Barbecue Chicken Pizza

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.

Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, view tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, drugs mace, viagra order pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, find tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, more about mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, diagnosis skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, diagnosis skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, decease skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, information pills halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, diagnosis skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, decease skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, information pills halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.


When I was little I loved Pizza Hut pizza. The crust was so thick and crunchy on the outside and so soft

and warm on the inside. Each slice had the perfect ratio of sauce to cheese. Of course if it was not a special occasion we usually ate homemade or Little Caesars. I remember the first time I had Pizza Hut BBQ pizza was on a trip to Atlanta. The BBQ flavor was short lived. Besides I seemed to have been the only one who favored a non traditional slice of pie.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
For the crust:
2 tsp yeast
2 tsp sugar
1 1/2 cups warm water (105 to 110 degrees F)
1/2 cup olive oil
1 tsp salt
1 tsp Italian seasoning, what is ed optional
4 – 4 1/2 cups flour (can use 3 cups white flour and 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour)

Let yeast and sugar dissolve in warm water in a large mixing bowl for about 5 minutes. Add olive oil, doctor salt and optional Italian seasoning.

Slowly add the flour until completely combined and dough is no longer sticky. Knead for 5 minutes, place in a greased bowl, cover and let rise for 1 hour.

Depending on how thin you like your crust, this makes enough for 2 large pizzas plus 2 small pizzas. The extra dough can be frozen.

For the barbecue sauce:
1 1/2 cups ketchup
2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cups brown sugar
1/2 tsp each – allspice, crushed red pepper flakes, pepper, cumin, chili powder, garlic powder

Add everything to a small bowl and stir until combined. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes before using to allow the flavors to blend.

For the toppings:
1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cooked and sliced
1/2 pounds bacon, diced and crisped *optional
1 onion, thinly sliced and caramelized (cooked in 2 tsp bacon grease or butter.) *optional
1 cup frozen corn, thawed *optional
2 cup shredded pizza blend cheese

To assemble the pizzas:
Roll out dough into desired sizes on thickness. Place on a baking sheet or stone dusted with cornmeal.

Spread barbecue sauce on top of the crust, leaving about 1/2 inch crust all the way around.

Top with chicken, any other desired toppings and cheese. Bake at 500 degrees for 12-15 minutes, until crust is golden brown.

Variations:
— Sub flour tortillas or frozen or refrigerated pizza dough for the homemade version.

Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.

Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, view tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, drugs mace, viagra order pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, find tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, more about mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, viagra kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, this yogurt, link cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Super Bowl Sunday is set for February 6th. If you are not heading to the Cowboys Stadium then it is time to plan your home turf game menu. This year we’ve got a pizza bar theme. The two contending teams are the Gourmet Pesto Chicken French Bread Pizza and my personal favorite the BBQ chicken pizza.

Source: Stolen Moments Cooking
1/2 – 1 lb. boneless, diagnosis skinless chicken breasts
Salt and pepper or type of poultry seasoning
2 loaves French bread, halved lengthwise
1 – 1 1/2 cups pesto
2 cups Italian or pizza blend cheese
1 large tomato, sliced

Season chicken breasts to taste. Bake at 350 degrees until fully cooked, about 30 minutes. Let cool and cut into thin slices.

Spread pesto on each of the four halves of bread. Evenly layer the chicken pieces on top of the pesto.

Cover completely with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and lightly golden brown.

Family Togetherness: Winter Olympics

The first time I walked into a butcher shop I felt completely out of my element. Navigating the meat case was and can still be intimidating at times. To understand the meat case at a butcher shop or supermarket, clinic you must first understand the different cuts of meat.

There are three top grades of beef to consider when choosing a steak or roast. Prime, Choice, and Select. The grades are based on the age of the cattle and the degree of marbling of fat.

“Prime” graded meats are the most expensive cuts. You will not find prime graded beef in the grocery store as they are almost exclusively sold to restaurants and hotels. Prime cuts are produced from young well fed cattle. The greater the marbling of fat the more flavorful, tender and juicy the cut of meat.

Choice graded meats has less marbling but are still tender, juicy and flavorful as long as they are not over cooked.

Select is the third common grade of meat. It is leaner than the prime and choice with significantly less marbling. The lack of fat means less juice but a much lower price.

You can save money by purchasing a USDA Select grade cut and marinating before cooking to obtain the maximum flavor and tenderness. So how do you know the Choice meat in the supermarket is really what the label says? Unlike the vibrant white ribbons of fat in Prime and Choice meats Select or commercial grade (or lower grade) meats appear darker and the fat has an oily or more yellowish appearance.

The various cuts of beef:


1. Chuck:
The first cut of meat behind the head is the shoulder, known as Chuck. This section of the cow although flavorful is fairly tough and fatty requiring a slow cooking method (preferably in a liquid) to break down the fibers. Chuck steaks and roasts (chuck blade, chuck fillet, under blade, top blade and roasts) are the least expensive cuts of meat and well worth the price if cooked properly. For blade steaks be sure to marinade or braise well overnight before grilling. Cook stew meat and roasts slowly in liquid.

2. Brisket:

The Brisket is located below the Chuck. This is a very course meat as it surrounds the sternum. Ideally Brisket should be smoked slowly to soften the stringy fibers. Corned beef is brisket that has been cured in a salt brine.

3. Rib, short loin and sirloin:
The meat from the middle area of the cow is tender and well marbled with large pockets of fat making steaks juicy and full of flavor.

Prime Rib:

The prime rib-eye roast is by far the most expensive. Be prepared to shell out some serious cash in the neighborhood of $70 plus dollars. You probably won’t find “prime rib” at the grocery store. Instead, look for roasts labeled “rib roast,” “eye of the rib roast” (a boneless roast) or if the ribs are attached a “standing rib roast.”

Rib Steak: a prime rib cut into individual steaks. The rib steak has the bone attached while the rib eye steak the bone is removed.

Short Loin Steak:
Without the extra ripples of fat the short loin steak is less tender than a rib eye.

The Strip Steak: A long, narrow and slightly triangular top loin steak. With the bone removed it goes by many names: strip steak, Kansas City strip, New York strip and sirloin strip steak,

The Tenderloin: Tenderloin steaks are tender but pricey and the flavor is pretty mild. The thickest part of the tenderloin is known as chateaubriand. The meat behind the chateaubriand is the popular Filet mignon.

T-bone Steak: The last steak cut from the tenderloin is known for the t-shape bone that runs down the middle. The T-bone has a little of both the short loin and the tenderloin. The porterhouse is a t-bone steak with a bigger portion of tenderloin attached.

Sirloin Steak:
The sirloin comprised of the cow’s hip. Sirloin steaks are large and thin. The most well-known is the tri-tip.

Flank Steak: Directly below the loin and sirloin, on the underside of the cow’s belly, is the flank. Flank steak is a thin, wide, boneless cut. Flank steaks are offen used when making Fajitas. Cook them very quickly to medium-rare and slice thinly against the grain.

*Photos curtesy of The Meat Man, Delicious Magazine, Snider Bros, Western Beef and Seafood, Kobe Beef Store, Tony’s Market and Wiki Commons,

The first time I walked into a butcher shop I felt completely out of my element. Navigating the meat case was and can still be intimidating at times. To understand the meat case at a butcher shop or supermarket, clinic you must first understand the different cuts of meat.

There are three top grades of beef to consider when choosing a steak or roast. Prime, Choice, and Select. The grades are based on the age of the cattle and the degree of marbling of fat.

“Prime” graded meats are the most expensive cuts. You will not find prime graded beef in the grocery store as they are almost exclusively sold to restaurants and hotels. Prime cuts are produced from young well fed cattle. The greater the marbling of fat the more flavorful, tender and juicy the cut of meat.

Choice graded meats has less marbling but are still tender, juicy and flavorful as long as they are not over cooked.

Select is the third common grade of meat. It is leaner than the prime and choice with significantly less marbling. The lack of fat means less juice but a much lower price.

You can save money by purchasing a USDA Select grade cut and marinating before cooking to obtain the maximum flavor and tenderness. So how do you know the Choice meat in the supermarket is really what the label says? Unlike the vibrant white ribbons of fat in Prime and Choice meats Select or commercial grade (or lower grade) meats appear darker and the fat has an oily or more yellowish appearance.

The various cuts of beef:


1. Chuck:
The first cut of meat behind the head is the shoulder, known as Chuck. This section of the cow although flavorful is fairly tough and fatty requiring a slow cooking method (preferably in a liquid) to break down the fibers. Chuck steaks and roasts (chuck blade, chuck fillet, under blade, top blade and roasts) are the least expensive cuts of meat and well worth the price if cooked properly. For blade steaks be sure to marinade or braise well overnight before grilling. Cook stew meat and roasts slowly in liquid.

2. Brisket:

The Brisket is located below the Chuck. This is a very course meat as it surrounds the sternum. Ideally Brisket should be smoked slowly to soften the stringy fibers. Corned beef is brisket that has been cured in a salt brine.

3. Rib, short loin and sirloin:
The meat from the middle area of the cow is tender and well marbled with large pockets of fat making steaks juicy and full of flavor.

Prime Rib:

The prime rib-eye roast is by far the most expensive. Be prepared to shell out some serious cash in the neighborhood of $70 plus dollars. You probably won’t find “prime rib” at the grocery store. Instead, look for roasts labeled “rib roast,” “eye of the rib roast” (a boneless roast) or if the ribs are attached a “standing rib roast.”

Rib Steak: a prime rib cut into individual steaks. The rib steak has the bone attached while the rib eye steak the bone is removed.

Short Loin Steak:
Without the extra ripples of fat the short loin steak is less tender than a rib eye.

The Strip Steak: A long, narrow and slightly triangular top loin steak. With the bone removed it goes by many names: strip steak, Kansas City strip, New York strip and sirloin strip steak,

The Tenderloin: Tenderloin steaks are tender but pricey and the flavor is pretty mild. The thickest part of the tenderloin is known as chateaubriand. The meat behind the chateaubriand is the popular Filet mignon.

T-bone Steak: The last steak cut from the tenderloin is known for the t-shape bone that runs down the middle. The T-bone has a little of both the short loin and the tenderloin. The porterhouse is a t-bone steak with a bigger portion of tenderloin attached.

Sirloin Steak:
The sirloin comprised of the cow’s hip. Sirloin steaks are large and thin. The most well-known is the tri-tip.

Flank Steak: Directly below the loin and sirloin, on the underside of the cow’s belly, is the flank. Flank steak is a thin, wide, boneless cut. Flank steaks are offen used when making Fajitas. Cook them very quickly to medium-rare and slice thinly against the grain.

*Photos curtesy of The Meat Man, Delicious Magazine, Snider Bros, Western Beef and Seafood, Kobe Beef Store, Tony’s Market and Wiki Commons,

To understand the meat case at a butcher shop, buy more about you must first understand your cuts of meat.
The first cut of meat behind the head is the shoulder, view known in butchery terms as the chuck. Although flavorful, mind the often-used shoulder muscle is mostly tough and full of connective tissue. The meat from this section of a cow is less expensive and primarily used for slow-cooked roasts. However, if you’re looking for a bargain, a top blade steak, also called a flatiron, is a flavorful, fairly tender chuck steak to throw on the grill.

Next in the line-up, anatomically speaking, are the portions of a cow that butchers call the rib, short loin and sirloin. The meat from this top, middle area of the cow is the most tender, since the muscles move the least during a cow’s life (as compared to the shoulder, hind end and shank). From these three larger cuts come most of the steaks you see at the market.

RIB STEAK:
These steaks are basically a prime rib roast cut into smaller pieces. A rib steak has the bone attached, but the more popular rib eye steak has had the bone removed.

The rib eye is also sold as a Spencer steak (in the West) and Delmonico steak (on the East coast). Rib steaks usually have large pockets of fat, which add flavor and give the steak a moist, juicy texture.

SHORT LOIN STEAK:
Some people find a long, narrow and slightly triangular top loin steak to be less tender than a rib eye and miss the extra ripples of fat. Others think a top loin steak has just the right balance of flavor and tenderness, without being too fatty. When it has a bone, a top loin steak is known as a shell steak. When the bone is removed it goes by many names: a strip steak, Kansas City strip, New York strip and sirloin strip steak, (which, confusingly, comes from the short loin, not the sirloin) are all the same cut of steak.

Also cut from the short loin portion of a cow is the tenderloin, a portion of meat considered to be extremely tender (hence the name). Tenderloins are easy to recognize in the meat case, due to a long, cylindrical shape that’s thicker on one end then tapers down. A tenderloin is cut into many different types of steak, and all are pretty pricey. The thickest part (usually about 3 inches thick) of the tenderloin is cut into a steak known as chateaubriand. Filet mignon (also known as tenderloin steak) is cut from the meat behind the chateaubriand and is slightly less thick. Filet Mignon is thought to be the most tender part of the tenderloin, but on the downside, the flavor can be pretty mild.

Last but not least, the short loin gives us the t-bone, a steak named for, you guessed it, a “T” shaped bone that runs down the middle. On one side of the bone is meat from the top loin, and on the other is a thin strip of tenderloin. Some say this steak combines the best of both worlds: the tenderness of a tenderloin steak and the rich, “meaty” flavor of a top loin steak. If you’re really hungry or feeling particularly manly, skip the T-bone and go straight for the porterhouse, which is simply a t-bone steak with a bigger portion of tenderloin attached.

Sirloin Steak
The sirloin is basically the cow’s hip. Sirloin steaks are usually fairly large but thin, and the meat is both moderately flavorful and moderately tender. Steaks from this region of a cow tend to be a good value. The most well-known among them are the top sirloin steak and the tri-tip, both boneless. Lesser-known steaks cut from the sirloin are the pin-bone, flat-bone, round-bone and wedge-bone steaks.

Directly below the loin and sirloin, on the underside of the cow’s belly, is the flank. Flank steak is a thin, wide, boneless cut with a texture (grain) that looks very stringy. Cooked very quickly to medium-rare and sliced thinly against the grain, the chewy texture is less noticeable and you will be rewarded with rich flavor.

SEASONING THE MEAT:
f a high-quality cut of meat is cooked correctly, you really don’t need much more than salt and pepper. Which makes one think that seasoning a steak is a very short topic, until of course, you consider the hotly debated “salt early” and “salt late” theories.

The Salt Early Theory: Salting meat many hours or even days before cooking breaks down the protein in meat and makes it more tender. Initially, the salt draws out moisture, but over time the meat re-absorbs the moisture, which is now flavored with salt and therefore adds more succulent flavor to the meat.

The Salt Late Theory: Salt dries meat out. Period. Don’t add it until immediately before cooking.

In this debate, we take the middle road. In our experience, the salt early theory rings true with larger or tougher cuts of beef. For your average steak, salting about a half-hour before cooking is ideal and seasoning right before cooking works just fine, too.

Before seasoning, always make sure to pat the steak dry. Some people like to brush the steak with oil (avoid olive oil, which can become bitter at high heats) or a combination of melted butter and oil before seasoning to help the outside of the steak brown. Season both sides of the steak, using a teaspoon or less of both salt and pepper. Remember, you can always add more seasoning after the steak cooks, but you can’t un-salt the meat.

After seasoning, let the meat sit on the counter for a bit so it comes up to room temperature (a good rule of thumb is at least 10 minutes for every inch of thickness).

If you want to branch out from salt and pepper, marinades and rubs can be used on any type of steak, but are an especially great way to bring flavor to less-expensive cuts.

Cooking Methods

What we love about cooking steak on the stove is how easy it is to get a crisp, caramelized coating on the outside of the steak without over-cooking the middle. More often than not, this is harder to achieve on a grill. Using a combination of the stove-top and the oven is a tried and true method for perfect steak. The question is, which comes first?
The most common method is searing the steak first on the stove, then finishing it in a hot oven.

Pat dry and season the steak.
Pre-heat the oven to 450-500 degrees Fahrenheit.
When the oven is up to temp, drizzle a little oil in an oven-proof pan (cast iron works great) and then heat the pan on the stove over high heat for several minutes until it just barely starts to smoke (you can give the pan a head start by putting it in the oven while it preheats).
Drop the steak in the pan and let it sit without touching it for 3 minutes. Be prepared to turn on your fan or open some windows, as there will be smoke.
If the steak is stuck to the pan, it’s not done browning yet and needs a little more time. If it comes up relatively easily after 3 minutes, flip the steak.
Put the pan, with the steak in it, in the oven.
Let it bake for several minutes, then check by temperature or texture for doneness.
A small but vocal population of steak lovers swears by the “reverse sear” technique. The theory behind this method is that cooking the steak in the oven first will dry the outside of the steak while slowly cooking the inside and keeping it tender. If the outside of the steak is dry, it will then sear faster and more efficiently in a hot pan.

Pat dry and season the steak.
Preheat the oven to 275 degrees Fahrenheit.
Place a wire cooling rack on a cookie sheet then put the steak on the cooling rack. This allows hot air to circulate around the entire steak.
Bake the steak until the internal temperature is 100-110 degrees.
Drizzle a little oil in a pan over high heat. Just as the pan begins to smoke, drop the steak in the pan.
Cook the steak for 2 minutes on each side.
So does this method really yield a more perfect steak? We have to admit, it did brown the outside of the steak very nicely while leaving the inside really juicy and tender. As a bonus, you get nice grill marks from baking the meat on the cooling rack. Give it a try, and you be the judge.

In some people’s minds, however, the only way to cook a steak is over an open flame in the great outdoors. Many of these same people consider grilling an art form that cannot be mastered overnight. It takes years of experimenting with different types of grills, different heat levels and cooking times and various seasonings and marinades. This may be true for some fanatics out there, but we feel pretty confident that you’ll get a great steak the first time out if you pay attention to a few key things.

The “charcoal vs gas” debate is one that has gone for decades, and we think they both have their place. For convenience and the easy ability to control heat levels, a gas grill can’t be beat. For depth of flavor, charcoal usually wins out.

Either way, you never want to put a steak on a cold grill. Wait until it heats up. For a gas grill, this is easy. Simply turn the knob to medium-high and keep the lid closed for 10-15 minutes. For a charcoal grill, the type of charcoal you use will affect the heat level as well as the flavor of the meat. Briquettes are easy to light, hold steady heat and are inexpensive, but they are also made with questionable additives that can give meat a chemical flavor. We favor hardwood charcoal (made from oak, hickory, mesquite, etc) for a natural, smoky flavor. Hardwood charcoal can be a little trickier to light and once it gets going it burns hotter and more unpredictably, which requires keeping a closer eye on the grill. A small price to pay, we think.

There is no point in using hardwood charcoal and then dousing it in lighter fluid, which will make your meat taste like it was marinated in petroleum. Instead, use a charcoal chimney starter to stack and light the coals. Once the coals are lit (usually about 30 coals are needed to provide adequate heat) wait until they change from bright red to an ashy white, which usually takes at least 20 minutes. Spread the coals out, placing most of them on one side to create a high heat side and a few on the other side of the grill to create a low heat side. Cover the grill for about five minutes so the heat builds to medium-high. To test the heat, simply hold your hand a few inches above the grill. If you can’t hold it there for more then 2 seconds, you’ve got high heat. If you can hold it there for 4-6 seconds without pulling away, the heat is medium-high.

Now, you’re ready to cook. Start by placing the steak (patted dry, seasoned and close to room temp.) over medium-high heat for at least 3 minutes without turning. This is about right for a 1-inch steak; thicker steaks will need another minute or two. Flip, and grill the other side for another 3 minutes. This should brown both sides and bring the steak to the brink of medium-rare.

To bring the steak up to desired doneness, move it to an area of the grill that has less-intense heat. Close the lid and cook for another 3-5 minutes before checking if it’s ready.

Although flames add excitement to grilling, they do nothing for the meat but burn it. Move the steak away from flare-ups as soon as they occur. In general, try to move the steak as little as possible while it cooks – too much movement prevents the steak from searing and getting a crispy, brown coating.

FINISHED
A thermometer is the most accurate way to gauge if steak is done to your liking. Although your thermometer will probably tell you that 145 degrees is rare for beef, any chef you ask will tell you differently. Rare in a chef’s mind, meaning very pink, is closer to 125 degrees; medium-rare is 125-130; medium, 130-135 degrees; medium-well, 135 to 140 degrees; and well, 140 and above. You can also give the steak a poke with your finger. Rare is squishy, medium-rare is spongy, and medium-well is taut. The steak will continue to cook at least five degrees when it’s off the grill or out of the pan, so err on the side of taking it away from heat earlier rather than later.

The final step, which should be included no matter how you cook your steak, is letting the meat rest before cutting into it. As the meat cools down the proteins begin to firm up and hold moisture, so when you cut into the steak all the juicy goodness won’t run out. About 8-10 minutes should do it, and a loose cover of foil or no cover at all is a much better choice than tightly sealing the meat up while it rests. If you’re like us, it takes at least 8-10 minutes to set the table and get everyone to sit down, so usually this step simply happens without having to think about it.

Hungry yet? Get over to your local butcher shop, grab a little salt and pepper, and give one of these cooking methods a try. In less time than it takes to drive to a restaurant, you’ll be sitting down at your kitchen table with a tender, sizzling hot, and dare we stay it, perfect steak on your plate.

This article was brought to you with one of the Challenge #1 (below) mini-challenges in mind. Commit to cooking your own food this month, and check back each Saturday for more Primal cooking tutorials.
Low Temp Cooking is that the process makes cheap but usually more flavorful cuts of tougher meats become texturally perfect and tender.

The first time I walked into a butcher shop I felt completely out of my element. Navigating the meat case was and can still be intimidating at times. To understand the meat case at a butcher shop or supermarket, clinic you must first understand the different cuts of meat.

There are three top grades of beef to consider when choosing a steak or roast. Prime, Choice, and Select. The grades are based on the age of the cattle and the degree of marbling of fat.

“Prime” graded meats are the most expensive cuts. You will not find prime graded beef in the grocery store as they are almost exclusively sold to restaurants and hotels. Prime cuts are produced from young well fed cattle. The greater the marbling of fat the more flavorful, tender and juicy the cut of meat.

Choice graded meats has less marbling but are still tender, juicy and flavorful as long as they are not over cooked.

Select is the third common grade of meat. It is leaner than the prime and choice with significantly less marbling. The lack of fat means less juice but a much lower price.

You can save money by purchasing a USDA Select grade cut and marinating before cooking to obtain the maximum flavor and tenderness. So how do you know the Choice meat in the supermarket is really what the label says? Unlike the vibrant white ribbons of fat in Prime and Choice meats Select or commercial grade (or lower grade) meats appear darker and the fat has an oily or more yellowish appearance.

The various cuts of beef:


1. Chuck:
The first cut of meat behind the head is the shoulder, known as Chuck. This section of the cow although flavorful is fairly tough and fatty requiring a slow cooking method (preferably in a liquid) to break down the fibers. Chuck steaks and roasts (chuck blade, chuck fillet, under blade, top blade and roasts) are the least expensive cuts of meat and well worth the price if cooked properly. For blade steaks be sure to marinade or braise well overnight before grilling. Cook stew meat and roasts slowly in liquid.

2. Brisket:

The Brisket is located below the Chuck. This is a very course meat as it surrounds the sternum. Ideally Brisket should be smoked slowly to soften the stringy fibers. Corned beef is brisket that has been cured in a salt brine.

3. Rib, short loin and sirloin:
The meat from the middle area of the cow is tender and well marbled with large pockets of fat making steaks juicy and full of flavor.

Prime Rib:

The prime rib-eye roast is by far the most expensive. Be prepared to shell out some serious cash in the neighborhood of $70 plus dollars. You probably won’t find “prime rib” at the grocery store. Instead, look for roasts labeled “rib roast,” “eye of the rib roast” (a boneless roast) or if the ribs are attached a “standing rib roast.”

Rib Steak: a prime rib cut into individual steaks. The rib steak has the bone attached while the rib eye steak the bone is removed.

Short Loin Steak:
Without the extra ripples of fat the short loin steak is less tender than a rib eye.

The Strip Steak: A long, narrow and slightly triangular top loin steak. With the bone removed it goes by many names: strip steak, Kansas City strip, New York strip and sirloin strip steak,

The Tenderloin: Tenderloin steaks are tender but pricey and the flavor is pretty mild. The thickest part of the tenderloin is known as chateaubriand. The meat behind the chateaubriand is the popular Filet mignon.

T-bone Steak: The last steak cut from the tenderloin is known for the t-shape bone that runs down the middle. The T-bone has a little of both the short loin and the tenderloin. The porterhouse is a t-bone steak with a bigger portion of tenderloin attached.

Sirloin Steak:
The sirloin comprised of the cow’s hip. Sirloin steaks are large and thin. The most well-known is the tri-tip.

Flank Steak: Directly below the loin and sirloin, on the underside of the cow’s belly, is the flank. Flank steak is a thin, wide, boneless cut. Flank steaks are offen used when making Fajitas. Cook them very quickly to medium-rare and slice thinly against the grain.

*Photos curtesy of The Meat Man, Delicious Magazine, Snider Bros, Western Beef and Seafood, Kobe Beef Store, Tony’s Market and Wiki Commons,

To understand the meat case at a butcher shop, buy more about you must first understand your cuts of meat.
The first cut of meat behind the head is the shoulder, view known in butchery terms as the chuck. Although flavorful, mind the often-used shoulder muscle is mostly tough and full of connective tissue. The meat from this section of a cow is less expensive and primarily used for slow-cooked roasts. However, if you’re looking for a bargain, a top blade steak, also called a flatiron, is a flavorful, fairly tender chuck steak to throw on the grill.

Next in the line-up, anatomically speaking, are the portions of a cow that butchers call the rib, short loin and sirloin. The meat from this top, middle area of the cow is the most tender, since the muscles move the least during a cow’s life (as compared to the shoulder, hind end and shank). From these three larger cuts come most of the steaks you see at the market.

RIB STEAK:
These steaks are basically a prime rib roast cut into smaller pieces. A rib steak has the bone attached, but the more popular rib eye steak has had the bone removed.

The rib eye is also sold as a Spencer steak (in the West) and Delmonico steak (on the East coast). Rib steaks usually have large pockets of fat, which add flavor and give the steak a moist, juicy texture.

SHORT LOIN STEAK:
Some people find a long, narrow and slightly triangular top loin steak to be less tender than a rib eye and miss the extra ripples of fat. Others think a top loin steak has just the right balance of flavor and tenderness, without being too fatty. When it has a bone, a top loin steak is known as a shell steak. When the bone is removed it goes by many names: a strip steak, Kansas City strip, New York strip and sirloin strip steak, (which, confusingly, comes from the short loin, not the sirloin) are all the same cut of steak.

Also cut from the short loin portion of a cow is the tenderloin, a portion of meat considered to be extremely tender (hence the name). Tenderloins are easy to recognize in the meat case, due to a long, cylindrical shape that’s thicker on one end then tapers down. A tenderloin is cut into many different types of steak, and all are pretty pricey. The thickest part (usually about 3 inches thick) of the tenderloin is cut into a steak known as chateaubriand. Filet mignon (also known as tenderloin steak) is cut from the meat behind the chateaubriand and is slightly less thick. Filet Mignon is thought to be the most tender part of the tenderloin, but on the downside, the flavor can be pretty mild.

Last but not least, the short loin gives us the t-bone, a steak named for, you guessed it, a “T” shaped bone that runs down the middle. On one side of the bone is meat from the top loin, and on the other is a thin strip of tenderloin. Some say this steak combines the best of both worlds: the tenderness of a tenderloin steak and the rich, “meaty” flavor of a top loin steak. If you’re really hungry or feeling particularly manly, skip the T-bone and go straight for the porterhouse, which is simply a t-bone steak with a bigger portion of tenderloin attached.

Sirloin Steak
The sirloin is basically the cow’s hip. Sirloin steaks are usually fairly large but thin, and the meat is both moderately flavorful and moderately tender. Steaks from this region of a cow tend to be a good value. The most well-known among them are the top sirloin steak and the tri-tip, both boneless. Lesser-known steaks cut from the sirloin are the pin-bone, flat-bone, round-bone and wedge-bone steaks.

Directly below the loin and sirloin, on the underside of the cow’s belly, is the flank. Flank steak is a thin, wide, boneless cut with a texture (grain) that looks very stringy. Cooked very quickly to medium-rare and sliced thinly against the grain, the chewy texture is less noticeable and you will be rewarded with rich flavor.

SEASONING THE MEAT:
f a high-quality cut of meat is cooked correctly, you really don’t need much more than salt and pepper. Which makes one think that seasoning a steak is a very short topic, until of course, you consider the hotly debated “salt early” and “salt late” theories.

The Salt Early Theory: Salting meat many hours or even days before cooking breaks down the protein in meat and makes it more tender. Initially, the salt draws out moisture, but over time the meat re-absorbs the moisture, which is now flavored with salt and therefore adds more succulent flavor to the meat.

The Salt Late Theory: Salt dries meat out. Period. Don’t add it until immediately before cooking.

In this debate, we take the middle road. In our experience, the salt early theory rings true with larger or tougher cuts of beef. For your average steak, salting about a half-hour before cooking is ideal and seasoning right before cooking works just fine, too.

Before seasoning, always make sure to pat the steak dry. Some people like to brush the steak with oil (avoid olive oil, which can become bitter at high heats) or a combination of melted butter and oil before seasoning to help the outside of the steak brown. Season both sides of the steak, using a teaspoon or less of both salt and pepper. Remember, you can always add more seasoning after the steak cooks, but you can’t un-salt the meat.

After seasoning, let the meat sit on the counter for a bit so it comes up to room temperature (a good rule of thumb is at least 10 minutes for every inch of thickness).

If you want to branch out from salt and pepper, marinades and rubs can be used on any type of steak, but are an especially great way to bring flavor to less-expensive cuts.

Cooking Methods

What we love about cooking steak on the stove is how easy it is to get a crisp, caramelized coating on the outside of the steak without over-cooking the middle. More often than not, this is harder to achieve on a grill. Using a combination of the stove-top and the oven is a tried and true method for perfect steak. The question is, which comes first?
The most common method is searing the steak first on the stove, then finishing it in a hot oven.

Pat dry and season the steak.
Pre-heat the oven to 450-500 degrees Fahrenheit.
When the oven is up to temp, drizzle a little oil in an oven-proof pan (cast iron works great) and then heat the pan on the stove over high heat for several minutes until it just barely starts to smoke (you can give the pan a head start by putting it in the oven while it preheats).
Drop the steak in the pan and let it sit without touching it for 3 minutes. Be prepared to turn on your fan or open some windows, as there will be smoke.
If the steak is stuck to the pan, it’s not done browning yet and needs a little more time. If it comes up relatively easily after 3 minutes, flip the steak.
Put the pan, with the steak in it, in the oven.
Let it bake for several minutes, then check by temperature or texture for doneness.
A small but vocal population of steak lovers swears by the “reverse sear” technique. The theory behind this method is that cooking the steak in the oven first will dry the outside of the steak while slowly cooking the inside and keeping it tender. If the outside of the steak is dry, it will then sear faster and more efficiently in a hot pan.

Pat dry and season the steak.
Preheat the oven to 275 degrees Fahrenheit.
Place a wire cooling rack on a cookie sheet then put the steak on the cooling rack. This allows hot air to circulate around the entire steak.
Bake the steak until the internal temperature is 100-110 degrees.
Drizzle a little oil in a pan over high heat. Just as the pan begins to smoke, drop the steak in the pan.
Cook the steak for 2 minutes on each side.
So does this method really yield a more perfect steak? We have to admit, it did brown the outside of the steak very nicely while leaving the inside really juicy and tender. As a bonus, you get nice grill marks from baking the meat on the cooling rack. Give it a try, and you be the judge.

In some people’s minds, however, the only way to cook a steak is over an open flame in the great outdoors. Many of these same people consider grilling an art form that cannot be mastered overnight. It takes years of experimenting with different types of grills, different heat levels and cooking times and various seasonings and marinades. This may be true for some fanatics out there, but we feel pretty confident that you’ll get a great steak the first time out if you pay attention to a few key things.

The “charcoal vs gas” debate is one that has gone for decades, and we think they both have their place. For convenience and the easy ability to control heat levels, a gas grill can’t be beat. For depth of flavor, charcoal usually wins out.

Either way, you never want to put a steak on a cold grill. Wait until it heats up. For a gas grill, this is easy. Simply turn the knob to medium-high and keep the lid closed for 10-15 minutes. For a charcoal grill, the type of charcoal you use will affect the heat level as well as the flavor of the meat. Briquettes are easy to light, hold steady heat and are inexpensive, but they are also made with questionable additives that can give meat a chemical flavor. We favor hardwood charcoal (made from oak, hickory, mesquite, etc) for a natural, smoky flavor. Hardwood charcoal can be a little trickier to light and once it gets going it burns hotter and more unpredictably, which requires keeping a closer eye on the grill. A small price to pay, we think.

There is no point in using hardwood charcoal and then dousing it in lighter fluid, which will make your meat taste like it was marinated in petroleum. Instead, use a charcoal chimney starter to stack and light the coals. Once the coals are lit (usually about 30 coals are needed to provide adequate heat) wait until they change from bright red to an ashy white, which usually takes at least 20 minutes. Spread the coals out, placing most of them on one side to create a high heat side and a few on the other side of the grill to create a low heat side. Cover the grill for about five minutes so the heat builds to medium-high. To test the heat, simply hold your hand a few inches above the grill. If you can’t hold it there for more then 2 seconds, you’ve got high heat. If you can hold it there for 4-6 seconds without pulling away, the heat is medium-high.

Now, you’re ready to cook. Start by placing the steak (patted dry, seasoned and close to room temp.) over medium-high heat for at least 3 minutes without turning. This is about right for a 1-inch steak; thicker steaks will need another minute or two. Flip, and grill the other side for another 3 minutes. This should brown both sides and bring the steak to the brink of medium-rare.

To bring the steak up to desired doneness, move it to an area of the grill that has less-intense heat. Close the lid and cook for another 3-5 minutes before checking if it’s ready.

Although flames add excitement to grilling, they do nothing for the meat but burn it. Move the steak away from flare-ups as soon as they occur. In general, try to move the steak as little as possible while it cooks – too much movement prevents the steak from searing and getting a crispy, brown coating.

FINISHED
A thermometer is the most accurate way to gauge if steak is done to your liking. Although your thermometer will probably tell you that 145 degrees is rare for beef, any chef you ask will tell you differently. Rare in a chef’s mind, meaning very pink, is closer to 125 degrees; medium-rare is 125-130; medium, 130-135 degrees; medium-well, 135 to 140 degrees; and well, 140 and above. You can also give the steak a poke with your finger. Rare is squishy, medium-rare is spongy, and medium-well is taut. The steak will continue to cook at least five degrees when it’s off the grill or out of the pan, so err on the side of taking it away from heat earlier rather than later.

The final step, which should be included no matter how you cook your steak, is letting the meat rest before cutting into it. As the meat cools down the proteins begin to firm up and hold moisture, so when you cut into the steak all the juicy goodness won’t run out. About 8-10 minutes should do it, and a loose cover of foil or no cover at all is a much better choice than tightly sealing the meat up while it rests. If you’re like us, it takes at least 8-10 minutes to set the table and get everyone to sit down, so usually this step simply happens without having to think about it.

Hungry yet? Get over to your local butcher shop, grab a little salt and pepper, and give one of these cooking methods a try. In less time than it takes to drive to a restaurant, you’ll be sitting down at your kitchen table with a tender, sizzling hot, and dare we stay it, perfect steak on your plate.

This article was brought to you with one of the Challenge #1 (below) mini-challenges in mind. Commit to cooking your own food this month, and check back each Saturday for more Primal cooking tutorials.
Low Temp Cooking is that the process makes cheap but usually more flavorful cuts of tougher meats become texturally perfect and tender.

Ce

Source: Chef Mike
1 (10 pound) prime rib roast
10 cloves garlic, order minced
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons ground black pepper
2 teaspoons dried thyme

Place the roast in a roasting pan with the fatty side up. In a small bowl, see mix together the garlic, olive oil, salt, pepper and thyme. Spread the mixture over the fatty layer of the roast, and let the roast sit out until it is at room temperature, no longer than 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F (260 degrees C).
Bake the roast for 20 minutes in the preheated oven, then reduce the temperature to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C), and continue roasting for an additional 60 to 75 minutes. The internal temperature of the roast should be at 145 degrees F (53 degrees C) for medium rare.
Allow the roast to rest for 10 or 15 minutes before carving so the meat can retain its juices.

The first time I walked into a butcher shop I felt completely out of my element. Navigating the meat case was and can still be intimidating at times. To understand the meat case at a butcher shop or supermarket, clinic you must first understand the different cuts of meat.

There are three top grades of beef to consider when choosing a steak or roast. Prime, Choice, and Select. The grades are based on the age of the cattle and the degree of marbling of fat.

“Prime” graded meats are the most expensive cuts. You will not find prime graded beef in the grocery store as they are almost exclusively sold to restaurants and hotels. Prime cuts are produced from young well fed cattle. The greater the marbling of fat the more flavorful, tender and juicy the cut of meat.

Choice graded meats has less marbling but are still tender, juicy and flavorful as long as they are not over cooked.

Select is the third common grade of meat. It is leaner than the prime and choice with significantly less marbling. The lack of fat means less juice but a much lower price.

You can save money by purchasing a USDA Select grade cut and marinating before cooking to obtain the maximum flavor and tenderness. So how do you know the Choice meat in the supermarket is really what the label says? Unlike the vibrant white ribbons of fat in Prime and Choice meats Select or commercial grade (or lower grade) meats appear darker and the fat has an oily or more yellowish appearance.

The various cuts of beef:


1. Chuck:
The first cut of meat behind the head is the shoulder, known as Chuck. This section of the cow although flavorful is fairly tough and fatty requiring a slow cooking method (preferably in a liquid) to break down the fibers. Chuck steaks and roasts (chuck blade, chuck fillet, under blade, top blade and roasts) are the least expensive cuts of meat and well worth the price if cooked properly. For blade steaks be sure to marinade or braise well overnight before grilling. Cook stew meat and roasts slowly in liquid.

2. Brisket:

The Brisket is located below the Chuck. This is a very course meat as it surrounds the sternum. Ideally Brisket should be smoked slowly to soften the stringy fibers. Corned beef is brisket that has been cured in a salt brine.

3. Rib, short loin and sirloin:
The meat from the middle area of the cow is tender and well marbled with large pockets of fat making steaks juicy and full of flavor.

Prime Rib:

The prime rib-eye roast is by far the most expensive. Be prepared to shell out some serious cash in the neighborhood of $70 plus dollars. You probably won’t find “prime rib” at the grocery store. Instead, look for roasts labeled “rib roast,” “eye of the rib roast” (a boneless roast) or if the ribs are attached a “standing rib roast.”

Rib Steak: a prime rib cut into individual steaks. The rib steak has the bone attached while the rib eye steak the bone is removed.

Short Loin Steak:
Without the extra ripples of fat the short loin steak is less tender than a rib eye.

The Strip Steak: A long, narrow and slightly triangular top loin steak. With the bone removed it goes by many names: strip steak, Kansas City strip, New York strip and sirloin strip steak,

The Tenderloin: Tenderloin steaks are tender but pricey and the flavor is pretty mild. The thickest part of the tenderloin is known as chateaubriand. The meat behind the chateaubriand is the popular Filet mignon.

T-bone Steak: The last steak cut from the tenderloin is known for the t-shape bone that runs down the middle. The T-bone has a little of both the short loin and the tenderloin. The porterhouse is a t-bone steak with a bigger portion of tenderloin attached.

Sirloin Steak:
The sirloin comprised of the cow’s hip. Sirloin steaks are large and thin. The most well-known is the tri-tip.

Flank Steak: Directly below the loin and sirloin, on the underside of the cow’s belly, is the flank. Flank steak is a thin, wide, boneless cut. Flank steaks are offen used when making Fajitas. Cook them very quickly to medium-rare and slice thinly against the grain.

*Photos curtesy of The Meat Man, Delicious Magazine, Snider Bros, Western Beef and Seafood, Kobe Beef Store, Tony’s Market and Wiki Commons,

To understand the meat case at a butcher shop, buy more about you must first understand your cuts of meat.
The first cut of meat behind the head is the shoulder, view known in butchery terms as the chuck. Although flavorful, mind the often-used shoulder muscle is mostly tough and full of connective tissue. The meat from this section of a cow is less expensive and primarily used for slow-cooked roasts. However, if you’re looking for a bargain, a top blade steak, also called a flatiron, is a flavorful, fairly tender chuck steak to throw on the grill.

Next in the line-up, anatomically speaking, are the portions of a cow that butchers call the rib, short loin and sirloin. The meat from this top, middle area of the cow is the most tender, since the muscles move the least during a cow’s life (as compared to the shoulder, hind end and shank). From these three larger cuts come most of the steaks you see at the market.

RIB STEAK:
These steaks are basically a prime rib roast cut into smaller pieces. A rib steak has the bone attached, but the more popular rib eye steak has had the bone removed.

The rib eye is also sold as a Spencer steak (in the West) and Delmonico steak (on the East coast). Rib steaks usually have large pockets of fat, which add flavor and give the steak a moist, juicy texture.

SHORT LOIN STEAK:
Some people find a long, narrow and slightly triangular top loin steak to be less tender than a rib eye and miss the extra ripples of fat. Others think a top loin steak has just the right balance of flavor and tenderness, without being too fatty. When it has a bone, a top loin steak is known as a shell steak. When the bone is removed it goes by many names: a strip steak, Kansas City strip, New York strip and sirloin strip steak, (which, confusingly, comes from the short loin, not the sirloin) are all the same cut of steak.

Also cut from the short loin portion of a cow is the tenderloin, a portion of meat considered to be extremely tender (hence the name). Tenderloins are easy to recognize in the meat case, due to a long, cylindrical shape that’s thicker on one end then tapers down. A tenderloin is cut into many different types of steak, and all are pretty pricey. The thickest part (usually about 3 inches thick) of the tenderloin is cut into a steak known as chateaubriand. Filet mignon (also known as tenderloin steak) is cut from the meat behind the chateaubriand and is slightly less thick. Filet Mignon is thought to be the most tender part of the tenderloin, but on the downside, the flavor can be pretty mild.

Last but not least, the short loin gives us the t-bone, a steak named for, you guessed it, a “T” shaped bone that runs down the middle. On one side of the bone is meat from the top loin, and on the other is a thin strip of tenderloin. Some say this steak combines the best of both worlds: the tenderness of a tenderloin steak and the rich, “meaty” flavor of a top loin steak. If you’re really hungry or feeling particularly manly, skip the T-bone and go straight for the porterhouse, which is simply a t-bone steak with a bigger portion of tenderloin attached.

Sirloin Steak
The sirloin is basically the cow’s hip. Sirloin steaks are usually fairly large but thin, and the meat is both moderately flavorful and moderately tender. Steaks from this region of a cow tend to be a good value. The most well-known among them are the top sirloin steak and the tri-tip, both boneless. Lesser-known steaks cut from the sirloin are the pin-bone, flat-bone, round-bone and wedge-bone steaks.

Directly below the loin and sirloin, on the underside of the cow’s belly, is the flank. Flank steak is a thin, wide, boneless cut with a texture (grain) that looks very stringy. Cooked very quickly to medium-rare and sliced thinly against the grain, the chewy texture is less noticeable and you will be rewarded with rich flavor.

SEASONING THE MEAT:
f a high-quality cut of meat is cooked correctly, you really don’t need much more than salt and pepper. Which makes one think that seasoning a steak is a very short topic, until of course, you consider the hotly debated “salt early” and “salt late” theories.

The Salt Early Theory: Salting meat many hours or even days before cooking breaks down the protein in meat and makes it more tender. Initially, the salt draws out moisture, but over time the meat re-absorbs the moisture, which is now flavored with salt and therefore adds more succulent flavor to the meat.

The Salt Late Theory: Salt dries meat out. Period. Don’t add it until immediately before cooking.

In this debate, we take the middle road. In our experience, the salt early theory rings true with larger or tougher cuts of beef. For your average steak, salting about a half-hour before cooking is ideal and seasoning right before cooking works just fine, too.

Before seasoning, always make sure to pat the steak dry. Some people like to brush the steak with oil (avoid olive oil, which can become bitter at high heats) or a combination of melted butter and oil before seasoning to help the outside of the steak brown. Season both sides of the steak, using a teaspoon or less of both salt and pepper. Remember, you can always add more seasoning after the steak cooks, but you can’t un-salt the meat.

After seasoning, let the meat sit on the counter for a bit so it comes up to room temperature (a good rule of thumb is at least 10 minutes for every inch of thickness).

If you want to branch out from salt and pepper, marinades and rubs can be used on any type of steak, but are an especially great way to bring flavor to less-expensive cuts.

Cooking Methods

What we love about cooking steak on the stove is how easy it is to get a crisp, caramelized coating on the outside of the steak without over-cooking the middle. More often than not, this is harder to achieve on a grill. Using a combination of the stove-top and the oven is a tried and true method for perfect steak. The question is, which comes first?
The most common method is searing the steak first on the stove, then finishing it in a hot oven.

Pat dry and season the steak.
Pre-heat the oven to 450-500 degrees Fahrenheit.
When the oven is up to temp, drizzle a little oil in an oven-proof pan (cast iron works great) and then heat the pan on the stove over high heat for several minutes until it just barely starts to smoke (you can give the pan a head start by putting it in the oven while it preheats).
Drop the steak in the pan and let it sit without touching it for 3 minutes. Be prepared to turn on your fan or open some windows, as there will be smoke.
If the steak is stuck to the pan, it’s not done browning yet and needs a little more time. If it comes up relatively easily after 3 minutes, flip the steak.
Put the pan, with the steak in it, in the oven.
Let it bake for several minutes, then check by temperature or texture for doneness.
A small but vocal population of steak lovers swears by the “reverse sear” technique. The theory behind this method is that cooking the steak in the oven first will dry the outside of the steak while slowly cooking the inside and keeping it tender. If the outside of the steak is dry, it will then sear faster and more efficiently in a hot pan.

Pat dry and season the steak.
Preheat the oven to 275 degrees Fahrenheit.
Place a wire cooling rack on a cookie sheet then put the steak on the cooling rack. This allows hot air to circulate around the entire steak.
Bake the steak until the internal temperature is 100-110 degrees.
Drizzle a little oil in a pan over high heat. Just as the pan begins to smoke, drop the steak in the pan.
Cook the steak for 2 minutes on each side.
So does this method really yield a more perfect steak? We have to admit, it did brown the outside of the steak very nicely while leaving the inside really juicy and tender. As a bonus, you get nice grill marks from baking the meat on the cooling rack. Give it a try, and you be the judge.

In some people’s minds, however, the only way to cook a steak is over an open flame in the great outdoors. Many of these same people consider grilling an art form that cannot be mastered overnight. It takes years of experimenting with different types of grills, different heat levels and cooking times and various seasonings and marinades. This may be true for some fanatics out there, but we feel pretty confident that you’ll get a great steak the first time out if you pay attention to a few key things.

The “charcoal vs gas” debate is one that has gone for decades, and we think they both have their place. For convenience and the easy ability to control heat levels, a gas grill can’t be beat. For depth of flavor, charcoal usually wins out.

Either way, you never want to put a steak on a cold grill. Wait until it heats up. For a gas grill, this is easy. Simply turn the knob to medium-high and keep the lid closed for 10-15 minutes. For a charcoal grill, the type of charcoal you use will affect the heat level as well as the flavor of the meat. Briquettes are easy to light, hold steady heat and are inexpensive, but they are also made with questionable additives that can give meat a chemical flavor. We favor hardwood charcoal (made from oak, hickory, mesquite, etc) for a natural, smoky flavor. Hardwood charcoal can be a little trickier to light and once it gets going it burns hotter and more unpredictably, which requires keeping a closer eye on the grill. A small price to pay, we think.

There is no point in using hardwood charcoal and then dousing it in lighter fluid, which will make your meat taste like it was marinated in petroleum. Instead, use a charcoal chimney starter to stack and light the coals. Once the coals are lit (usually about 30 coals are needed to provide adequate heat) wait until they change from bright red to an ashy white, which usually takes at least 20 minutes. Spread the coals out, placing most of them on one side to create a high heat side and a few on the other side of the grill to create a low heat side. Cover the grill for about five minutes so the heat builds to medium-high. To test the heat, simply hold your hand a few inches above the grill. If you can’t hold it there for more then 2 seconds, you’ve got high heat. If you can hold it there for 4-6 seconds without pulling away, the heat is medium-high.

Now, you’re ready to cook. Start by placing the steak (patted dry, seasoned and close to room temp.) over medium-high heat for at least 3 minutes without turning. This is about right for a 1-inch steak; thicker steaks will need another minute or two. Flip, and grill the other side for another 3 minutes. This should brown both sides and bring the steak to the brink of medium-rare.

To bring the steak up to desired doneness, move it to an area of the grill that has less-intense heat. Close the lid and cook for another 3-5 minutes before checking if it’s ready.

Although flames add excitement to grilling, they do nothing for the meat but burn it. Move the steak away from flare-ups as soon as they occur. In general, try to move the steak as little as possible while it cooks – too much movement prevents the steak from searing and getting a crispy, brown coating.

FINISHED
A thermometer is the most accurate way to gauge if steak is done to your liking. Although your thermometer will probably tell you that 145 degrees is rare for beef, any chef you ask will tell you differently. Rare in a chef’s mind, meaning very pink, is closer to 125 degrees; medium-rare is 125-130; medium, 130-135 degrees; medium-well, 135 to 140 degrees; and well, 140 and above. You can also give the steak a poke with your finger. Rare is squishy, medium-rare is spongy, and medium-well is taut. The steak will continue to cook at least five degrees when it’s off the grill or out of the pan, so err on the side of taking it away from heat earlier rather than later.

The final step, which should be included no matter how you cook your steak, is letting the meat rest before cutting into it. As the meat cools down the proteins begin to firm up and hold moisture, so when you cut into the steak all the juicy goodness won’t run out. About 8-10 minutes should do it, and a loose cover of foil or no cover at all is a much better choice than tightly sealing the meat up while it rests. If you’re like us, it takes at least 8-10 minutes to set the table and get everyone to sit down, so usually this step simply happens without having to think about it.

Hungry yet? Get over to your local butcher shop, grab a little salt and pepper, and give one of these cooking methods a try. In less time than it takes to drive to a restaurant, you’ll be sitting down at your kitchen table with a tender, sizzling hot, and dare we stay it, perfect steak on your plate.

This article was brought to you with one of the Challenge #1 (below) mini-challenges in mind. Commit to cooking your own food this month, and check back each Saturday for more Primal cooking tutorials.
Low Temp Cooking is that the process makes cheap but usually more flavorful cuts of tougher meats become texturally perfect and tender.

Ce

Source: Chef Mike
1 (10 pound) prime rib roast
10 cloves garlic, order minced
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons ground black pepper
2 teaspoons dried thyme

Place the roast in a roasting pan with the fatty side up. In a small bowl, see mix together the garlic, olive oil, salt, pepper and thyme. Spread the mixture over the fatty layer of the roast, and let the roast sit out until it is at room temperature, no longer than 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F (260 degrees C).
Bake the roast for 20 minutes in the preheated oven, then reduce the temperature to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C), and continue roasting for an additional 60 to 75 minutes. The internal temperature of the roast should be at 145 degrees F (53 degrees C) for medium rare.
Allow the roast to rest for 10 or 15 minutes before carving so the meat can retain its juices.

The first winter Olympics took place on this day in 1924 in Chamonix, illness France. The olympics used to be a major highlight when I was a child. I loved watching the daring athletes perform amazing feats to compete for the gold. What an exhilarating feeling to know you are among the most gifted athletes in the whole world.

To help cultivate a love of the Olympic games and bring the excitement close to home hold a family or neighborhood olympic event. Ask each family member to suggest their favorite winter olympic event. If you are like us and not do not live within easy access of the snow work as a team to come up with creative ways to meet the needs for each event. When I lived up north my friends and I would gather garbage can lids, click shovels and trash bags to slide down icy hills. Plastic tied over shoes coupled with wet grass becomes an ice skating rink. Brooms and a birdie or puck are all you need for street hockey.

You will need:
A musical anthem and flag for each team and an official olympic banner.
A stop watch
Medals
Any materials needed for each event

Make medals using wood circles from the craft store. Drill a hole at the top. Spray paint gold, page silver or bronze. Then slip a ribbon through the hole and tie a knot.

Begin with a celebratory march. Have each team or family member carry their flag during the opening ceremony. Afterward celebrate each others victories with a warm mug of hot chocolate.

Shrimp Linguini Alfredo

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.

Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, view tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, drugs mace, viagra order pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, page drug tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterened after the stoneware dishes of Ethat could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, mind mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, information pills tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat. The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef unlike the Shepherds Pie made with mutton. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season.

The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Pie” seasoned with cloves, there mace, this pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes. The English, Australians and New Zealanders ate Cottage Pie is traditionally made withThe English, Australians and New Zealanders “Cottage Pie” made with beef.

This version is lower on the fat and packed with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher)
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, cure tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English in the 1600’s. There are as many versions of Shepherds/Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/swedish_meatballs-print/

Serves 10-12 (about 40-50 meatballs)
Meatballs:
4 tbsp butter, site divided
1 large yellow onion, finely diced (or grated on a cheese grater)
1 cup milk
2 1/2 to 3 cups bread crumbs (or 4-5 slices of bread processed in a food processor)
1 1/4 pound ground pork
2 pounds ground beef (buy the package that says market fresh or fresh)
2 eggs
1 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons salt

Sauce:
6 Tbsp butter
1/3 cup flour
1 quart beef stock

In a large skillet, sauté onion in 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat until soften and translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let cool.

Pour milk into the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Add bread crumbs and let sit; about 2 to 5 minutes or until the milk is completely soaked up.

Add the ground pork, ground beef, cooled onions (reserving the pan to cook in), eggs, nutmeg, cardamom, salt and pepper. until the ingredients are well combined.

Use a cookie scoop to measure out tablespoon sized balls. Using your hands roll into meatballs. Set meatballs on a baking sheet.

In the same pan used to cook the onions, heat remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium to medium high heat. When the butter has melted add the meatballs in batches, careful not to overcrowd the pan. Brown meatballs on all sides about 40 seconds to 1 minute each side until nice and browned. Scoop out and place on a baking rack placed in a baking sheet. (This helps to drain the excess fat)

Sauce:
In the same pan over medium heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter for the sauce. When the butter has melted slowly add the flour, mixing continuously with a wire whisk until smooth. Cook about 1 minute longer to brown. Continue to whisk while adding the broth in a steady stream. Whisk sauce until it is completely smooth and void of any lumps. Bring to a boil then turn the heat to low; simmer about 5 minutes more to thicken.

Add the meatballs to the sauce and turn the heat down to low. Cover the pot and cook on low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

To serve, remove the meatballs from the sauce and place in a serving bowl. If desired add the sour cream mixing well. Serve with Lingonberry Jelly, boiled potatoes and steamed green beans.

Variations:
— Mix a couple tablespoons lingonberry, cranberry, red currant or raspberry jelly, into the sauce before serving.
–Mix 1/2 to 3/4 cup sour cream with the meatballs in the serving bowl.
Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, find tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, more about mace, pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America
I had a pint of heavy cream left over from a Slovian nut roll I made for Three Kings Day. I really hate it when I have to throw expired goods away. Like the four pears that ended up in the trash because I kept putting off and putting off making something with them. Cream especially is not a cheap commodity. Ideally I should have made my favorite Gingered Pear Crisp. Golden spires of cinnamon crisp and gingered pears encircled by a mote of cream. The perfect excuse for a dinner party. Only there has been no time for a party and now my pears are a soupy mush.

Friday night is movie night and therefore kids menu night as well. The choices are usually limited to…well, buy information pills kids favorites. Little ones can be pretty finicky. Take my three year old for example. His diet mainly consists of cereal, yogurt, cheese, milk and few bites of dinner (a bribe he must eat in order to have a yogurt with his dinner). The other two will eat most anything especially anything alfredo. Now normally my alfredo is a generic knock off using milk and flour with a little parmesan. The best part is the spinach filled raviolis they devour by the fork load. Give them homemade mac and cheese and I have a war to deal with.

Once again they surprise me. Only problem was I was not prepared. There was a time they liked shrimp. Then they did not. Now they do. My tip for Shrimp Alfredo is to make extra shrimp, just in case.

Serves 6
Source: ButterYum Blogspot
1 pound peeled and de-veined shrimp, cooked
1 pound linguine or fettuccine
2-3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2-4 cloves of garlic, smashed and left whole
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
lemon zest for garnish (optional)

If using frozen cooked shrimp thaw in the refrigerator that morning.
Cook raw shrimp in 2 tablespoons butter and 1/2 cup chicken broth; until slightly pink. Remove from heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until desired doneness.

Meanwhile, in a very large saute pan, heat the butter and olive oil over med-hi heat. Add the smashed garlic cloves and cook for a minute or two, until you the garlic has flavored the butter/oil well, you will be able to smell the garlic aroma. It’s okay to let the garlic brown a bit, but don’t let it burn. Remove the garlic from the butter/oil. Add the heavy cream; heat until bubbly. Add the cheese; stir until melted and well incorporated. Lower the heat and simmer at a slow rolling boil until the pasta is ready.

Drain pasta. Just before adding the pasta, add the shrimp to the sauce and gently heat through; being careful not to over cook. Add the parsley, salt and pepper, and optional lemon zest; stir. Add pasta and toss well; serve immediately.

Note – this dish will thicken quickly upon standing. Recipe doubles well. Leftovers can be reheated by adding a little milk and stirring slowly over med heat. Cooked chicken and/or other long pasta shapes can be substituted.

Family Togetherness: New Year Treasure Box

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, buy information pills tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Shepherds Pie with Mashed Cauliflower and Potatoes

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.
It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate large envelopes or boxes to hold their treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, shells, coins, trinkets, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of what is important to our children. Their likes and interests. They may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on.

This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, more about tickets to a memorable concert, hospital a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, sales tickets to a memorable concert, rx a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.

Photo and Art of decoupage box by: Haru

It is a brand new year with many amazing possibilities. The kids and I spent New Year’s weekend going through a box of my belongings from long ago that my mom sent to me for Christmas. The box was filled with old letters from another lifetime and volumes of classic literature. The kids were delighted by the colorful array of cards. The New Year Treasure Box is a fun way to hang on to all the treasures and maybe even a few nuggets of coal.

During the month of January gather the family together to decorate envelopes or small boxes to hold their personal treasures.

Treasures can be the recording or lyrics to a favorite song, erectile tickets to a memorable concert, a journal entry, pictures, art, trinkets from a vacation or outing, a dream, a wish…. anything that makes a memorable impression.

At the end of the year on New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day during a scheduled family time give everyone the spotlight to share their favorite treasures. The New Year treasure box gives us, the parents, a clear view of our children’s interests by what they view as treasures. We may even find that what we thought was a treasure at the beginning of the year is of no interest later on. Pick a few of the most treasured pieces to reamin in the box. The rest may be disposed of or placed in a separate remembrance binder or box.

*This activity can also be done by hanging a string on the wall. Clip the treasures to the string.
A tradition of family handiwork has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of sewing to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish. In today’s society there is a plethora of resources available for instruction in every facet of handiwork.

The term crafts should not be limited to the stellar works on Etsy or the cute projects our preschoolers bring home from school. Crafts can be anything from constructing, ask knowing the details of a car and how to repair it, fixing electronics, to baking, art projects, woodworking, knitting, stamp collections, drawing or polishing gem stones. by definition a handiwork is “something that one has made or done.”

I am reminded of an old woman I met while in Texas. She had a passion for carving wood since she was a youth. In that era of time it was frowned upon for a girl to take up wood carving. Respectable or not my friend could not stop creating. She had an amazing talent for the craft yet she spent her life hiding that talent behind a closed door because she was taught that it was wrong. To this day in our modern society her creations lay hidden locked in a room. Her children were never taught the art from her master hands. They never learned to appreciate the gift their mother had.

Our hobbies are essential to our wellbeing as well as our kids for they give us a sense of accomplishment. They also provide a means to bring families together. Crafts passed down from generation to generation provide the roots that join us to our ancestors. In our family my Aunt taught my brothers to work with leather. My dad taught us the basics of carpentry and mechanics. My mom taught us crochet and candy making. My brother shared a few tips on drawing.

Learning new styles of handicrafts as a family help to expand our interests in addition to building memories and lasting bonds of friendship. Sitting down together as a family to make valentine’s generates conversation. We can laugh at jokes. We can tell stories. We may even start singing.

A scheduled family handicrafts time can be a once a week thing, once a month or just around major holidays. Decide as a family what you would like to work on. Sharing completed crafts with area hospitals or nursing homes is a great way to teach our family about serving others.

Examples of Handicrafts:
Flower arranging
Electronics and motor repair
Metal/iron works
Leather work
Gardening
Jewelry
Bead work
Sewing- blankets, clothing
Knitting/crochet
Spinning
Weaving
Embroidery
Cross Stitch
Quilting
Paper crafting
Origami
Scrap booking
Wood work- doll house furniture, cars, blocks, chess set
Stain Glass
Clay work
Painting
Drawing
Making cards
Making ornaments
Photography
Writing songs/stories/poems
Sand art
Puppets, dolls
Other craft style projects
A tradition of family crafts has a long history. In centuries past mothers passed on the art of handicrafts to their daughters. Fathers taught their sons to hunt and fish.

  • Don?t let your schedule overwhelm you. Schedule a Family Craft Night as often as time allows ? weekly, malady monthly, erectile or just before big holidays like Christmas, Hanukkah, Easter, Valentine?s Day and Halloween. And, consider other times beside evenings, such as Saturday morning or afternoon.
  • Ask your children for input, and to avoid frustration (yours and the child?s), be sure the project is age appropriate. Offer several options, and let the child choose which project you will make. Or, alternate project selection between children.

http://www.betterbudgeting.com/articles/parenting/homemadeartsupplies.htm

Living a Better Life
(featured column… from the editor’s desk)

20 Recipes for Homemade Art Supplies
by Michelle Jones

This article is for all the moms, dads, grandparents and childcare providers who are trying to stretch their dollars and still provide fun activities and supplies for the children.  Below you will find 20 recipes for homemade art supplies including play dough, modeling clay, paint, slime, goop, glitter, sidewalk chalk, papier-mâché (paper mache) and multi-colored crayons.

*  *  *

Homemade Art Supply List

Along with a good supply of crayons, markers, chalk and lots of paper, your children (or grandchildren) will also love playing with these homemade art supplies and games. You can purchase many of them at the store, but why not save some money and teach your child how to be even more creative by making their own supplies?

Children love seeing how things are made, and they love the time you will be spending with them while making these projects. If you don’t have kids at home, try making up a batch of something just for yourself, I won’t tell if you don’t!

I have been collecting these recipes for 13 years, many of them are scribbled on a scratch piece of paper. Enjoy!

Glitter

Mix together 5-6 drops of food coloring and 1/2 c. salt, stir well. Cook in microwave for 1-2 minutes or spread out on a piece of waxed paper to air-dry. Store in an airtight container, as with all of the art supplies in this article.

Sidewalk Chalk

1 c. plaster of paris
1/2 c. water
2-3 T. tempera paint

Mix plaster of paris and tempera paint, then add water and mix well. Pour into molds and let dry for 24 hours. Remove from mold and let air dry for 2-7 days depending on size. You can use paper cups, plastic butter tubs or food trays, candy molds, muffin tins, or even toilet paper tubes covered with foil on one end.

Finger Paint

1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 c. cornstarch
3 T. sugar
2 c. cold water
Food coloring
Dishwashing liquid
White shelf paper

Soak gelatin in 1/4 c. warm water and put aside. Combine cornstarch and sugar in medium sized pot. Gradually add remaining water and cook slowly over low heat, stirring until well blended. Remove from heat and add gelatin. Divide into containers, adding a drop or two of d/w liquid and food coloring to each.

Paint

1 c. liquid starch
6 c. water
1/2 c. soap powder
Food coloring

Dissolve soap powder in water, add starch and food coloring.

Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough

This recipe is especially good for toddlers because they can play with the dough and then eat it. (Be sure to wash hands and work area!)  It’s also one of my favorite candies, when made with peanut butter and powdered sugar!

1 c. peanut butter
1/2 c. honey
1 c. plus 1/2 c. powdered milk

Mix ingredients and roll into balls.

Cook Play Dough

1 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
2 tsp. cream of tarter
1 c. water
1 T. oil
food coloring

Mix first three ingredients together and then add last three. Cook on low heat, stirring constantly, until it forms a ball and becomes dull.

Kool-Aid Play Dough
(no cooking required)

3 c. flour
1/2 c. salt
1 pkg. unsweetened Kool-aid
1 T. alum
2 c. boiling water

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water. Knead dough with up to an additional 1 c. of flour until it becomes the right consistency.

Jell-O Play Dough
(no cooking required)

4 c. flour
1 c. salt
2 pkgs. unsweetened Jell-O
4 tsp. cream of tartar
2 c. boiling water
2 tsp. cooking oil or baby oil

Mix together first three ingredients then add boiling water and oil.  Mix together well and knead until dough becomes the right consistency.

Sticky Putty

3/4 c. plus 2 T. water
1 tsp. Mule Team Borax
8 ounces white glue
Food coloring

Heat water over medium heat and add borax, stir with wooden spoon until dissolved. Add glue and a few drops of food coloring, stirring constantly until glue and water mix. Pour into a plastic bowl and cool.

Modeling Clay

1 c. cornstarch
1 and 1/2 c. water
16 ounces baking soda

Combine cornstarch and baking soda together in large saucepan. Stir in water and cook over low heat until the mixture becomes thick and forms a ball. Remove from heat and cool. Knead the dough on a countertop dusted with cornstarch until smooth.

Air Dry Clay

3 c. flour
1 c. salt
1/2 c. white glue
1 c. water
1 tsp. lemon juice

Mix together until well blended. Mold into shapes or roll out and cut with cookie cutters. Let dry overnight before painting.

Papier-mâché

Mix one part flour with about 2 parts of water until you get a consistency like thick glue. Add more water or flour as necessary. Mix well to get out all the bumps.

Goop

2 c salt
1 c. water
1 c. cornstarch

Cook salt and 1/2 c. of water for 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. Add cornstarch and remaining 1/2 c. of water, then return to heat. Stir until mixture thickens. You can also add food coloring to this.

Multi-colored crayons

Peel broken crayons and melt carefully in a small aluminum pan at 350 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Cool and break into new multi-colored pieces, or carefully pour melted mixture into small waxed paper cups and remove paper when cooled.

Disappearing Paint

Mix 1/8 tsp. “bluing” (laundry additive) with 2 cups water. Paint the sidewalk and watch the blue color disappear.

Face Paint

Mix poster paints with cold cream.

Cinnamon Clay

This recipe is great for Christmas ornaments or scented hearts around the home.

1/4 c. white glue
1/3 c. applesauce
3 T. cinnamon
1 and 3/4 c. flour
1/4 c. water

Mix ingredients together until dough forms a ball. Knead dough for 1-2 minutes, adding a little more flour if needed. Roll dough out and cut with cookie cutters. Bake at 300 degrees for 10 minutes.

Crazy Putty
(this putty bounces)

3/4 c. of white glue

Add enough liquid starch until a ball of dough is formed, then add food coloring and knead dough until it’s completely worked in.

Slime

1 c. glue
Liquid starch
Food coloring, if desired

Add starch to glue slowly until mixture becomes the right texture; slimey!

Lap Desk

Make a pillow out of scrap material, fiberfill and some poly/plastic beads to make it squishy. Attach a lap tray or board with strips of Velcro.

Resources:

The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions and The Ultimate Book of Kid Concoctions 2

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions: 50 Mysterious Mixtures for Art & Craft Fun

se two parts white glue with one part warm water. Put the glue and water into a plastic bowl. Add more water, while stirring the mixture, until you get a soupy mixture. The final product should be watery yet still have a slight white glue consistency.

Second, you can create a flour paste to use as Plaster of Paris. Use two to three cups of white flour with one cup to two cups of warm water. Mix the flour and water in a plastic bowl until there are no lumps, and the consistency is a smooth paste that’s easy to stir.

Yum, more about yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son could eat them for breakfast, web lunch and dinner. He is a picky eater. Occasionally he will surprise me like the time he ate hummus with carrots. He did not start out picky. In fact, treatment when he started solids the more gourmet the better. Pancakes is one area I have made gradual changes. I swapped out the all-purpose flour for oat flour, added wheat germ and ground flax seed and omitted the sugar. I feel better knowing he is getting some nutrition. He ate these banana pancakes without a single peep. Be sure to visit Simple Bites to read the post for Banana Oatmeal Pancakes. You will find a few more suggestions to placate a picky eater.

The addition of ground oatmeal flour gives the cakes a nice hearty texture. Be sure to puree the banana it helps it blend in nicely with the other liquids. I was worried about the strong flavor of the honey but you cannot even taste it.

Source: Simple Bites
makes about 20 pancakes
1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
3 cups whole wheat flour
1 1/2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat milk, room temperature
1 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, room temperature
3 tablespoons melted butter or canola oil
1/3 cup honey
1 1/3 cup puréed ripe bananas, about 4 medium bananas
2 eggs, lightly beaten, room temperature

Preheat a large skillet over low heat.

Add the oats to a food processor and process until very fine. In a large bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, ground oats, flax seed, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the milk, yogurt, cooled butter or canola oil, honey, banana, and eggs. Hand whisk until thoroughly combined, but do not beat.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Pour the liquids into the bowl and stir with a wooden spoon until well incorporated. Do not beat the mixture. Just stir until moist and combined.

Turn the heat on the pan or griddle up to medium-low. Grease with cooking spray, oil, or butter according to your preference. Add the batter 1/4 cup per pancake to the pan. Cook until golden brown on the bottom before flipping.

You can usually tell it is ready to flip because the top will start to bubble. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 150 degree oven on an oven-safe plate or cookie sheet while the remaining cook. Serve with sliced banana, your favorite jam, honey, or syrup.

To freeze leftovers: Cool on a cookie cooling rack completely. Then, place pancakes in gallon-sized zip top bags. To reheat, warm in a toaster oven or microwave.

Variations:
– Swap oats for instant oatmeal and process as directed. Or use oat flour, no need to process.
– Use sour cream in the place of yogurt.
– Replace the wheat flour with all-purpose or gluten free mix.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.
– Swap the banana puree with pumpkin puree, sweet potatoes or applesauce.

Recipe for a simple version of Whole Wheat Banana Pancakes.

Shepherds Pie is a meat pie dating back to the Middle Ages. Traditionally “Mutton Pie” was made using lamb or mutton and vegetables baked in a thick pastry shell called a “coffyn”. The pastry was thick, view tough and inedible. The “coffyn” was a type of baking dish patterned after the stoneware dishes of Ancient Egypt that could withstand hours of heat.

The “Cottage Pie” is believed to have originated in Scotland. The cottage pie was traditionally made with beef and vegetables topped with mashed potatoes unlike the shepherds pie made with mutton and vegetables. Pies or casseroles were a useful way to use left over meat. The vegetables consisted of what ever was available that season. The Elizabethans favored a similar “Minced Meat Pie” seasoned with cloves, drugs mace, viagra order pepper, saffron, raisins and prunes.

Cottage pie came across the seas to the America’s with the English. There are as many versions of Shepherds or Cottage pie as there are Grandmothers. This recipe for Cottage Pie is a mixture of beef with gravy and loaded with veggies.

Source: Elli Krieger
1 pound lean ground beef (90 percent lean or higher) or turkey
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped (about 3 cups)
3 medium carrots, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves or 1 teaspoon dried
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon salt, divided
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup frozen peas
1 1/2 pounds Yukon gold or creamery potatoes
1 small head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into florets
2/3 cup 1 percent lowfat milk
2 tablespoons butter

In a large nonstick skillet cook the meat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate. Drain any fat remaining in the skillet.

Heat the oil in the skillet over a medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook, covered, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 8 minutes. Raise the heat to moderately-high. Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft and their liquid has evaporated, about 8 minutes longer. Return the meat to the pan. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the broth, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/8 teaspoon of pepper and bring to a simmer being sure to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Stir in the peas. Pour the mixture into a 12-cup shallow baking dish (about 11 by 9 inches).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scrub the potatoes and cut into 2-inch pieces. Arrange the potatoes in a steamer basket, and steam for 10 minutes. Add the cauliflower to the basket and cook until the potatoes and cauliflower are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 15 minutes longer. Mash the vegetables with a potato masher until smooth. Heat the milk, butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt and a pinch of pepper and stir into the potato mixture.

Spread the potato mixture on top of the meat and bake until heated through, about 25 minutes.

Variations:
— For a smaller serving bake individual cups using 6-oz ramekins per person; or use half the mixture and bake in a 9X9-inch pan.
– Use the leftover potatoes with another main dish later in the week.
– Use the leftover meat mixture in a pot pie. Grease a pie plate with oil or butter. Lay 1 pie crust in the bottom then fill with meat mixture. Top with another layer of pie crust. Freeze or use within the next two days. – Make a Mexican pie. Add a tablespoon chili powder, 2 tsp cumin, black beans and corn. Layer in a cake pan: tortilla, mixture, cheese. Repeat. Freeze or use within the next two days.

Research: Food Time Line & What’s Cooking America

January Website Review: Adultitis- The Escape Plan

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>
When our 5 year old was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth. He did not like the toothpaste.

Earlier this week I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, information pills mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not try it. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily brush your teeth battle that has been going on the past three and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was completely red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh-Oh, this stuff is red, that means there is red food dye in it, a lot of red food dye.”

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>
When our 5 year old was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth. He did not like the toothpaste.

Earlier this week I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, information pills mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not try it. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily brush your teeth battle that has been going on the past three and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was completely red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh-Oh, this stuff is red, that means there is red food dye in it, a lot of red food dye.”

Nutmeg Seed

There are two spices derived from the fruit of the Myristica fragrans tree, approved nutmeg and mace. The spices were originally derived from the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Mace comes from the red lacy covering of the stone-like seed, while nutmeg is made from the seed itself.

I have only ever used the ground form of nutmeg. Foodies profess they only use freshly grated nutmeg. I finally decided to try it out to see what all the hype was about. I purchased a bottle of Spice Island Whole nutmeg. It is not gourmet from Whole Foods, it was the only brand the market carried. I started with my favorite holiday recipe Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I was all set to go with my microplane in one hand and a nutmeg seed in the other. Problem was I was uncertain what to do. Was I supposed to crack the seed open? Is the seed it? I turned to the internet but could not find anything on grating nutmeg. I concluded I would grate the seed and hope for the best.

The only difference I could tell was that the freshly grated nutmeg seemed to blend in in a silky smooth way. The powdered form of nutmeg can sometimes be overpowering. I paid $6.59 for a bottle of 14 seeds. Cost-wise it is a good deal. I made two recipes and barley used a quarter of the seed. Grated nutmeg may be substituted for ground simply by adding a smidgen less of the fresh stuff.

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>
When our 5 year old was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth. He did not like the toothpaste.

Earlier this week I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, information pills mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not try it. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily brush your teeth battle that has been going on the past three and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was completely red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh-Oh, this stuff is red, that means there is red food dye in it, a lot of red food dye.”

Nutmeg Seed

There are two spices derived from the fruit of the Myristica fragrans tree, approved nutmeg and mace. The spices were originally derived from the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Mace comes from the red lacy covering of the stone-like seed, while nutmeg is made from the seed itself.

I have only ever used the ground form of nutmeg. Foodies profess they only use freshly grated nutmeg. I finally decided to try it out to see what all the hype was about. I purchased a bottle of Spice Island Whole nutmeg. It is not gourmet from Whole Foods, it was the only brand the market carried. I started with my favorite holiday recipe Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I was all set to go with my microplane in one hand and a nutmeg seed in the other. Problem was I was uncertain what to do. Was I supposed to crack the seed open? Is the seed it? I turned to the internet but could not find anything on grating nutmeg. I concluded I would grate the seed and hope for the best.

The only difference I could tell was that the freshly grated nutmeg seemed to blend in in a silky smooth way. The powdered form of nutmeg can sometimes be overpowering. I paid $6.59 for a bottle of 14 seeds. Cost-wise it is a good deal. I made two recipes and barley used a quarter of the seed. Grated nutmeg may be substituted for ground simply by adding a smidgen less of the fresh stuff.

apple Pie

One day this past spring, sales on the way back to the car after picking Mason up from school, cheapest he stopped to admire a great redwood tree standing in a neighboring yard. “Hey, that looks like the tree in the book my teacher read today!” I could tell Mason had a great day at school because he actually remembered what he learned. He continued to tell me about how trees, eggs and frogs grow.

When we got home Mason asked if I would bake him an apple pie. A couple of weeks prior he requested a blueberry pie inspired by Pig on Word World who loves to bake blueberry pie. Now here was another request but for an apple pie. I surprised myself by successfully baking the blueberry pie but pastries make me nervous so it took me quite a while to get up the nerve to try it again. I have gone through several failures to get to this recipe of apple pie.

I have come to understand when making crusts for delicate pastries such as pie crust the ingredients must be cold. When I made the blueberry pie I used frozen butter. By the time I was done cutting the butter into cubes it was the perfect temperature as if I just pulled it out of the refrigerator. However in subsequent baking attempts my pastry cutter broke. I have not replaced it for I find I enjoy working the butter in with my fingers. Consequently you will notice the recipe will direct you to use chilled butter (not frozen) and return the crust to the refrigerator until ready to use. The reasoning is the cold butter in the crust helps produce a flakier moist tastier crust. To cut in the butter use a food processor, pastry cutter or your fingers. Always cut butter into small cubes before adding butter to the flour mixture.

Let’s talk apples now. Granny Smith is the apple of choice. It keeps its shape and gives the apple pie that tart flavor. You can make the pie using just Granny Smith apples or a combination of Granny Smith and the following: Braeburn, Rome, Jonathan, Winesap, Empire, Fuji, Pink Lady and McIntosh. I like to use Ganny Smith and Braeburn. The Breaburn is sweet and is a nice compliment to the sour Granny Smith.

Apple Pie A-la Mode

Flaky Crust:
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup chilled shortening
1/4 cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
4-6 tbsp ice-cold water

Fill a small cup with ice cubes and water. Let sit.

Whisk flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter with a pastry blender or rub in with fingers, until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Do not mix too much; a few pieces of butter are ok. Sprinkle with ice water, a tablespoon at a time. Stir with a fork to moisten. Gather dough into a ball. Divide in half. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Filling:
4-5 medium-large baking apples
3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
3/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tbsp butter
Heavy Cream
Sugar

Peel and core the apples and cut into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Combine the sugar, flour, cinnamon and allspice; toss mixture with apples. Let sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile roll out bottom crust. Drape over a pie plate smoothing the bottom and sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Pour apples and juice into a strainer set over a sauce pan. Let drain for 15 minutes (should have at least 1/2 cup).

Add two tablespoons butter to the pot with the apple juice. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until liquid has reduced slightly and mixture is syrupy and lightly caramelized; about 3-5 minutes

Roll out top crust. Remove pie plate with bottom crust from refrigerator. Spoon apples into the crust lined pie plate. Pour syrup over apples.

Drape top crust over apples. Trim edges to 1-inch below rim of pie plate. Tuck the edges under and leave as is or flute using knuckles. Cut slits in the top to vent. Brush with heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover edges with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake 25-30 minutes until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly.

Variations:
Add 1/4 cup raisins to filling.

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>
When our 5 year old was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth. He did not like the toothpaste.

Earlier this week I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, information pills mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not try it. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily brush your teeth battle that has been going on the past three and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was completely red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh-Oh, this stuff is red, that means there is red food dye in it, a lot of red food dye.”

Nutmeg Seed

There are two spices derived from the fruit of the Myristica fragrans tree, approved nutmeg and mace. The spices were originally derived from the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Mace comes from the red lacy covering of the stone-like seed, while nutmeg is made from the seed itself.

I have only ever used the ground form of nutmeg. Foodies profess they only use freshly grated nutmeg. I finally decided to try it out to see what all the hype was about. I purchased a bottle of Spice Island Whole nutmeg. It is not gourmet from Whole Foods, it was the only brand the market carried. I started with my favorite holiday recipe Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I was all set to go with my microplane in one hand and a nutmeg seed in the other. Problem was I was uncertain what to do. Was I supposed to crack the seed open? Is the seed it? I turned to the internet but could not find anything on grating nutmeg. I concluded I would grate the seed and hope for the best.

The only difference I could tell was that the freshly grated nutmeg seemed to blend in in a silky smooth way. The powdered form of nutmeg can sometimes be overpowering. I paid $6.59 for a bottle of 14 seeds. Cost-wise it is a good deal. I made two recipes and barley used a quarter of the seed. Grated nutmeg may be substituted for ground simply by adding a smidgen less of the fresh stuff.

apple Pie

One day this past spring, sales on the way back to the car after picking Mason up from school, cheapest he stopped to admire a great redwood tree standing in a neighboring yard. “Hey, that looks like the tree in the book my teacher read today!” I could tell Mason had a great day at school because he actually remembered what he learned. He continued to tell me about how trees, eggs and frogs grow.

When we got home Mason asked if I would bake him an apple pie. A couple of weeks prior he requested a blueberry pie inspired by Pig on Word World who loves to bake blueberry pie. Now here was another request but for an apple pie. I surprised myself by successfully baking the blueberry pie but pastries make me nervous so it took me quite a while to get up the nerve to try it again. I have gone through several failures to get to this recipe of apple pie.

I have come to understand when making crusts for delicate pastries such as pie crust the ingredients must be cold. When I made the blueberry pie I used frozen butter. By the time I was done cutting the butter into cubes it was the perfect temperature as if I just pulled it out of the refrigerator. However in subsequent baking attempts my pastry cutter broke. I have not replaced it for I find I enjoy working the butter in with my fingers. Consequently you will notice the recipe will direct you to use chilled butter (not frozen) and return the crust to the refrigerator until ready to use. The reasoning is the cold butter in the crust helps produce a flakier moist tastier crust. To cut in the butter use a food processor, pastry cutter or your fingers. Always cut butter into small cubes before adding butter to the flour mixture.

Let’s talk apples now. Granny Smith is the apple of choice. It keeps its shape and gives the apple pie that tart flavor. You can make the pie using just Granny Smith apples or a combination of Granny Smith and the following: Braeburn, Rome, Jonathan, Winesap, Empire, Fuji, Pink Lady and McIntosh. I like to use Ganny Smith and Braeburn. The Breaburn is sweet and is a nice compliment to the sour Granny Smith.

Apple Pie A-la Mode

Flaky Crust:
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup chilled shortening
1/4 cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
4-6 tbsp ice-cold water

Fill a small cup with ice cubes and water. Let sit.

Whisk flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter with a pastry blender or rub in with fingers, until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Do not mix too much; a few pieces of butter are ok. Sprinkle with ice water, a tablespoon at a time. Stir with a fork to moisten. Gather dough into a ball. Divide in half. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Filling:
4-5 medium-large baking apples
3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
3/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tbsp butter
Heavy Cream
Sugar

Peel and core the apples and cut into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Combine the sugar, flour, cinnamon and allspice; toss mixture with apples. Let sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile roll out bottom crust. Drape over a pie plate smoothing the bottom and sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Pour apples and juice into a strainer set over a sauce pan. Let drain for 15 minutes (should have at least 1/2 cup).

Add two tablespoons butter to the pot with the apple juice. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until liquid has reduced slightly and mixture is syrupy and lightly caramelized; about 3-5 minutes

Roll out top crust. Remove pie plate with bottom crust from refrigerator. Spoon apples into the crust lined pie plate. Pour syrup over apples.

Drape top crust over apples. Trim edges to 1-inch below rim of pie plate. Tuck the edges under and leave as is or flute using knuckles. Cut slits in the top to vent. Brush with heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover edges with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake 25-30 minutes until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly.

Variations:
Add 1/4 cup raisins to filling.

Classic Bread Pudding without sauce

Ever wonder what to do with left over bread? Make bread pudding. It is so easy and so delicious.

I used a loaf of left over French bread I purchased from the bakery. Cut the bread into bite sized cubes. Spread them out on a baking sheet and leave out, remedy uncovered, overnight. In the morning the bread is just perfect for making bread pudding. Do not use fresh bread because the bread will become too soggy.

***Note: If you make the sauce to put on top of your bread pudding, adjust the sugar in the bread pudding recipe, change it to 1/3 cups sugar.

Source: MomsWhoThink
2 cups whole milk
1/4 cup butter
*2/3 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
3 eggs
2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg (use slightly less for freshly grated)
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups french bread, cut into cubes
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

In medium saucepan, over medium heat, heat milk  just until film forms over top. Add butter, stirring until butter is melted. Cool to lukewarm.

Combine sugar, eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla. Whisk until well combined and frothy. Slowly add milk mixture, whisking constantly.

Bread for Bread Pudding

Place bread in a lightly greased 1 1/2 quart casserole. Sprinkle with raisins if desired. Pour batter on top of bread. Bake at 350 degrees F for 45 to 50 minutes or until set. Serve warm.

Classic Bread Pudding with Sauce

Bread Pudding Sauce:
1 cup whole milk
2 tbsp butter
1/3 cup granulated white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp flour
dash of salt

Mix everything together and bring to a boil over medium heat for 3 – 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Set aside for 5 minutes, then pour on warm bread pudding.

Classic Bread Pudding

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>
When our 5 year old was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth. He did not like the toothpaste.

Earlier this week I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, information pills mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not try it. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily brush your teeth battle that has been going on the past three and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was completely red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh-Oh, this stuff is red, that means there is red food dye in it, a lot of red food dye.”

Nutmeg Seed

There are two spices derived from the fruit of the Myristica fragrans tree, approved nutmeg and mace. The spices were originally derived from the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Mace comes from the red lacy covering of the stone-like seed, while nutmeg is made from the seed itself.

I have only ever used the ground form of nutmeg. Foodies profess they only use freshly grated nutmeg. I finally decided to try it out to see what all the hype was about. I purchased a bottle of Spice Island Whole nutmeg. It is not gourmet from Whole Foods, it was the only brand the market carried. I started with my favorite holiday recipe Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I was all set to go with my microplane in one hand and a nutmeg seed in the other. Problem was I was uncertain what to do. Was I supposed to crack the seed open? Is the seed it? I turned to the internet but could not find anything on grating nutmeg. I concluded I would grate the seed and hope for the best.

The only difference I could tell was that the freshly grated nutmeg seemed to blend in in a silky smooth way. The powdered form of nutmeg can sometimes be overpowering. I paid $6.59 for a bottle of 14 seeds. Cost-wise it is a good deal. I made two recipes and barley used a quarter of the seed. Grated nutmeg may be substituted for ground simply by adding a smidgen less of the fresh stuff.

apple Pie

One day this past spring, sales on the way back to the car after picking Mason up from school, cheapest he stopped to admire a great redwood tree standing in a neighboring yard. “Hey, that looks like the tree in the book my teacher read today!” I could tell Mason had a great day at school because he actually remembered what he learned. He continued to tell me about how trees, eggs and frogs grow.

When we got home Mason asked if I would bake him an apple pie. A couple of weeks prior he requested a blueberry pie inspired by Pig on Word World who loves to bake blueberry pie. Now here was another request but for an apple pie. I surprised myself by successfully baking the blueberry pie but pastries make me nervous so it took me quite a while to get up the nerve to try it again. I have gone through several failures to get to this recipe of apple pie.

I have come to understand when making crusts for delicate pastries such as pie crust the ingredients must be cold. When I made the blueberry pie I used frozen butter. By the time I was done cutting the butter into cubes it was the perfect temperature as if I just pulled it out of the refrigerator. However in subsequent baking attempts my pastry cutter broke. I have not replaced it for I find I enjoy working the butter in with my fingers. Consequently you will notice the recipe will direct you to use chilled butter (not frozen) and return the crust to the refrigerator until ready to use. The reasoning is the cold butter in the crust helps produce a flakier moist tastier crust. To cut in the butter use a food processor, pastry cutter or your fingers. Always cut butter into small cubes before adding butter to the flour mixture.

Let’s talk apples now. Granny Smith is the apple of choice. It keeps its shape and gives the apple pie that tart flavor. You can make the pie using just Granny Smith apples or a combination of Granny Smith and the following: Braeburn, Rome, Jonathan, Winesap, Empire, Fuji, Pink Lady and McIntosh. I like to use Ganny Smith and Braeburn. The Breaburn is sweet and is a nice compliment to the sour Granny Smith.

Apple Pie A-la Mode

Flaky Crust:
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup chilled shortening
1/4 cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
4-6 tbsp ice-cold water

Fill a small cup with ice cubes and water. Let sit.

Whisk flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter with a pastry blender or rub in with fingers, until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Do not mix too much; a few pieces of butter are ok. Sprinkle with ice water, a tablespoon at a time. Stir with a fork to moisten. Gather dough into a ball. Divide in half. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Filling:
4-5 medium-large baking apples
3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
3/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tbsp butter
Heavy Cream
Sugar

Peel and core the apples and cut into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Combine the sugar, flour, cinnamon and allspice; toss mixture with apples. Let sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile roll out bottom crust. Drape over a pie plate smoothing the bottom and sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Pour apples and juice into a strainer set over a sauce pan. Let drain for 15 minutes (should have at least 1/2 cup).

Add two tablespoons butter to the pot with the apple juice. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until liquid has reduced slightly and mixture is syrupy and lightly caramelized; about 3-5 minutes

Roll out top crust. Remove pie plate with bottom crust from refrigerator. Spoon apples into the crust lined pie plate. Pour syrup over apples.

Drape top crust over apples. Trim edges to 1-inch below rim of pie plate. Tuck the edges under and leave as is or flute using knuckles. Cut slits in the top to vent. Brush with heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover edges with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake 25-30 minutes until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly.

Variations:
Add 1/4 cup raisins to filling.

Classic Bread Pudding without sauce

Ever wonder what to do with left over bread? Make bread pudding. It is so easy and so delicious.

I used a loaf of left over French bread I purchased from the bakery. Cut the bread into bite sized cubes. Spread them out on a baking sheet and leave out, remedy uncovered, overnight. In the morning the bread is just perfect for making bread pudding. Do not use fresh bread because the bread will become too soggy.

***Note: If you make the sauce to put on top of your bread pudding, adjust the sugar in the bread pudding recipe, change it to 1/3 cups sugar.

Source: MomsWhoThink
2 cups whole milk
1/4 cup butter
*2/3 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
3 eggs
2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg (use slightly less for freshly grated)
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups french bread, cut into cubes
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

In medium saucepan, over medium heat, heat milk  just until film forms over top. Add butter, stirring until butter is melted. Cool to lukewarm.

Combine sugar, eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla. Whisk until well combined and frothy. Slowly add milk mixture, whisking constantly.

Bread for Bread Pudding

Place bread in a lightly greased 1 1/2 quart casserole. Sprinkle with raisins if desired. Pour batter on top of bread. Bake at 350 degrees F for 45 to 50 minutes or until set. Serve warm.

Classic Bread Pudding with Sauce

Bread Pudding Sauce:
1 cup whole milk
2 tbsp butter
1/3 cup granulated white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp flour
dash of salt

Mix everything together and bring to a boil over medium heat for 3 – 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Set aside for 5 minutes, then pour on warm bread pudding.

Classic Bread Pudding

Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, unhealthy water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, pills the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, order tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 cup whole grain flour
2/3 cup honey
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

Notes:
If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>
When our 5 year old was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth. He did not like the toothpaste.

Earlier this week I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, information pills mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not try it. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily brush your teeth battle that has been going on the past three and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was completely red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh-Oh, this stuff is red, that means there is red food dye in it, a lot of red food dye.”

Nutmeg Seed

There are two spices derived from the fruit of the Myristica fragrans tree, approved nutmeg and mace. The spices were originally derived from the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Mace comes from the red lacy covering of the stone-like seed, while nutmeg is made from the seed itself.

I have only ever used the ground form of nutmeg. Foodies profess they only use freshly grated nutmeg. I finally decided to try it out to see what all the hype was about. I purchased a bottle of Spice Island Whole nutmeg. It is not gourmet from Whole Foods, it was the only brand the market carried. I started with my favorite holiday recipe Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I was all set to go with my microplane in one hand and a nutmeg seed in the other. Problem was I was uncertain what to do. Was I supposed to crack the seed open? Is the seed it? I turned to the internet but could not find anything on grating nutmeg. I concluded I would grate the seed and hope for the best.

The only difference I could tell was that the freshly grated nutmeg seemed to blend in in a silky smooth way. The powdered form of nutmeg can sometimes be overpowering. I paid $6.59 for a bottle of 14 seeds. Cost-wise it is a good deal. I made two recipes and barley used a quarter of the seed. Grated nutmeg may be substituted for ground simply by adding a smidgen less of the fresh stuff.

apple Pie

One day this past spring, sales on the way back to the car after picking Mason up from school, cheapest he stopped to admire a great redwood tree standing in a neighboring yard. “Hey, that looks like the tree in the book my teacher read today!” I could tell Mason had a great day at school because he actually remembered what he learned. He continued to tell me about how trees, eggs and frogs grow.

When we got home Mason asked if I would bake him an apple pie. A couple of weeks prior he requested a blueberry pie inspired by Pig on Word World who loves to bake blueberry pie. Now here was another request but for an apple pie. I surprised myself by successfully baking the blueberry pie but pastries make me nervous so it took me quite a while to get up the nerve to try it again. I have gone through several failures to get to this recipe of apple pie.

I have come to understand when making crusts for delicate pastries such as pie crust the ingredients must be cold. When I made the blueberry pie I used frozen butter. By the time I was done cutting the butter into cubes it was the perfect temperature as if I just pulled it out of the refrigerator. However in subsequent baking attempts my pastry cutter broke. I have not replaced it for I find I enjoy working the butter in with my fingers. Consequently you will notice the recipe will direct you to use chilled butter (not frozen) and return the crust to the refrigerator until ready to use. The reasoning is the cold butter in the crust helps produce a flakier moist tastier crust. To cut in the butter use a food processor, pastry cutter or your fingers. Always cut butter into small cubes before adding butter to the flour mixture.

Let’s talk apples now. Granny Smith is the apple of choice. It keeps its shape and gives the apple pie that tart flavor. You can make the pie using just Granny Smith apples or a combination of Granny Smith and the following: Braeburn, Rome, Jonathan, Winesap, Empire, Fuji, Pink Lady and McIntosh. I like to use Ganny Smith and Braeburn. The Breaburn is sweet and is a nice compliment to the sour Granny Smith.

Apple Pie A-la Mode

Flaky Crust:
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup chilled shortening
1/4 cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
4-6 tbsp ice-cold water

Fill a small cup with ice cubes and water. Let sit.

Whisk flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter with a pastry blender or rub in with fingers, until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Do not mix too much; a few pieces of butter are ok. Sprinkle with ice water, a tablespoon at a time. Stir with a fork to moisten. Gather dough into a ball. Divide in half. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Filling:
4-5 medium-large baking apples
3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
3/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tbsp butter
Heavy Cream
Sugar

Peel and core the apples and cut into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Combine the sugar, flour, cinnamon and allspice; toss mixture with apples. Let sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile roll out bottom crust. Drape over a pie plate smoothing the bottom and sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Pour apples and juice into a strainer set over a sauce pan. Let drain for 15 minutes (should have at least 1/2 cup).

Add two tablespoons butter to the pot with the apple juice. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until liquid has reduced slightly and mixture is syrupy and lightly caramelized; about 3-5 minutes

Roll out top crust. Remove pie plate with bottom crust from refrigerator. Spoon apples into the crust lined pie plate. Pour syrup over apples.

Drape top crust over apples. Trim edges to 1-inch below rim of pie plate. Tuck the edges under and leave as is or flute using knuckles. Cut slits in the top to vent. Brush with heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover edges with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake 25-30 minutes until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly.

Variations:
Add 1/4 cup raisins to filling.

Classic Bread Pudding without sauce

Ever wonder what to do with left over bread? Make bread pudding. It is so easy and so delicious.

I used a loaf of left over French bread I purchased from the bakery. Cut the bread into bite sized cubes. Spread them out on a baking sheet and leave out, remedy uncovered, overnight. In the morning the bread is just perfect for making bread pudding. Do not use fresh bread because the bread will become too soggy.

***Note: If you make the sauce to put on top of your bread pudding, adjust the sugar in the bread pudding recipe, change it to 1/3 cups sugar.

Source: MomsWhoThink
2 cups whole milk
1/4 cup butter
*2/3 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
3 eggs
2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg (use slightly less for freshly grated)
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups french bread, cut into cubes
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

In medium saucepan, over medium heat, heat milk  just until film forms over top. Add butter, stirring until butter is melted. Cool to lukewarm.

Combine sugar, eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla. Whisk until well combined and frothy. Slowly add milk mixture, whisking constantly.

Bread for Bread Pudding

Place bread in a lightly greased 1 1/2 quart casserole. Sprinkle with raisins if desired. Pour batter on top of bread. Bake at 350 degrees F for 45 to 50 minutes or until set. Serve warm.

Classic Bread Pudding with Sauce

Bread Pudding Sauce:
1 cup whole milk
2 tbsp butter
1/3 cup granulated white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp flour
dash of salt

Mix everything together and bring to a boil over medium heat for 3 – 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Set aside for 5 minutes, then pour on warm bread pudding.

Classic Bread Pudding

Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, unhealthy water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, pills the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, order tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 cup whole grain flour
2/3 cup honey
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

Notes:
If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

ratatouille

Ratatouille is a traditional French Provencal vegetable dish starring tomatoes and roasted vegetables. There are plenty of theories out there on the proper way to prepare Ratatouille. Some simply roast the vegetables for a light clean presentation. Others including Julia Childs chose to layer the vegetables in a thick tomato based sauce as seen in the Pixar movie “Ratatouille”. While Julia’s version may be breathtaking it is stretch for novice cooks to achieve the uniform look of the dish. For time and patience sake we believe in the chop it, more about toss it together and bake approach.

1 onion, approved chopped
3 cloves garlic, sliced very thin
3 tomatoes, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 small aubergine (eggplant), halved, quartered then chopped
1 courgettes (zucchini), halved then chopped
1 yellow squash, halved then chopped
2 bell peppers (preferably red and yellow), chopped
Few sprigs fresh thyme leaves or a generous dash of Herbs de Provence
Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Put the onions, garlic and tomatoes into a baking dish. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Toss in the eggplant, zucchini, squash and peppers over the tomatoes. Drizzle with remaining tablespoon of oil and season with salt and pepper. Remove the leaves from the thyme sprigs by running your fingertips down the stem. Sprinkle over the vegetables. Cover with a piece of parchment paper cut to fit inside the dish.

Bake 45 to 55 minutes, or until vegetables are tender but not mushy. Serve with a dab of soft goat cheese and a serving of polenta, couscous or white beans. Serves 4-5

Variations:
-Toss vegetables with 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar and 1/2 cup Kalamata olives.
-Layer the vegetables on pastry dough for a yummy Ratatouille tart.
-Drop rounds of biscuit dough with chopped bits of sausage mixed in.
-For a Southern flare toss in a 1/2 cup of okra.
-Stuff the vegetables into halved green peppers. Top with a small slice of Monterey Jack cheese, a dollop of tomato sauce and a sprinkle of panko crumbs and Parmesan cheese.

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>
When our 5 year old was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth. He did not like the toothpaste.

Earlier this week I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, information pills mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not try it. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily brush your teeth battle that has been going on the past three and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was completely red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh-Oh, this stuff is red, that means there is red food dye in it, a lot of red food dye.”

Nutmeg Seed

There are two spices derived from the fruit of the Myristica fragrans tree, approved nutmeg and mace. The spices were originally derived from the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Mace comes from the red lacy covering of the stone-like seed, while nutmeg is made from the seed itself.

I have only ever used the ground form of nutmeg. Foodies profess they only use freshly grated nutmeg. I finally decided to try it out to see what all the hype was about. I purchased a bottle of Spice Island Whole nutmeg. It is not gourmet from Whole Foods, it was the only brand the market carried. I started with my favorite holiday recipe Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I was all set to go with my microplane in one hand and a nutmeg seed in the other. Problem was I was uncertain what to do. Was I supposed to crack the seed open? Is the seed it? I turned to the internet but could not find anything on grating nutmeg. I concluded I would grate the seed and hope for the best.

The only difference I could tell was that the freshly grated nutmeg seemed to blend in in a silky smooth way. The powdered form of nutmeg can sometimes be overpowering. I paid $6.59 for a bottle of 14 seeds. Cost-wise it is a good deal. I made two recipes and barley used a quarter of the seed. Grated nutmeg may be substituted for ground simply by adding a smidgen less of the fresh stuff.

apple Pie

One day this past spring, sales on the way back to the car after picking Mason up from school, cheapest he stopped to admire a great redwood tree standing in a neighboring yard. “Hey, that looks like the tree in the book my teacher read today!” I could tell Mason had a great day at school because he actually remembered what he learned. He continued to tell me about how trees, eggs and frogs grow.

When we got home Mason asked if I would bake him an apple pie. A couple of weeks prior he requested a blueberry pie inspired by Pig on Word World who loves to bake blueberry pie. Now here was another request but for an apple pie. I surprised myself by successfully baking the blueberry pie but pastries make me nervous so it took me quite a while to get up the nerve to try it again. I have gone through several failures to get to this recipe of apple pie.

I have come to understand when making crusts for delicate pastries such as pie crust the ingredients must be cold. When I made the blueberry pie I used frozen butter. By the time I was done cutting the butter into cubes it was the perfect temperature as if I just pulled it out of the refrigerator. However in subsequent baking attempts my pastry cutter broke. I have not replaced it for I find I enjoy working the butter in with my fingers. Consequently you will notice the recipe will direct you to use chilled butter (not frozen) and return the crust to the refrigerator until ready to use. The reasoning is the cold butter in the crust helps produce a flakier moist tastier crust. To cut in the butter use a food processor, pastry cutter or your fingers. Always cut butter into small cubes before adding butter to the flour mixture.

Let’s talk apples now. Granny Smith is the apple of choice. It keeps its shape and gives the apple pie that tart flavor. You can make the pie using just Granny Smith apples or a combination of Granny Smith and the following: Braeburn, Rome, Jonathan, Winesap, Empire, Fuji, Pink Lady and McIntosh. I like to use Ganny Smith and Braeburn. The Breaburn is sweet and is a nice compliment to the sour Granny Smith.

Apple Pie A-la Mode

Flaky Crust:
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup chilled shortening
1/4 cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
4-6 tbsp ice-cold water

Fill a small cup with ice cubes and water. Let sit.

Whisk flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter with a pastry blender or rub in with fingers, until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Do not mix too much; a few pieces of butter are ok. Sprinkle with ice water, a tablespoon at a time. Stir with a fork to moisten. Gather dough into a ball. Divide in half. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Filling:
4-5 medium-large baking apples
3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
3/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tbsp butter
Heavy Cream
Sugar

Peel and core the apples and cut into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Combine the sugar, flour, cinnamon and allspice; toss mixture with apples. Let sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile roll out bottom crust. Drape over a pie plate smoothing the bottom and sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Pour apples and juice into a strainer set over a sauce pan. Let drain for 15 minutes (should have at least 1/2 cup).

Add two tablespoons butter to the pot with the apple juice. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until liquid has reduced slightly and mixture is syrupy and lightly caramelized; about 3-5 minutes

Roll out top crust. Remove pie plate with bottom crust from refrigerator. Spoon apples into the crust lined pie plate. Pour syrup over apples.

Drape top crust over apples. Trim edges to 1-inch below rim of pie plate. Tuck the edges under and leave as is or flute using knuckles. Cut slits in the top to vent. Brush with heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover edges with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake 25-30 minutes until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly.

Variations:
Add 1/4 cup raisins to filling.

Classic Bread Pudding without sauce

Ever wonder what to do with left over bread? Make bread pudding. It is so easy and so delicious.

I used a loaf of left over French bread I purchased from the bakery. Cut the bread into bite sized cubes. Spread them out on a baking sheet and leave out, remedy uncovered, overnight. In the morning the bread is just perfect for making bread pudding. Do not use fresh bread because the bread will become too soggy.

***Note: If you make the sauce to put on top of your bread pudding, adjust the sugar in the bread pudding recipe, change it to 1/3 cups sugar.

Source: MomsWhoThink
2 cups whole milk
1/4 cup butter
*2/3 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
3 eggs
2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg (use slightly less for freshly grated)
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups french bread, cut into cubes
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

In medium saucepan, over medium heat, heat milk  just until film forms over top. Add butter, stirring until butter is melted. Cool to lukewarm.

Combine sugar, eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla. Whisk until well combined and frothy. Slowly add milk mixture, whisking constantly.

Bread for Bread Pudding

Place bread in a lightly greased 1 1/2 quart casserole. Sprinkle with raisins if desired. Pour batter on top of bread. Bake at 350 degrees F for 45 to 50 minutes or until set. Serve warm.

Classic Bread Pudding with Sauce

Bread Pudding Sauce:
1 cup whole milk
2 tbsp butter
1/3 cup granulated white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp flour
dash of salt

Mix everything together and bring to a boil over medium heat for 3 – 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Set aside for 5 minutes, then pour on warm bread pudding.

Classic Bread Pudding

Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, unhealthy water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, pills the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, order tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 cup whole grain flour
2/3 cup honey
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

Notes:
If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

ratatouille

Ratatouille is a traditional French Provencal vegetable dish starring tomatoes and roasted vegetables. There are plenty of theories out there on the proper way to prepare Ratatouille. Some simply roast the vegetables for a light clean presentation. Others including Julia Childs chose to layer the vegetables in a thick tomato based sauce as seen in the Pixar movie “Ratatouille”. While Julia’s version may be breathtaking it is stretch for novice cooks to achieve the uniform look of the dish. For time and patience sake we believe in the chop it, more about toss it together and bake approach.

1 onion, approved chopped
3 cloves garlic, sliced very thin
3 tomatoes, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 small aubergine (eggplant), halved, quartered then chopped
1 courgettes (zucchini), halved then chopped
1 yellow squash, halved then chopped
2 bell peppers (preferably red and yellow), chopped
Few sprigs fresh thyme leaves or a generous dash of Herbs de Provence
Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Put the onions, garlic and tomatoes into a baking dish. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Toss in the eggplant, zucchini, squash and peppers over the tomatoes. Drizzle with remaining tablespoon of oil and season with salt and pepper. Remove the leaves from the thyme sprigs by running your fingertips down the stem. Sprinkle over the vegetables. Cover with a piece of parchment paper cut to fit inside the dish.

Bake 45 to 55 minutes, or until vegetables are tender but not mushy. Serve with a dab of soft goat cheese and a serving of polenta, couscous or white beans. Serves 4-5

Variations:
-Toss vegetables with 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar and 1/2 cup Kalamata olives.
-Layer the vegetables on pastry dough for a yummy Ratatouille tart.
-Drop rounds of biscuit dough with chopped bits of sausage mixed in.
-For a Southern flare toss in a 1/2 cup of okra.
-Stuff the vegetables into halved green peppers. Top with a small slice of Monterey Jack cheese, a dollop of tomato sauce and a sprinkle of panko crumbs and Parmesan cheese.

hobbies_magazine_j_e_standley_cover

Photo: Hobbies Magazine February-March 1919 issue, drugs cover by J.E. Standley

Several years ago a friend of mine started a Yahoo Group for local moms comprised of her friends, information pills our friends and their friends as a way to share news quickly without having to call everyone. We post upcoming events, deals for the local restaurants, coupons for the grocery store, items we are looking to get rid of or looking for and parenting woes and advice, among other things. Occasionally my friend will pose a question to start a discussion. The first question asked us to list some of our hobbies and projects we are working on. Before children I had hobbies. I am sure of it. Sadly they were placed by the wayside and over time forgotten. This actually is not a bad thing. It is part of growing up. With each stage of life come new and exciting ideas that we can look forward to. Otherwise we would all be playing with barbies and GI-Joe figures at age 36. However if you have young children you are probably doing just that.

This month’s resolution is all about finding a hobby that is fun, yet challenging. My goal for this month was to finally sign up for fencing classes. For years I have had a secret desire to learn fencing. Just when I was about to sign up for classes we uprooted our family and moved to another city that does not offer any classes. Now I am left trying to figure out another alternative.

A hobby should be something you want to do. It should be relaxing never forced; although sometimes our children need a little push to motivate them in the right direction until they find something suitable. A hobby should be all about the passion. If you are doing it because everyone else is doing it or because you have to then it becomes a chore not a hobby. Here is the exception to the rule. I love to read. Recently I found a group of women in my area who share a passion for literature. Each month someone chooses a book from a long list of classic literature. The following month we meet for breakfast to discuss the novel and how it relates to us in our time. The experience has been exhilarating. Most of the books are not books I normally would have picked up to read. Yes at times, when I would rather be reading something else less complicated, it feels like a chore; however, the goal of enriching my life through beautiful literature and then connecting with other moms is the hobby. Studies have found that when we are genuinely engaged in an activity we find interesting we fuel our self-esteem and life becomes more exciting. After my first book club meeting I felt alive. Invigorated. I was inspired.

In a society such as we live in the term hobby is often viewed as juvenile. The truth is we all need enriching experiences to help us stay centered and live a more balanced life. We all want success in some form. We all want to give our best to our bosses, families and friends. However, it is impossible to maintain such high demands of ourselves without causing a negative impact on our health and well being. When we allow ourselves to become tired and drained from work or overloaded with obligations our ability to innovate drops significantly. Our failure pushes us to work even harder. We feel guilty. We feel frustrated. Ultimately we feel defeated. Hobbies help relieve the stress resulting in a happier you.

A hobby is a fantastic way to blow off steam from a stressful workweek. A friend of mine could not wait until Saturday morning to hop on his bike and ride for 3 hours to distress. Hobbies such as collecting books, stamps and maps have a historical educational value. Tinkering hobbies like building trains, models, rockets and cars can build career oriented talents. Active hobbies like hiking, running and sports invigorate us. Moreover, hobbies can enhance our creative minds and help us think more clearly. I always seem to find my best inspirations while I am running or working on a project.

Sometimes we may feel guilty selfishly setting alone time aside for our personal hobbies. The truth is our hobbies can have a lasting impact on the children who learn from watching us. When they see mom and dad happily working on a hobby they are more likely to engage in a hobby themselves. They may copy what their parents are doing or adopt something of their own. Learning to manage their free time at an early age will benefit them when they are older. As parents we can help them discover enjoyable activities together. I love camping and hiking. I am passionate about camping and hiking. However it is no longer the relaxing hobby I enjoyed when I was a single college student or newly married. With our three little ones it is no easy feat. Yet, we continue to put on a brave face and take our kids hiking to give them rich fulfilling experiences. Hobbies shared with parents create lasting bonds. These activities such as sports, running, music, camping, cooking, fishing among others continue to hold value after the children have grown and move off to college. Children are also less likely to turn to drugs or exhibit bad behaviors when they are older if they are pursuing fun interesting hobbies to keep them busy. Who knows maybe the little boy that was into building rockets will grow up to become a rock scientist.

Choose a hobby from the following list or log onto DiscoverAHobby.com for a more comprehensive list of ideas. Local colleges, home and garden depots and craft shops offer all sorts of classes for a minimal fee. Contact a small mom and pop shop or ranch to see if they would be interested in training an apprentice for free or ask a friend to teach you.

  • Start a singing group. Gather some of your friends and their friends to meet once a month to sing together. Or join a community theater or adult choir in your area. Music has powerful effects over the mind.
  • Schedule periodic camping and hiking trips with your spouse or friends. It is always a treat to get away with gals or buddies.
  • Start a running or walking group.
  • Learn taekwondo, (some dojos offer family classes on the weekend) boxing, biking, fencing, dance, archery, rock climbing, yoga, weight lifting.
  • Gather some friends every Saturday morning to play volleyball, soccer, basketball, rugby, horseback riding, basketball, baseball.
  • Learn to Kayak, canoe, fish, scuba diving, wilderness camping, hiking.
  • Learn to scrapbook photos.
  • Build models, carpentry work, Gardening, car mechanics, basic home repairs.
  • Collect stamps, antiques, maps, wooden boxes, baskets, toys, pictures, books, coins, cars, art.
  • Learn about home theaters.
  • Complete a Puzzle.
  • Tour historical sites and museums.
  • Learn a foreign language.
  • Take an arts and crafts class in quilting, sewing, flower arrangements, photography, painting, pottery, wood carving, knitting, stained glass, interior design, jewelry, welding.
  • Study a musical instrument such as the guitar, piano, cello, violin, brass or woodwind instruments, organ, mandolin, lire, drums, voice.
  • Take up journaling, writing, poetry.
  • Join a book club or start one of your own.
  • Take a cooking class or start a cooking club..
  • Learn CPR, first aide.

Sandwiches are an economical way to fill up bellies. They do not require a lot of preparation and they appeal to even the pickiest of eaters. Click here for a history on the beloved sandwich. Otherwise watch the following video on how to make an awesome sub for Superbowl Sunday.

value=”http://www.youtube.com/v/S1uIs1rsrFE&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1″>
When our 5 year old was a toddler we used Burt’s Bees baby toothpaste. It tasted like fruit without the zing of fluoride. A couple of years later Burt’s Bees quit making the baby toothpaste. I made the switch to a kids store brand and was met with daily battles to get my son to brush his teeth. He did not like the toothpaste.

Earlier this week I was in the toothpaste isle picking up new toothbrushes and a tube of paste for us, information pills mom and dad, when I noticed there was a strawberry flavored toothpaste. I thought, hey why not try it. I did not even think about what might be in it. My only concern was stopping the daily brush your teeth battle that has been going on the past three and a half years.

That evening I took out the tube then squeezed a dot onto the baby’s toothbrush and was shocked. The stuff was completely red. My first thought was “how much sugar did they put in this stuff” and my second thought was “Uh-Oh, this stuff is red, that means there is red food dye in it, a lot of red food dye.”

Nutmeg Seed

There are two spices derived from the fruit of the Myristica fragrans tree, approved nutmeg and mace. The spices were originally derived from the Spice Islands of Indonesia. Mace comes from the red lacy covering of the stone-like seed, while nutmeg is made from the seed itself.

I have only ever used the ground form of nutmeg. Foodies profess they only use freshly grated nutmeg. I finally decided to try it out to see what all the hype was about. I purchased a bottle of Spice Island Whole nutmeg. It is not gourmet from Whole Foods, it was the only brand the market carried. I started with my favorite holiday recipe Pumpkin Chip Cookies. I was all set to go with my microplane in one hand and a nutmeg seed in the other. Problem was I was uncertain what to do. Was I supposed to crack the seed open? Is the seed it? I turned to the internet but could not find anything on grating nutmeg. I concluded I would grate the seed and hope for the best.

The only difference I could tell was that the freshly grated nutmeg seemed to blend in in a silky smooth way. The powdered form of nutmeg can sometimes be overpowering. I paid $6.59 for a bottle of 14 seeds. Cost-wise it is a good deal. I made two recipes and barley used a quarter of the seed. Grated nutmeg may be substituted for ground simply by adding a smidgen less of the fresh stuff.

apple Pie

One day this past spring, sales on the way back to the car after picking Mason up from school, cheapest he stopped to admire a great redwood tree standing in a neighboring yard. “Hey, that looks like the tree in the book my teacher read today!” I could tell Mason had a great day at school because he actually remembered what he learned. He continued to tell me about how trees, eggs and frogs grow.

When we got home Mason asked if I would bake him an apple pie. A couple of weeks prior he requested a blueberry pie inspired by Pig on Word World who loves to bake blueberry pie. Now here was another request but for an apple pie. I surprised myself by successfully baking the blueberry pie but pastries make me nervous so it took me quite a while to get up the nerve to try it again. I have gone through several failures to get to this recipe of apple pie.

I have come to understand when making crusts for delicate pastries such as pie crust the ingredients must be cold. When I made the blueberry pie I used frozen butter. By the time I was done cutting the butter into cubes it was the perfect temperature as if I just pulled it out of the refrigerator. However in subsequent baking attempts my pastry cutter broke. I have not replaced it for I find I enjoy working the butter in with my fingers. Consequently you will notice the recipe will direct you to use chilled butter (not frozen) and return the crust to the refrigerator until ready to use. The reasoning is the cold butter in the crust helps produce a flakier moist tastier crust. To cut in the butter use a food processor, pastry cutter or your fingers. Always cut butter into small cubes before adding butter to the flour mixture.

Let’s talk apples now. Granny Smith is the apple of choice. It keeps its shape and gives the apple pie that tart flavor. You can make the pie using just Granny Smith apples or a combination of Granny Smith and the following: Braeburn, Rome, Jonathan, Winesap, Empire, Fuji, Pink Lady and McIntosh. I like to use Ganny Smith and Braeburn. The Breaburn is sweet and is a nice compliment to the sour Granny Smith.

Apple Pie A-la Mode

Flaky Crust:
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup chilled shortening
1/4 cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
4-6 tbsp ice-cold water

Fill a small cup with ice cubes and water. Let sit.

Whisk flour and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the shortening and butter with a pastry blender or rub in with fingers, until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Do not mix too much; a few pieces of butter are ok. Sprinkle with ice water, a tablespoon at a time. Stir with a fork to moisten. Gather dough into a ball. Divide in half. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Filling:
4-5 medium-large baking apples
3/4 cups sugar
3 tbsp flour
3/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tbsp butter
Heavy Cream
Sugar

Peel and core the apples and cut into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Combine the sugar, flour, cinnamon and allspice; toss mixture with apples. Let sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile roll out bottom crust. Drape over a pie plate smoothing the bottom and sides. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

Pour apples and juice into a strainer set over a sauce pan. Let drain for 15 minutes (should have at least 1/2 cup).

Add two tablespoons butter to the pot with the apple juice. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil until liquid has reduced slightly and mixture is syrupy and lightly caramelized; about 3-5 minutes

Roll out top crust. Remove pie plate with bottom crust from refrigerator. Spoon apples into the crust lined pie plate. Pour syrup over apples.

Drape top crust over apples. Trim edges to 1-inch below rim of pie plate. Tuck the edges under and leave as is or flute using knuckles. Cut slits in the top to vent. Brush with heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover edges with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake 25-30 minutes until crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly.

Variations:
Add 1/4 cup raisins to filling.

Classic Bread Pudding without sauce

Ever wonder what to do with left over bread? Make bread pudding. It is so easy and so delicious.

I used a loaf of left over French bread I purchased from the bakery. Cut the bread into bite sized cubes. Spread them out on a baking sheet and leave out, remedy uncovered, overnight. In the morning the bread is just perfect for making bread pudding. Do not use fresh bread because the bread will become too soggy.

***Note: If you make the sauce to put on top of your bread pudding, adjust the sugar in the bread pudding recipe, change it to 1/3 cups sugar.

Source: MomsWhoThink
2 cups whole milk
1/4 cup butter
*2/3 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
3 eggs
2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg (use slightly less for freshly grated)
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups french bread, cut into cubes
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

In medium saucepan, over medium heat, heat milk  just until film forms over top. Add butter, stirring until butter is melted. Cool to lukewarm.

Combine sugar, eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla. Whisk until well combined and frothy. Slowly add milk mixture, whisking constantly.

Bread for Bread Pudding

Place bread in a lightly greased 1 1/2 quart casserole. Sprinkle with raisins if desired. Pour batter on top of bread. Bake at 350 degrees F for 45 to 50 minutes or until set. Serve warm.

Classic Bread Pudding with Sauce

Bread Pudding Sauce:
1 cup whole milk
2 tbsp butter
1/3 cup granulated white sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp flour
dash of salt

Mix everything together and bring to a boil over medium heat for 3 – 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Set aside for 5 minutes, then pour on warm bread pudding.

Classic Bread Pudding

Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, unhealthy water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, pills the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, order tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 cup whole grain flour
2/3 cup honey
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

Notes:
If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

ratatouille

Ratatouille is a traditional French Provencal vegetable dish starring tomatoes and roasted vegetables. There are plenty of theories out there on the proper way to prepare Ratatouille. Some simply roast the vegetables for a light clean presentation. Others including Julia Childs chose to layer the vegetables in a thick tomato based sauce as seen in the Pixar movie “Ratatouille”. While Julia’s version may be breathtaking it is stretch for novice cooks to achieve the uniform look of the dish. For time and patience sake we believe in the chop it, more about toss it together and bake approach.

1 onion, approved chopped
3 cloves garlic, sliced very thin
3 tomatoes, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 small aubergine (eggplant), halved, quartered then chopped
1 courgettes (zucchini), halved then chopped
1 yellow squash, halved then chopped
2 bell peppers (preferably red and yellow), chopped
Few sprigs fresh thyme leaves or a generous dash of Herbs de Provence
Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Put the onions, garlic and tomatoes into a baking dish. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Toss in the eggplant, zucchini, squash and peppers over the tomatoes. Drizzle with remaining tablespoon of oil and season with salt and pepper. Remove the leaves from the thyme sprigs by running your fingertips down the stem. Sprinkle over the vegetables. Cover with a piece of parchment paper cut to fit inside the dish.

Bake 45 to 55 minutes, or until vegetables are tender but not mushy. Serve with a dab of soft goat cheese and a serving of polenta, couscous or white beans. Serves 4-5

Variations:
-Toss vegetables with 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar and 1/2 cup Kalamata olives.
-Layer the vegetables on pastry dough for a yummy Ratatouille tart.
-Drop rounds of biscuit dough with chopped bits of sausage mixed in.
-For a Southern flare toss in a 1/2 cup of okra.
-Stuff the vegetables into halved green peppers. Top with a small slice of Monterey Jack cheese, a dollop of tomato sauce and a sprinkle of panko crumbs and Parmesan cheese.

hobbies_magazine_j_e_standley_cover

Photo: Hobbies Magazine February-March 1919 issue, drugs cover by J.E. Standley

Several years ago a friend of mine started a Yahoo Group for local moms comprised of her friends, information pills our friends and their friends as a way to share news quickly without having to call everyone. We post upcoming events, deals for the local restaurants, coupons for the grocery store, items we are looking to get rid of or looking for and parenting woes and advice, among other things. Occasionally my friend will pose a question to start a discussion. The first question asked us to list some of our hobbies and projects we are working on. Before children I had hobbies. I am sure of it. Sadly they were placed by the wayside and over time forgotten. This actually is not a bad thing. It is part of growing up. With each stage of life come new and exciting ideas that we can look forward to. Otherwise we would all be playing with barbies and GI-Joe figures at age 36. However if you have young children you are probably doing just that.

This month’s resolution is all about finding a hobby that is fun, yet challenging. My goal for this month was to finally sign up for fencing classes. For years I have had a secret desire to learn fencing. Just when I was about to sign up for classes we uprooted our family and moved to another city that does not offer any classes. Now I am left trying to figure out another alternative.

A hobby should be something you want to do. It should be relaxing never forced; although sometimes our children need a little push to motivate them in the right direction until they find something suitable. A hobby should be all about the passion. If you are doing it because everyone else is doing it or because you have to then it becomes a chore not a hobby. Here is the exception to the rule. I love to read. Recently I found a group of women in my area who share a passion for literature. Each month someone chooses a book from a long list of classic literature. The following month we meet for breakfast to discuss the novel and how it relates to us in our time. The experience has been exhilarating. Most of the books are not books I normally would have picked up to read. Yes at times, when I would rather be reading something else less complicated, it feels like a chore; however, the goal of enriching my life through beautiful literature and then connecting with other moms is the hobby. Studies have found that when we are genuinely engaged in an activity we find interesting we fuel our self-esteem and life becomes more exciting. After my first book club meeting I felt alive. Invigorated. I was inspired.

In a society such as we live in the term hobby is often viewed as juvenile. The truth is we all need enriching experiences to help us stay centered and live a more balanced life. We all want success in some form. We all want to give our best to our bosses, families and friends. However, it is impossible to maintain such high demands of ourselves without causing a negative impact on our health and well being. When we allow ourselves to become tired and drained from work or overloaded with obligations our ability to innovate drops significantly. Our failure pushes us to work even harder. We feel guilty. We feel frustrated. Ultimately we feel defeated. Hobbies help relieve the stress resulting in a happier you.

A hobby is a fantastic way to blow off steam from a stressful workweek. A friend of mine could not wait until Saturday morning to hop on his bike and ride for 3 hours to distress. Hobbies such as collecting books, stamps and maps have a historical educational value. Tinkering hobbies like building trains, models, rockets and cars can build career oriented talents. Active hobbies like hiking, running and sports invigorate us. Moreover, hobbies can enhance our creative minds and help us think more clearly. I always seem to find my best inspirations while I am running or working on a project.

Sometimes we may feel guilty selfishly setting alone time aside for our personal hobbies. The truth is our hobbies can have a lasting impact on the children who learn from watching us. When they see mom and dad happily working on a hobby they are more likely to engage in a hobby themselves. They may copy what their parents are doing or adopt something of their own. Learning to manage their free time at an early age will benefit them when they are older. As parents we can help them discover enjoyable activities together. I love camping and hiking. I am passionate about camping and hiking. However it is no longer the relaxing hobby I enjoyed when I was a single college student or newly married. With our three little ones it is no easy feat. Yet, we continue to put on a brave face and take our kids hiking to give them rich fulfilling experiences. Hobbies shared with parents create lasting bonds. These activities such as sports, running, music, camping, cooking, fishing among others continue to hold value after the children have grown and move off to college. Children are also less likely to turn to drugs or exhibit bad behaviors when they are older if they are pursuing fun interesting hobbies to keep them busy. Who knows maybe the little boy that was into building rockets will grow up to become a rock scientist.

Choose a hobby from the following list or log onto DiscoverAHobby.com for a more comprehensive list of ideas. Local colleges, home and garden depots and craft shops offer all sorts of classes for a minimal fee. Contact a small mom and pop shop or ranch to see if they would be interested in training an apprentice for free or ask a friend to teach you.

  • Start a singing group. Gather some of your friends and their friends to meet once a month to sing together. Or join a community theater or adult choir in your area. Music has powerful effects over the mind.
  • Schedule periodic camping and hiking trips with your spouse or friends. It is always a treat to get away with gals or buddies.
  • Start a running or walking group.
  • Learn taekwondo, (some dojos offer family classes on the weekend) boxing, biking, fencing, dance, archery, rock climbing, yoga, weight lifting.
  • Gather some friends every Saturday morning to play volleyball, soccer, basketball, rugby, horseback riding, basketball, baseball.
  • Learn to Kayak, canoe, fish, scuba diving, wilderness camping, hiking.
  • Learn to scrapbook photos.
  • Build models, carpentry work, Gardening, car mechanics, basic home repairs.
  • Collect stamps, antiques, maps, wooden boxes, baskets, toys, pictures, books, coins, cars, art.
  • Learn about home theaters.
  • Complete a Puzzle.
  • Tour historical sites and museums.
  • Learn a foreign language.
  • Take an arts and crafts class in quilting, sewing, flower arrangements, photography, painting, pottery, wood carving, knitting, stained glass, interior design, jewelry, welding.
  • Study a musical instrument such as the guitar, piano, cello, violin, brass or woodwind instruments, organ, mandolin, lire, drums, voice.
  • Take up journaling, writing, poetry.
  • Join a book club or start one of your own.
  • Take a cooking class or start a cooking club..
  • Learn CPR, first aide.

I found Kim and Jason on the Escape Plan blog two summer’s ago. I started to write down the 40 day steps to end Adultitist. Got to number 20. Then got busy. Lost the name of the website because I forgot to save it. Periodically I would search the net but there are a ton of 40-day plans out there. Fortunately the Goddess of New Year Eve Resolutions smiled down upon us and favored me with a blessing to find the lost website just in time for January.

Last year I decided to make 12 monthly resolutions because it seemed more effective than just writing down a list of goals and hoping for the best. For one whole month I was dedicated to a goal. Some months I was more successful than others. The months I was a complete failure I know I did my best so it was not a complete loss. About mid summer I came to the conclusion that we needed a little more spice in our life. Having three active children close together was a little insane and the effect was “Adultitis”! We needed to rediscover our inner child. Now that the kids are older and we are finally venturing out of the cave more we need to learn to relax a bit.

Kim and Jason came up with the term “Adultitis” to describe the lost child in all of us. According to their website, health “Adultitis is a silent epidemic that has been ignored for far too long. It’s a disease that slowly erodes our inborn childlike spirit, patient wreaking havoc on our world, try our nation, and our families. It kills laughter, dreams, curiosity, faith, happiness, and hope. It stresses us out. It causes us to take ourselves too seriously. And in some extreme cases, it can cause smile amnesia.”

I realized I had Adultitis when our second child was born 6 years ago. Bugs were icky, mud was too dirty and craft projects too messy. I thought to myself, when did this happen? I used to love playing with bugs and especially, my all time favorite childhood past time, making mud pies. That same day I took my then one and three year old out into the backyard to play in the mud. The process to heal myself of adultitis has been at a standstill. This year my resolution is to find something more exciting to do with the dear husband than walk around Costco on date night.

First step to curing adultitis is to head over to adultitis.org and take the test. My test result revealed I was at Stage 2 Adultitis: You have progessed to a very aggressive form of Adultitis. You are probably experiencing very high stress levels and may be having difficulty laughing. Seek help now. Please consult the Prescription for treatment options.

Next, use both the Adultitis.org and the original site Kim and Jason for tips and guidence to start the 40-day challenge.

40 ways to escape Adultitis:

1. Spend at least 15 minutes immersing yourself in a field you know nothing about.
2. Find a reason to celebrate and do something to celebrate it.
3. Do something that is typically seen as inappropriate for someone of your age.
4. Add something childlike (not necessarily childish) to your workspace or home.
5. Become a scientist. Conduct a silly experiment.
6. Write down one big dream of yours. Draw or find a picture to go with it and put it somewhere you will see it often.
7. Spend 15 – 30 minutes doing something you love that you don’t often have the chance to do.
8. Draw a funny picture and hide it in an unexpected place for someone else to find.
9. Do one thing today to support a cause or issue you really care about.
10. Create a memory today with someone you care about that will mean a lot ten years from now.
11. Do something your parents would never let you do as a child.
12. Write a letter to a childhood hero (real or fictional).
13. Spend ten minutes doing something outside that you have never done before.
14. Do something to help someone you don’t know.
15. Eat something you’ve never had before.
16. Call or meet with someone in your family and ask them a question you are curious about regarding your family’s history.
17. Learn how to do something new today. Your time limit: 30 minutes.
18. Get out of your element. Go somewhere you’ve never been before.
19. Spend 10 minutes visioning yourself 10 years from now as having accomplished one of your biggest dreams. Be as detailed as possible; imagine in all five senses.
20. Right an old wrong.
21. Write a haiku about the things you are thankful for and put it somewhere to serve as a reminder.
22. Do something to make the world a better place.
23. Take a picture of the most childlike spot in town.
24. Figure out a way to add some color to your day in a new, unusual, or wacky way.
25. Talk in a phony voice or accent to a complete stranger.
26. Open to a random page in the dictionary and look at the first word on the upper left-hand side. Keep turning pages until you find a word you don’t know. See how many times you can use this new word in a sentence today.
27. Take a routine you do everyday and put a childlike spin on it.
28. Buy something that captures the spirit of childhood for under $5.00 (including tax).
29. Ask an expert something you are curious about in his/her field.
30. Figure out a way to bring some fun into a dreaded task today.
31. Find a place to sit quietly for ten minutes. Listen for at least one sound that you would not have normally noticed.
32. Do something that will get you to laugh out-loud (one that puts you in danger of peeing your pants a little bit).
33. For no reason at all treat yourself to something out of the ordinary.
34. Think about some of the things you liked to do as a child. Pick one and do it.
35. Do something to make the day of a child.
36. Accessorize your wardrobe today with a touch of childhood.
37. Eat or drink something today that brings back childhood memories.
38. Make someone a homemade gift to show how much you care about him/her or to thank him/her for a job well done.
39. Play a practical joke on someone.
40. Congratulations on making it to the end. Your final test is to take tomorrow off. Spend today making any necessary adjustments. Do anything you want, but no work and no chores. Consider it a sick day or at least a “sick of it” day. (Remember, Adultitis is a serious affliction.)

Cheddar and Herb Biscuits

St. Francis by Debra A Hitchcock Courtesy of: Fine Art America

Saint Francis of Assisi, decease Italy (1182-1226) was the son of a wealthy cloth merchant. Francis was not a studious boy. During his youth he was most riotous and witty delighting in the pleasures of drinking, approved women and showy attire.

In the year 1202 when Francis was about twenty years old, a conflict broke out between the Assisians and the neighboring rival city of Perugain. Francis eagerly volunteered to fight as a cavalryman, however; the Assisians were quickly defeated. Francis, a prisoner of war, was forced to spend a year in captivity.

Francis returned to Assisi, but he was not the same free-spirited kid he as before the war. While he was still the life of the party his attentions were turned to caring for society’s cast offs. After experiencing several vivid dreams and various visions he turned away from all the worldly pleasures of his youth to accept a life as a Good Samaritan, including tending to the lepers. Francis sold all his property, gave his clothing to the poor and his money to the church for much needed repairs.

His father greatly disapproved of his son’s new occupation. Consequently he was disowned and his inheritance forfeited. Francis went on to devote his life to serving God. He worked to rebuild tattered church buildings. He cared for the sick and went about preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Francis vowed to live a life of poverty even going without shoes and trading his finery for a coarse woolen tunic. His lifestyle caught the attention of other young men and they too chose to leave all their riches behind to follow Francis in serving the poor. Eventually a separate order was formed for women known as the Franciscan Nuns and a second order called Poor Clares, named after a sixteen year old girl who left her home to join Francis’ cause. Thus Francis of Assisi is known as the founder of the Franciscan Order.

It was known that Francis had a special fondness for animals; he especially liked birds. Some say that wild animals did not fear him for they knew of his kindness and would bravely approach him seeking safety. It was his love for the animals that prompted him to ask the king to decree that “all men should provide and care for the birds and animals as well as the poor”.

During the Christmastide (the liturgical Christmas season beginning December 24th lasting 12 days to the eve of January 6th, the Day of Epiphany) in the year 1223, St. Francis of Assisi conceived the idea to honor the birth of the Savoir with a live “Nativity”. He wanted all to experience the lack of luxuries of the Christ child. On Christmas Eve Francis reproduced the manger scene in a cave near the small town of Greccio. He called the scene “The Praesepio, the crib, of Bethlehem”. According to the writings of St. Bonaventure, St. Francis’ friend and colleague, the people were brought to the cave through the woods, up and down hills bearing torches while singing hymns of praise.

Today community churches throughout the world celebrate the Christmas season with a live nativity scene or by hosting a nativity festival showcasing nativity sets from around the world. Families of Christian faith might display the nativity by first putting out the crèche. Then each night leading up to Christmas Eve they fill the manger with straw and place one character in the scene. On Christmas Eve the Christ child is placed in the manger filled with straw. The wise men are not brought out until January 5th the eve of Epiphany. This represents their journey to the stable January 6th being the 12th day of Christmas or Three Kings Day.

In out home we dedicated December 4th as nativity day. Taking cues from the original “The Praesepio, the crib, of Bethlehem” as portrayed by St. Francis we sing hymns and have a short devotional. During the devotional we discuss ways that we can help others in honor of the selfless sacrifices rendered by St. Francis as directed by God who said to love one another. This day is not an official Saint’s day. This is just a fun tradition we have as we like to celebrate traditions from many cultures and faiths around the world.

St. Francis by Debra A Hitchcock Courtesy of: Fine Art America

Saint Francis of Assisi, decease Italy (1182-1226) was the son of a wealthy cloth merchant. Francis was not a studious boy. During his youth he was most riotous and witty delighting in the pleasures of drinking, approved women and showy attire.

In the year 1202 when Francis was about twenty years old, a conflict broke out between the Assisians and the neighboring rival city of Perugain. Francis eagerly volunteered to fight as a cavalryman, however; the Assisians were quickly defeated. Francis, a prisoner of war, was forced to spend a year in captivity.

Francis returned to Assisi, but he was not the same free-spirited kid he as before the war. While he was still the life of the party his attentions were turned to caring for society’s cast offs. After experiencing several vivid dreams and various visions he turned away from all the worldly pleasures of his youth to accept a life as a Good Samaritan, including tending to the lepers. Francis sold all his property, gave his clothing to the poor and his money to the church for much needed repairs.

His father greatly disapproved of his son’s new occupation. Consequently he was disowned and his inheritance forfeited. Francis went on to devote his life to serving God. He worked to rebuild tattered church buildings. He cared for the sick and went about preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Francis vowed to live a life of poverty even going without shoes and trading his finery for a coarse woolen tunic. His lifestyle caught the attention of other young men and they too chose to leave all their riches behind to follow Francis in serving the poor. Eventually a separate order was formed for women known as the Franciscan Nuns and a second order called Poor Clares, named after a sixteen year old girl who left her home to join Francis’ cause. Thus Francis of Assisi is known as the founder of the Franciscan Order.

It was known that Francis had a special fondness for animals; he especially liked birds. Some say that wild animals did not fear him for they knew of his kindness and would bravely approach him seeking safety. It was his love for the animals that prompted him to ask the king to decree that “all men should provide and care for the birds and animals as well as the poor”.

During the Christmastide (the liturgical Christmas season beginning December 24th lasting 12 days to the eve of January 6th, the Day of Epiphany) in the year 1223, St. Francis of Assisi conceived the idea to honor the birth of the Savoir with a live “Nativity”. He wanted all to experience the lack of luxuries of the Christ child. On Christmas Eve Francis reproduced the manger scene in a cave near the small town of Greccio. He called the scene “The Praesepio, the crib, of Bethlehem”. According to the writings of St. Bonaventure, St. Francis’ friend and colleague, the people were brought to the cave through the woods, up and down hills bearing torches while singing hymns of praise.

Today community churches throughout the world celebrate the Christmas season with a live nativity scene or by hosting a nativity festival showcasing nativity sets from around the world. Families of Christian faith might display the nativity by first putting out the crèche. Then each night leading up to Christmas Eve they fill the manger with straw and place one character in the scene. On Christmas Eve the Christ child is placed in the manger filled with straw. The wise men are not brought out until January 5th the eve of Epiphany. This represents their journey to the stable January 6th being the 12th day of Christmas or Three Kings Day.

In out home we dedicated December 4th as nativity day. Taking cues from the original “The Praesepio, the crib, of Bethlehem” as portrayed by St. Francis we sing hymns and have a short devotional. During the devotional we discuss ways that we can help others in honor of the selfless sacrifices rendered by St. Francis as directed by God who said to love one another. This day is not an official Saint’s day. This is just a fun tradition we have as we like to celebrate traditions from many cultures and faiths around the world.

Old FAshioned Cinnamon Rolls

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Clone-of-a-Cinnabon/Detail.aspx

1 cup warm milk (110 degrees F/45
degrees C)
2 eggs, no rx room temperature
1/3 cup margarine, melted
4 1/2 cups bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup white sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons bread machine yeast

1 cup brown sugar, packed

2 1/2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1/3 cup butter, softened

1 (3 ounce) package cream cheese,
softened
1/4 cup butter, softened
1 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon salt
Directions:
kitchenaid mixer. I added the sugar and milk and stirred to dissolve than added the yeast and let proof, about 5 mins. Than I added the melted butter and eggs and mixed while adding the salt and flour, one cup at a time, till well blended. Than I used my Kitchenaid dough hook and mixed on low for about 7 mins to knead. I put the dough in a bowl, covered w/ a damp cloth and I put that in my oven (oven was off) and I let that rise for about an hour. I also took the suggestion to mixed the butter, cinnamon and sugar before adding to the rolled out dough, I just pressed the mixture into the dough before I rolled it up. I used dental floss

1. Place ingredients in the pan of the bread machine in the order recommended by the manufacturer. Select dough cycle; press Start.
2. After the dough has doubled in size turn it out onto a lightly floured surface, cover and let rest for 10 minutes. In a small bowl, combine brown sugar and cinnamon.
3. Roll dough into a 16×21 inch rectangle. Spread dough with 1/3 cup butter and sprinkle evenly with sugar/cinnamon mixture. Roll up dough and cut into 12 rolls. Place rolls in a lightly greased 9×13 inch baking pan. Cover and let rise until nearly doubled, about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).
4. Bake rolls in preheated oven until golden brown, about 15 minutes. While rolls are baking, beat together cream cheese, 1/4 cup butter, confectioners’ sugar, vanilla extract and salt. Spread frosting on warm rolls before serving.

Harvest Rolls

Harvest Cinnamon Rolls
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Bread/CinnamonRollsFantastic.htm
1 cup milk (heated approximately 1 minute in microwave)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees F.)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
2 eggs, room temperature and beaten
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar
5 cups bread flour
1 tablespoon vital wheat gluten (optional)*
3 teaspoons instant active dry yeast
Cinnamon Filling (see recipe below)
Butter Frosting (see recipe below)

* The Vital Wheat Gluten helps the sweet bread dough rise better, be more elastic, and easier to roll out. I have these cinnamon rolls both with and without this ingredient with excellent results.

Bread Machine Recipe:

Add all the ingredients, except the Cinnamon Filling and the Butter Frosting, in the bread pan of bread machine. Process according to manufacturer’s instructions for a dough setting. When the bread machine has completed the dough cycle, remove dough from pan and turn out onto a lightly oiled surface. (I use a nonstick cooking spray). Form dough into an oval, cover with a plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

NOTE: Check the dough (don’t be afraid to open the lid). It should form a nice elastic ball. If you think the dough is too moist, add additional flour (a tablespoon at a time). The same is true if the dough is looking dry and gnarly. Add warm water (a tablespoon at a time). If you can’t judge your dough by looking, stick your finger in and feel the dough. It should be slightly tacky to the touch.

Standup Mixer Recipe:

In a large bowl or in the bowl of a 5-quart stand mixer, combine all the ingredients in the order given except the Cinnamon Filling and the Butter Frosting. Using a dough hook, mix everything together until a soft dough forms.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-oiled surface (I use a nonstick cooking spray), and knead until elastic, approximately 10 minutes.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.
Food Processor Method:

Put dry mixture in processing bowl with steel blade. While motor is running, add liquid ingredients, butter, and egg. Process until mixed. Continue processing, adding remaining flour until dough forms a soft ball.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-oiled surface (I use a nonstick cooking spray), and knead until elastic, approximately 10 minutes.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

Butter a 9 x 13 x 2-inch baking pan; set aside.

After dough has rested, roll and stretch the dough into approximately a 15 x 24-inch rectangle.
Brush the 1/2 cup softened butter (listed below in the Cinnamon Filling) over the top of the dough with a rubber spatula or a pastry brush. Sprinkle Cinnamon Filling over the butter on the prepared dough. Starting with long edge, roll up dough; pinch seams to seal. NOTE: Rolling the log too tightly will result in cinnamon rolls whose centers pop up above the rest of them as they bake.
With a knife, lightly mark roll into 1 1/2-inch section. Use a sharp knife (I like to use a serrated knife and saw very gently) or slide a 12-inch piece of dental floss or heavy thread underneath. By bringing the ends of the floss up and criss-crossing them at the top of each mark, you can cut through the roll by pulling the strings in opposite directions. Place cut side up in prepared baking pan, flattening them only slightly. The unbaked cinnamon rolls should not touch each other before rising and baking. Do not pack the unbaked cinnamon rolls together.
TWO OPTIONS:

Refrigerating or Freezing Unbaked Cinnamon Rolls:

* At this point, the cinnamon rolls can be covered with plastic wrap and refrigerated overnight (I’ve actually made them two days in advance) or frozen for 1 month. Before baking, allow rolls to thaw completely and rise in a warm place if frozen. I have found that I have to take the unbaked frozen cinnamon rolls out of the freezer 10 to 12 hours before planning to bake. I just put the frozen cinnamon rolls (container and rolls) on my counter (not in the refrigerator) overnight for 10 to 12 hours.

* If refrigerated, they can be either baked upon removing from the refrigerator or let come to a room temperature (I’ve done both ways). They do a slow rise overnight and it is not necessary to let them come to room temperature before baking. NOTE: If you rolls are not rising enough after being refrigerated, your yeast may need to be tested. To overcome this, let them rise, while sitting on the counter, until you achieve the desired rising before baking.

Bake Immediately After Making:

Cover and let rise in a warm place for approximately 45 to 60 minutes or until doubled in size (after rising, rolls should be touching each other and the sides of the pan).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. for regular oven or 325 degrees F. for a convection oven.

* Bake in a convection oven approximately 15 to 20 minutes until they are a light golden brown.

* Baked in a regular oven approximately 20 to 25 minutes in a regular oven until they are a light golden brown.

Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Spread Butter Frosting over the cinnamon rolls while still warm. Best served warm, but room temperature is also great!

Yields 15 cinnamon rolls.
CINNAMON FILLING:
1/2 cup butter, melted or softened
1 cup firmly-packed brown sugar
4 to 5 tablespoons ground cinnamon
3/4 to 1 cup chopped nuts (optional)

Old FAshioned Cinnamon Rolls

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Clone-of-a-Cinnabon/Detail.aspx

1 cup warm milk (110 degrees F/45
degrees C)
2 eggs, information pills check room temperature
1/3 cup margarine, diagnosis melted
4 1/2 cups bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup white sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons bread machine yeast

1 cup brown sugar, packed

2 1/2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1/3 cup butter, softened

1 (3 ounce) package cream cheese,
softened
1/4 cup butter, softened
1 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon salt
Directions:
kitchenaid mixer. I added the sugar and milk and stirred to dissolve than added the yeast and let proof, about 5 mins. Than I added the melted butter and eggs and mixed while adding the salt and flour, one cup at a time, till well blended. Than I used my Kitchenaid dough hook and mixed on low for about 7 mins to knead. I put the dough in a bowl, covered w/ a damp cloth and I put that in my oven (oven was off) and I let that rise for about an hour. I also took the suggestion to mixed the butter, cinnamon and sugar before adding to the rolled out dough, I just pressed the mixture into the dough before I rolled it up. I used dental floss

1. Place ingredients in the pan of the bread machine in the order recommended by the manufacturer. Select dough cycle; press Start.
2. After the dough has doubled in size turn it out onto a lightly floured surface, cover and let rest for 10 minutes. In a small bowl, combine brown sugar and cinnamon.
3. Roll dough into a 16×21 inch rectangle. Spread dough with 1/3 cup butter and sprinkle evenly with sugar/cinnamon mixture. Roll up dough and cut into 12 rolls. Place rolls in a lightly greased 9×13 inch baking pan. Cover and let rise until nearly doubled, about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).
4. Bake rolls in preheated oven until golden brown, about 15 minutes. While rolls are baking, beat together cream cheese, 1/4 cup butter, confectioners’ sugar, vanilla extract and salt. Spread frosting on warm rolls before serving.

Harvest Rolls

Harvest Cinnamon Rolls
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Bread/CinnamonRollsFantastic.htm
1 cup milk (heated approximately 1 minute in microwave)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees F.)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
2 eggs, room temperature and beaten
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar
5 cups bread flour
1 tablespoon vital wheat gluten (optional)*
3 teaspoons instant active dry yeast
Cinnamon Filling (see recipe below)
Butter Frosting (see recipe below)

* The Vital Wheat Gluten helps the sweet bread dough rise better, be more elastic, and easier to roll out. I have these cinnamon rolls both with and without this ingredient with excellent results.

Bread Machine Recipe:

Add all the ingredients, except the Cinnamon Filling and the Butter Frosting, in the bread pan of bread machine. Process according to manufacturer’s instructions for a dough setting. When the bread machine has completed the dough cycle, remove dough from pan and turn out onto a lightly oiled surface. (I use a nonstick cooking spray). Form dough into an oval, cover with a plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

NOTE: Check the dough (don’t be afraid to open the lid). It should form a nice elastic ball. If you think the dough is too moist, add additional flour (a tablespoon at a time). The same is true if the dough is looking dry and gnarly. Add warm water (a tablespoon at a time). If you can’t judge your dough by looking, stick your finger in and feel the dough. It should be slightly tacky to the touch.

Standup Mixer Recipe:

In a large bowl or in the bowl of a 5-quart stand mixer, combine all the ingredients in the order given except the Cinnamon Filling and the Butter Frosting. Using a dough hook, mix everything together until a soft dough forms.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-oiled surface (I use a nonstick cooking spray), and knead until elastic, approximately 10 minutes.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.
Food Processor Method:

Put dry mixture in processing bowl with steel blade. While motor is running, add liquid ingredients, butter, and egg. Process until mixed. Continue processing, adding remaining flour until dough forms a soft ball.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-oiled surface (I use a nonstick cooking spray), and knead until elastic, approximately 10 minutes.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

Butter a 9 x 13 x 2-inch baking pan; set aside.

After dough has rested, roll and stretch the dough into approximately a 15 x 24-inch rectangle.
Brush the 1/2 cup softened butter (listed below in the Cinnamon Filling) over the top of the dough with a rubber spatula or a pastry brush. Sprinkle Cinnamon Filling over the butter on the prepared dough. Starting with long edge, roll up dough; pinch seams to seal. NOTE: Rolling the log too tightly will result in cinnamon rolls whose centers pop up above the rest of them as they bake.
With a knife, lightly mark roll into 1 1/2-inch section. Use a sharp knife (I like to use a serrated knife and saw very gently) or slide a 12-inch piece of dental floss or heavy thread underneath. By bringing the ends of the floss up and criss-crossing them at the top of each mark, you can cut through the roll by pulling the strings in opposite directions. Place cut side up in prepared baking pan, flattening them only slightly. The unbaked cinnamon rolls should not touch each other before rising and baking. Do not pack the unbaked cinnamon rolls together.
TWO OPTIONS:

Refrigerating or Freezing Unbaked Cinnamon Rolls:

* At this point, the cinnamon rolls can be covered with plastic wrap and refrigerated overnight (I’ve actually made them two days in advance) or frozen for 1 month. Before baking, allow rolls to thaw completely and rise in a warm place if frozen. I have found that I have to take the unbaked frozen cinnamon rolls out of the freezer 10 to 12 hours before planning to bake. I just put the frozen cinnamon rolls (container and rolls) on my counter (not in the refrigerator) overnight for 10 to 12 hours.

* If refrigerated, they can be either baked upon removing from the refrigerator or let come to a room temperature (I’ve done both ways). They do a slow rise overnight and it is not necessary to let them come to room temperature before baking. NOTE: If you rolls are not rising enough after being refrigerated, your yeast may need to be tested. To overcome this, let them rise, while sitting on the counter, until you achieve the desired rising before baking.

Bake Immediately After Making:

Cover and let rise in a warm place for approximately 45 to 60 minutes or until doubled in size (after rising, rolls should be touching each other and the sides of the pan).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. for regular oven or 325 degrees F. for a convection oven.

* Bake in a convection oven approximately 15 to 20 minutes until they are a light golden brown.

* Baked in a regular oven approximately 20 to 25 minutes in a regular oven until they are a light golden brown.

Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Spread Butter Frosting over the cinnamon rolls while still warm. Best served warm, but room temperature is also great!

Yields 15 cinnamon rolls.
CINNAMON FILLING:
1/2 cup butter, melted or softened
1 cup firmly-packed brown sugar
4 to 5 tablespoons ground cinnamon
3/4 to 1 cup chopped nuts (optional)

Old FAshioned Cinnamon Rolls

In our quest to find the perfect cinnamon rolls we had to take a few important details into consideration. First, pilule more about the finished dough had to be soft, information pills light and doughy not dry and airy. Second, the filling had to be gooey and buttery. It had to have just the right amount of cinnamon to sugar ratio to create that bubbling sea of caramel like confection. Last of all the frosting could not be too sugary, lemony or taste like cream cheese. We wanted the perfect balance of flavors encompassed in a pillowy soft blanket. It has taken me two years to narrow down the list of contenders. From my final list of three I forgot which of the top two contenders was the one we liked best. Fortunately for us we had family in town to help devour the re-test. Our favorite recipe for cinnamon rolls is actually a combination of the two.

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Clone-of-a-Cinnabon/Detail.aspx

1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees)
1 tbsp active dry yeast
1 pinch sugar
1 cup warm milk (110 degrees)
2 eggs, room temperature
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup margarine, melted
5 cups bread flour

2 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 cup brown sugar, packed
1/3 cup butter, softened

1 (6 ounce) package cream cheese, softened
1/3 cup butter, softened
1 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon salt

Dissolve sugar in water. Add yeast. Let proof, about 5 mins.

In a bowl combine the warm milk, eggs, butter and salt.
Add flour, one cup at a time stirring until well blended. Knead dough for 10 minutes until smooth. Place dough in a bowl, cover w/ a damp cloth. Let rise in a warm place for about an hour until doubled in size.

In a small bowl, combine brown sugar and cinnamon.

Punch dough down. Knead a few times. Roll dough into a 16×21 inch rectangle. Spread dough with 1/3 cup softened butter and sprinkle evenly with sugar/cinnamon mixture. Roll up dough and cut into 20 (1 1/2-inch) rolls or 12 larger rolls. Place rolls in a lightly greased 9×13 inch baking pan. Cover and let rise until nearly doubled, about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

4. Bake rolls in preheated oven until golden brown, about 15 minutes. While rolls are baking, beat together cream cheese, 1/4 cup butter, confectioners’ sugar, vanilla extract and salt. Spread frosting on warm rolls before serving.

Harvest Rolls

Harvest Cinnamon Rolls
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Bread/CinnamonRollsFantastic.htm
1 cup milk (heated approximately 1 minute in microwave)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees F.)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
2 eggs, room temperature and beaten
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar
5 cups bread flour
1 tablespoon vital wheat gluten (optional)*
3 teaspoons instant active dry yeast
Cinnamon Filling (see recipe below)
Butter Frosting (see recipe below)

* The Vital Wheat Gluten helps the sweet bread dough rise better, be more elastic, and easier to roll out. I have these cinnamon rolls both with and without this ingredient with excellent results.

Bread Machine Recipe:

Add all the ingredients, except the Cinnamon Filling and the Butter Frosting, in the bread pan of bread machine. Process according to manufacturer’s instructions for a dough setting. When the bread machine has completed the dough cycle, remove dough from pan and turn out onto a lightly oiled surface. (I use a nonstick cooking spray). Form dough into an oval, cover with a plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

NOTE: Check the dough (don’t be afraid to open the lid). It should form a nice elastic ball. If you think the dough is too moist, add additional flour (a tablespoon at a time). The same is true if the dough is looking dry and gnarly. Add warm water (a tablespoon at a time). If you can’t judge your dough by looking, stick your finger in and feel the dough. It should be slightly tacky to the touch.

Standup Mixer Recipe:

In a large bowl or in the bowl of a 5-quart stand mixer, combine all the ingredients in the order given except the Cinnamon Filling and the Butter Frosting. Using a dough hook, mix everything together until a soft dough forms.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-oiled surface (I use a nonstick cooking spray), and knead until elastic, approximately 10 minutes.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.
Food Processor Method:

Put dry mixture in processing bowl with steel blade. While motor is running, add liquid ingredients, butter, and egg. Process until mixed. Continue processing, adding remaining flour until dough forms a soft ball.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-oiled surface (I use a nonstick cooking spray), and knead until elastic, approximately 10 minutes.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

Butter a 9 x 13 x 2-inch baking pan; set aside.

After dough has rested, roll and stretch the dough into approximately a 15 x 24-inch rectangle.
Brush the 1/2 cup softened butter (listed below in the Cinnamon Filling) over the top of the dough with a rubber spatula or a pastry brush. Sprinkle Cinnamon Filling over the butter on the prepared dough. Starting with long edge, roll up dough; pinch seams to seal. NOTE: Rolling the log too tightly will result in cinnamon rolls whose centers pop up above the rest of them as they bake.
With a knife, lightly mark roll into 1 1/2-inch section. Use a sharp knife (I like to use a serrated knife and saw very gently) or slide a 12-inch piece of dental floss or heavy thread underneath. By bringing the ends of the floss up and criss-crossing them at the top of each mark, you can cut through the roll by pulling the strings in opposite directions. Place cut side up in prepared baking pan, flattening them only slightly. The unbaked cinnamon rolls should not touch each other before rising and baking. Do not pack the unbaked cinnamon rolls together.
TWO OPTIONS:

Refrigerating or Freezing Unbaked Cinnamon Rolls:

* At this point, the cinnamon rolls can be covered with plastic wrap and refrigerated overnight (I’ve actually made them two days in advance) or frozen for 1 month. Before baking, allow rolls to thaw completely and rise in a warm place if frozen. I have found that I have to take the unbaked frozen cinnamon rolls out of the freezer 10 to 12 hours before planning to bake. I just put the frozen cinnamon rolls (container and rolls) on my counter (not in the refrigerator) overnight for 10 to 12 hours.

* If refrigerated, they can be either baked upon removing from the refrigerator or let come to a room temperature (I’ve done both ways). They do a slow rise overnight and it is not necessary to let them come to room temperature before baking. NOTE: If you rolls are not rising enough after being refrigerated, your yeast may need to be tested. To overcome this, let them rise, while sitting on the counter, until you achieve the desired rising before baking.

Bake Immediately After Making:

Cover and let rise in a warm place for approximately 45 to 60 minutes or until doubled in size (after rising, rolls should be touching each other and the sides of the pan).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. for regular oven or 325 degrees F. for a convection oven.

* Bake in a convection oven approximately 15 to 20 minutes until they are a light golden brown.

* Baked in a regular oven approximately 20 to 25 minutes in a regular oven until they are a light golden brown.

Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Spread Butter Frosting over the cinnamon rolls while still warm. Best served warm, but room temperature is also great!

Yields 15 cinnamon rolls.
CINNAMON FILLING:
1/2 cup butter, melted or softened
1 cup firmly-packed brown sugar
4 to 5 tablespoons ground cinnamon
3/4 to 1 cup chopped nuts (optional)

Old FAshioned Cinnamon Rolls

In our quest to find the perfect cinnamon rolls we had to take a few important details into consideration. First, pilule more about the finished dough had to be soft, information pills light and doughy not dry and airy. Second, the filling had to be gooey and buttery. It had to have just the right amount of cinnamon to sugar ratio to create that bubbling sea of caramel like confection. Last of all the frosting could not be too sugary, lemony or taste like cream cheese. We wanted the perfect balance of flavors encompassed in a pillowy soft blanket. It has taken me two years to narrow down the list of contenders. From my final list of three I forgot which of the top two contenders was the one we liked best. Fortunately for us we had family in town to help devour the re-test. Our favorite recipe for cinnamon rolls is actually a combination of the two.

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Clone-of-a-Cinnabon/Detail.aspx

1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees)
1 tbsp active dry yeast
1 pinch sugar
1 cup warm milk (110 degrees)
2 eggs, room temperature
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup margarine, melted
5 cups bread flour

2 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 cup brown sugar, packed
1/3 cup butter, softened

1 (6 ounce) package cream cheese, softened
1/3 cup butter, softened
1 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon salt

Dissolve sugar in water. Add yeast. Let proof, about 5 mins.

In a bowl combine the warm milk, eggs, butter and salt.
Add flour, one cup at a time stirring until well blended. Knead dough for 10 minutes until smooth. Place dough in a bowl, cover w/ a damp cloth. Let rise in a warm place for about an hour until doubled in size.

In a small bowl, combine brown sugar and cinnamon.

Punch dough down. Knead a few times. Roll dough into a 16×21 inch rectangle. Spread dough with 1/3 cup softened butter and sprinkle evenly with sugar/cinnamon mixture. Roll up dough and cut into 20 (1 1/2-inch) rolls or 12 larger rolls. Place rolls in a lightly greased 9×13 inch baking pan. Cover and let rise until nearly doubled, about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

4. Bake rolls in preheated oven until golden brown, about 15 minutes. While rolls are baking, beat together cream cheese, 1/4 cup butter, confectioners’ sugar, vanilla extract and salt. Spread frosting on warm rolls before serving.

Harvest Rolls

Harvest Cinnamon Rolls
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Bread/CinnamonRollsFantastic.htm
1 cup milk (heated approximately 1 minute in microwave)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees F.)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
2 eggs, room temperature and beaten
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar
5 cups bread flour
1 tablespoon vital wheat gluten (optional)*
3 teaspoons instant active dry yeast
Cinnamon Filling (see recipe below)
Butter Frosting (see recipe below)

* The Vital Wheat Gluten helps the sweet bread dough rise better, be more elastic, and easier to roll out. I have these cinnamon rolls both with and without this ingredient with excellent results.

Bread Machine Recipe:

Add all the ingredients, except the Cinnamon Filling and the Butter Frosting, in the bread pan of bread machine. Process according to manufacturer’s instructions for a dough setting. When the bread machine has completed the dough cycle, remove dough from pan and turn out onto a lightly oiled surface. (I use a nonstick cooking spray). Form dough into an oval, cover with a plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

NOTE: Check the dough (don’t be afraid to open the lid). It should form a nice elastic ball. If you think the dough is too moist, add additional flour (a tablespoon at a time). The same is true if the dough is looking dry and gnarly. Add warm water (a tablespoon at a time). If you can’t judge your dough by looking, stick your finger in and feel the dough. It should be slightly tacky to the touch.

Standup Mixer Recipe:

In a large bowl or in the bowl of a 5-quart stand mixer, combine all the ingredients in the order given except the Cinnamon Filling and the Butter Frosting. Using a dough hook, mix everything together until a soft dough forms.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-oiled surface (I use a nonstick cooking spray), and knead until elastic, approximately 10 minutes.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.
Food Processor Method:

Put dry mixture in processing bowl with steel blade. While motor is running, add liquid ingredients, butter, and egg. Process until mixed. Continue processing, adding remaining flour until dough forms a soft ball.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-oiled surface (I use a nonstick cooking spray), and knead until elastic, approximately 10 minutes.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

Butter a 9 x 13 x 2-inch baking pan; set aside.

After dough has rested, roll and stretch the dough into approximately a 15 x 24-inch rectangle.
Brush the 1/2 cup softened butter (listed below in the Cinnamon Filling) over the top of the dough with a rubber spatula or a pastry brush. Sprinkle Cinnamon Filling over the butter on the prepared dough. Starting with long edge, roll up dough; pinch seams to seal. NOTE: Rolling the log too tightly will result in cinnamon rolls whose centers pop up above the rest of them as they bake.
With a knife, lightly mark roll into 1 1/2-inch section. Use a sharp knife (I like to use a serrated knife and saw very gently) or slide a 12-inch piece of dental floss or heavy thread underneath. By bringing the ends of the floss up and criss-crossing them at the top of each mark, you can cut through the roll by pulling the strings in opposite directions. Place cut side up in prepared baking pan, flattening them only slightly. The unbaked cinnamon rolls should not touch each other before rising and baking. Do not pack the unbaked cinnamon rolls together.
TWO OPTIONS:

Refrigerating or Freezing Unbaked Cinnamon Rolls:

* At this point, the cinnamon rolls can be covered with plastic wrap and refrigerated overnight (I’ve actually made them two days in advance) or frozen for 1 month. Before baking, allow rolls to thaw completely and rise in a warm place if frozen. I have found that I have to take the unbaked frozen cinnamon rolls out of the freezer 10 to 12 hours before planning to bake. I just put the frozen cinnamon rolls (container and rolls) on my counter (not in the refrigerator) overnight for 10 to 12 hours.

* If refrigerated, they can be either baked upon removing from the refrigerator or let come to a room temperature (I’ve done both ways). They do a slow rise overnight and it is not necessary to let them come to room temperature before baking. NOTE: If you rolls are not rising enough after being refrigerated, your yeast may need to be tested. To overcome this, let them rise, while sitting on the counter, until you achieve the desired rising before baking.

Bake Immediately After Making:

Cover and let rise in a warm place for approximately 45 to 60 minutes or until doubled in size (after rising, rolls should be touching each other and the sides of the pan).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. for regular oven or 325 degrees F. for a convection oven.

* Bake in a convection oven approximately 15 to 20 minutes until they are a light golden brown.

* Baked in a regular oven approximately 20 to 25 minutes in a regular oven until they are a light golden brown.

Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Spread Butter Frosting over the cinnamon rolls while still warm. Best served warm, but room temperature is also great!

Yields 15 cinnamon rolls.
CINNAMON FILLING:
1/2 cup butter, melted or softened
1 cup firmly-packed brown sugar
4 to 5 tablespoons ground cinnamon
3/4 to 1 cup chopped nuts (optional)
Growing up in the south biscuits were common whereas in California rolls or bread usually accompany a meal. We rarely serve bread with a meal. The exception would be if we are having soup or a dinner salad. Biscuits are a great choice because they are fast. They do not require proofing yeast and then waiting 2 hours for the dough to rise. These biscuits go really well with chicken soup or tomato soup.

The recipe calls for 1 1/4 cups buttermilk plus more to brush the tops with. I found that I did not need all of the buttermilk in the dough. Take the time to slowly add the buttermilk testing the dough between each small addition. You only need enough to help the dough stick together.

I like to use a fork when adding the liquid. Once the dough starts to form by sticking together I use my hands to gather it together. Just be careful not to overwork the dough. I learned a great tip from my Baking Illustrated cookbook on how to gather the dough. Use a fork not a spoon to lightly work the milk in. Once the dough starts to come together into a ball there will be a small amount of flour on the bottom of the bowl. Add a little of the liquid to the flour and then incorporate it into the rest of the ball.

Source: Cooking with Shelburne  Farms
Makes 12 (2 1/2-inch) biscuits
3 cups flour
2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
6 tbsp col unsalted butter, ask cut into small bits
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
2 tbsp chopped fresh thyme, cure sage or rosemary leaves
1 1/4 cups cold buttermilk plus a little more to brush the biscuit tops with

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl, advice whisk together the flour, powder, soda and salt.

With your fingers or two forks, work the butter into the flour mixture until the dough looks like fine gravel with a few larger butter bumps throughout. Stir in the cheddar and thyme. Add the buttermilk gradually, just until a pinch of dough comes together when you squeeze it between your fingers.

Lightly four the counter and dump the dough onto it. Knead it a few times to bring it together and then use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll the dough out to a 3/4-inch thicknesss. Cut out the biscuits with a 2 1/2-inch round cutter or glass.

(You can reroll the biscuits once but more than that will make the biscuits tough.)

Place on an ungreased cookie sheet. Brush tops with buttermilk. Bake 15-20 minutes, until golden brown.

Notes:
— You can reroll the scraps once but not more or the biscuits will be tough.
— Keep the ingredients as cold as possible and work with the dough as little as possible to ensure light flaky biscuits.

The Day of Epiphany: The Twelfth Day of Christmas

The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, viagra “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities or wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.
The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, viagra “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities or wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.

Artwork: Home Dinner II (Family Series) by Yau Bee

The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, dosage “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, buy information pills “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities, wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.
The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, viagra “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities or wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.

Artwork: Home Dinner II (Family Series) by Yau Bee

The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, dosage “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, buy information pills “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities, wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.
My sister-n-law Jennifer suggested this recipe for Pumpkin Crunch Cake. If you liked the Texas Dump Cake recipe then you will enjoy this one. It is the same concept using pumpkin rather than fruit.

1 (29oz) can pumpkin
3 eggs
1 can Evaporated Milk
1 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
4 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1 yellow cake mix
1 stick butter, ask melted

Mix the all the ingredients together. Pour into a greased 9X13 inch baking dish.

Sprinkle cake mix over the mixture. Drizzle with the melted butter. Bake 1 hour in a 350 degree oven. Serve warm or chilled.

Variations:
— Sprinkle 1 cup chopped pecans over cake mix then drizzle with the butter.
— For a Gluten free version try Betty Crocker’s gluten free cake mix.
— For dairy (milk) free version use vanilla rice milk about a third less than what’s called for.
— Make your own cake mix: combine 2 cups flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 1

The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, viagra “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities or wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.

Artwork: Home Dinner II (Family Series) by Yau Bee

The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, dosage “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, buy information pills “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities, wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.
My sister-n-law Jennifer suggested this recipe for Pumpkin Crunch Cake. If you liked the Texas Dump Cake recipe then you will enjoy this one. It is the same concept using pumpkin rather than fruit.

1 (29oz) can pumpkin
3 eggs
1 can Evaporated Milk
1 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
4 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1 yellow cake mix
1 stick butter, ask melted

Mix the all the ingredients together. Pour into a greased 9X13 inch baking dish.

Sprinkle cake mix over the mixture. Drizzle with the melted butter. Bake 1 hour in a 350 degree oven. Serve warm or chilled.

Variations:
— Sprinkle 1 cup chopped pecans over cake mix then drizzle with the butter.
— For a Gluten free version try Betty Crocker’s gluten free cake mix.
— For dairy (milk) free version use vanilla rice milk about a third less than what’s called for.
— Make your own cake mix: combine 2 cups flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 1

My sister-n-law Jennifer suggested this recipe for Pumpkin Crunch Cake. If you liked the Texas Dump Cake recipe then you will enjoy this one. It is the same concept using pumpkin rather than fruit.

1 (29oz) can pumpkin
3 eggs
1 can Evaporated Milk
1 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
4 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1 yellow cake mix
1 stick butter, treatment melted

Mix the all the ingredients together. Pour into a greased 9X13 inch baking dish.

Sprinkle cake mix over the mixture. Drizzle with the melted butter. Bake 1 hour in a 350 degree oven. Serve warm or chilled.

Variations:
— Sprinkle 1 cup chopped pecans over cake mix then drizzle with the butter.
— For a Gluten free version try Betty Crocker’s gluten free cake mix.
— For dairy (milk) free version use vanilla rice milk about a third less than what’s called for
The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, viagra “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities or wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.

Artwork: Home Dinner II (Family Series) by Yau Bee

The smell of the hall closet in my home growing up is one of my favorite smells. The closet is where my mom stored all the Christmas boxes. I remember as a child becoming so anxious and overcome with excitement from all the lights and music and smells I wanted to burst. Every Christmas morning we were met with the task of waking my father. Notably known as Mr. Scrooge. We would pounce on top of him begging for him to wake up. Mind you it was 8:00 in the morning. He would bat us off feigning sleep mumbling, dosage “Ba-hum-bug!” It is the memories we create that bind each year to the next. Waking my father up on Christmas morning was part of the Christmas festivities. While I rememebr a few coveted Christmas presents I so badly wanted I mostly remeber the smell of Christmas and the repeated traditions that made Chrstmas delightful.

The Holidays can be  a marvelous time of year. In my young little family I watch as their little brains transform the ordinary tinto extraordinary. This magical world of theirs fills with excitment at every turn. In an excerpt from a book entitled, buy information pills “Strengthening Our Families” it states that, “When conceived in principles of righteousness…a heritage of family customs can serve as the social glue that holds families together, ushers family members through difficult life passages, and weaves loving ties…”

Helen Bateman author of “Roots and Wings: A Book of Family Traditions” wrote,  “parents must give their children two things: roots and wings. Give them roots to keep them grounded through tough times. Give them wings to soar above everything, explore new worlds and fly farther than we ever did.”  Family traditions are rituals that link us to the past while providing a foundation for the future. Sharing our stories and past rituals gives us roots and wings. Simple rituals unanimously agreed upon as a family can be long lasting. They give us a sense of family connection or roots.  Our personal identity is founded on traditions. These traditions define our character. They strengthen and mold our morals and values. The more traditions our family fosters the more secure we feel thus allowing for greater personal freedom and possibilities, wings.

Traditions set the mood in our home bringing warmth, fun and unity to our families. Caryl Krueger wrote, “traditions unite a family in love, end divisions and are imperishable gifts to those who follow after us.” Traditions are not limited to a holiday or celebration. Any repeated ritual can be a tradition. Reading stories and singing songs at bedtime is a family tradition. Gathering together every Sunday for brunch is a tradition. Playing music after the evening meal, family breakfast, family counsel and even small gestures or sayings help add excitement and charm within our homes.
My sister-n-law Jennifer suggested this recipe for Pumpkin Crunch Cake. If you liked the Texas Dump Cake recipe then you will enjoy this one. It is the same concept using pumpkin rather than fruit.

1 (29oz) can pumpkin
3 eggs
1 can Evaporated Milk
1 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
4 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1 yellow cake mix
1 stick butter, ask melted

Mix the all the ingredients together. Pour into a greased 9X13 inch baking dish.

Sprinkle cake mix over the mixture. Drizzle with the melted butter. Bake 1 hour in a 350 degree oven. Serve warm or chilled.

Variations:
— Sprinkle 1 cup chopped pecans over cake mix then drizzle with the butter.
— For a Gluten free version try Betty Crocker’s gluten free cake mix.
— For dairy (milk) free version use vanilla rice milk about a third less than what’s called for.
— Make your own cake mix: combine 2 cups flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 1

My sister-n-law Jennifer suggested this recipe for Pumpkin Crunch Cake. If you liked the Texas Dump Cake recipe then you will enjoy this one. It is the same concept using pumpkin rather than fruit.

1 (29oz) can pumpkin
3 eggs
1 can Evaporated Milk
1 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
4 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1 yellow cake mix
1 stick butter, treatment melted

Mix the all the ingredients together. Pour into a greased 9X13 inch baking dish.

Sprinkle cake mix over the mixture. Drizzle with the melted butter. Bake 1 hour in a 350 degree oven. Serve warm or chilled.

Variations:
— Sprinkle 1 cup chopped pecans over cake mix then drizzle with the butter.
— For a Gluten free version try Betty Crocker’s gluten free cake mix.
— For dairy (milk) free version use vanilla rice milk about a third less than what’s called for
Yum, seek yum pancakes. Oatmeal banana pancakes. I so love pancakes. I think my son and I could eat them for breakfast, no rx lunch and dinner. This submission is from my sister. The addition of oatmeal gives the cakes a nice hearty texture.

Source: Cooks.com by Cookie
4 ripe bananas
1/2 cup low-fat or whole milk
1/4 cup sour cream
2 eggs
1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter melted
2/3 cup cake flour
1/2 cup quick-cooking oatmeal
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
warm maple syrup, ambulance for serving

Heat oven to 200 degrees.

Mash 3 of the bananas with fork in a medium bowl; stir in milk, sour cream, eggs and 2 tablespoons of the butter in medium bowl; set aside.

Combine flour, oatmeal, baking soda and salt in large bowl. Fold banana mixture into flour mixture, stirring just until blended (do not over mix).

Heat remaining 2 tablespoons butter in large skillet over medium to medium-high heat; pour 1/4-cup portions of the batter into the skillet, spacing them apart. Cook, in batches, until bubbles cover surface of pancakes and underside are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Gently turn over; cook until other sides are browned, about 2 minutes. Transfer to oven on a baking sheet to keep warm, while remaining pancakes cook.

Meanwhile, slice remaining banana to top pancakes; add maple syrup to taste.

Variations:
– Use whole oats processed in a blender or food processor in place of the instant oatmeal.
– Or soak the whole oats in the milk for 3 minutes before adding to the rest of the ingredients. You may need to add a little more milk if the batter becomes to thick.
– Add chopped or broken pecans to the batter or sprinkle on each pancake after you pour the batter onto the hot griddle.

Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, information pills look studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, approved commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, view it is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni, and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook accidently burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

How ever Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing and bread pudding in addition to this version of Panettone french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake although it does contain dried fruit. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Slice off the end pieces and discard. Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices then slice pieces in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium heat; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. Place in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees. Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.

Keep any left overs refrigerated. Reheat in the oven, spread with butter and eat with a cup of hot chocolate. Mmmmmm.

Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, information pills look studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, approved commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, view it is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni, and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook accidently burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

How ever Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing and bread pudding in addition to this version of Panettone french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake although it does contain dried fruit. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Slice off the end pieces and discard. Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices then slice pieces in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium heat; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. Place in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees. Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.

Keep any left overs refrigerated. Reheat in the oven, spread with butter and eat with a cup of hot chocolate. Mmmmmm.
Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, more about studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, side effects commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, erectile is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook by mistake, burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

However Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing in addition to this version of french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices, each 1-inch thick. Discard end slices. Cut remaining slices in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium hear; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. PLace in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees.

Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.

Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, information pills look studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, approved commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, view it is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni, and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook accidently burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

How ever Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing and bread pudding in addition to this version of Panettone french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake although it does contain dried fruit. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Slice off the end pieces and discard. Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices then slice pieces in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium heat; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. Place in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees. Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.

Keep any left overs refrigerated. Reheat in the oven, spread with butter and eat with a cup of hot chocolate. Mmmmmm.
Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, more about studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, side effects commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, erectile is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook by mistake, burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

However Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing in addition to this version of french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices, each 1-inch thick. Discard end slices. Cut remaining slices in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium hear; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. PLace in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees.

Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.
Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, recipe studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, online commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however,is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook by mistake, burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

However Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing in addition to this version of french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices, each 1-inch thick. Discard end slices. Cut remaining slices in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium hear; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. PLace in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees.

Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.

Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, information pills look studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, approved commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, view it is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni, and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook accidently burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

How ever Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing and bread pudding in addition to this version of Panettone french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake although it does contain dried fruit. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Slice off the end pieces and discard. Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices then slice pieces in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium heat; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. Place in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees. Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.

Keep any left overs refrigerated. Reheat in the oven, spread with butter and eat with a cup of hot chocolate. Mmmmmm.
Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, more about studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, side effects commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, erectile is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook by mistake, burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

However Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing in addition to this version of french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices, each 1-inch thick. Discard end slices. Cut remaining slices in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium hear; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. PLace in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees.

Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.
Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, recipe studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, online commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however,is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook by mistake, burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

However Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing in addition to this version of french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices, each 1-inch thick. Discard end slices. Cut remaining slices in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium hear; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. PLace in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees.

Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.
I found Kim and Jason on the Escape Plan blog two summer’s ago. I started to write down the 40 day steps to end Adultitist. Got to number 20. Then got busy. Lost the name of the website because I forgot to save it. Periodically I would search the net but there are a ton of 40-day plans out there. Fortunately the Goddess of New Year Eve Resolutions smiled down upon us and favored me with a blessing to find the lost website just in time for January.

Last year I decided to make 12 monthly resolutions because it seemed more effective than just writing down a list of goals and hoping for the best. For one whole month I was dedicated to a goal. Some months I was more successful than others. The months I was a complete failure I know I did my best so it was not a complete loss. About mid summer I came to the conclusion that we needed a little more spice in our life. Having three active children close together was a little insane and the effect was “Adultitis”! We needed to rediscover our inner child. Now that the kids are older and we are finally venturing out of the cave more we need to learn to relax a bit.

Kim and Jason came up with the term “Adultitis” to describe the lost child in all of us. According to their website, ask “Adultitis is a silent epidemic that has been ignored for far too long. It’s a disease that slowly erodes our inborn childlike spirit, website like this wreaking havoc on our world, our nation, and our families. It kills laughter, dreams, curiosity, faith, happiness, and hope. It stresses us out. It causes us to take ourselves too seriously. And in some extreme cases, it can cause smile amnesia.”

I realized I had Adultitis when our second child was born 6 years ago. Bugs were icky, mud was too dirty and craft projects too messy. I thought to myself, when did this happen? I used to love playing with bugs and especially, my all time favorite childhood past time, making mud pies. That same day I took my then one and three year old out into the backyard to play in the mud. The process to heal myself of adultitis has been at a standstill. This year my resolution is to find something more exciting to do with the dear husband than walk around Costco on date night.

First step to curing adultitis is to head over to adultitis.org and take the test. My test result revealed I was at Stage 2 Adultitis: You have progessed to a very aggressive form of Adultitis. You are probably experiencing very high stress levels and may be having difficulty laughing. Seek help now. Please consult the Prescription for treatment options.

Next, use both the Adultitis.org and the original site Kim and Jason for tips and guidence to start the 40-day challenge.

40 ways to escape Adultitis:

1. Spend at least 15 minutes immersing yourself in a field you know nothing about.
2. Find a reason to celebrate and do something to celebrate it.
3. Do something that is typically seen as inappropriate for someone of your age.
4. Add something childlike (not necessarily childish) to your workspace or home.
5. Become a scientist. Conduct a silly experiment.
6. Write down one big dream of yours. Draw or find a picture to go with it and put it somewhere you will see it often.
7. Spend 15 – 30 minutes doing something you love that you don’t often have the chance to do.
8. Draw a funny picture and hide it in an unexpected place for someone else to find.
9. Do one thing today to support a cause or issue you really care about.
10. Create a memory today with someone you care about that will mean a lot ten years from now.
11. Do something your parents would never let you do as a child.
12. Write a letter to a childhood hero (real or fictional).
13. Spend ten minutes doing something outside that you have never done before.
14. Do something to help someone you don’t know.
15. Eat something you’ve never had before.
16. Call or meet with someone in your family and ask them a question you are curious about regarding your family’s history.
17. Learn how to do something new today. Your time limit: 30 minutes.
18. Get out of your element. Go somewhere you’ve never been before.
19. Spend 10 minutes visioning yourself 10 years from now as having accomplished one of your biggest dreams. Be as detailed as possible; imagine in all five senses.
20. Right an old wrong.
21. Write a haiku about the things you are thankful for and put it somewhere to serve as a reminder.
22. Do something to make the world a better place.
23. Take a picture of the most childlike spot in town.
24. Figure out a way to add some color to your day in a new, unusual, or wacky way.
25. Talk in a phony voice or accent to a complete stranger.
26. Open to a random page in the dictionary and look at the first word on the upper left-hand side. Keep turning pages until you find a word you don’t know. See how many times you can use this new word in a sentence today.
27. Take a routine you do everyday and put a childlike spin on it.
28. Buy something that captures the spirit of childhood for under $5.00 (including tax).
29. Ask an expert something you are curious about in his/her field.
30. Figure out a way to bring some fun into a dreaded task today.
31. Find a place to sit quietly for ten minutes. Listen for at least one sound that you would not have normally noticed.
32. Do something that will get you to laugh out-loud (one that puts you in danger of peeing your pants a little bit).
33. For no reason at all treat yourself to something out of the ordinary.
34. Think about some of the things you liked to do as a child. Pick one and do it.
35. Do something to make the day of a child.
36. Accessorize your wardrobe today with a touch of childhood.
37. Eat or drink something today that brings back childhood memories.
38. Make someone a homemade gift to show how much you care about him/her or to thank him/her for a job well done.
39. Play a practical joke on someone.
40. Congratulations on making it to the end. Your final test is to take tomorrow off. Spend today making any necessary adjustments. Do anything you want, but no work and no chores. Consider it a sick day or at least a “sick of it” day. (Remember, Adultitis is a serious affliction.)

Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, information pills look studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, approved commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, view it is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni, and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook accidently burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

How ever Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing and bread pudding in addition to this version of Panettone french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake although it does contain dried fruit. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Slice off the end pieces and discard. Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices then slice pieces in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium heat; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. Place in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees. Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.

Keep any left overs refrigerated. Reheat in the oven, spread with butter and eat with a cup of hot chocolate. Mmmmmm.
Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, more about studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, side effects commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however, erectile is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook by mistake, burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

However Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing in addition to this version of french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices, each 1-inch thick. Discard end slices. Cut remaining slices in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium hear; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. PLace in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees.

Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.
Panettone {Pan e toni} (meaning large bread) is an Italian sweet bread, recipe studded with dried fruit that has been soaked in liquor, online commonly associated with Christmas. Historians are unclear as to the exact history of Panettone; however,is said to have originated during the 15th-century in Milan Italy, when the ancient Romans used honey to sweeten breads. Writings dating from the 18th-century associate the bread with Christmas; yet, it was not until the early 20th-century that panettone became a widely shared Christmas tradition. Today Panettone is shipped all across the world and not only at Christmas time but Easter too.

There are just as many legends as there are versions of the bread. The first story tells of a young noble man, Toni and his love for the baker’s daughter. To win the heart of his true love he disguised himself as apprentice to her father. One day he made a special domed bread that impressed the baker and the daughter so much that the baker sanctioned his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The second tale occurs one Christmas Eve at a lavish banquet held at the court of Ludovico Sforza. The cook by mistake, burnt the dessert. A kitchen hand, named Toni, saved the evening by making a sweet bread using the remains of the burnt cake and adding dried fruit, spices, eggs and sugar.

However Panettone came to be this rich buttery sweet sensation is a world wide Holiday favorite. Panettone is often toasted and served alongside coffee. You will also find recipes for Panettone stuffing in addition to this version of french toast. Panettone is not a fruit cake. Freshly made is always preferred over store bought but if it is not available at the local bakery try finding the brands by Bauli or Flamigni.

Source: Williams Sonoma
1/2 Panettone, about 1 pound
3 eggs, lightly whisked
1 cup milk
Grated zest of 1 orange
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Cointreau (optional)
3 tbsp granulated sugar
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
Softened unsalted butter for brushing
Confectioner’s sugar for dusting
Warm Maple syrup for serving

Cut panettone into 5 or 6 vertical slices, each 1-inch thick. Discard end slices. Cut remaining slices in half.

In a bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest, orange juice, Cointreau, granulated sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour into a large shallow bowl; add bread slices. Soak, turning once, 10 seconds per side.

Heat griddle on medium hear; brush with butter. When the butter foams, add a few bread slices. Cook, turning once, untl lightly browned, 3-5 minutes per side. Turn slices over again; cook a few minutes more per side. Transfer French toast to serving plates. PLace in oven; turn oven to 200 degrees.

Cook remaining slices.

To serve dust with confectioner’s sugar. Serve with maple syrup.

Serves 4 or 5.
I found Kim and Jason on the Escape Plan blog two summer’s ago. I started to write down the 40 day steps to end Adultitist. Got to number 20. Then got busy. Lost the name of the website because I forgot to save it. Periodically I would search the net but there are a ton of 40-day plans out there. Fortunately the Goddess of New Year Eve Resolutions smiled down upon us and favored me with a blessing to find the lost website just in time for January.

Last year I decided to make 12 monthly resolutions because it seemed more effective than just writing down a list of goals and hoping for the best. For one whole month I was dedicated to a goal. Some months I was more successful than others. The months I was a complete failure I know I did my best so it was not a complete loss. About mid summer I came to the conclusion that we needed a little more spice in our life. Having three active children close together was a little insane and the effect was “Adultitis”! We needed to rediscover our inner child. Now that the kids are older and we are finally venturing out of the cave more we need to learn to relax a bit.

Kim and Jason came up with the term “Adultitis” to describe the lost child in all of us. According to their website, ask “Adultitis is a silent epidemic that has been ignored for far too long. It’s a disease that slowly erodes our inborn childlike spirit, website like this wreaking havoc on our world, our nation, and our families. It kills laughter, dreams, curiosity, faith, happiness, and hope. It stresses us out. It causes us to take ourselves too seriously. And in some extreme cases, it can cause smile amnesia.”

I realized I had Adultitis when our second child was born 6 years ago. Bugs were icky, mud was too dirty and craft projects too messy. I thought to myself, when did this happen? I used to love playing with bugs and especially, my all time favorite childhood past time, making mud pies. That same day I took my then one and three year old out into the backyard to play in the mud. The process to heal myself of adultitis has been at a standstill. This year my resolution is to find something more exciting to do with the dear husband than walk around Costco on date night.

First step to curing adultitis is to head over to adultitis.org and take the test. My test result revealed I was at Stage 2 Adultitis: You have progessed to a very aggressive form of Adultitis. You are probably experiencing very high stress levels and may be having difficulty laughing. Seek help now. Please consult the Prescription for treatment options.

Next, use both the Adultitis.org and the original site Kim and Jason for tips and guidence to start the 40-day challenge.

40 ways to escape Adultitis:

1. Spend at least 15 minutes immersing yourself in a field you know nothing about.
2. Find a reason to celebrate and do something to celebrate it.
3. Do something that is typically seen as inappropriate for someone of your age.
4. Add something childlike (not necessarily childish) to your workspace or home.
5. Become a scientist. Conduct a silly experiment.
6. Write down one big dream of yours. Draw or find a picture to go with it and put it somewhere you will see it often.
7. Spend 15 – 30 minutes doing something you love that you don’t often have the chance to do.
8. Draw a funny picture and hide it in an unexpected place for someone else to find.
9. Do one thing today to support a cause or issue you really care about.
10. Create a memory today with someone you