a smaller shape.

Eat one and you have a snack or a mini meal. Eat two with a side salad and you have a quick and easy lunch or dinner. Beware of  cherry tomato splatters as these red beauties have lots of juice!

Mozzarella, dosage Basil, Tomato Grilled Cheese Bruschetta

4 servings (with 4 inch round cookie cutter)

NOTES

  • Adjust your ratios of tomatoes. cheese and spices according to taste preference.
  • As always, use your own taste buds to determine how you want to flavor your Grilled Cheese Bruschetta. My ingredient lists are wide open for interpretation.

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 pieces Sprouted Grain Bread (I use EzekielAlvarado St. Bakery brands) cut into rounds
  • one pint Cherry Tomatoes
  • 4 to 8 ounces ounces Mozzarella Cheese
  • handful fresh Basil, slice thinly
  • Garlic Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Garlic Oil or Olive Oil

METHOD

  1. Pre heat oven to 400?F with rack in the center of oven. Toss cherry tomatoes with olive oil, garlic salt & pepper. Roast tomatoes for about 20 minutes or until the skins have popped and the tomatoes are softened.
  2. Set Broiler to low heat. Brush a light layer of garlic oil on bread. Toast bread about 2 minutes on each side. Remove from oven.
  3. Top each toasted bread round with about 6 cherry tomatoes. Press a round of cheese (1-2 ounces) gently on top of the tomatoes (Wear an apron & beware of tomato splatter!)
  4. Low broil for about 6-8 minutes the bruschetta’s until cheese is melted and lightly browned. Watch carefully at towards the end of cook time that your grilled cheese bruschetta do not burn.
  5. Top with fresh basil chiffonade, cracked pepper and garlic salt.

I don’t eat guacamole very often, buy more about cure never at home, because no one around here likes it. Guacamole is reserved for the special occasions when we have company who might like it as a topping with a mexican dish or on Super Bowl Sunday with chips.

I have made guacamole a few times in the past with dismal results. The first time I made it was at a dinner party. I arrived early to help the host with any last minute details. My task was to make the guacamole. Smash the avocados, season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon. All the subsequent times I have tried to reproduce the recipe resulted in failure. Then I found this recipe for guacamole and could not fight the craving off any longer. I had to have another go at making a great bowl of guacamole. The guacamole turned out so delicious Stephen is now a convert.

The fresh lime juice and cumin really helped set the stage. Creating a nice subtle combination of flavors. Only use fresh ripe quality ingredients for the best results. Serve with tacos, corn chips or in sandwiches.

Source: Fix Me A Snack

2 ripe Haas avocados
3 medium cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 – 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped
Juice from one half of a lime

Slice the avocados in half. Discard the pits and remove the flesh from the skins. Place the flesh in a small mixing bowl. Add the garlic, cumin, salt, cilantro,and lime juice. Mash it all up with a fork. Serve with tortilla chips.

Store any leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator placing a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the guacamole in order to prevent browning.

Yield: 1 1/4 cups
Prep time: 10 minutes

May Website Review: The Little Travelers

http://factorytoursusa.com/
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, here I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, here I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 10
Chicken- cook 4 large chicken breasts in 1 cup broth, medications 1 tbsp fresh chopped cilantro, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tsp lime juice, 1/2 tsp thyme, 1 tsp oregano, pinch salt and pepper. Cook until almost done, slightly pink. Shred, put aside.

Sauce-
1 tbsp olive oil
2 large cloves garlic (sometimes I add up to 5 cloves)
1/2 tablespoon minced onion
2 1/2 teaspoons chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon coriander
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/8 tsp salt
1 (8oz) can tomato sauce, plus 1 can water
1 (4oz) can tomato paste, plus 1 can water
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey, about 1 pound
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Heat oil in pan on medium-high. Saute garlic and onion slightly until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the oregano, chili powder, cumin, coriander, salt and pepper. Simmer 20 minutes. Cool slightly.

Toss the cilantro with the shredded chicken.

Pour a little sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on of working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold up and place in dish. Once pan is full drizzle some sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.
http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, here I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 10
Chicken- cook 4 large chicken breasts in 1 cup broth, medications 1 tbsp fresh chopped cilantro, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tsp lime juice, 1/2 tsp thyme, 1 tsp oregano, pinch salt and pepper. Cook until almost done, slightly pink. Shred, put aside.

Sauce-
1 tbsp olive oil
2 large cloves garlic (sometimes I add up to 5 cloves)
1/2 tablespoon minced onion
2 1/2 teaspoons chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon coriander
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/8 tsp salt
1 (8oz) can tomato sauce, plus 1 can water
1 (4oz) can tomato paste, plus 1 can water
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey, about 1 pound
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Heat oil in pan on medium-high. Saute garlic and onion slightly until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the oregano, chili powder, cumin, coriander, salt and pepper. Simmer 20 minutes. Cool slightly.

Toss the cilantro with the shredded chicken.

Pour a little sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on of working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold up and place in dish. Once pan is full drizzle some sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, more about fluffy, page flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard cookie or scone served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months. Soldiers were issued biscuits as part of their food rations as well.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a softer “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory and sweet baked experiments would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, scones, wafers, and cake.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAK)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in early America the pioneers carried soda biscuits across the prairie.
From the 1900’s – Beaten, Soda, Touch of Grace, cat head, Maryland, cowboy,
Rolled, Drop, Scones, Shortcake, Angel, Refrigerator, Buttermilk, Baking powder,

black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, sweet potato, cheddar,
types of biscuits are endless-

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, here I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 10
Chicken- cook 4 large chicken breasts in 1 cup broth, medications 1 tbsp fresh chopped cilantro, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tsp lime juice, 1/2 tsp thyme, 1 tsp oregano, pinch salt and pepper. Cook until almost done, slightly pink. Shred, put aside.

Sauce-
1 tbsp olive oil
2 large cloves garlic (sometimes I add up to 5 cloves)
1/2 tablespoon minced onion
2 1/2 teaspoons chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon coriander
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/8 tsp salt
1 (8oz) can tomato sauce, plus 1 can water
1 (4oz) can tomato paste, plus 1 can water
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey, about 1 pound
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Heat oil in pan on medium-high. Saute garlic and onion slightly until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the oregano, chili powder, cumin, coriander, salt and pepper. Simmer 20 minutes. Cool slightly.

Toss the cilantro with the shredded chicken.

Pour a little sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on of working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold up and place in dish. Once pan is full drizzle some sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, more about fluffy, page flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard cookie or scone served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months. Soldiers were issued biscuits as part of their food rations as well.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a softer “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory and sweet baked experiments would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, scones, wafers, and cake.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAK)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in early America the pioneers carried soda biscuits across the prairie.
From the 1900’s – Beaten, Soda, Touch of Grace, cat head, Maryland, cowboy,
Rolled, Drop, Scones, Shortcake, Angel, Refrigerator, Buttermilk, Baking powder,

black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, sweet potato, cheddar,
types of biscuits are endless-

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, page fluffy, illness flaky, visit this buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a soft “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory baked foods would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, wafers, and cake.

Throughout most of the world, the term biscuit still means a hard baked dough like a cracker. The confusion starts here in America. The flaky pioneer style biscuits of 1900’s were a softer, puffy leavened bread called soda biscuits and beaten biscuits. To the American’s a cookie meant a hard baked savory or sweetened snack.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in America the types of biscuits are endless- sweet potato, angel, cheddar, black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, beaten, soda, touch of grace, shortcake, cat head, cowboy, refrigerator, buttermilk, baking powder.

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
Since bisqui
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, here I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 10
Chicken- cook 4 large chicken breasts in 1 cup broth, medications 1 tbsp fresh chopped cilantro, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tsp lime juice, 1/2 tsp thyme, 1 tsp oregano, pinch salt and pepper. Cook until almost done, slightly pink. Shred, put aside.

Sauce-
1 tbsp olive oil
2 large cloves garlic (sometimes I add up to 5 cloves)
1/2 tablespoon minced onion
2 1/2 teaspoons chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon coriander
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/8 tsp salt
1 (8oz) can tomato sauce, plus 1 can water
1 (4oz) can tomato paste, plus 1 can water
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey, about 1 pound
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Heat oil in pan on medium-high. Saute garlic and onion slightly until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the oregano, chili powder, cumin, coriander, salt and pepper. Simmer 20 minutes. Cool slightly.

Toss the cilantro with the shredded chicken.

Pour a little sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on of working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold up and place in dish. Once pan is full drizzle some sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, more about fluffy, page flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard cookie or scone served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months. Soldiers were issued biscuits as part of their food rations as well.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a softer “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory and sweet baked experiments would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, scones, wafers, and cake.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAK)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in early America the pioneers carried soda biscuits across the prairie.
From the 1900’s – Beaten, Soda, Touch of Grace, cat head, Maryland, cowboy,
Rolled, Drop, Scones, Shortcake, Angel, Refrigerator, Buttermilk, Baking powder,

black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, sweet potato, cheddar,
types of biscuits are endless-

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, page fluffy, illness flaky, visit this buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a soft “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory baked foods would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, wafers, and cake.

Throughout most of the world, the term biscuit still means a hard baked dough like a cracker. The confusion starts here in America. The flaky pioneer style biscuits of 1900’s were a softer, puffy leavened bread called soda biscuits and beaten biscuits. To the American’s a cookie meant a hard baked savory or sweetened snack.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in America the types of biscuits are endless- sweet potato, angel, cheddar, black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, beaten, soda, touch of grace, shortcake, cat head, cowboy, refrigerator, buttermilk, baking powder.

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
Since bisqui
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, cure fluffy, sildenafil flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker. ANZAC Biscuit

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot
ANZAK- Australia and New Zeland The War Biscuit (WWI)
Dutch-
Shortcakes
Scotish- Shortbread
Biscotti- Italy
Russain Ukraine- Sponge Cake
English 14th century
Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The flour paste Small confections called shortcakes were popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. came about during the 1500’s
In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”
Shortcakes 1500’s descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, here I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 10
Chicken- cook 4 large chicken breasts in 1 cup broth, medications 1 tbsp fresh chopped cilantro, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tsp lime juice, 1/2 tsp thyme, 1 tsp oregano, pinch salt and pepper. Cook until almost done, slightly pink. Shred, put aside.

Sauce-
1 tbsp olive oil
2 large cloves garlic (sometimes I add up to 5 cloves)
1/2 tablespoon minced onion
2 1/2 teaspoons chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon coriander
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/8 tsp salt
1 (8oz) can tomato sauce, plus 1 can water
1 (4oz) can tomato paste, plus 1 can water
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey, about 1 pound
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Heat oil in pan on medium-high. Saute garlic and onion slightly until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the oregano, chili powder, cumin, coriander, salt and pepper. Simmer 20 minutes. Cool slightly.

Toss the cilantro with the shredded chicken.

Pour a little sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on of working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold up and place in dish. Once pan is full drizzle some sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, more about fluffy, page flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard cookie or scone served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months. Soldiers were issued biscuits as part of their food rations as well.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a softer “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory and sweet baked experiments would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, scones, wafers, and cake.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAK)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in early America the pioneers carried soda biscuits across the prairie.
From the 1900’s – Beaten, Soda, Touch of Grace, cat head, Maryland, cowboy,
Rolled, Drop, Scones, Shortcake, Angel, Refrigerator, Buttermilk, Baking powder,

black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, sweet potato, cheddar,
types of biscuits are endless-

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, page fluffy, illness flaky, visit this buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a soft “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory baked foods would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, wafers, and cake.

Throughout most of the world, the term biscuit still means a hard baked dough like a cracker. The confusion starts here in America. The flaky pioneer style biscuits of 1900’s were a softer, puffy leavened bread called soda biscuits and beaten biscuits. To the American’s a cookie meant a hard baked savory or sweetened snack.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in America the types of biscuits are endless- sweet potato, angel, cheddar, black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, beaten, soda, touch of grace, shortcake, cat head, cowboy, refrigerator, buttermilk, baking powder.

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
Since bisqui
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, cure fluffy, sildenafil flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker. ANZAC Biscuit

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot
ANZAK- Australia and New Zeland The War Biscuit (WWI)
Dutch-
Shortcakes
Scotish- Shortbread
Biscotti- Italy
Russain Ukraine- Sponge Cake
English 14th century
Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The flour paste Small confections called shortcakes were popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. came about during the 1500’s
In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”
Shortcakes 1500’s descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, sickness fluffy, approved flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker. ANZAC Biscuit

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot
ANZAK- Australia and New Zeland The War Biscuit (WWI)
Dutch- koekje Ginger biscuit
Shortcakes
Scotish- Shortbread
Biscotti- Italy
Russain Ukraine- Sponge Cake
English- biscuit hard 14th century
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French – gingerbread
Persia-
Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. Small confections were popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD.

shortcakes came about during the 1500’s

America cookie meant hard bake twice. Biscuits were small levened bread
throughout most of the world, the term biscuit still means a hard, crisp, brittle bread, except in the United States, where it now denotes a softer bread product baked only once.
In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”
Shortcakes 1500’s descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, here I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 10
Chicken- cook 4 large chicken breasts in 1 cup broth, medications 1 tbsp fresh chopped cilantro, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1 tsp lime juice, 1/2 tsp thyme, 1 tsp oregano, pinch salt and pepper. Cook until almost done, slightly pink. Shred, put aside.

Sauce-
1 tbsp olive oil
2 large cloves garlic (sometimes I add up to 5 cloves)
1/2 tablespoon minced onion
2 1/2 teaspoons chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon coriander
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/8 tsp salt
1 (8oz) can tomato sauce, plus 1 can water
1 (4oz) can tomato paste, plus 1 can water
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey, about 1 pound
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Heat oil in pan on medium-high. Saute garlic and onion slightly until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the oregano, chili powder, cumin, coriander, salt and pepper. Simmer 20 minutes. Cool slightly.

Toss the cilantro with the shredded chicken.

Pour a little sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on of working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold up and place in dish. Once pan is full drizzle some sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, more about fluffy, page flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard cookie or scone served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months. Soldiers were issued biscuits as part of their food rations as well.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a softer “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory and sweet baked experiments would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, scones, wafers, and cake.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAK)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in early America the pioneers carried soda biscuits across the prairie.
From the 1900’s – Beaten, Soda, Touch of Grace, cat head, Maryland, cowboy,
Rolled, Drop, Scones, Shortcake, Angel, Refrigerator, Buttermilk, Baking powder,

black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, sweet potato, cheddar,
types of biscuits are endless-

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, page fluffy, illness flaky, visit this buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a soft “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia; slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory baked foods would evolve according to the respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, wafers, and cake.

Throughout most of the world, the term biscuit still means a hard baked dough like a cracker. The confusion starts here in America. The flaky pioneer style biscuits of 1900’s were a softer, puffy leavened bread called soda biscuits and beaten biscuits. To the American’s a cookie meant a hard baked savory or sweetened snack.

Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- ship’s biscuit
French- wafers, crackers
American- hardtack, shortcake
Jewish- mandelbrot
English- rusk, biscuit
German- zweiback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAK (War Biscuits)
Dutch- Koekje (ginger cake)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Sponge Cake
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French- ginger wafers
Persia- cookie

Here in America the types of biscuits are endless- sweet potato, angel, cheddar, black pepper cream, jalapeno corn, beaten, soda, touch of grace, shortcake, cat head, cowboy, refrigerator, buttermilk, baking powder.

The Secrets to a Better Biscuit.
Since bisqui
.Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, cure fluffy, sildenafil flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker. ANZAC Biscuit

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot
ANZAK- Australia and New Zeland The War Biscuit (WWI)
Dutch-
Shortcakes
Scotish- Shortbread
Biscotti- Italy
Russain Ukraine- Sponge Cake
English 14th century
Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The flour paste Small confections called shortcakes were popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. came about during the 1500’s
In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”
Shortcakes 1500’s descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, sickness fluffy, approved flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker. ANZAC Biscuit

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot
ANZAK- Australia and New Zeland The War Biscuit (WWI)
Dutch- koekje Ginger biscuit
Shortcakes
Scotish- Shortbread
Biscotti- Italy
Russain Ukraine- Sponge Cake
English- biscuit hard 14th century
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French – gingerbread
Persia-
Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. Small confections were popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD.

shortcakes came about during the 1500’s

America cookie meant hard bake twice. Biscuits were small levened bread
throughout most of the world, the term biscuit still means a hard, crisp, brittle bread, except in the United States, where it now denotes a softer bread product baked only once.
In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”
Shortcakes 1500’s descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, website fluffy, buy flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker served with tea or coffee.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was baked, removed from the pan then cooked again in a cooler oven to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot, biscuits, cookies, waffers, crackers
ANZAK- Australia and New Zeland The War Biscuit (WWI)
Dutch- koekje Ginger biscuit
Shortcakes
Scotish- Shortbread
Biscotti- Italy
Russain Ukraine- Sponge Cake
English- biscuit hard 14th century
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
French – ginger wafers
Persia- 1st cakes 7th Century AD
America- leavened biscuits, sweet potato, angel,

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in the Persian Empire during the 7th Century AD. Cooks refrained from cooking the dough a second time resulting in a soft “cookie”.

The culinary techniques for making sweet cake-like biscuits were later introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades. Sugar was being exported from Begal China into Persia slowly making its way throughout the Middle Eastern countries. These savory baked foods would evolve according to its respective culture into what we know today as crackers, shortcakes, cookies, biscuits, wafers, and cake.

Throughout most of the world, the term biscuit still means a hard, brittle baked dough. The confusion starts here in America. The flaky pioneer style biscuits of 1900’s were a softer, puffy leavened bread called soda biscuits. America cookie meant hard bake twice. Biscuits were small levened bread A

denotes a softer bread product baked only once.
In the late Middle Ages

Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

Corn bread – could grow the corn, grind it and make it easy to cook did not need a lot of tools. Corn bread was a staple in Appalachian homes.
Biscuits required a baking pan, an oven.
Beaten biscuits became the

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

Use white lily or Pilsbury flour for lower protein content

Dust the work surface with all-purpose flour. I have always used the same flour that the recipe called for self-rising. The reason: The leavening in self-rising leaves a bitter taste on the outside of biscuits. Where did that come from? No one told me this for all these years!!!

2. Yesterday I used a dark pan. That is OK if you want a dark thick crust on the bottom of your biscuits, but I don’t like that. The recipe calls for a jelly roll pan which has a very short lip. This pan does not brown the bottom so therefore the result is a much softer inside crumb. I used mine today and it works so much better. This is good!

3. I have always shaped biscuits with my hands, but for high school students to do this is very hard. They handle them too much and add more flour making a tough biscuit. This recipe says to cut with a pastry cutter. Yesterday I used a closed cutter that was 2 in. in diameter. Today I used a pizza cutter and cut them in 24 equal pieces. It worked great! So don’t twist the cutter or you’ll seal the edges of the biscuit and reduce the rise. And the same with a glass , don’t use one. Both sides of the cutter need to be open to let air to exit. I knew that you should not twist the cutter, but never thought that it would deter the rise.

GI Joe has been home sick for two days and has been the tester for the biscuits. Today he had to remove the pan from the kitchen before I stuffed every single one of these things in my mouth. I am not lying to you. They are fabulous!!! I will be testing out the next 3 variations of this recipe and sharing them with you, but right now I have to head to the gym and get a handle on these handles!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Journey to the Middle East – Barazek (Pitaschio & Sesame Biscuits)


http://factorytoursusa.com/
Ok, pills this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, case but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, approved this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
Ok, more about this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, view but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, this this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
1 rotisserie chicken
1 bag Caesar salad kit

In the South the term “biscuit” often refers to a light, order fluffy, flaky, buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In England and other places around the world however, a biscuit is more like a hard scone or “cookie” served with tea or coffee.

The History:
The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “panis biscoctus,” meaning “bread twice baked.” The history books tell us that the “biscuit” began as a simple paste of flour and water. The paste was baked, removed from the pan; then cooked again in a cooler oven until thoroughly dried out. The result was a hard, portable “cracker” with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring alternate baked goods. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream; in addition to, sugar, fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East. The first shift from the unyielding biscuits were small cake like confections popular in Persia during the 7th Century AD. During the Medieval Ages the culinary techniques for making sweet and savory cake-like biscuits were introduced to the Europeans during the invasion of Muslims into Spain and the Crusades.

Biscuits World Wide:
Throughout the centuries biscuits have been called many things:
British- Ship’s Biscuit (Hardtack)
French- Gaufrettes wafers,
Jewish- Mandelbrot
South Africa- Rusk
German-Zwieback
Australian / New Zeland- ANZAC (War Biscuits), (Afghan biscuits were derived from the Australian ANZAC)
Dutch- Speculaas (ginger flavored type cookie)
Scotish- Shortbread
Italy- Biscotti
Russain / Ukraine- Tea Cakes
Egypt- millet bread called dhourra cake
Persia- cookies
Middle East- Barazek

In early America the pioneers favored the “soda biscuit” or as the Chuck Wagoners referred to them, “Cowboy biscuits”. Soda biscuits were usually cooked in iron dutch ovens.These were cast-iron pots with lids that could be used over an open fire. The biscuits were were rolled then placed in the pot. After the lid was set in place the cook would layer coals from fire on top of the lid. The heat created a small portable oven.

The “Marlyand”, “Beaten Biscuit” or “Appalachian biscuit” is thought to predate the leavened soda biscuit of the settlers. Before the 1900’s corn bread was a favored commodity in the Appalachian mountains. Corn bread was cheap to make as the corn was grown in abundance locally. The bread did not require a fancy oven or pans as did the “biscuits” eaten by those of society.

At the turn of the century the settlement movement placed women volunteers in low income areas in the South to help alleviate poverty. The Appalachians contaminated corn products or “musty corn” were thought to be the cause of pellagra. “A life-threatening disease similar in effect to leprosy.” Families were faced with a choice to eat the stores of corn and risk death or starve during the winter months. The women hoped to help the Appalachians adopt a healthier diet. They taught them cooking lessons introducing the wheat flour “Beaten Biscuit.” The beaten biscuit was not a realistic choice for the impoverished community. The biscuits required imported wheat flour in addition to a special oven to regulate temperatures; moreover, the biscuits needed to be beaten with a mallet on a marble slab 300-500 times to incorporate air into the dough.

Seeing the need for reform the Appalachains were taught how to make a simpler version called the “Cat Head”. It was basically a Southern buttermilk biscuit the size of a cat’s head. The dough was pinched off, then rolled into a ball, and placed with sides touching into an iron skillet. Today corn bread still remains the chosen bread for many in the Appalachian territory.

Other biscuits from the 1900’s include:
–The “Touch of Grace” or “Angel” biscuit. These are very light and similar to a yeast roll but still considered a biscuit. They were a fool-proof recipe for new brides because the recipe called for two leaveners in case one failed.
–The “Rolled” biscuit- dates back to the late 1800’s. The dough was rolled out then shaped with a cutter.
–The “Drop” biscuit– the dough is the consistency of a batter. The batter is dropped by spoonfuls rather than cut or pinched.
–“Refrigerator” biscuits – arrived in the 1930’s. They are tubes of prepackaged biscuit dough.

Other ways to eat biscuits:
Cream Cheese Biscuits with Chocolate Gravy
Peach Cobbler
Shortcakes
Chicken and Dumplings
Biscuits and Gravy
Scones
Cheddar and Herb


Ok, troche this is not really a meal I cook from scratch, search but it is fast and it is our favorite meal. Whenever my husband and I celebrate our Anniversary or Valentines Day or just get a night out together, ask this is what we want to have. Paired with some apple cider and voila, you have an elegant tasty dinner.

Caesar dressing mix (use white wine vinegar) or ready made salad dressing
Iceberg or Romaine lettuce
Grilled Chicken Breasts, chopped
Parmesan Cheese, freshly grated
Croutons (recipe follows)

Croutons:
Day old bread (1 slice per person)
Garlic powder
Italian seasoning
Olive oil.

Cut bread into 1-2 inch pieces. Toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with garlic powder and herbs. Bake 350 until browned. About 10 minutes. Let cool. Croutons will harden as they cool so do not over cook.

Variations:
-1 rotisserie chicken
-1 bag Caesar salad kit
Caesar Dressing
In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, capsule fluffy, physician flaky, unhealthy buttery bread usually served with breakfast. Around the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

many English speaking countries, price the word “biscuit” refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, cialis 40mg yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
The word derives from the Latin words “bis” (twice) plus “coctus” (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit

puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits, sick ” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”
original term “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” or “twice baked.” Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage. Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits. In most English-speaking countries, the traditional definition of biscuit remains. In the United States the term “biscuit” was reassigned to denote a small, soft, quick-leavened bread product served piping hot. It generally accompanied meals in lieu of bread.

A flour paste, cooked once, then cooked again to dry it thoroughly, becomes a hard, portable victual with an extraordinarily long storage life–perfect for traveling….For centuries, no ship left port without enough bone-hard, twice-cooked ship’s biscuit–the word biscuit comes from the Old French biscoit, meaning twice cooked—to last for months, or even years. While sailors and other travelers chewed their way through unyielding biscuits, cooks of the ancient civilizations of the Middle East explored the culinary possibilities of sweetness and richness. These cooks lightened and enriched the paste mixtures with eggs, butter and cream and sweetened them with fruit, honey and finally–when the food became widely available in the late Middle Ages–with sugar… Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

In the South the term biscuit often refers to a light, pharmacy fluffy, remedy flaky, ampoule buttery bread usually served with breakfast. In EnglandAround the world however, a biscuit is like a hard cookie or cracker.

The word “biscuit” derives from the Latin “bis coctus,” meaning “twice baked.”

Ancient Roman armies were issued biscuits as part of their rations. Hardtack, ships biscuit, rusk and mandelbrot descend from this culinary lineage.
Advances in technology permitted a wider range of biscuit products. Small cakes and delicate wafers were gradually added to the family of biscuits.
Cowboy-style biscuits were rustled up by pioneers and overland travelers
puffy leavened little breads were called “soda biscuits” or “baking-soda biscuits,” in contrast to the unleavened cracker type….Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every nineteenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South…The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853…In 1930 General Mills began selling a packaged quick biscuit mix called Bisquick that was a great success and spawned many imitators.”

The history books tell us that the biscuit began as a simple flour paste. The paste was cooked, then cooked again to thoroughly dry it out. The result was a hard, portable cracker with an extraordinary extended shelf life. “Ship’s biscuits” were very popular among the sailors and travelers because they were lite and could last for months or even years.

Meanwhile, the more civilized areas of the world started exploring with alternate ways to bake biscuits. These ancient civilizations experimented with eggs, butter and cream in addition to sugar from fruits and honey as well as spices from the Middle East.

In the late Middle Ages
Luxurious cakes and pastries in large and small versions were well known in the Persian empire of the Seventh Century A.D. With the Muslim invasion of Spain, then the Crusades and the developing spice trade, the cooking techniques and ingredients of Arabia spread into Northern Europe. There the word cookies, distinguishing small confections, appeared: The word comes from the Dutch Koeptje [koekje], meaning small cake. By the end of the 14th Century, one could buy little filled wafers on the streets of Paris…Renaissance cookbooks were rich in cookie recipes, and by the 17th Century, cookies were common-place.”

angel biscuits … cheddar biscuits … sweet potato biscuits … black pepper cream biscuits … jalapeno corn biscuits … beaten biscuits … “touch of grace” biscuits … cat head biscuits.

English- biscuit means cake or cookie, cracker

Whole-wheat flour will make us all heart-healthy, but it will also make your biscuits heavy and dense. I’d rather be light and fluffy.
The best combination of flour for biscuits is one part all purpose and one part cake flour. Cake flour is soft and has a lower gluten protein percentage.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, here I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until on