National Nutrition Month “Eat Right…With Color”

We have had many requests asking how to feed a picky eater. Since we too are dealing with our own picky eater issues I understand the struggle many of you experience on a daily basis.

http://foodformyfamily.com/tag/picky-eaters

http://foodformyfamily.com/the-kitchen-sink/news-the-kitchen-sink/placating-picky-eaters-cooking-connections-class

Nutrition for Picky Eaters (Recipe: Fluffy Banana Oat Pancakes)


We have had many requests asking how to feed a picky eater. Since we too are dealing with our own picky eater issues I understand the struggle many of you experience on a daily basis.

http://foodformyfamily.com/tag/picky-eaters

http://foodformyfamily.com/the-kitchen-sink/news-the-kitchen-sink/placating-picky-eaters-cooking-connections-class

Nutrition for Picky Eaters (Recipe: Fluffy Banana Oat Pancakes)

The theme this year for National Nutrition month is, abortion “Eat Right…With Color.” The challenge? To swap out calorie dense starches and fats for fruits, discount vegetables and whole grains. This month we have joined the leagues with the National Dietetic Association; in addition to, the many accompanying voices of dietetics from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans to promote healthy habits. We discussed ways to filter out the high calorie prepackaged foods by reading labels; checking for ingredients that are closest to nature. Sadly too many products on the supermarket and natural food store shelves posing as food are really un-food. Fortunately for us today we do not have to spend the day in the kitchen preparing meals. There are honest companies out there producing products without the harmful additives and preservatives. Be sure to always check the labels. The following week we posted links to help our pickiest eaters over come their food fears. Be Patient and keep offering them the good stuff. One day they will surprise you. We would like to wrap up National Nutrition Month with a guide to seasonal foods.

Eat the Color of the Rainbow“…”Eat Clean”…”Eat Seasonal”…What does this all mean? Food is fuel for our body. Each morsel of food contains within it nutrients and minerals our body needs to boost the immune system, help cells and organs function properly, and support growth and development. Eating a variety of foods (the color of the rainbow) is the best way to get all the vitamins and minerals our bodies need each day.

When fruits and vegetables are at their peak they contain abundant amounts of the vitamins and minerals our body craves. Over time these vitamins and minerals diminish. Eating seasonal fruits and vegetables ensures that we are getting the maximum benefit from our food. Choosing meals and snacks around what is in season keeps costs low. When foods are in season it means they are usually shipped locally. As a result prices are substantially lower and the taste is superb. Use this opportunity to stock up for later months. Find a farmers market or packing plant nearby for fresh produce and keep an eye out for sales on poultry and fish. (**Refer to the chart above for foods listed by season.)

Eating clean is the practice of eating whole, natural foods and avoiding any manmade fats, sugars, dyes and preservatives. Let’s say one sweet potato has the same amount of carbs as a candy bar. Even though the potato is largely a carbohydrate it has less sugar and calories and more soluble fiber than the candy bar. The potato also has zero harmful preservatives (such as BHA, BHT and TBHQ) or food dyes (made from petroleum). The health benefits of a starchy potato far outweigh those of the candy bar. Whole, unprocessed, foods like seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, fish and fresh lean meats provide the nutrients our bodies need to grow properly.

Salud!

Additional Reading:

Raise Healthy Eaters: Wonderful spot for everything you ever needed to know about feeding children.

The Gracious Pantry: How Tiffany transformed her pantry filled with junk food to one that supports clean eating habits.

Nut Shell Nutrition: “Make a Rainbow on Your plate”, also be sure to peruse the site. Brittany has several informative posts on making health goals that might be of interest.

Dish on Dieting: A witty article describing the use of a GPS to guide us down the road of meal choices.

A Sprinkle of Sage: “What’s Your Nutrition Resolution?” The first of a month long series of tips to reach this month’s goal for optimal health.

Kleiner Nutrition: Great articles to help inspire us to stay on the path to better habits. Be sure to check out the interview with Hope Warshaw.

Banana Oat Pancakes

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.

Feeding Your Picky Eaters

Whenever my mom made her famous cream puffs or coconut cake she would make this incredible pudding filling. For her cream puffs she folded decadent whipped cream into the pudding. Her coconut cake was  stacked 6 layers high with a filling of coconut pudding in between. I confess the pudding was the best part. It was so rich and creamy. I would sneak a finger full from the bowl of pudding. Maybe she knew it was me. If she did she never said anything, mind that I remember.

Weeks ago I was on a mission to recreate a box free version of my moms coconut pudding. The dilemma I ran into was, do I use a pudding recipe or a pastry cream. I noticed in my prior attempts when making vanilla pudding for cream puffs that the pudding was too soft and unstable.

Pudding by definition is a type of custard or soft dessert. There are two types of custards, stirred and baked. Puddings and pastry creams are stirred custards, with the exception of desserts such as bread pudding. Baked custards, like flan, are firmer and not as smooth. You would never use a baked custard or pudding to fill a cake. You would, however, use pastry cream.

I decided to use pastry cream. Pastry cream is thicker than pudding. It is meant to be used as a filling in pastries and cakes because the constant stirring enables the custard to thicken making it perfect to pipe with. Cook and serve Jello brand pudding is a easy substitute for pastry cream because of the additives that help thicken it.

Since I was using fat free milk I let the custard thicken a little longer. I was worried the custard would not set enough. I made coconut cake for my dad’s birthday once, when I was in college. I do not think I let the pudding thicken enough because the layers of the cake started to slide off. We ended up dumping the whole lot into a bowl and called it coconut punch bowl cake. It was still good.

Source: King Arthur Flour
3 cups whole milk
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1/2 vanilla bean, slit lengthwise
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 tablespoon King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour, or rice flour
4 large egg yolks
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
1 cup heavy cream, whipped to soft peaks

In a medium-sized saucepan, stir together 2 1/2 cups of the milk, the sugar, salt, and the vanilla bean. (If you’re using vanilla extract, add it at the end.) Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar.

Meanwhile, whisk the cornstarch, flour, and egg yolks with the remaining 1/2 cup milk.

Whisk some of the hot milk mixture with the egg yolks to temper them. This keeps the yolks from turning to scrambled eggs when you add them to the simmering milk.

Pastry cream will keep, covered in the refrigerator, for up to 5 days. After that it may start to weep.

If you want the pastry cream to be sliceable, as for a cream pie, don’t fold in the whipped cream. The recipe will yield 3 cups of pastry cream in that case.

Pour the egg/milk mixture back into the remaining simmering milk. Doing this through a strainer will help prevent lumps later. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly with a whisk, until the mixture thickens.

Remove from the heat and strain through a fine sieve. Stir in the butter and vanilla extract (if you’re using it). If you’re going to flavor the pastry cream with chocolate or some other flavor, this is the time to do it (see variations below).

Rub a piece of butter over the surface of the cream, top with a piece of plastic wrap (make sure it touches the top of the pastry cream so it doesn’t develop a skin), then refrigerate until cool.

To complete, fold the whipped cream into the cooled pastry cream.

Flavor Variations:
— Butterscotch Pastry Cream: Add 1/4 teaspoon butter-rum flavor and/or 1 cup (6 ounces) butterscotch chips to the pastry cream after straining, stirring until the chips have melted.
— Caramel Pastry Cream: Add 3/4 cup chopped caramel (7 1/2 ounces, or 21 to 23 unwrapped individual caramels) to the hot, strained pastry cream, stirring until melted and the mixture is smooth.
— Chocolate Pastry Cream: Add 1 cup (6 ounces) chopped chocolate to the hot, strained pastry cream, stirring until melted and the mixture is smooth.
— Hazelnut Pastry Cream: Omit the butter and increase the sugar to 3/4 cup (5 1/4 ounces). Add 3/4 cup (8 1/4 ounces) praline paste to the hot, strained pastry cream, stirring until combined.
— Orange Pastry Cream: Increase the sugar to 3/4 cup (5 1/4 ounces). Add 1 teaspoon orange extract; 1/4 teaspoon orange oil; or 3 tablespoons orange zest to the hot, strained pastry cream.
— Peanut Butter Pastry Cream: Add 3/4 cup (7 1/4 ounces) smooth peanut butter to the hot pastry cream, stirring until melted and the mixture is smooth. If you’re using a natural or freshly-made peanut butter, omit the butter from the recipe, or the pastry cream will be greasy.
— Pistachio Pastry Cream: Omit the butter and increase the sugar to 3/4 cup (5 1/4 ounces). Add 3/4 cup (8 1/4 ounces) pistachio paste, or blanched pureed pistachio meats.

Whenever my mom made her famous cream puffs or coconut cake she would make this incredible pudding filling. For her cream puffs she folded decadent whipped cream into the pudding. Her coconut cake was  stacked 6 layers high with a filling of coconut pudding in between. I confess the pudding was the best part. It was so rich and creamy. I would sneak a finger full from the bowl of pudding. Maybe she knew it was me. If she did she never said anything, mind that I remember.

Weeks ago I was on a mission to recreate a box free version of my moms coconut pudding. The dilemma I ran into was, do I use a pudding recipe or a pastry cream. I noticed in my prior attempts when making vanilla pudding for cream puffs that the pudding was too soft and unstable.

Pudding by definition is a type of custard or soft dessert. There are two types of custards, stirred and baked. Puddings and pastry creams are stirred custards, with the exception of desserts such as bread pudding. Baked custards, like flan, are firmer and not as smooth. You would never use a baked custard or pudding to fill a cake. You would, however, use pastry cream.

I decided to use pastry cream. Pastry cream is thicker than pudding. It is meant to be used as a filling in pastries and cakes because the constant stirring enables the custard to thicken making it perfect to pipe with. Cook and serve Jello brand pudding is a easy substitute for pastry cream because of the additives that help thicken it.

Since I was using fat free milk I let the custard thicken a little longer. I was worried the custard would not set enough. I made coconut cake for my dad’s birthday once, when I was in college. I do not think I let the pudding thicken enough because the layers of the cake started to slide off. We ended up dumping the whole lot into a bowl and called it coconut punch bowl cake. It was still good.

Source: King Arthur Flour
3 cups whole milk
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract or 1/2 vanilla bean, slit lengthwise
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 tablespoon King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour, or rice flour
4 large egg yolks
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
1 cup heavy cream, whipped to soft peaks

In a medium-sized saucepan, stir together 2 1/2 cups of the milk, the sugar, salt, and the vanilla bean. (If you’re using vanilla extract, add it at the end.) Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar.

Meanwhile, whisk the cornstarch, flour, and egg yolks with the remaining 1/2 cup milk.

Whisk some of the hot milk mixture with the egg yolks to temper them. This keeps the yolks from turning to scrambled eggs when you add them to the simmering milk.

Pastry cream will keep, covered in the refrigerator, for up to 5 days. After that it may start to weep.

If you want the pastry cream to be sliceable, as for a cream pie, don’t fold in the whipped cream. The recipe will yield 3 cups of pastry cream in that case.

Pour the egg/milk mixture back into the remaining simmering milk. Doing this through a strainer will help prevent lumps later. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly with a whisk, until the mixture thickens.

Remove from the heat and strain through a fine sieve. Stir in the butter and vanilla extract (if you’re using it). If you’re going to flavor the pastry cream with chocolate or some other flavor, this is the time to do it (see variations below).

Rub a piece of butter over the surface of the cream, top with a piece of plastic wrap (make sure it touches the top of the pastry cream so it doesn’t develop a skin), then refrigerate until cool.

To complete, fold the whipped cream into the cooled pastry cream.

Flavor Variations:
— Butterscotch Pastry Cream: Add 1/4 teaspoon butter-rum flavor and/or 1 cup (6 ounces) butterscotch chips to the pastry cream after straining, stirring until the chips have melted.
— Caramel Pastry Cream: Add 3/4 cup chopped caramel (7 1/2 ounces, or 21 to 23 unwrapped individual caramels) to the hot, strained pastry cream, stirring until melted and the mixture is smooth.
— Chocolate Pastry Cream: Add 1 cup (6 ounces) chopped chocolate to the hot, strained pastry cream, stirring until melted and the mixture is smooth.
— Hazelnut Pastry Cream: Omit the butter and increase the sugar to 3/4 cup (5 1/4 ounces). Add 3/4 cup (8 1/4 ounces) praline paste to the hot, strained pastry cream, stirring until combined.
— Orange Pastry Cream: Increase the sugar to 3/4 cup (5 1/4 ounces). Add 1 teaspoon orange extract; 1/4 teaspoon orange oil; or 3 tablespoons orange zest to the hot, strained pastry cream.
— Peanut Butter Pastry Cream: Add 3/4 cup (7 1/4 ounces) smooth peanut butter to the hot pastry cream, stirring until melted and the mixture is smooth. If you’re using a natural or freshly-made peanut butter, omit the butter from the recipe, or the pastry cream will be greasy.
— Pistachio Pastry Cream: Omit the butter and increase the sugar to 3/4 cup (5 1/4 ounces). Add 3/4 cup (8 1/4 ounces) pistachio paste, or blanched pureed pistachio meats.

Over the past few years we have had many requests inquiring how to feed a picky eater. If you have a picky eater then you are familiar with what a daunting task this can be. We want our children to grow up healthy and strong and along the way develop healthy eating habits to ensure their success. When all a little guy wants is cereal or yogurt that goal may sometimes seem unattainable. Fear not. There is hope. The following is my own account of the struggles we are currently facing and how we deal with them. I have included additional links to posts with further suggestions on how to placate a picky eater.

Like many other households opting for a cleaner choice of foods we choose to limit the types of prepackaged foods in the house to wholesome cereals and breads and low fat dairy. By making the majority of our snacks at home at least I can control what goes into them. I feel better knowing our picky guy is eating something better than just empty calories. Secondly, drugs our picky eater has a major sweet tooth. If it is not in the house he nor I will eat it. If we happen to have crackers in the pantry they are put up where the kids cannot get into them. A picky kid with a taste for sugar is not going to want to eat his chicken and broccoli when there is a pantry filled with crackers and granola bars.

Limit the Treat and Packaged Foods:

Treats are reserved for special occasions such as movie night or dessert with Sunday dinner. By making a few alterations a basic sweet such as a muffin can become a filling snack offering the much needed vitamins and minerals a growing body needs. Some of the variations we make include:

— Replacing regular all-purpose flour with whole wheat, oat or coconut flour. I always add a double tablespoon of wheat germ and ground flaxseed.
— Swap out lard and vegetable oils for canola, olive and coconut oil. Butter instead of margarine.
— Replacing part or all of the refined sugar with pureed vegetables or fruits or natural local honey.
— Adding chopped, pureed and shredded vegetables to snacks and meals.

Restrict Snacking Before Dinner and Other Meal Times:

We follow strict snack times to help tie our kids over until dinner is ready. When kids snack right before dinner time they are less likely to try new foods much less eat their dinner. Our rule is they have to take at least one bite. If we are having salad with chicken and green beans they have to take one bite of each item. Our picky eater will often feign that he does not like something to keep up with his picky appearance. We have caught him sneaking additional bites. We do not make a big deal over it because with his temperament the praise would backfire. We just let him explore on his own while continuing to offer him the good stuff. We want to make dinner a positive experience for him.

Exploration:

For a picky eater trying new foods takes time. It requires working with them to help them overcome their fear. When I am cooking I let him help stir or measure. Sometimes I give him his own bowl and let him create his recipe. It allows him to feel in control as he places each item in the bowl and mixes it with his hands.

Our doctor reassured me our son would not starve. Meanwhile continue to offer the good stuff. Most of all make dinner a positive experience for them. Avoid negative comments and of course never try to force feed your child. Be sure to include something they are likely to eat but avoid making two dinners. Give them time and love and eventually they will come around.

For additional reading on how to placate a picky eater visit the following links:

Make and Takes – Helpful Tips to Appease Picky Eaters

Raise Healthy Eaters – How to Tell if Your Picky Eater Needs Help

What’s Cooking With Kids – Tips to Help Kids Accept New Foods

The Motherhood – How to Appease Picky Eaters

Dazzledish- More Peas Please

Food For My Family – Picky Eaters

Keep Kids Healthy – Picky Eaters

Nutrition Fitness Life – Getting Picky Eater to Eat Healthy

PBS.org – Science of Picky Eaters

Tilapia with Pesto

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to an archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, cialis 40mg two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to an archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, cialis 40mg two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, buy information pills the founders, viagra buy Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, malady FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to an archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, cialis 40mg two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, buy information pills the founders, viagra buy Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, malady FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, try two avid chess players, discount wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to an archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, cialis 40mg two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, buy information pills the founders, viagra buy Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, malady FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, try two avid chess players, discount wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, side effects two avid chess players, purchase wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, pill several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to an archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, cialis 40mg two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, buy information pills the founders, viagra buy Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, malady FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, try two avid chess players, discount wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, side effects two avid chess players, purchase wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, pill several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

The first winter Olympics took place on this day in 1924 in Chamonix, hospital France. The olympics used to be a major highlight when I was a child. I loved watching the daring athletes perform amazing feats to compete for the gold. What an exhilarating feeling to know you are among the most gifted athletes in the whole world.

To help cultivate a love of the Olympic games and bring the excitement close to home hold a family or neighborhood olympic event. Ask each family member to suggest their favorite winter olympic event. If you are like us and not do not live within easy access of the snow work as a team to come up with creative ways to meet the needs for each event. When I lived up north my friends and I would gather garbage can lids, shovels and trash bags to slide down icy hills. Plastic tied over shoes coupled with wet grass becomes an ice skating rink. Brooms and a birdie or puck are all you need for street hockey.

You will need:
A musical anthem and flag for each team and an official olympic banner.
A stop watch
Medals
Any materials needed for each event

Make medals using wood circles from the craft store. Drill a hole at the top. Spray paint gold, silver or bronze. Then slip a ribbon through the hole and tie a knot.

Begin with a celebratory march. Have each team or family member carry their flag during the opening ceremony. Afterward celebrate each others victories with a warm mug of hot chocolate.

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to an archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, cialis 40mg two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, buy information pills the founders, viagra buy Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, malady FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, try two avid chess players, discount wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, side effects two avid chess players, purchase wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, pill several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

The first winter Olympics took place on this day in 1924 in Chamonix, hospital France. The olympics used to be a major highlight when I was a child. I loved watching the daring athletes perform amazing feats to compete for the gold. What an exhilarating feeling to know you are among the most gifted athletes in the whole world.

To help cultivate a love of the Olympic games and bring the excitement close to home hold a family or neighborhood olympic event. Ask each family member to suggest their favorite winter olympic event. If you are like us and not do not live within easy access of the snow work as a team to come up with creative ways to meet the needs for each event. When I lived up north my friends and I would gather garbage can lids, shovels and trash bags to slide down icy hills. Plastic tied over shoes coupled with wet grass becomes an ice skating rink. Brooms and a birdie or puck are all you need for street hockey.

You will need:
A musical anthem and flag for each team and an official olympic banner.
A stop watch
Medals
Any materials needed for each event

Make medals using wood circles from the craft store. Drill a hole at the top. Spray paint gold, silver or bronze. Then slip a ribbon through the hole and tie a knot.

Begin with a celebratory march. Have each team or family member carry their flag during the opening ceremony. Afterward celebrate each others victories with a warm mug of hot chocolate.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, seek two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to an archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, cialis 40mg two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, buy information pills the founders, viagra buy Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, malady FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, try two avid chess players, discount wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, side effects two avid chess players, purchase wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, pill several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

The first winter Olympics took place on this day in 1924 in Chamonix, hospital France. The olympics used to be a major highlight when I was a child. I loved watching the daring athletes perform amazing feats to compete for the gold. What an exhilarating feeling to know you are among the most gifted athletes in the whole world.

To help cultivate a love of the Olympic games and bring the excitement close to home hold a family or neighborhood olympic event. Ask each family member to suggest their favorite winter olympic event. If you are like us and not do not live within easy access of the snow work as a team to come up with creative ways to meet the needs for each event. When I lived up north my friends and I would gather garbage can lids, shovels and trash bags to slide down icy hills. Plastic tied over shoes coupled with wet grass becomes an ice skating rink. Brooms and a birdie or puck are all you need for street hockey.

You will need:
A musical anthem and flag for each team and an official olympic banner.
A stop watch
Medals
Any materials needed for each event

Make medals using wood circles from the craft store. Drill a hole at the top. Spray paint gold, silver or bronze. Then slip a ribbon through the hole and tie a knot.

Begin with a celebratory march. Have each team or family member carry their flag during the opening ceremony. Afterward celebrate each others victories with a warm mug of hot chocolate.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, seek two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, for sale two avid chess players, information pills wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, information pills several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free but will shortly begin charging to access an account. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, prostate the founders, approved Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, buy more about FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to an archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, cialis 40mg two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as an idea in February of 2009. According to the website, buy information pills the founders, viagra buy Greg and Sean two avid chess players went in search of an online chess site to hash out who of the two was the supreme player. Disappointed by the lack of online chess games they decided to create their own. They brought in the highly sought after and talented Todd Williams to help develop their creation in addition a few other team members.

ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, malady FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, try two avid chess players, discount wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, side effects two avid chess players, purchase wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, pill several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

The first winter Olympics took place on this day in 1924 in Chamonix, hospital France. The olympics used to be a major highlight when I was a child. I loved watching the daring athletes perform amazing feats to compete for the gold. What an exhilarating feeling to know you are among the most gifted athletes in the whole world.

To help cultivate a love of the Olympic games and bring the excitement close to home hold a family or neighborhood olympic event. Ask each family member to suggest their favorite winter olympic event. If you are like us and not do not live within easy access of the snow work as a team to come up with creative ways to meet the needs for each event. When I lived up north my friends and I would gather garbage can lids, shovels and trash bags to slide down icy hills. Plastic tied over shoes coupled with wet grass becomes an ice skating rink. Brooms and a birdie or puck are all you need for street hockey.

You will need:
A musical anthem and flag for each team and an official olympic banner.
A stop watch
Medals
Any materials needed for each event

Make medals using wood circles from the craft store. Drill a hole at the top. Spray paint gold, silver or bronze. Then slip a ribbon through the hole and tie a knot.

Begin with a celebratory march. Have each team or family member carry their flag during the opening ceremony. Afterward celebrate each others victories with a warm mug of hot chocolate.

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a lack of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, seek two avid chess players, wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. One thought led to a comment, several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later.

ChessJam is a free online chess game. Yes, FREE! You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

ChessJam began as a “What If?” idea in February of 2009 in response to a archaic cache of online chess websites. According to the ChessJam site the founders Greg and Sean, for sale two avid chess players, information pills wanted to determine which of the two was the uno supreme chess player. As they surfed the internet for a venue they quickly became discouraged by the unimpressive quality of online chess games. None of them delivered the modern graphic experience Sean and Greg were looking for. One thought led to a comment, information pills several comments turned into the brillant idea to create their own online chess gaming site. They brought in Todd Williams in addition to a few other team members to help develop their creation. ChessJam was launched eight months later. ChessJam was the first to launch instant online live chess games. Unlike its predecessors who could only provide games by correspondence, ChessJam could offer a live experience. When a player moves it is seen instantly.

ChessJam is currently free but will shortly begin charging to access an account. You can download the program to your computer for offline play or connect with other chess players, beginner to advanced and children to adult, throughout the globe online. To begin you will need to register. Then just enter the castle and choose a door. They have since added live tournaments, Facebook integration and many other fun features. Happy Gaming!

The first time I had pesto was with my friend Tammy. She was making pesto with pasta for a girl’s night out pot luck. I was in love at first bite. The history of basil begins in the regions of Liguria, cheapest Italy. This region of the country is extremely fertile and thus known for it’s rich abundance of vegetation; particularly basil. Pesto or Pesta (meaning to pound) comes from the act of crushing the basil leaves, recipe oil and nuts with a mortar and pestle until creamy and smooth. Pesto is best noted as a sauce for pasta. Traditionally that is true however the Italians and Persians enjoyed pesto with boiled potatoes as well.

Tilapia with pesto is by far my favorite Dazzledish recipe. I love pesto first of all. Then add a creamy light fish such as Tilapia and you have a match made in heaven.

1 1/2 bunches fresh basil (about 1 1/2 cups lightly packed)
4 ounces pine nuts
2 Garlic cloves
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 pieces (6 ounces each) fresh tilapia
1 Tbsp. olive oil

Toast pine nuts in a pan over medium heat until golden and fragrant. Process pine nuts and garlic in a food processor until it a smooth paste forms. Add the basil and cheese; processing until completely blended and smooth. Slowly drizzle in the oil while the processor is on. Season with salt and pepper.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Season the tilapia with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a large oven proof sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add oil. Cook the fish for 1 to 2 minutes (If using fresh fish start on the flesh side) or until it turns light golden brown. Flip the fish over and spoon the pesto generously over the fish.

Transfer pan to the oven and continue to cook 5 more minutes or until the fish is cooked through. Serve with a salad of mixed greens for a complete meal.

Variations:
— Pesto sauce without the cheese

March National Nutrition Month

We have had many requests asking how to feed a picky eater. Since we too are dealing with our own picky eater issues I understand the struggle many of you experience on a daily basis.

http://foodformyfamily.com/tag/picky-eaters

http://foodformyfamily.com/the-kitchen-sink/news-the-kitchen-sink/placating-picky-eaters-cooking-connections-class

Nutrition for Picky Eaters (Recipe: Fluffy Banana Oat Pancakes)


We have had many requests asking how to feed a picky eater. Since we too are dealing with our own picky eater issues I understand the struggle many of you experience on a daily basis.

http://foodformyfamily.com/tag/picky-eaters

http://foodformyfamily.com/the-kitchen-sink/news-the-kitchen-sink/placating-picky-eaters-cooking-connections-class

Nutrition for Picky Eaters (Recipe: Fluffy Banana Oat Pancakes)

The theme this year for National Nutrition month is, abortion “Eat Right…With Color.” The challenge? To swap out calorie dense starches and fats for fruits, discount vegetables and whole grains. This month we have joined the leagues with the National Dietetic Association; in addition to, the many accompanying voices of dietetics from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans to promote healthy habits. We discussed ways to filter out the high calorie prepackaged foods by reading labels; checking for ingredients that are closest to nature. Sadly too many products on the supermarket and natural food store shelves posing as food are really un-food. Fortunately for us today we do not have to spend the day in the kitchen preparing meals. There are honest companies out there producing products without the harmful additives and preservatives. Be sure to always check the labels. The following week we posted links to help our pickiest eaters over come their food fears. Be Patient and keep offering them the good stuff. One day they will surprise you. We would like to wrap up National Nutrition Month with a guide to seasonal foods.

Eat the Color of the Rainbow“…”Eat Clean”…”Eat Seasonal”…What does this all mean? Food is fuel for our body. Each morsel of food contains within it nutrients and minerals our body needs to boost the immune system, help cells and organs function properly, and support growth and development. Eating a variety of foods (the color of the rainbow) is the best way to get all the vitamins and minerals our bodies need each day.

When fruits and vegetables are at their peak they contain abundant amounts of the vitamins and minerals our body craves. Over time these vitamins and minerals diminish. Eating seasonal fruits and vegetables ensures that we are getting the maximum benefit from our food. Choosing meals and snacks around what is in season keeps costs low. When foods are in season it means they are usually shipped locally. As a result prices are substantially lower and the taste is superb. Use this opportunity to stock up for later months. Find a farmers market or packing plant nearby for fresh produce and keep an eye out for sales on poultry and fish. (**Refer to the chart above for foods listed by season.)

Eating clean is the practice of eating whole, natural foods and avoiding any manmade fats, sugars, dyes and preservatives. Let’s say one sweet potato has the same amount of carbs as a candy bar. Even though the potato is largely a carbohydrate it has less sugar and calories and more soluble fiber than the candy bar. The potato also has zero harmful preservatives (such as BHA, BHT and TBHQ) or food dyes (made from petroleum). The health benefits of a starchy potato far outweigh those of the candy bar. Whole, unprocessed, foods like seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, fish and fresh lean meats provide the nutrients our bodies need to grow properly.

Salud!

Additional Reading:

Raise Healthy Eaters: Wonderful spot for everything you ever needed to know about feeding children.

The Gracious Pantry: How Tiffany transformed her pantry filled with junk food to one that supports clean eating habits.

Nut Shell Nutrition: “Make a Rainbow on Your plate”, also be sure to peruse the site. Brittany has several informative posts on making health goals that might be of interest.

Dish on Dieting: A witty article describing the use of a GPS to guide us down the road of meal choices.

A Sprinkle of Sage: “What’s Your Nutrition Resolution?” The first of a month long series of tips to reach this month’s goal for optimal health.

Kleiner Nutrition: Great articles to help inspire us to stay on the path to better habits. Be sure to check out the interview with Hope Warshaw.
We have had many requests asking how to feed a picky eater. Since we too are dealing with our own picky eater issues I understand the struggle many of you experience on a daily basis.

http://foodformyfamily.com/tag/picky-eaters

http://foodformyfamily.com/the-kitchen-sink/news-the-kitchen-sink/placating-picky-eaters-cooking-connections-class

Nutrition for Picky Eaters (Recipe: Fluffy Banana Oat Pancakes)

The theme this year for National Nutrition month is, abortion “Eat Right…With Color.” The challenge? To swap out calorie dense starches and fats for fruits, discount vegetables and whole grains. This month we have joined the leagues with the National Dietetic Association; in addition to, the many accompanying voices of dietetics from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans to promote healthy habits. We discussed ways to filter out the high calorie prepackaged foods by reading labels; checking for ingredients that are closest to nature. Sadly too many products on the supermarket and natural food store shelves posing as food are really un-food. Fortunately for us today we do not have to spend the day in the kitchen preparing meals. There are honest companies out there producing products without the harmful additives and preservatives. Be sure to always check the labels. The following week we posted links to help our pickiest eaters over come their food fears. Be Patient and keep offering them the good stuff. One day they will surprise you. We would like to wrap up National Nutrition Month with a guide to seasonal foods.

Eat the Color of the Rainbow“…”Eat Clean”…”Eat Seasonal”…What does this all mean? Food is fuel for our body. Each morsel of food contains within it nutrients and minerals our body needs to boost the immune system, help cells and organs function properly, and support growth and development. Eating a variety of foods (the color of the rainbow) is the best way to get all the vitamins and minerals our bodies need each day.

When fruits and vegetables are at their peak they contain abundant amounts of the vitamins and minerals our body craves. Over time these vitamins and minerals diminish. Eating seasonal fruits and vegetables ensures that we are getting the maximum benefit from our food. Choosing meals and snacks around what is in season keeps costs low. When foods are in season it means they are usually shipped locally. As a result prices are substantially lower and the taste is superb. Use this opportunity to stock up for later months. Find a farmers market or packing plant nearby for fresh produce and keep an eye out for sales on poultry and fish. (**Refer to the chart above for foods listed by season.)

Eating clean is the practice of eating whole, natural foods and avoiding any manmade fats, sugars, dyes and preservatives. Let’s say one sweet potato has the same amount of carbs as a candy bar. Even though the potato is largely a carbohydrate it has less sugar and calories and more soluble fiber than the candy bar. The potato also has zero harmful preservatives (such as BHA, BHT and TBHQ) or food dyes (made from petroleum). The health benefits of a starchy potato far outweigh those of the candy bar. Whole, unprocessed, foods like seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, fish and fresh lean meats provide the nutrients our bodies need to grow properly.

Salud!

Additional Reading:

Raise Healthy Eaters: Wonderful spot for everything you ever needed to know about feeding children.

The Gracious Pantry: How Tiffany transformed her pantry filled with junk food to one that supports clean eating habits.

Nut Shell Nutrition: “Make a Rainbow on Your plate”, also be sure to peruse the site. Brittany has several informative posts on making health goals that might be of interest.

Dish on Dieting: A witty article describing the use of a GPS to guide us down the road of meal choices.

A Sprinkle of Sage: “What’s Your Nutrition Resolution?” The first of a month long series of tips to reach this month’s goal for optimal health.

Kleiner Nutrition: Great articles to help inspire us to stay on the path to better habits. Be sure to check out the interview with Hope Warshaw.
Over the past few years we have had many requests inquiring how to feed a picky eater. If you have a picky eater then you are familiar with what a daunting task this can be. We want our children to grow up healthy and strong and along the way develop healthy eating habits to ensure their success. When all a little guy wants is cereal or yogurt that goal may sometimes seem unattainable. Fear not. There is hope.

Like many other households opting for a cleaner choice of foods we choose to limit the types of prepackaged foods in the house to wholesome cereals and breads. By making all our baked goods at home at least I can control what goes into them. I feel better knowing our picky guy is eating something better than just empty calories. If we happen to have crackers in the pantry they are put up where the kids cannot get into them. A picky kid with a taste for sugar is not going to want to eat his chicken and broccoli when there is a pantry filled with crackers and granola bars. It is best to not have it around or hide it.

Treats are reserved for special occasions such as movie night or dessert at Sunday dinner. By making a few alterations a basic sweet such as a muffin can become a filling treat offering the much needed vitamins and minerals a growing body needs. Some of the variations we make include:
— replacing regular all-purpose flour with whole wheat, more about oat or coconut flour. I always add a couple tablespoons wheat germ and ground flaxseed.
— Swap out lard and vegetable oils for canola, olive and coconut oil. Butter instead of margarine.
— Replacing part or all of the refined sugar with pureed vegetables or fruits.
— Adding chopped, pureed and shredded vegetables to snacks and meals.

We follow strict snack times to help tie our kids over until dinner is ready. When kids snack right before dinner time they are less likely to try new foods much less eat their dinner. Our rule is they have to take at least one bite. If we are having salad with chicken and green beans they have to take one bite of each item. Our picky eater will often feign that he does not like something to keep up with his picky appearance. We have caught him sneaking additional bites. For a picky eater trying new foods takes time. Meanwhile continue to offer the good stuff in a positive way. We want to make dinner a positive experience for them. Avoid negative comments and of course never try to force feed your child. Give them time and eventually they will come around.

For additional reading:
http://www.themotherhood.com/talk/show/id/62135
http://whatscookingwithkids.com/2011/02/18/5-tips-to-help-kids-accept-new-foods/
http://foodformyfamily.com/tag/picky-eaters
http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/parenting_tips/picky_eaters.html

We have had many requests asking how to feed a picky eater. Since we too are dealing with our own picky eater issues I understand the struggle many of you experience on a daily basis.

http://foodformyfamily.com/tag/picky-eaters

http://foodformyfamily.com/the-kitchen-sink/news-the-kitchen-sink/placating-picky-eaters-cooking-connections-class

Nutrition for Picky Eaters (Recipe: Fluffy Banana Oat Pancakes)

The theme this year for National Nutrition month is, abortion “Eat Right…With Color.” The challenge? To swap out calorie dense starches and fats for fruits, discount vegetables and whole grains. This month we have joined the leagues with the National Dietetic Association; in addition to, the many accompanying voices of dietetics from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans to promote healthy habits. We discussed ways to filter out the high calorie prepackaged foods by reading labels; checking for ingredients that are closest to nature. Sadly too many products on the supermarket and natural food store shelves posing as food are really un-food. Fortunately for us today we do not have to spend the day in the kitchen preparing meals. There are honest companies out there producing products without the harmful additives and preservatives. Be sure to always check the labels. The following week we posted links to help our pickiest eaters over come their food fears. Be Patient and keep offering them the good stuff. One day they will surprise you. We would like to wrap up National Nutrition Month with a guide to seasonal foods.

Eat the Color of the Rainbow“…”Eat Clean”…”Eat Seasonal”…What does this all mean? Food is fuel for our body. Each morsel of food contains within it nutrients and minerals our body needs to boost the immune system, help cells and organs function properly, and support growth and development. Eating a variety of foods (the color of the rainbow) is the best way to get all the vitamins and minerals our bodies need each day.

When fruits and vegetables are at their peak they contain abundant amounts of the vitamins and minerals our body craves. Over time these vitamins and minerals diminish. Eating seasonal fruits and vegetables ensures that we are getting the maximum benefit from our food. Choosing meals and snacks around what is in season keeps costs low. When foods are in season it means they are usually shipped locally. As a result prices are substantially lower and the taste is superb. Use this opportunity to stock up for later months. Find a farmers market or packing plant nearby for fresh produce and keep an eye out for sales on poultry and fish. (**Refer to the chart above for foods listed by season.)

Eating clean is the practice of eating whole, natural foods and avoiding any manmade fats, sugars, dyes and preservatives. Let’s say one sweet potato has the same amount of carbs as a candy bar. Even though the potato is largely a carbohydrate it has less sugar and calories and more soluble fiber than the candy bar. The potato also has zero harmful preservatives (such as BHA, BHT and TBHQ) or food dyes (made from petroleum). The health benefits of a starchy potato far outweigh those of the candy bar. Whole, unprocessed, foods like seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, fish and fresh lean meats provide the nutrients our bodies need to grow properly.

Salud!

Additional Reading:

Raise Healthy Eaters: Wonderful spot for everything you ever needed to know about feeding children.

The Gracious Pantry: How Tiffany transformed her pantry filled with junk food to one that supports clean eating habits.

Nut Shell Nutrition: “Make a Rainbow on Your plate”, also be sure to peruse the site. Brittany has several informative posts on making health goals that might be of interest.

Dish on Dieting: A witty article describing the use of a GPS to guide us down the road of meal choices.

A Sprinkle of Sage: “What’s Your Nutrition Resolution?” The first of a month long series of tips to reach this month’s goal for optimal health.

Kleiner Nutrition: Great articles to help inspire us to stay on the path to better habits. Be sure to check out the interview with Hope Warshaw.
Over the past few years we have had many requests inquiring how to feed a picky eater. If you have a picky eater then you are familiar with what a daunting task this can be. We want our children to grow up healthy and strong and along the way develop healthy eating habits to ensure their success. When all a little guy wants is cereal or yogurt that goal may sometimes seem unattainable. Fear not. There is hope.

Like many other households opting for a cleaner choice of foods we choose to limit the types of prepackaged foods in the house to wholesome cereals and breads. By making all our baked goods at home at least I can control what goes into them. I feel better knowing our picky guy is eating something better than just empty calories. If we happen to have crackers in the pantry they are put up where the kids cannot get into them. A picky kid with a taste for sugar is not going to want to eat his chicken and broccoli when there is a pantry filled with crackers and granola bars. It is best to not have it around or hide it.

Treats are reserved for special occasions such as movie night or dessert at Sunday dinner. By making a few alterations a basic sweet such as a muffin can become a filling treat offering the much needed vitamins and minerals a growing body needs. Some of the variations we make include:
— replacing regular all-purpose flour with whole wheat, more about oat or coconut flour. I always add a couple tablespoons wheat germ and ground flaxseed.
— Swap out lard and vegetable oils for canola, olive and coconut oil. Butter instead of margarine.
— Replacing part or all of the refined sugar with pureed vegetables or fruits.
— Adding chopped, pureed and shredded vegetables to snacks and meals.

We follow strict snack times to help tie our kids over until dinner is ready. When kids snack right before dinner time they are less likely to try new foods much less eat their dinner. Our rule is they have to take at least one bite. If we are having salad with chicken and green beans they have to take one bite of each item. Our picky eater will often feign that he does not like something to keep up with his picky appearance. We have caught him sneaking additional bites. For a picky eater trying new foods takes time. Meanwhile continue to offer the good stuff in a positive way. We want to make dinner a positive experience for them. Avoid negative comments and of course never try to force feed your child. Give them time and eventually they will come around.

For additional reading:
http://www.themotherhood.com/talk/show/id/62135
http://whatscookingwithkids.com/2011/02/18/5-tips-to-help-kids-accept-new-foods/
http://foodformyfamily.com/tag/picky-eaters
http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/parenting_tips/picky_eaters.html

Graphic Art by: Kia Robertson

During the month of March the American Dietetic Association focuses their efforts on helping families understand the importance of physical activity and more importantly how to make the right food choices. This March Dazzledish is celebrating National Nutrition Month with a two part health series. This week we will dive into the basic stepping stones to begin a journey to better health. Next week we will look at ways to help our pickiest eaters overcome the challenge of trying new foods.

The first component to a healthy diet is to reduce the amount of refined sugars and enriched carbs by replacing them with fresh fruits, discount nutrient rich grains and fiber dense vegetables. Easier said than done, website right? So where do you start exactly? Start with little baby steps. Begin by reading the labels.

Reading the nutrition labels is crucial when trying to switch to a healthier lifestyle. Food companies are less concerned about your health and more concerned with meeting this quarter’s profits. Prepackaged and fast foods sell because they are convenient and they are made to taste great. Problem is fast foods in addition to prepackaged foods are unnecessarily overloaded with large quantities of sugar, sodium and calories that leave us hungry for more. Moreover, sugar and sodium have been linked to numerous health conditions later in life in addition to the increase of type-2 diabetes in children and teens. Of course these are the foods that are cheap and always available.

I doubt many of our parents actually understood the direct impact theses types of foods would have on our bodies. We were taught to celebrate with mounds of candy and sugary confections. White bread, whole milk and fried foods were the norm. We ate a carb with a side of carb. Ie: Lasagna with garlic bread or a sandwich with chips. Only now are we as a society beginning to realize the harmful effects these habits wreak on our bodies. Today the food companies, to their credit, have tried to heed the demand for healthier products. Introducing the 100-calorie snack packs, fat free and low fat and sugar free products. Unfortunately what they took out they had to replace with something else to make it taste delicious. Fat free foods still contain sugar and sugar free products still contain fats. When eaten in excess these foods can still be stored as fat. The number one misleading product on store shelves is whole wheat bread. Surprisingly, the majority of breads claiming to be %100 whole wheat use enriched wheat flour and contain high fructose corn syrup.

The nutritional label and the ingredients list should be evaluated as a whole. The ingredients are listed in descending order from the most to the least. It should be short, comprehensible and minus all the man-made ingredients. A loaf of bread for example is mostly flour and water. Flour would be listed first because there is more flour in a loaf of bread than any other ingredient. When shopping for bread look for whole grain or whole wheat flour in the number one spot. Enriched flour white or wheat has been refined and processed until it no longer holds any nutritional value. Instead choose breads with whole wheat, corn, potato and/or oat flours.

Sugar is stated as being a culprit of childhood obesity. It is no wonder when it is in just about everything. Take for example a can of soda. There is an average of 39 grams of sugar and over 100 calories in one 12-ounce can of soda. That equals 9 ¾ teaspoons of sugar or 3 1/4 tablespoons.
This much sugar can wreak havoc on our energy levels. A healthier option might be a glass of crystal light or flavored sparkling water (check the label for the type of artificial sweetener). For a nutritious pick me up in the afternoon try a handful of nuts with a piece of fruit. The protein in the nuts helps the body feel full longer without the spike in blood sugar.

Sugars may be listed in the form of: corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, maple syrup, brown rice syrup, fruit juice concentrate, maltose, dextrose, fructose, sucrose, honey and artificial sweeteners. Put back anything that contains high fructose corn syrup. High fructose corn syrup can only be converted to glucose through the liver. The worse part is the body turns high fructose corn syrup straight into fat. The liver’s function is to filter out toxins. Eating high fructose syrup places unneeded stress on the liver in addition to being highly addictive.

Next, limit products whose fat source comes from saturated fat or trans fat. They have the ability to increase the likelihood of heart disease. On the flipside we do need some fat in our diet. These “good” fats are called monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats derived from plants such as oils, avocados or nuts. Fats are listed in both the ingredients and on the nutritional label. A product may not contain trans fat according to the nutritional label but a hydrogenated oil or partially hydrogenated oil listed in the ingredient list means that product contains some trans fats.

Lastly, calories are the amount of energy in a food. A cup of lettuce contains 10 calories while there are 500 in a regular sized vanilla milkshake. If the intake of calories is higher than what the body burns the excess calories are turned to fat. Keep an eye on the amount of calories per serving size in the foods you choose. You will be surprised at how easy it is to accumulate calories. A serving of bread is typically one slice. Depending on the brand that 1 slice can contain 70 to 100 calories. Add another slice, meat and cheese to make a sandwich and you have a complete 350 calorie meal. That is not counting the can of soda and bag of chips that so often accompany a sandwich.

Be careful to watch the amount of calories per serving in addition to the calories from fat percentage. The calories from fat should make up no more than a quarter percent of the total calories. Peanuts are a perfect example of high calories from fat. There are about 170 calories in 1 serving (28 nuts) of peanuts with 130 calories from fat. Nuts are a great source of protein; however, if you are looking to snack Cashews or almonds are a better choice if you are watching your fat intake.

This first phase helps identify the type of food choices we regularly make. The reduction of refined flours and sugars prepare the body and taste buds for the next phase.

Additional Reading:
To the Fullest: Join Beth on her inspiring journey to better health by overcoming food addiction.
Walk About: Find the balance to eating healthy.
Healthy Life Style Balance: Learning how to maintain a healthy lifestyle.
Simple Nourished Living: Overcoming constant hunger
Medifast Plan: Understanding fats and carbs
Raise Healthy Eaters: Raising Healthy Eaters recipes and advice

Peppery Irish Beef Stew

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, buy and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, sales poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, story seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, sales poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, story seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, ambulance and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, more about some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, erectile pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, sales poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, story seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, ambulance and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, more about some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, erectile pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish.

Curried Turkey Salad with Apples, more about Cranberries, store and Walnuts

http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/

4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, sales poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, story seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, ambulance and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, more about some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, erectile pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish.

Curried Turkey Salad with Apples, more about Cranberries, store and Walnuts

http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/

4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!
Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish. This particular salad is a wonderful way to use up left over chicken or turkey.

Curry is commonly used throughout Asia and India. The term curry refers to a seasoning consisting of but not limited to black pepper, erectile coriander, no rx ginger, cumin, chili powder, mustard seeds, salt, five spice powder, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg and other pungent spices.

Source: http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/“>PinchMySalt.com
4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, sales poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, story seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, ambulance and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, more about some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, erectile pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish.

Curried Turkey Salad with Apples, more about Cranberries, store and Walnuts

http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/

4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!
Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish. This particular salad is a wonderful way to use up left over chicken or turkey.

Curry is commonly used throughout Asia and India. The term curry refers to a seasoning consisting of but not limited to black pepper, erectile coriander, no rx ginger, cumin, chili powder, mustard seeds, salt, five spice powder, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg and other pungent spices.

Source: http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/“>PinchMySalt.com
4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!

Beef Tip Stroganoff

Stroganoff is a classic 18th century Russian dish usually made with strips of beef, healing mustard and a cream sauce. Credit was given to the Count Alexander Grigorievitch Stroganov, prescription a 19th century diplomat, although; similar accounts for a dish containing beefs strips in a cream sauce were uncovered as far back as the 15th century.

After his retirement, the Count frequently entertained the wealthy with “Open Table” dinner parties. Anyone in high society could walk in and sit down at the table. As the story goes, the Count’s chef invented the dish he called A La Francaise, a French recipe prepared in traditional Russian style in that the meat was mixed with a saucy gravy before serving. It is thought that the Chef learned of the recipe from a family cookbook. The dish was popular with the Count’s “Open Table” setting as it could easily be passed around.

It was not until the 1930’s the recipe turned up in American cookbooks and upscale restaurants featuring onions, mushrooms and a sour cream sauce. Because of the war and the price of beef at the time Beef Stronganoff did not became a popular American favorite until the 1950’s. The need for convenience and price replaced the sour cream with canned cream of mushroom soup and beef cubes with ground beef.

Beef Stoganoff remains a favorite in household’s throughout the world. Today’s influences include the addition of wine and herbs to yogurt. How ever you make it Beef Stroganoff is a classic recipe sure to please.

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirlion steak or stew meat, cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil or dill
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, sales poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, story seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, ambulance and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, more about some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, erectile pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish.

Curried Turkey Salad with Apples, more about Cranberries, store and Walnuts

http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/

4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!
Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish. This particular salad is a wonderful way to use up left over chicken or turkey.

Curry is commonly used throughout Asia and India. The term curry refers to a seasoning consisting of but not limited to black pepper, erectile coriander, no rx ginger, cumin, chili powder, mustard seeds, salt, five spice powder, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg and other pungent spices.

Source: http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/“>PinchMySalt.com
4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!

Beef Tip Stroganoff

Stroganoff is a classic 18th century Russian dish usually made with strips of beef, healing mustard and a cream sauce. Credit was given to the Count Alexander Grigorievitch Stroganov, prescription a 19th century diplomat, although; similar accounts for a dish containing beefs strips in a cream sauce were uncovered as far back as the 15th century.

After his retirement, the Count frequently entertained the wealthy with “Open Table” dinner parties. Anyone in high society could walk in and sit down at the table. As the story goes, the Count’s chef invented the dish he called A La Francaise, a French recipe prepared in traditional Russian style in that the meat was mixed with a saucy gravy before serving. It is thought that the Chef learned of the recipe from a family cookbook. The dish was popular with the Count’s “Open Table” setting as it could easily be passed around.

It was not until the 1930’s the recipe turned up in American cookbooks and upscale restaurants featuring onions, mushrooms and a sour cream sauce. Because of the war and the price of beef at the time Beef Stronganoff did not became a popular American favorite until the 1950’s. The need for convenience and price replaced the sour cream with canned cream of mushroom soup and beef cubes with ground beef.

Beef Stoganoff remains a favorite in household’s throughout the world. Today’s influences include the addition of wine and herbs to yogurt. How ever you make it Beef Stroganoff is a classic recipe sure to please.

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirlion steak or stew meat, cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil or dill
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.
Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirloin steak, prescription cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, order divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, sales poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, story seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, ambulance and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, more about some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, erectile pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish.

Curried Turkey Salad with Apples, more about Cranberries, store and Walnuts

http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/

4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!
Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish. This particular salad is a wonderful way to use up left over chicken or turkey.

Curry is commonly used throughout Asia and India. The term curry refers to a seasoning consisting of but not limited to black pepper, erectile coriander, no rx ginger, cumin, chili powder, mustard seeds, salt, five spice powder, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg and other pungent spices.

Source: http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/“>PinchMySalt.com
4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!

Beef Tip Stroganoff

Stroganoff is a classic 18th century Russian dish usually made with strips of beef, healing mustard and a cream sauce. Credit was given to the Count Alexander Grigorievitch Stroganov, prescription a 19th century diplomat, although; similar accounts for a dish containing beefs strips in a cream sauce were uncovered as far back as the 15th century.

After his retirement, the Count frequently entertained the wealthy with “Open Table” dinner parties. Anyone in high society could walk in and sit down at the table. As the story goes, the Count’s chef invented the dish he called A La Francaise, a French recipe prepared in traditional Russian style in that the meat was mixed with a saucy gravy before serving. It is thought that the Chef learned of the recipe from a family cookbook. The dish was popular with the Count’s “Open Table” setting as it could easily be passed around.

It was not until the 1930’s the recipe turned up in American cookbooks and upscale restaurants featuring onions, mushrooms and a sour cream sauce. Because of the war and the price of beef at the time Beef Stronganoff did not became a popular American favorite until the 1950’s. The need for convenience and price replaced the sour cream with canned cream of mushroom soup and beef cubes with ground beef.

Beef Stoganoff remains a favorite in household’s throughout the world. Today’s influences include the addition of wine and herbs to yogurt. How ever you make it Beef Stroganoff is a classic recipe sure to please.

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirlion steak or stew meat, cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil or dill
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.
Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirloin steak, prescription cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, order divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.
If you buy two pounds

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirlion steak, capsule cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, medicine sick poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, patient seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, ampoule okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Gumbo

Many years ago I lived in a very small town near Louisiana for a spell. The eastern boarder towns of Texas were heavily influenced by Cajun cuisine. While there I experienced squirrel soup (I will spare you any further details). I learned all about how to shoot a squirrel and became an honorary “Coon Ass”; a ritual that involves sucking the head of a crawfish. Despite the strange customs I loved it there. The people were amazing. Everyone I met was friendly and eager to call me family.

Of all the dishes Louisiana is known for Gumbo is the most popular. Gumbo is a soup traditionally served over rice. Everyone’s Grandma has their own version but typically gumbo is usually made with pork, sales poultry and seafood and thickened using a rue or okra. In this recipe for Gumbo we break a cardinal rule that disapproves the use of both okra and a thickener. Die-hards believe that you can only use one or the other. In this case the recipe calls for flour and okra.

My sister Michelle sent this recipe to me and I am glad she did. I have been searching for a simple tasty gumbo recipe that would be easy for beginners  or those new to gumbo. More experienced cooks can also use this recipe to expound on.

Source: Adapted from the Weight Watchers Cookbook
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound of hot or mild Italian pork sausage
1 onion chopped
1 green bell pepper, story seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons of flour
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes with green chiles or Cajun stewed tomatoes
2 to 3 cups chicken broth
3/4 pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs cut into 1- inch pieces
1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun or seafood seasoning
1/2 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined
1 (10-oz) package sliced okra
2 cups frozen or fresh corn
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or teaspoon dried
2 cups cooked white or brown rice

Cook sausage in a large pot over medium to medium-high heat until brown; about 10 to 15 minutes.

Add the onion and green pepper; cooking until softened about 5-7 minutes.

Stir in the flour; cook 1 minute longer.

Pour in the tomatoes and broth; bring to a boil.

Add the chicken and Cajun seasoning; return to boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered until chicken is cooked through about 5 min.

Add the shrimp, okra, corn and thyme; return to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat; cover and cook about 5 minutes longer until shrimp are pink. Serve over rice.

Variations:
–  In place of the Italian sausage use spicy chicken sausage, 1 (2-inch) piece kielbasa sliced, or spicy breakfast sausage.
– Additional vegetables: 1 celery stalk, 6 scallions, 1 squash and/or zucchini sliced.
– Additional spices: 1 garlic clove minced, 1 bay leaf, 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, ambulance and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, more about some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, erectile pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish.

Curried Turkey Salad with Apples, more about Cranberries, store and Walnuts

http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/

4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!
Salads do not have to be boring. They can be an upscale companion to any main dish. This particular salad is a wonderful way to use up left over chicken or turkey.

Curry is commonly used throughout Asia and India. The term curry refers to a seasoning consisting of but not limited to black pepper, erectile coriander, no rx ginger, cumin, chili powder, mustard seeds, salt, five spice powder, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg and other pungent spices.

Source: http://pinchmysalt.com/2008/11/12/curried-turkey-salad-with-apples-cranberries-and-walnuts/“>PinchMySalt.com
4 cups cooked and chopped turkey
1/2 cup diced apple (pref. granny smith)
1/3 cup chopped sweetened dried cranberries
1/3 cup chopped toasted walnuts*
Curry Dressing (recipe below)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir well.  Serve on your favorite bread as a sandwich or on a bed of greens as a salad.  Serves four to six.

Dressing:
1/2 cup thick yogurt
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons curry powder**
1 tablespoon honey
generous pinch of salt
fresh ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients until well combined.

Recipe Notes: *To toast walnuts, spread a handful of walnuts on a baking sheet. Toast in a preheated 350 degree oven for about five minutes or until they are fragrant. Don’t leave them in too long! Allow to cool slightly before chopping and adding to salad.  **If you prefer less spice in your salad, start with one tablespoon of curry powder then taste dressing and add more if desired.  I used a full two tablespoons.  For the turkey, I used a roasted half turkey breast from the deli section of the grocery store, but this would be perfect if you have lots of turkey left over from the holidays!

Beef Tip Stroganoff

Stroganoff is a classic 18th century Russian dish usually made with strips of beef, healing mustard and a cream sauce. Credit was given to the Count Alexander Grigorievitch Stroganov, prescription a 19th century diplomat, although; similar accounts for a dish containing beefs strips in a cream sauce were uncovered as far back as the 15th century.

After his retirement, the Count frequently entertained the wealthy with “Open Table” dinner parties. Anyone in high society could walk in and sit down at the table. As the story goes, the Count’s chef invented the dish he called A La Francaise, a French recipe prepared in traditional Russian style in that the meat was mixed with a saucy gravy before serving. It is thought that the Chef learned of the recipe from a family cookbook. The dish was popular with the Count’s “Open Table” setting as it could easily be passed around.

It was not until the 1930’s the recipe turned up in American cookbooks and upscale restaurants featuring onions, mushrooms and a sour cream sauce. Because of the war and the price of beef at the time Beef Stronganoff did not became a popular American favorite until the 1950’s. The need for convenience and price replaced the sour cream with canned cream of mushroom soup and beef cubes with ground beef.

Beef Stoganoff remains a favorite in household’s throughout the world. Today’s influences include the addition of wine and herbs to yogurt. How ever you make it Beef Stroganoff is a classic recipe sure to please.

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirlion steak or stew meat, cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil or dill
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.
Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirloin steak, prescription cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, order divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.
If you buy two pounds

Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
1.5 pounds sirlion steak, capsule cut into bite sized chunks
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup butter, divided
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 cup beef broth
1 tsp dried basil
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup sour cream
cooked rice or noodles

Season flour with a pinch of salt and pepper. Toss beef in flour to coat. In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat; saute onions until tender. Remove onions from pan; set aside.

Increase heat to medium-heat. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter; brown meat on all sides. Add mushrooms; cook until slightly brown and softened. Add broth, basil, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce and onions. Stir, scraping the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Turn heat down to simmer until mixture thickens, about 5 minutes.

Just before serving, stir in sour cream. Heat through, but do not boil. Serve immediately over rice or noodles.

Photo: Property of The Good Mood Food Blog

Traditional Irish stew begins with mutton (or lamb). It includes onions and other root vegetables such as turnips, information pills carrots and potatoes. The use of Guinness beer in Irish beef stew is as Irish as the St. Patrick’s Day Leprechaun. In America beef was cheaper than lamb, drug therefore, the beer was an Irish-American addition used to give the less flavorful beef stew more flavor. Traditionalists would rather use cheaper shanks and other boney pieces with little to no meat on them to flavor the broth rather than switch to beef. To thicken the stew they used potatoes, flour or barley grains.

In this version of Irish beef stew the potatoes are sliced then layered. During cooking the potato slices near the bottom of the casserole dish break down then meld with the juices to thicken the stew. The black pepper really compliments this stew but the 2 teaspoons might be too much for children and those averse to pepper. Reduce the pepper to 1/2 to 1 teaspoon.

Source: The Good Mood Food Blog
3 tbsp flour
2 tsp ground black pepper
1 1/2 pounds stew meat, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 tbsp oil
4 large carrots, cut into 1/2-inch slices
2 large onions, sliced into half moon pieces
6 cups beef stock
Pinch course salt
2 bay leaves
5 large potatoes, peeled, sliced into 1/2-inch discs
Chopped parsley, to garnish
Oven Safe Casserole or pot with lid

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Combine the flour and black pepper in a resealable bag or plastic container. Add stew meat, seal and shake until meat is thoroughly coated with flour.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add half the meat. Brown on all sides then transfer to a large over safe pot. Brown the other half of the meat and transfer to pot.

In the same skillet saute the onions for 2 minutes, adding a little oil if necessary. Transfer the onions to the casserole. Add the carrots, beef stock, sea salt and bay leaves to the pot stirring to scrape up all the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. Pour into pot. Toss the potato slices on top of the onions and carrots. Season with a generous amount of black pepper and cover. Cook for 1 1/2 hours. To serve pour into individual bowls and sprinkle with a little parsley.

Serves 6 generously

Family Togetherness: Sunday Brunch

Illustration by: Richard Svensson
Illustration by: Richard Svensson

I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, order filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  He believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, purchase old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage or Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
  • Perform a family service project.
  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
  • Tie green balloons to the car.
  • Dye the milk green.
Illustration by: Richard Svensson
Illustration by: Richard Svensson

I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

A little Irish History

Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
  • Perform a family service project.
  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
  • Tie green balloons to the car.
  • Dye the milk green.
Illustration by: Richard Svensson
Illustration by: Richard Svensson

I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

A little Irish History

Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
  • Perform a family service project.
  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
  • Tie green balloons to the car.
  • Dye the milk green.
Illustration by: Richard Svensson
Illustration by: Richard Svensson

I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

A little Irish History

Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    • Perform a family service project.
    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
    • Tie green balloons to the car.
    • Dye the milk green.
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    A little Irish History

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    • Perform a family service project.
    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
    • Tie green balloons to the car.
    • Dye the milk green.
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    A little Irish History

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
      • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
      • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
      • Perform a family service project.
      • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
      • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
      • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
      • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
      • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
      • Tie green balloons to the car.
      • Dye the milk green.
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson

      I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

      A little Irish History

      Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

      There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

      The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

      Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

      • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
      • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
      • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
      • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
      • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
      • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
      • Perform a family service project.
      • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
      • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
      • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
      • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
      • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
      • Tie green balloons to the car.
      • Dye the milk green.
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson

      I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

      A little Irish History

      Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

      There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

      The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

      Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

      • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
      • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
      • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
      • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
      • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
      • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
      • Perform a family service project.
      • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
      • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
      • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
      • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
      • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
      • Tie green balloons to the car.
      • Dye the milk green.
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson

      I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

      A little Irish History

      Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

      There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

      The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

      Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

      • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
      • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
      • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
      • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
        • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
        • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
        • Perform a family service project.
        • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
        • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
        • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
        • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
        • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
        • Tie green balloons to the car.
        • Dye the milk green.
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson

        I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

        A little Irish History

        Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

        There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

        The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

        Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

        • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
        • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
        • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
        • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
        • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
        • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
        • Perform a family service project.
        • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
        • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
        • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
        • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
        • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
        • Tie green balloons to the car.
        • Dye the milk green.
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson

        I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

        A little Irish History

        Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

        There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

        The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

        Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

        • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
        • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
        • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
        • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
        • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
        • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
        • Perform a family service project.
        • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
        • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
        • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
        • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
        • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
        • Tie green balloons to the car.
        • Dye the milk green.
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson

        I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

        A little Irish History

        Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

        There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

        The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

        Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

        • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
        • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
        • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
        • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
        • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
        • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
        • Perform a family service project.
        • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
        • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
        • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
        • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
        • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
        • Tie green balloons to the car.
        • Dye the milk green.
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson

        I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

        A little Irish History

        Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

        There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

        The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

        Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

        • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
        • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
        • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
        • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.

            Chicken Lo Mein

            I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

            After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

            1 tbsp oil
            2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
            3 garlic cloves, chopped
            Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
            Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

            1/4 cup soy sauce
            1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
            1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
            1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
            1-2 tsp sesame oil

            Sauce:
            Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

            Boil noodles according to package directions.

            Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

            Serves 4

            In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
            Oriental Flavoring
            Source: Adapted from Spark People
            2 tablespoons onion powder
            2 tablespoons ground ginger
            2 tablespoons garlic powder
            1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
            1/2 teaspoon salt
            1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

            Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
            1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.

            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.

              Chicken Lo Mein

              I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

              After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

              1 tbsp oil
              2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
              3 garlic cloves, chopped
              Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
              Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

              1/4 cup soy sauce
              1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
              1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
              1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
              1-2 tsp sesame oil

              Sauce:
              Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

              Boil noodles according to package directions.

              Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

              Serves 4

              In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
              Oriental Flavoring
              Source: Adapted from Spark People
              2 tablespoons onion powder
              2 tablespoons ground ginger
              2 tablespoons garlic powder
              1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
              1/2 teaspoon salt
              1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

              Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
              1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
              I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

              After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

              1 tbsp oil
              2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
              3 garlic cloves, chopped
              Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
              Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
              1/4 cup soy sauce
              1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
              1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
              1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
              1-2 tsp sesame oil

              Sauce:
              Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

              Boil noodles according to package directions.

              Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

              In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
              Oriental Flavoring:

              2 tablespoons onion powder
              2 tablespoons ground ginger
              2 tablespoons garlic powder
              1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
              1/2 teaspoon salt
              1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

              Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
              1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.

              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.

                Chicken Lo Mein

                I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                1 tbsp oil
                2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                3 garlic cloves, chopped
                Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                1/4 cup soy sauce
                1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                1-2 tsp sesame oil

                Sauce:
                Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                Boil noodles according to package directions.

                Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                Serves 4

                In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                Oriental Flavoring
                Source: Adapted from Spark People
                2 tablespoons onion powder
                2 tablespoons ground ginger
                2 tablespoons garlic powder
                1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                1/2 teaspoon salt
                1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                1 tbsp oil
                2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                3 garlic cloves, chopped
                Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                1/4 cup soy sauce
                1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                1-2 tsp sesame oil

                Sauce:
                Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                Boil noodles according to package directions.

                Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                Oriental Flavoring:

                2 tablespoons onion powder
                2 tablespoons ground ginger
                2 tablespoons garlic powder
                1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                1/2 teaspoon salt
                1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, more about grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, physician organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                1 tbsp oil
                2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                3 garlic cloves, chopped
                Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                1/4 cup soy sauce
                1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                1-2 tsp sesame oil

                Sauce:
                Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                Boil noodles according to package directions.

                Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                Oriental Flavoring
                Source: Adapted from Spark People
                2 tablespoons onion powder
                2 tablespoons ground ginger
                2 tablespoons garlic powder
                1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                1/2 teaspoon salt
                1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.

                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.

                  Chicken Lo Mein

                  I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                  After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                  1 tbsp oil
                  2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                  3 garlic cloves, chopped
                  Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                  Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                  1/4 cup soy sauce
                  1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                  1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                  1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                  1-2 tsp sesame oil

                  Sauce:
                  Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                  Boil noodles according to package directions.

                  Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                  Serves 4

                  In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                  Oriental Flavoring
                  Source: Adapted from Spark People
                  2 tablespoons onion powder
                  2 tablespoons ground ginger
                  2 tablespoons garlic powder
                  1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                  1/2 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                  Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                  1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                  I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                  After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                  1 tbsp oil
                  2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                  3 garlic cloves, chopped
                  Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                  Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                  1/4 cup soy sauce
                  1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                  1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                  1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                  1-2 tsp sesame oil

                  Sauce:
                  Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                  Boil noodles according to package directions.

                  Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                  In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                  Oriental Flavoring:

                  2 tablespoons onion powder
                  2 tablespoons ground ginger
                  2 tablespoons garlic powder
                  1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                  1/2 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                  Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                  1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                  I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, more about grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, physician organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                  After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                  1 tbsp oil
                  2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                  3 garlic cloves, chopped
                  Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                  Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                  1/4 cup soy sauce
                  1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                  1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                  1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                  1-2 tsp sesame oil

                  Sauce:
                  Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                  Boil noodles according to package directions.

                  Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                  In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                  Oriental Flavoring
                  Source: Adapted from Spark People
                  2 tablespoons onion powder
                  2 tablespoons ground ginger
                  2 tablespoons garlic powder
                  1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                  1/2 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                  Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                  1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                  I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit this pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, tadalafil organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                  After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                  1 tbsp oil
                  2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                  3 garlic cloves, chopped
                  Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                  Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                  1/4 cup soy sauce
                  1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                  1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                  1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                  1-2 tsp sesame oil

                  Sauce:
                  Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                  Boil noodles according to package directions.

                  Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                  Serves 4

                  In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                  Oriental Flavoring
                  Source: Adapted from Spark People
                  2 tablespoons onion powder
                  2 tablespoons ground ginger
                  2 tablespoons garlic powder
                  1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                  1/2 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                  Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                  1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.

                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                    • Perform a family service project.
                    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                    • Tie green balloons to the car.
                    • Dye the milk green.
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                    A little Irish History

                    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                    • Perform a family service project.
                    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                    • Tie green balloons to the car.
                    • Dye the milk green.
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                    A little Irish History

                    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                    • Perform a family service project.
                    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                    • Tie green balloons to the car.
                    • Dye the milk green.
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                    A little Irish History

                    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                    • Perform a family service project.
                    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                    • Tie green balloons to the car.
                    • Dye the milk green.

                    Chicken Lo Mein

                    I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                    After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                    1 tbsp oil
                    2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                    3 garlic cloves, chopped
                    Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                    Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                    1/4 cup soy sauce
                    1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                    1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                    1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                    1-2 tsp sesame oil

                    Sauce:
                    Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                    Boil noodles according to package directions.

                    Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                    Serves 4

                    In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                    Oriental Flavoring
                    Source: Adapted from Spark People
                    2 tablespoons onion powder
                    2 tablespoons ground ginger
                    2 tablespoons garlic powder
                    1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                    Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                    1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                    I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                    After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                    1 tbsp oil
                    2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                    3 garlic cloves, chopped
                    Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                    Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                    1/4 cup soy sauce
                    1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                    1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                    1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                    1-2 tsp sesame oil

                    Sauce:
                    Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                    Boil noodles according to package directions.

                    Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                    In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                    Oriental Flavoring:

                    2 tablespoons onion powder
                    2 tablespoons ground ginger
                    2 tablespoons garlic powder
                    1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                    Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                    1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                    I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, more about grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, physician organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                    After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                    1 tbsp oil
                    2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                    3 garlic cloves, chopped
                    Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                    Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                    1/4 cup soy sauce
                    1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                    1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                    1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                    1-2 tsp sesame oil

                    Sauce:
                    Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                    Boil noodles according to package directions.

                    Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                    In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                    Oriental Flavoring
                    Source: Adapted from Spark People
                    2 tablespoons onion powder
                    2 tablespoons ground ginger
                    2 tablespoons garlic powder
                    1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                    Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                    1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                    I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit this pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, tadalafil organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                    After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                    1 tbsp oil
                    2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                    3 garlic cloves, chopped
                    Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                    Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                    1/4 cup soy sauce
                    1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                    1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                    1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                    1-2 tsp sesame oil

                    Sauce:
                    Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                    Boil noodles according to package directions.

                    Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                    Serves 4

                    In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                    Oriental Flavoring
                    Source: Adapted from Spark People
                    2 tablespoons onion powder
                    2 tablespoons ground ginger
                    2 tablespoons garlic powder
                    1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                    Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                    1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                    Vinaigrette

                    • 1 tbsp fresh ginger, search minced
                    • 2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    • 2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    • 1/2 cup sesame oil
                    • 1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad

                    • 1 tbsp olive oil
                    • 1 cup shiitake mushrooms, ask sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    • 1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    • 4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    • 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    • 1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    • Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would also make a wonder side dish on Thanksgiving.

                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, decease halved lengthwise, approved seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, healing to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    — Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

                    — Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

                    — Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.
                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would also make a wonder side dish on Thanksgiving.

                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, decease halved lengthwise, approved seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, healing to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    — Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

                    — Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

                    — Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.
                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, side effects halved lengthwise, illness seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F.

                    Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    Replace the sausage with black beans for a vegetaria
                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would also make a wonder side dish on Thanksgiving.

                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, decease halved lengthwise, approved seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, healing to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    — Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

                    — Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

                    — Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.
                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, side effects halved lengthwise, illness seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F.

                    Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    Replace the sausage with black beans for a vegetaria

                    • 2 medium acorn squash
                    • 1 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
                    • Kosher salt and fine ground black pepper, drug to taste
                    • 1 fresh spicy chicken or turkey sausage, generic casings removed, crumbled
                    • 1 cup yellow onion, diced small
                    • 1 cup celery, diced small (save inner leaves for garnish)
                    • 1 tbsp garlic, minced
                    • 1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    • 8 oz low-fat sour cream
                    • 1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated

                    INSTRUCTIONS:

                    1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
                    2. Begin by slicing squash lengthwise. With a spoon, remove seeds to create a clean cavity for stuffing.
                    3. Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.
                    4. Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan over medium heat, brown sausage until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.
                    5. Return sauté pan to medium-low heat and add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent.
                    6. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté until aromatic, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat.
                    7. In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary.
                    8. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.
                    9. Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Garnish with reserved celery leaves and serve.

                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would also make a wonder side dish on Thanksgiving.

                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, decease halved lengthwise, approved seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, healing to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    — Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

                    — Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

                    — Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.
                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, side effects halved lengthwise, illness seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F.

                    Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    Replace the sausage with black beans for a vegetaria

                    • 2 medium acorn squash
                    • 1 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
                    • Kosher salt and fine ground black pepper, drug to taste
                    • 1 fresh spicy chicken or turkey sausage, generic casings removed, crumbled
                    • 1 cup yellow onion, diced small
                    • 1 cup celery, diced small (save inner leaves for garnish)
                    • 1 tbsp garlic, minced
                    • 1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    • 8 oz low-fat sour cream
                    • 1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated

                    INSTRUCTIONS:

                    1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
                    2. Begin by slicing squash lengthwise. With a spoon, remove seeds to create a clean cavity for stuffing.
                    3. Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.
                    4. Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan over medium heat, brown sausage until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.
                    5. Return sauté pan to medium-low heat and add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent.
                    6. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté until aromatic, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat.
                    7. In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary.
                    8. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.
                    9. Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Garnish with reserved celery leaves and serve.
                    Scrumptious Honey Whole Grain Cornbread

                    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html

                    1/2 c butter, price melted


                    2 powdered eggs (if substituting fresh decrease milk by 2-3 T)

                    1/2 t baking soda

                    1 c
                    whole grain flour (plain kamut is delicious in this recipe)
                    2/3 c honey
                    1 c buttermilk
                    *
                    1 c yellow cornmeal

                    1/2 t salt

                    Combine honey and butter in a mixing bowl. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda.


                    Mix cornmeal, flour and salt in small bowl.

                    Add cornmeal mixture to wet mixture. Stir as little as possible (you don’t want to activate the gluten and make your bread chewy instead of crumbly).

                    Butter pan (I always use glass), or make into muffins.
                    Bake at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes.

                    *Sour milk works well in a pinch (2 T apple cider vinegar combined with 1 c milk (minus 2 T)), but for fabulous bread go with the real buttermilk.

                    Sidenote…In almost all of my baking I use powdered eggs. These are whole eggs just with the water evaporated. I store them for emergencies and baking. The also reduce costs. We don’t like them plain however. The nutrition content is the same. I purchase mine from Walton feed. For me convenience is key, so I order all my bulk things together and have them delivered. It is just about impossible to try to get to the store with my 3 little ones.
                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would also make a wonder side dish on Thanksgiving.

                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, decease halved lengthwise, approved seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, healing to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    — Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

                    — Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

                    — Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.
                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, side effects halved lengthwise, illness seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F.

                    Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    Replace the sausage with black beans for a vegetaria

                    • 2 medium acorn squash
                    • 1 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
                    • Kosher salt and fine ground black pepper, drug to taste
                    • 1 fresh spicy chicken or turkey sausage, generic casings removed, crumbled
                    • 1 cup yellow onion, diced small
                    • 1 cup celery, diced small (save inner leaves for garnish)
                    • 1 tbsp garlic, minced
                    • 1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    • 8 oz low-fat sour cream
                    • 1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated

                    INSTRUCTIONS:

                    1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
                    2. Begin by slicing squash lengthwise. With a spoon, remove seeds to create a clean cavity for stuffing.
                    3. Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.
                    4. Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan over medium heat, brown sausage until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.
                    5. Return sauté pan to medium-low heat and add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent.
                    6. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté until aromatic, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat.
                    7. In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary.
                    8. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.
                    9. Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Garnish with reserved celery leaves and serve.
                    Scrumptious Honey Whole Grain Cornbread

                    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html

                    1/2 c butter, price melted


                    2 powdered eggs (if substituting fresh decrease milk by 2-3 T)

                    1/2 t baking soda

                    1 c
                    whole grain flour (plain kamut is delicious in this recipe)
                    2/3 c honey
                    1 c buttermilk
                    *
                    1 c yellow cornmeal

                    1/2 t salt

                    Combine honey and butter in a mixing bowl. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda.


                    Mix cornmeal, flour and salt in small bowl.

                    Add cornmeal mixture to wet mixture. Stir as little as possible (you don’t want to activate the gluten and make your bread chewy instead of crumbly).

                    Butter pan (I always use glass), or make into muffins.
                    Bake at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes.

                    *Sour milk works well in a pinch (2 T apple cider vinegar combined with 1 c milk (minus 2 T)), but for fabulous bread go with the real buttermilk.

                    Sidenote…In almost all of my baking I use powdered eggs. These are whole eggs just with the water evaporated. I store them for emergencies and baking. The also reduce costs. We don’t like them plain however. The nutrition content is the same. I purchase mine from Walton feed. For me convenience is key, so I order all my bulk things together and have them delivered. It is just about impossible to try to get to the store with my 3 little ones.
                    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
                    Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, ambulance water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

                    You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

                    During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

                    I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

                    1/2 cup butter, melted
                    2 eggs
                    1/2 tsp baking soda
                    1 cup whole grain flour
                    2/3 cup honey
                    1 cup buttermilk
                    1 cup yellow cornmeal
                    1/2 tsp salt

                    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

                    In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

                    In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

                    Notes:
                    If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.
                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would also make a wonder side dish on Thanksgiving.

                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, decease halved lengthwise, approved seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, healing to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    — Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

                    — Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

                    — Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.
                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, side effects halved lengthwise, illness seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F.

                    Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    Replace the sausage with black beans for a vegetaria

                    • 2 medium acorn squash
                    • 1 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
                    • Kosher salt and fine ground black pepper, drug to taste
                    • 1 fresh spicy chicken or turkey sausage, generic casings removed, crumbled
                    • 1 cup yellow onion, diced small
                    • 1 cup celery, diced small (save inner leaves for garnish)
                    • 1 tbsp garlic, minced
                    • 1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    • 8 oz low-fat sour cream
                    • 1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated

                    INSTRUCTIONS:

                    1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
                    2. Begin by slicing squash lengthwise. With a spoon, remove seeds to create a clean cavity for stuffing.
                    3. Season cut side of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.
                    4. Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan over medium heat, brown sausage until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.
                    5. Return sauté pan to medium-low heat and add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent.
                    6. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté until aromatic, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat.
                    7. In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary.
                    8. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.
                    9. Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Garnish with reserved celery leaves and serve.
                    Scrumptious Honey Whole Grain Cornbread

                    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html

                    1/2 c butter, price melted


                    2 powdered eggs (if substituting fresh decrease milk by 2-3 T)

                    1/2 t baking soda

                    1 c
                    whole grain flour (plain kamut is delicious in this recipe)
                    2/3 c honey
                    1 c buttermilk
                    *
                    1 c yellow cornmeal

                    1/2 t salt

                    Combine honey and butter in a mixing bowl. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda.


                    Mix cornmeal, flour and salt in small bowl.

                    Add cornmeal mixture to wet mixture. Stir as little as possible (you don’t want to activate the gluten and make your bread chewy instead of crumbly).

                    Butter pan (I always use glass), or make into muffins.
                    Bake at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes.

                    *Sour milk works well in a pinch (2 T apple cider vinegar combined with 1 c milk (minus 2 T)), but for fabulous bread go with the real buttermilk.

                    Sidenote…In almost all of my baking I use powdered eggs. These are whole eggs just with the water evaporated. I store them for emergencies and baking. The also reduce costs. We don’t like them plain however. The nutrition content is the same. I purchase mine from Walton feed. For me convenience is key, so I order all my bulk things together and have them delivered. It is just about impossible to try to get to the store with my 3 little ones.
                    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
                    Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, ambulance water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

                    You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

                    During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

                    I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

                    1/2 cup butter, melted
                    2 eggs
                    1/2 tsp baking soda
                    1 cup whole grain flour
                    2/3 cup honey
                    1 cup buttermilk
                    1 cup yellow cornmeal
                    1/2 tsp salt

                    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

                    In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

                    In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

                    Notes:
                    If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.
                    Here is a hearty Lentil Soup to warm the bones through the last scraps of winter.

                    1/4 cup olive oil
                    1 onion, buy more about chopped
                    2 carrots, malady diced
                    2 celery stalks, page chopped
                    2 cloves garlic, minced
                    1 tsp oregano
                    1 bay leaf
                    1 tsp basil
                    1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained
                    2 cups dry hearty lentils
                    8 cups water
                    1 cup baby spinach leaves
                    2 tbsp vinegar
                    salt and pepper to taste

                    In a large soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onions, carrots and celery and saute until tender. Stir in garlic, oregano, bay leaf, and basil and cook for 2 minutes.

                    Stir in lentils, water and tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for at least 1 hour. When ready to serve, stir in spinach and cook until wilted. Stir in vinegar and season with salt and pepper.

                    Variations:
                    Barley
                    Sausage
                    Here is a hearty Lentil Soup to warm the bones through the last scraps of winter. I have tried many lentil soup recipes but they either had an off taste or they lacked flavour. I hope this soup is to your liking.

                    When ever possible I like to add a little history with a recipe. It makes for an interesting conversation starter at the dinner table.

                    A member of the legume family, visit this drug the lentil in addition to providing a rich source of iron is packed with fiber, ambulance folate and B vitamins. The lentil is often associated with Middle Eastern fare; however, the origins of this tiny legume dates back to 9000 BC Asia. Traces of the lentil are evident in Greece where it was once considered a poor man’s food while in Egypt the lentil has been discovered amoung the belongings of the royal Egypian tombs. Lentils were also a staple in early settlements of Hungary, Britain, Switzerland, Africa, Peru and Eastern Indian civilizations.

                    Lentils remain a popular source of protein for many cultures throughout the world. They cook quickly and do not require an overnight soaking like their cousins. Add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of lentils to any soup or stew. Mix cooked lentils with recipes like hamburgers, meatloaf and pasta dishes.

                    2 Italian Sausage links, castings removed
                    1/4 cup olive oil
                    1 onion, chopped
                    2 carrots, diced
                    2 celery stalks, chopped
                    4 cloves garlic, minced
                    1 tablespoon oregano
                    1 large bay leaf
                    1 teaspoon basil
                    1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained
                    2 cups dry lentils
                    8 cups chicken broth or water
                    1-2 cups baby spinach leaves
                    1/4 teaspoon pepper
                    Salt to taste

                    In a large soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the sausage; crumbling as it cooks. Add the garlic, onions, carrots and celery and saute until tender. Stir in garlic, oregano, bay leaf, basil, lentils, broth and tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for at least 2 hours until thickened and the vegetables are soft. When ready to serve, stir in spinach and pepper; cook until wilted. Season with salt if needed.

                    Variations:
                    – Note that the chicken stock helps give the soup flavor. Do not use canned broth it is flavorless. Use a good quality chicken base or homemade stock. I like Better than Bullion. If using water you might need to adjust the spices adding some thyme, salt, rosemary and a tablespoons of vinegar (distilled or white).
                    – For a vegan version of the soup omit the sausage and broth adding 1 tablespoon of vinegar.
                    Here is a hearty Lentil Soup to warm the bones through the last scraps of winter. I have tried many lentil soup recipes but they either had an off taste or they lacked flavour. I hope this soup is to your liking.

                    When ever possible I like to add a little history with a recipe. It makes for an interesting conversation starter at the dinner table.

                    A member of the legume family, visit this drug the lentil in addition to providing a rich source of iron is packed with fiber, ambulance folate and B vitamins. The lentil is often associated with Middle Eastern fare; however, the origins of this tiny legume dates back to 9000 BC Asia. Traces of the lentil are evident in Greece where it was once considered a poor man’s food while in Egypt the lentil has been discovered amoung the belongings of the royal Egypian tombs. Lentils were also a staple in early settlements of Hungary, Britain, Switzerland, Africa, Peru and Eastern Indian civilizations.

                    Lentils remain a popular source of protein for many cultures throughout the world. They cook quickly and do not require an overnight soaking like their cousins. Add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of lentils to any soup or stew. Mix cooked lentils with recipes like hamburgers, meatloaf and pasta dishes.

                    2 Italian Sausage links, castings removed
                    1/4 cup olive oil
                    1 onion, chopped
                    2 carrots, diced
                    2 celery stalks, chopped
                    4 cloves garlic, minced
                    1 tablespoon oregano
                    1 large bay leaf
                    1 teaspoon basil
                    1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained
                    2 cups dry lentils
                    8 cups chicken broth or water
                    1-2 cups baby spinach leaves
                    1/4 teaspoon pepper
                    Salt to taste

                    In a large soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the sausage; crumbling as it cooks. Add the garlic, onions, carrots and celery and saute until tender. Stir in garlic, oregano, bay leaf, basil, lentils, broth and tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for at least 2 hours until thickened and the vegetables are soft. When ready to serve, stir in spinach and pepper; cook until wilted. Season with salt if needed.

                    Variations:
                    – Note that the chicken stock helps give the soup flavor. Do not use canned broth it is flavorless. Use a good quality chicken base or homemade stock. I like Better than Bullion. If using water you might need to adjust the spices adding some thyme, salt, rosemary and a tablespoons of vinegar (distilled or white).
                    – For a vegan version of the soup omit the sausage and broth adding 1 tablespoon of vinegar.

                    mom-dad

                    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, approved making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, malady Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), medical who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

                    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

                    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

                    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

                    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

                    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

                    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.
                    Here is a hearty Lentil Soup to warm the bones through the last scraps of winter. I have tried many lentil soup recipes but they either had an off taste or they lacked flavour. I hope this soup is to your liking.

                    When ever possible I like to add a little history with a recipe. It makes for an interesting conversation starter at the dinner table.

                    A member of the legume family, visit this drug the lentil in addition to providing a rich source of iron is packed with fiber, ambulance folate and B vitamins. The lentil is often associated with Middle Eastern fare; however, the origins of this tiny legume dates back to 9000 BC Asia. Traces of the lentil are evident in Greece where it was once considered a poor man’s food while in Egypt the lentil has been discovered amoung the belongings of the royal Egypian tombs. Lentils were also a staple in early settlements of Hungary, Britain, Switzerland, Africa, Peru and Eastern Indian civilizations.

                    Lentils remain a popular source of protein for many cultures throughout the world. They cook quickly and do not require an overnight soaking like their cousins. Add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of lentils to any soup or stew. Mix cooked lentils with recipes like hamburgers, meatloaf and pasta dishes.

                    2 Italian Sausage links, castings removed
                    1/4 cup olive oil
                    1 onion, chopped
                    2 carrots, diced
                    2 celery stalks, chopped
                    4 cloves garlic, minced
                    1 tablespoon oregano
                    1 large bay leaf
                    1 teaspoon basil
                    1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained
                    2 cups dry lentils
                    8 cups chicken broth or water
                    1-2 cups baby spinach leaves
                    1/4 teaspoon pepper
                    Salt to taste

                    In a large soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the sausage; crumbling as it cooks. Add the garlic, onions, carrots and celery and saute until tender. Stir in garlic, oregano, bay leaf, basil, lentils, broth and tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for at least 2 hours until thickened and the vegetables are soft. When ready to serve, stir in spinach and pepper; cook until wilted. Season with salt if needed.

                    Variations:
                    – Note that the chicken stock helps give the soup flavor. Do not use canned broth it is flavorless. Use a good quality chicken base or homemade stock. I like Better than Bullion. If using water you might need to adjust the spices adding some thyme, salt, rosemary and a tablespoons of vinegar (distilled or white).
                    – For a vegan version of the soup omit the sausage and broth adding 1 tablespoon of vinegar.

                    mom-dad

                    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, approved making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, malady Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), medical who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

                    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

                    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

                    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

                    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

                    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

                    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

                    mom-dad

                    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, abortion making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, remedy Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), approved who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

                    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

                    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tale of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

                    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

                    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

                    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

                    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.
                    Here is a hearty Lentil Soup to warm the bones through the last scraps of winter. I have tried many lentil soup recipes but they either had an off taste or they lacked flavour. I hope this soup is to your liking.

                    When ever possible I like to add a little history with a recipe. It makes for an interesting conversation starter at the dinner table.

                    A member of the legume family, visit this drug the lentil in addition to providing a rich source of iron is packed with fiber, ambulance folate and B vitamins. The lentil is often associated with Middle Eastern fare; however, the origins of this tiny legume dates back to 9000 BC Asia. Traces of the lentil are evident in Greece where it was once considered a poor man’s food while in Egypt the lentil has been discovered amoung the belongings of the royal Egypian tombs. Lentils were also a staple in early settlements of Hungary, Britain, Switzerland, Africa, Peru and Eastern Indian civilizations.

                    Lentils remain a popular source of protein for many cultures throughout the world. They cook quickly and do not require an overnight soaking like their cousins. Add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of lentils to any soup or stew. Mix cooked lentils with recipes like hamburgers, meatloaf and pasta dishes.

                    2 Italian Sausage links, castings removed
                    1/4 cup olive oil
                    1 onion, chopped
                    2 carrots, diced
                    2 celery stalks, chopped
                    4 cloves garlic, minced
                    1 tablespoon oregano
                    1 large bay leaf
                    1 teaspoon basil
                    1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained
                    2 cups dry lentils
                    8 cups chicken broth or water
                    1-2 cups baby spinach leaves
                    1/4 teaspoon pepper
                    Salt to taste

                    In a large soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the sausage; crumbling as it cooks. Add the garlic, onions, carrots and celery and saute until tender. Stir in garlic, oregano, bay leaf, basil, lentils, broth and tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for at least 2 hours until thickened and the vegetables are soft. When ready to serve, stir in spinach and pepper; cook until wilted. Season with salt if needed.

                    Variations:
                    – Note that the chicken stock helps give the soup flavor. Do not use canned broth it is flavorless. Use a good quality chicken base or homemade stock. I like Better than Bullion. If using water you might need to adjust the spices adding some thyme, salt, rosemary and a tablespoons of vinegar (distilled or white).
                    – For a vegan version of the soup omit the sausage and broth adding 1 tablespoon of vinegar.

                    mom-dad

                    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, approved making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, malady Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), medical who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

                    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

                    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

                    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

                    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

                    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

                    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

                    mom-dad

                    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, abortion making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, remedy Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), approved who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

                    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

                    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tale of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

                    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

                    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

                    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

                    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

                    Photo: Paul Horsch and his family during their Sunday dinner

                    Courtesy of Art.com

                    Sunday dinner at my Grandmother Jepson’s home was always pot roast with carrots and potatoes. As my Grandmother opened the front door to let us in the smell of roast accompanied by the warmth from the oven would hit us so strongly making our bellies ache to eat right away. Today we carry on the Sunday dinner family tradition. Even though my grandparents have passed away and I am far from home I savor the memory.

                    During the week life can get fairly hectic. Dinners are kept simple to accomodate busy schedules. On Sunday however, for sale we slow down. I like to use to down time to cook. Sunday dinner usually consists of vegetables and a hearty meat such as pot roast or a roasted chicken. Sometimes we just make pancakes. Sunday is also the day I make a dessert. The gang opts for cookies most of the time. We all agree the extra effort to make a feast is worth it. It is a nice change to sit back and relax while enjoying good food that for once fills our bellies unlike the lighter weekly fare.

                    — Make Sunday dinner a time to relax, capsule laugh, mind tell stories and enjoy the company.
                    — Invite friends and extended family over to share in the feast.
                    — Have breakfast for dinner or dinner for brunch.
                    — Learn to make a family recipe together.
                    — Get everyone involved. Make fresh rolls or bread together.
                    — Set the table. Take the time to lay a clean tablecloth and set out candles or flowers. Use the fine china. Let the family know this is a special day.
                    — Decide on casual or church dress.
                    — Practice your manners.
                    — Clean up together.
                    — Play board games afterward.

                    Pistachio Pesto

                    1 1/2 bunches fresh basil (about 1 1/2 cups lightly packed)
                    4 ounces pine nuts
                    2 Garlic cloves
                    1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
                    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
                    4 pieces (6 ounces each) fresh tilapia
                    1 Tbsp. olive oil

                    Toast pine nuts in a pan over medium heat until golden and fragrant. Process pine nuts and garlic in a food processor until it a smooth paste forms. Add the basil and cheese; processing until completely blended and smooth. Slowly drizzle in the oil while the processor is on. Season with salt and pepper.

                    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

                    Season the tilapia with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a large oven proof sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add oil. Cook the fish for 1 to 2 minutes (If using fresh fish start on the flesh side) or until it turns light golden brown. Flip the fish over and spoon the pesto generously over the fish.

                    Transfer pan to the oven and continue to cook 5 more minutes or until the fish is cooked through. Serve with a salad of mixed greens for a complete meal.

                    Variations:
                    Pesto sauce without the cheese:
                    http://www.food.com/recipe/pesto-sauce-without-the-cheese-132222
                    1 1/2 bunches fresh basil (about 1 1/2 cups lightly packed)
                    4 ounces pine nuts
                    2 Garlic cloves
                    1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
                    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
                    4 pieces (6 ounces each) fresh tilapia
                    1 Tbsp. olive oil

                    Toast pine nuts in a pan over medium heat until golden and fragrant. Process pine nuts and garlic in a food processor until it a smooth paste forms. Add the basil and cheese; processing until completely blended and smooth. Slowly drizzle in the oil while the processor is on. Season with salt and pepper.

                    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

                    Season the tilapia with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a large oven proof sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add oil. Cook the fish for 1 to 2 minutes (If using fresh fish start on the flesh side) or until it turns light golden brown. Flip the fish over and spoon the pesto generously over the fish.

                    Transfer pan to the oven and continue to cook 5 more minutes or until the fish is cooked through. Serve with a salad of mixed greens for a complete meal.

                    Variations:
                    Pesto sauce without the cheese:
                    http://www.food.com/recipe/pesto-sauce-without-the-cheese-132222

                    Yum, information pills yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, visit lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, what is ed when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

                    The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

                    Source: Simple Bites
                    makes about 20 pancakes
                    1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
                    3 cups whole wheat flour
                    1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
                    1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
                    1 teaspoon baking soda
                    1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    2 cups low-fat milk
                    1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
                    3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
                    1/3 cup honey
                    1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
                    2 eggs, lightly beaten

                    Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

                    Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

                    In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

                    Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

                    Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

                    You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

                    To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

                    Variations:
                    – Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
                    – Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
                    – Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
                    – Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
                    – Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

                    Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
                    Yum, sickness sales yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son and I could eat them for breakfast, sales lunch and dinner. This submission is from my sister. She admits to becoming so smitten with this recipe of banana pancakes they had eaten them at least three times.

                    The addition of oatmeal gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. I used plain yogurt, recipe because I always have plain yogurt on hand, and grounded whole oats. I would suggest using the quick oats if you are not crazy over the texture of whole grain baked goods.

                    Source: Cooks.com by Cookie
                    4 ripe bananas
                    1/2 cup low-fat or whole milk
                    1/4 cup sour cream
                    2 eggs
                    1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter melted
                    2/3 cup cake flour
                    1/2 cup quick-cooking oatmeal
                    1 teaspoon baking soda
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    warm maple syrup, for serving

                    Heat oven to 200 degrees.

                    Mash 3 of the bananas with fork in a medium bowl; stir in milk, sour cream, eggs and 2 tablespoons of the butter in medium bowl; set aside.

                    Combine flour, oatmeal, baking soda and salt in large bowl. Fold banana mixture into flour mixture, stirring just until blended (do not over mix).

                    Heat remaining 2 tablespoons butter in large skillet over medium to medium-high heat; pour 1/4-cup portions of the batter into the skillet, spacing them apart. Cook, in batches, until bubbles cover surface of pancakes and underside are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Gently turn over; cook until other sides are browned, about 2 minutes. Transfer to oven on a baking sheet to keep warm, while remaining pancakes cook.

                    Meanwhile, slice remaining banana to top pancakes; add maple syrup to taste.

                    Variations:
                    – Use whole oats processed in a blender or food processor in place of the instant oatmeal.
                    – Or soak the whole oats in the milk for 3 minutes before adding to the rest of the ingredients. You may need to add a little more milk if the batter becomes to thick.
                    – Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
                    Yum, sickness sales yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son and I could eat them for breakfast, sales lunch and dinner. This submission is from my sister. She admits to becoming so smitten with this recipe of banana pancakes they had eaten them at least three times.

                    The addition of oatmeal gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. I used plain yogurt, recipe because I always have plain yogurt on hand, and grounded whole oats. I would suggest using the quick oats if you are not crazy over the texture of whole grain baked goods.

                    Source: Cooks.com by Cookie
                    4 ripe bananas
                    1/2 cup low-fat or whole milk
                    1/4 cup sour cream
                    2 eggs
                    1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter melted
                    2/3 cup cake flour
                    1/2 cup quick-cooking oatmeal
                    1 teaspoon baking soda
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    warm maple syrup, for serving

                    Heat oven to 200 degrees.

                    Mash 3 of the bananas with fork in a medium bowl; stir in milk, sour cream, eggs and 2 tablespoons of the butter in medium bowl; set aside.

                    Combine flour, oatmeal, baking soda and salt in large bowl. Fold banana mixture into flour mixture, stirring just until blended (do not over mix).

                    Heat remaining 2 tablespoons butter in large skillet over medium to medium-high heat; pour 1/4-cup portions of the batter into the skillet, spacing them apart. Cook, in batches, until bubbles cover surface of pancakes and underside are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Gently turn over; cook until other sides are browned, about 2 minutes. Transfer to oven on a baking sheet to keep warm, while remaining pancakes cook.

                    Meanwhile, slice remaining banana to top pancakes; add maple syrup to taste.

                    Variations:
                    – Use whole oats processed in a blender or food processor in place of the instant oatmeal.
                    – Or soak the whole oats in the milk for 3 minutes before adding to the rest of the ingredients. You may need to add a little more milk if the batter becomes to thick.
                    – Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.

                    I have been on a pesto kick this past month. I cannot get enough of the stuff. In years past my springtime addiction has consisted of cilantro and limes. Not sure why the sudden change. None the less I am not complaining. Pistachio pesto is a new take on the traditional basil pesto. It is a perfect green dish to celebrate St. Patrick’s day. Watch the garlic though. Too much will have tender young mouths breathing fire.

                    Source: Parents Magazine December 2010
                    1 cup packed spinach
                    1/3 cup olive oil
                    1/4 cup shelled pistachio nuts
                    1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1 clove garlic, visit
                    12 oz. dried pasta, more about cooked and drained

                    Put the spinach, oil, nuts, cheese, salt and garlic in the food processor.
                    Process until smooth. Toss with pasta and serve.

                    Makes 6 cups

                    March Website Review: The Thrifty Crafter

                    Photo: Property of The Thrifty Crafter

                    A Bargain Shopper’s Guide to Expressing Creativity

                    This months website review is on one of my three favorite go to craft sites: The Thrifty Crafter. The thrifty Crafter offers tantalizing recipes like Halibut and Chickpea Salad or a Sweetharts Sugar Cookies tutorial. You will also find fun zany projects and stylish elegant ideas. My favorite of all and the reason I came across The Thrifty Crafter was the huge paper pom poms.

                    Happy Entertaining!