Pepper Lover’s Peppered Beef Roll

One day while I was snooping through a local thrift store I found an old paperback entitled “Slow-Crock Cookery” dated 1974. I love old cookbooks especially those produced by a local church or organization. It looked interesting enough to spend the $.25 cents on. This little book was well worth the investment. It has become one of my top 5 favorite cook books.

Pork Chops with Oranges makes for a lovely dinner on a fall evening. Pair the chops with a baked sweet potato or use it as a stuffing in Stuffed Acorn Squash. Pork Chops with Oranges can be made in the oven using a dutch oven or casserole. Bake covered at 300 degrees F for the time listed.

6 lean pork chops, prescription 1-inch thick
1 (6-oz) can orange juice concentrate
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1/4 tsp pepper
1 (8-oz) can mandarin orange segments

Sear chops in a skillet over high heat. Place chops in the slow-cooker.

Combine orange juice concentrate, viagra 60mg brown sugar, treat salt cinnamon, allspice and pepper. Pour over pork chops. Cover tightly and cook on low for 6 to 7 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours.

Arrange oranges over the pork chops for the last 15 minutes of cooking time. Serve over a baked sweet potato or brown rice.

Makes 4-6 servings

Variations:
— Replace the orange juice with 1 cup apricot jam and add 1/4 teaspoon ginger and 1/4 teaspoon cloves.

One day while I was snooping through a local thrift store I found an old paperback entitled “Slow-Crock Cookery” dated 1974. I love old cookbooks especially those produced by a local church or organization. It looked interesting enough to spend the $.25 cents on. This little book was well worth the investment. It has become one of my top 5 favorite cook books.

Pork Chops with Oranges makes for a lovely dinner on a fall evening. Pair the chops with a baked sweet potato or use it as a stuffing in Stuffed Acorn Squash. Pork Chops with Oranges can be made in the oven using a dutch oven or casserole. Bake covered at 300 degrees F for the time listed.

6 lean pork chops, prescription 1-inch thick
1 (6-oz) can orange juice concentrate
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1/4 tsp pepper
1 (8-oz) can mandarin orange segments

Sear chops in a skillet over high heat. Place chops in the slow-cooker.

Combine orange juice concentrate, viagra 60mg brown sugar, treat salt cinnamon, allspice and pepper. Pour over pork chops. Cover tightly and cook on low for 6 to 7 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours.

Arrange oranges over the pork chops for the last 15 minutes of cooking time. Serve over a baked sweet potato or brown rice.

Makes 4-6 servings

Variations:
— Replace the orange juice with 1 cup apricot jam and add 1/4 teaspoon ginger and 1/4 teaspoon cloves.

Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, symptoms

Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, cure “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.”

The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

With the final exam approaching fast, order I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

–If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
–Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
–Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
–Learn that new hobby or trade.
–Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
–Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
Host a dinner party.
–Simplify your life and home.
–Reconnect severed ties with family.
–Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
–Break off unhealthy relationships.
–Go back to school.
–Stand up to a bully.
–Be positive.

One day while I was snooping through a local thrift store I found an old paperback entitled “Slow-Crock Cookery” dated 1974. I love old cookbooks especially those produced by a local church or organization. It looked interesting enough to spend the $.25 cents on. This little book was well worth the investment. It has become one of my top 5 favorite cook books.

Pork Chops with Oranges makes for a lovely dinner on a fall evening. Pair the chops with a baked sweet potato or use it as a stuffing in Stuffed Acorn Squash. Pork Chops with Oranges can be made in the oven using a dutch oven or casserole. Bake covered at 300 degrees F for the time listed.

6 lean pork chops, prescription 1-inch thick
1 (6-oz) can orange juice concentrate
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1/4 tsp pepper
1 (8-oz) can mandarin orange segments

Sear chops in a skillet over high heat. Place chops in the slow-cooker.

Combine orange juice concentrate, viagra 60mg brown sugar, treat salt cinnamon, allspice and pepper. Pour over pork chops. Cover tightly and cook on low for 6 to 7 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours.

Arrange oranges over the pork chops for the last 15 minutes of cooking time. Serve over a baked sweet potato or brown rice.

Makes 4-6 servings

Variations:
— Replace the orange juice with 1 cup apricot jam and add 1/4 teaspoon ginger and 1/4 teaspoon cloves.

Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, symptoms

Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, cure “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.”

The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

With the final exam approaching fast, order I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

–If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
–Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
–Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
–Learn that new hobby or trade.
–Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
–Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
Host a dinner party.
–Simplify your life and home.
–Reconnect severed ties with family.
–Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
–Break off unhealthy relationships.
–Go back to school.
–Stand up to a bully.
–Be positive.

Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, cheapest

Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, visit this “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.”

The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

With the final exam approaching fast, more about I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

–If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
–Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
–Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
–Learn that new hobby or trade.
–Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
–Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
Host a dinner party.
–Simplify your life and home.
–Reconnect severed ties with family.
–Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
–Break off unhealthy relationships.
–Go back to school.
–Stand up to a bully.
–Be positive.

One day while I was snooping through a local thrift store I found an old paperback entitled “Slow-Crock Cookery” dated 1974. I love old cookbooks especially those produced by a local church or organization. It looked interesting enough to spend the $.25 cents on. This little book was well worth the investment. It has become one of my top 5 favorite cook books.

Pork Chops with Oranges makes for a lovely dinner on a fall evening. Pair the chops with a baked sweet potato or use it as a stuffing in Stuffed Acorn Squash. Pork Chops with Oranges can be made in the oven using a dutch oven or casserole. Bake covered at 300 degrees F for the time listed.

6 lean pork chops, prescription 1-inch thick
1 (6-oz) can orange juice concentrate
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1/4 tsp pepper
1 (8-oz) can mandarin orange segments

Sear chops in a skillet over high heat. Place chops in the slow-cooker.

Combine orange juice concentrate, viagra 60mg brown sugar, treat salt cinnamon, allspice and pepper. Pour over pork chops. Cover tightly and cook on low for 6 to 7 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours.

Arrange oranges over the pork chops for the last 15 minutes of cooking time. Serve over a baked sweet potato or brown rice.

Makes 4-6 servings

Variations:
— Replace the orange juice with 1 cup apricot jam and add 1/4 teaspoon ginger and 1/4 teaspoon cloves.

Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, symptoms

Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, cure “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.”

The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

With the final exam approaching fast, order I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

–If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
–Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
–Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
–Learn that new hobby or trade.
–Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
–Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
Host a dinner party.
–Simplify your life and home.
–Reconnect severed ties with family.
–Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
–Break off unhealthy relationships.
–Go back to school.
–Stand up to a bully.
–Be positive.

Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, cheapest

Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, visit this “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.”

The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

With the final exam approaching fast, more about I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

–If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
–Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
–Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
–Learn that new hobby or trade.
–Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
–Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
Host a dinner party.
–Simplify your life and home.
–Reconnect severed ties with family.
–Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
–Break off unhealthy relationships.
–Go back to school.
–Stand up to a bully.
–Be positive.

I have grown quite fond of my little ceramic pot since I found an old 1970’s crock pot cookbook at the thrift store. Last week we enjoyed Pork Chops with Oranges and now this week we salivated over Peppered Beef Roll. I have not had this much fun or success since I bought the River Cottage Family Cookbook a few years ago.

Most of the heat from the pepper is contained in the stuffing. For a milder version cook as directed but serve without the stuffing. The flank steak I found was in a sealed commercial package meaning the butcher did not wrap it in house. It was a little expensive. I think I paid $10 for 2 pounds. On Sunday’s I like to serve more of a traditional type dinner with pot roast or a roasted chicken. We use the left over meat in subsequent meals during the week. So the price was not too bad. Serve with steamed vegetables.

Source: Slow Crock Cookery by Karen Plageman
1 Flank Steak, visit this site about 2 pounds
1/4 cup fine dry bread crumbs
1 to 2 tsp peppercorns, crushed
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1 cup chopped onion
1 1/2 cups beef stock
String

If flank steak is not already sliced, butterfly-cut steak to make it twice as long.

Lay meat out flat. Combine bread crumbs, crushed peppercorns, salt, allspice, and garlic powder and spread evenly over meat.

Roll up meat tightly and firmly and tire with string. Place in slow cooker. Add oinon, water and bouillon cubes. Cover tightly and cook at low for 7-8 hours. High for 4-5 hours. Turn beef roll several times during cooking. Makes 4-6 servings.

Crock Pot Pork Chops with Oranges

Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would a

Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
2 medium acorn squash, web halved lengthwise, ed seeds removed
1 tbsp olive oil
Coarse salt and black pepper, viagra order to taste
2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
1 medium onion, diced
2 celery stalks, diced
2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
Parsley to garnish

Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

Variations:
— Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

— Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

— Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.

Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would a

Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
2 medium acorn squash, web halved lengthwise, ed seeds removed
1 tbsp olive oil
Coarse salt and black pepper, viagra order to taste
2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
1 medium onion, diced
2 celery stalks, diced
2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
Parsley to garnish

Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

Variations:
— Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

— Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

— Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.

One day while I was snooping through a local thrift store I found an old paperback entitled “Slow-Crock Cookery” dated 1974. I love old cookbooks especially those produced by a local church or organization. It looked interesting enough to spend the $.25 cents on. This little book was well worth the investment. It has become one of my top 5 favorite cook books.

Pork Chops with Oranges makes for a lovely dinner on a fall evening. Pair the chops with a baked sweet potato or use it as a stuffing in Stuffed Acorn Squash. Pork Chops with Oranges can be made in the oven using a dutch oven or casserole. Bake covered at 300 degrees F for the time listed.

6 lean pork chops, view 1-inch thick
1 (6-oz) can orange juice concentrate
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1/4 tsp pepper
1 (8-oz) can mandarin orange segments

Sear chops in a skillet over high heat. Place chops in the slow-cooker.

Combine orange juice concentrate, brown sugar, salt cinnamon, allspice and pepper. Pour over pork chops. Cover tightly and cook on low for 6 to 7 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours.

Arrange oranges over the pork chops for the last 15 minutes of cooking time. Serve over a baked sweet potato or brown rice.

Makes 4-6 servings

Variations:
— Replace the orange juice with 1 cup apricot jam and add 1/4 teaspoon ginger and 1/4 teaspoon cloves.

Family Togetherness: Sunday Family Counsel

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, viagra buy Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours or starchy potatoes or sweet potatoes. It is not uncommon to find recipes that mix part potato with squash or spinach. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. Everyone loves them. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, nurse for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 30-45 minutes) Lay the potatoes on a board or towel to cool slightly before peeling.

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

The dough should be gently handled similar to when making biscuits or pie crusts or even meatballs. Everything is folded in mixing until just blended. This is not a pasta or bread dough so avoid kneading the dough too much. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas. Click here for a step by step tutorial from making the dough to ro

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks, approved
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 30 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, viagra buy Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours or starchy potatoes or sweet potatoes. It is not uncommon to find recipes that mix part potato with squash or spinach. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. Everyone loves them. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, nurse for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 30-45 minutes) Lay the potatoes on a board or towel to cool slightly before peeling.

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

The dough should be gently handled similar to when making biscuits or pie crusts or even meatballs. Everything is folded in mixing until just blended. This is not a pasta or bread dough so avoid kneading the dough too much. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas. Click here for a step by step tutorial from making the dough to ro

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks, approved
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 30 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, prostate Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, viagra buy Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours or starchy potatoes or sweet potatoes. It is not uncommon to find recipes that mix part potato with squash or spinach. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. Everyone loves them. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, nurse for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 30-45 minutes) Lay the potatoes on a board or towel to cool slightly before peeling.

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

The dough should be gently handled similar to when making biscuits or pie crusts or even meatballs. Everything is folded in mixing until just blended. This is not a pasta or bread dough so avoid kneading the dough too much. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas. Click here for a step by step tutorial from making the dough to ro

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks, approved
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 30 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, prostate Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, viagra approved she has meet since we moved, drug are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, discount after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, story rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drug cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, tadalafil rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, treatment rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, story cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, more about make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, approved rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, viagra cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, ed make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, ampoule rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, drugs cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, information pills make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.

I was looking for something different to go with grilled salmon when I stumbled upon this recipe for white bean salad. It combines fresh green beans with tomatoes and olives drizzled with a tangy vinaigrette. This white bean salad makes for a great side dish at any picnic or BBQ. Add canned tuna for a tasty lunch to take to work or use the dressing to flavor your favorite steamed vegetables.

Source: Adapted from Woman’s Day
12 oz fresh green beans
3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/4 cup olive oil
1?4 tsp each salt and pepper
1 can (15 to 16 oz) cannellini beans, order rinsed and drained
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
1?2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
Chopped parsley

Steam green beans by dropping them into a pot of salted boiling water. Blanch for 3-5 minutes. Drain water then cover pot.

Meanwhile, make dressing: Whisk oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper until well blended.
Cut green beans into smaller bite sized pieces. In a large serving bowl, gently toss green beans, cannellini beans, tomato and olives. Drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with parsley, if desired.

Variations:
– 1 grilled salmon steak, flaked
– 2 cans (5 to 6 oz each) solid light tuna in olive oil, undrained. Replace the oil in the can for 1/4 cup olive oil.
– Use 1 (12 oz) bag microwavable green beans in the place of fresh green beans.
– Go Mediterranean by mixing 8 oz green bean with two bags mixed greens, 2 cucumbers seeded and sliced, grape tomatoes in the place of wedges, 1 can (12 oz) tuna in oil drained, olives, 1/2 cup Greek salad dressing, 1/2 cup crumbled basil-tomato feta cheese.
Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, sildenafil Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, cheapest Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, viagra sale potato, troche sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs.  Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Boil gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, viagra buy Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours or starchy potatoes or sweet potatoes. It is not uncommon to find recipes that mix part potato with squash or spinach. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. Everyone loves them. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, nurse for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 30-45 minutes) Lay the potatoes on a board or towel to cool slightly before peeling.

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

The dough should be gently handled similar to when making biscuits or pie crusts or even meatballs. Everything is folded in mixing until just blended. This is not a pasta or bread dough so avoid kneading the dough too much. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas. Click here for a step by step tutorial from making the dough to ro

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks, approved
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 30 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Whenever I am in the mood to cook Italian I always turn to my favorite Napa Valley Chef, prostate Micheal Chiarello. His recipes are always clean and full of flavor. This recipe for Potato Gnocchi does not disappoint. Gnocchi [pronounced ‘Nyoke-ee’] is a type of dumpling made from semolina or wheat flours, potato, sweet potatoes, pumpkin or bread crumbs. Gnocchi are to the Italians what french fries are to the Americans. The dough is so light and fluffy it is like biting into a cloud; they practically melt in your mouth. Gnocchi was first introduced by Roman Legions during the expansion into Europe. It was a quick cheap side dish favored mostly in Northern Italy but now is enjoyed throughout the Middle East and South America.

Now, for the important part: the tips of trade for making perfect gnocchi. Michael prefers to bake the potatoes. It is perfectly fine to boil the potatoes however you must follow these important guidelines.

1. When boiling the potatoes for potato gnocchi you want to cook the potatoes WHOLE with SKINS ON. If you peel and cut the potatoes before boiling they will absorb too much water resulting in mush.

2. Do not over cook the potatoes. Test the potatoes by piercing one with a fork or knife. If it is hard then it needs to cook longer. A fork should be able to insert easily and the potato slowly slip off. (About 45 minutes)

3. Use a potato ricer or push the cooked potato through a strainer. Mashing the potatoes creates mashed potatoes. Gnocchi begins as a light dough. Pushing the potatoes through a strainer or ricer is what gives the gnocchi the airy texture.

One last tip has to do with adding the flour. Add the flour a little bit at a time until the dough holds together. Do not add too much flour. Once the dough is ready you can either cut the dough then cook or shape the cut pieces using the tines of a fork. The indentations created by rolling the dough on the fork is key to holding the sauce. The end result? Absolute heaven. There are many ways to serve gnocchi. Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the recipe for delicious ideas.

Source: Michael Chiarello
Kosher salt
1 pound russet potatoes
3 to 4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon gray salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting board and dough

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread a layer of kosher salt on a baking sheet and arrange the potatoes on top (see Cook’s Note). Bake until a bit overcooked, about 45 minutes. Let sit until cool enough to handle, cut in half, and scoop out the flesh. Reserve the potato skins, if desired, for another use. Pass the potatoes through a potato ricer or grate them on the large holes of a box grater. You should have about 2 cups.

Make a mound of potatoes on the counter or in a bowl with a well in the middle, add 3 of the egg yolks, the cheese, nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Mix in the potatoes and mix well with hands. Sprinkle 1/2 cup of the flour over the potatoes and, using your knuckles, press it into the potatoes. Fold the mass over on itself and press down again. Sprinkle on more flour, little by little, folding and pressing the dough until it just holds together, (try not to knead it.) Work any dough clinging to your fingers back into the dough.

If the mixture is too dry, add another egg yolk or a little water. The dough should give under slight pressure. It will feel firm but yielding. To test if the dough is the correct consistency, take a piece and roll it with your hands on a well-floured board into a rope 1/2-inch in diameter. If the dough holds together, it is ready. If not, add more flour, fold and press the dough several more times, and test again.

Keeping your work surface and the dough lightly floured, cut the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into a rope about 1/2-inch in diameter. Cut into 1/2-inch-long pieces. Lightly flour the gnocchi as you cut them.

To shape use a gnocchi board or the tines of a  fork turned upside down. Rest the bottom edge of the gnocchi board (or the back of a fork) on the work surface, then tilt it at about a 45 degree angle. Take each piece and squish it lightly with your thumb against the board while simultaneously pushing it away from you. As you shape the gnocchi, dust them lightly with flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pot of water to a light boil and add salt. Drop in the gnocchi and cook for about 90 seconds from the time they rise to the surface. Remove the cooked gnocchi with a skimmer, shake off the excess water, and serve as desired.

Cook’s Note:
Baking potatoes on a layer of salt allows heat to circulate 360 degrees. Scrape the salt into a jar and reuse it again and again. If you do not have time to shape the gnocchi, you can freeze the dough, defrost it in the refrigerator, and then shape it. To freeze shaped gnocchi, line baking sheets with waxed paper and dust with flour. Spread the gnocchi on the prepared sheets and freeze until hard. Remove to individual-portion-size freezer bags. Store in the freezer for up to 1 month. To cook, drop the frozen gnocchi into boiling salted water. Cook for about 2 minutes after they rise to the surface.

Dazzledish Variations:
– Baked Gnocchi: Prepare gnocchi as directed above. Meanwhile heat 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat. When melted stir in 2 tablespoons flour until smooth. Slowly add 1 cup milk whisking until smooth. Continue to heat sauce until slightly thickened about 5 minutes. Then add 3/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Place cooked gnocchi in a casserole dish. Pour sauce over gnocchi. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes.
– Sprinkle gnocchi with 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan cheese then drizzle with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10-12 minutes.
– Simmer gnocchi in chicken stock with chopped celery and carrots to make dumpling soup. Garnish with chopped scallions.
– Heat 3 tablespoons butter over medium heat until slightly browned. Toss with gnocchi.
– Serve Gnocchi with marinara sauce.
– Use in the place of pasta.

Last school year a few friends of mine and I decided to host a preschool for our four year old’s. We designed the preschool curriculum and drafted a schedule. There were four kids who thankfully got along well together. We met three days a week (Monday through Wednesday) for three hours. Each mom took turns hosting preschool at their house one week each month. The kids had a blast learning their letters and forming lasting friendships. My daughter just barely missed the cut off for Kindergarten this year. Unfortunately all her friends, viagra approved she has meet since we moved, drug are going to school. Meaning she will be home with me and little brother. In my search to come up with fresh ideas to make a new ABC book I found No Time For Flash Cards.

NO TIME FOR FLASH CARDS:
If you have little ones at home and are looking for fun fantastic learning ideas for preschoolers from activities to crafts and book recommendations NTFFC is an easy place to start. Allison McDonald is the founder of No Time For Flash Cards. Allison has a degree in Elementary Education and spent 10 years working with preschoolers and parents teaching crafts. In 2008, discount after the birth of her son she left the classroom to be home with her son. Her passion for teaching children inspired her to share her ideas online. Thus, No Time For Flash Cards was created. You will find tons of books, themes and alphabet crafts to teach your toddler and preschooler.

Favorite NTFFC Links:
Toothpick Sea Urchins
Paper Plate Animals
Fine Art Museum
Venus Fly Trap

PRESCHOOL EXPRESS:
Preschool Express is a free on-line educational resource for children ages 1-5. Jean Warren is the founder of Preschool Express and the previous owner of Totline Publications. She is best known for her songs, rhymes and stories which can be found in popular books such as; Piggyback © Song books, 1*2*3 Art , Theme-a-saurus and the Totline Teaching Tales children’s book series. Jean created the Preschool Express Website as a way to give back to the world. Her hope is to provide every parent and grandparent the resources they need to create a natural learning atmosphere.

There is so much to explore on the Preschool Express. The calendar station offers teachers or parents a calender with chosen themes for each week. There are calenders for preschoolers and toddlers with a daily activity to do together. Plan a party at the party station. Learn to make snacks, read stories and discover.

LOVE2LEARN2DAY:
If you have a child who loves math Love2Learn2Day offers loads of fun games and manipulative ideas that are K-12 math orientated. The creator of Love2Learn2Day is an educational consultant working with both kids and teachers. The website is all about learning to have fun with math.

Favorite Love2Learn2Day Links:
Mapping a Farm
Play dough Maps
Incan Quipu Math (place value, history)
Math in the Movies

Photo: property of Lily Jane Stationery

With the start of school also means the addition of all the extra curricular activities. Household schedules can become pretty hectic. Sunday Family Counsel is a way to meet up with the rest of the family to plan the week and work out any conflicting schedules.  In our home we meet together on Sunday night to go over the calendar and finances. We plan the weekly menu inviting suggestions from the gang. We also discuss any needs and reasonable wants. We can plan time for completing both home and school projects, illness schedule outings and even chores.

Family Counsel encourages communication, illness teaches leadership, this time management and financial responsibility.  Create a suggestion box or a dedicated notepad to jot down notes and ideas throughout the week to be discussed. Be sure to come prepared with the necessary documents and calendars. Follow an itinerary to keep things moving and to insure you do not forget anything. Jazz up the meeting by serving dessert or offering a chance to win a door prize.

Stuffed Acorn Squash

Illustration by: Richard Svensson
Illustration by: Richard Svensson

I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, order filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  He believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, purchase old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage or Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
  • Perform a family service project.
  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
  • Tie green balloons to the car.
  • Dye the milk green.
Illustration by: Richard Svensson
Illustration by: Richard Svensson

I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

A little Irish History

Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
  • Perform a family service project.
  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
  • Tie green balloons to the car.
  • Dye the milk green.
Illustration by: Richard Svensson
Illustration by: Richard Svensson

I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

A little Irish History

Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
  • Perform a family service project.
  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
  • Tie green balloons to the car.
  • Dye the milk green.
Illustration by: Richard Svensson
Illustration by: Richard Svensson

I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

A little Irish History

Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    • Perform a family service project.
    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
    • Tie green balloons to the car.
    • Dye the milk green.
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    A little Irish History

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    • Perform a family service project.
    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
    • Tie green balloons to the car.
    • Dye the milk green.
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    A little Irish History

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
      • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
      • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
      • Perform a family service project.
      • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
      • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
      • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
      • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
      • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
      • Tie green balloons to the car.
      • Dye the milk green.
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson

      I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

      A little Irish History

      Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

      There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

      The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

      Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

      • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
      • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
      • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
      • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
      • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
      • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
      • Perform a family service project.
      • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
      • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
      • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
      • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
      • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
      • Tie green balloons to the car.
      • Dye the milk green.
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson

      I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

      A little Irish History

      Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

      There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

      The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

      Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

      • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
      • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
      • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
      • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
      • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
      • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
      • Perform a family service project.
      • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
      • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
      • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
      • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
      • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
      • Tie green balloons to the car.
      • Dye the milk green.
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson
      Illustration by: Richard Svensson

      I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

      A little Irish History

      Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

      There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

      The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

      Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

      • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
      • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
      • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
      • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
        • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
        • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
        • Perform a family service project.
        • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
        • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
        • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
        • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
        • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
        • Tie green balloons to the car.
        • Dye the milk green.
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson

        I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

        A little Irish History

        Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

        There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

        The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

        Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

        • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
        • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
        • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
        • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
        • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
        • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
        • Perform a family service project.
        • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
        • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
        • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
        • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
        • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
        • Tie green balloons to the car.
        • Dye the milk green.
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson

        I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

        A little Irish History

        Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

        There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

        The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

        Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

        • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
        • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
        • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
        • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
        • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
        • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
        • Perform a family service project.
        • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
        • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
        • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
        • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
        • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
        • Tie green balloons to the car.
        • Dye the milk green.
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson

        I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

        A little Irish History

        Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

        There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

        The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

        Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

        • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
        • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
        • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
        • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
        • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
        • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
        • Perform a family service project.
        • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
        • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
        • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
        • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
        • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
        • Tie green balloons to the car.
        • Dye the milk green.
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson
        Illustration by: Richard Svensson

        I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

        A little Irish History

        Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

        There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

        The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

        Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

        • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
        • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
        • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
        • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
          • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
          • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
          • Perform a family service project.
          • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
          • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
          • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
          • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
          • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
          • Tie green balloons to the car.
          • Dye the milk green.
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson
          Illustration by: Richard Svensson

          I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

          A little Irish History

          Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

          There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

          The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

          Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

          • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
          • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
          • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
          • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.

            Chicken Lo Mein

            I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

            After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

            1 tbsp oil
            2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
            3 garlic cloves, chopped
            Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
            Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

            1/4 cup soy sauce
            1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
            1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
            1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
            1-2 tsp sesame oil

            Sauce:
            Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

            Boil noodles according to package directions.

            Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

            Serves 4

            In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
            Oriental Flavoring
            Source: Adapted from Spark People
            2 tablespoons onion powder
            2 tablespoons ground ginger
            2 tablespoons garlic powder
            1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
            1/2 teaspoon salt
            1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

            Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
            1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.

            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
            • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
            • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
            • Perform a family service project.
            • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
            • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
            • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
            • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
            • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
            • Tie green balloons to the car.
            • Dye the milk green.
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson
            Illustration by: Richard Svensson

            I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

            A little Irish History

            Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

            There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

            The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

            Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

            • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
            • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
            • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
            • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.

              Chicken Lo Mein

              I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

              After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

              1 tbsp oil
              2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
              3 garlic cloves, chopped
              Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
              Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

              1/4 cup soy sauce
              1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
              1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
              1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
              1-2 tsp sesame oil

              Sauce:
              Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

              Boil noodles according to package directions.

              Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

              Serves 4

              In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
              Oriental Flavoring
              Source: Adapted from Spark People
              2 tablespoons onion powder
              2 tablespoons ground ginger
              2 tablespoons garlic powder
              1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
              1/2 teaspoon salt
              1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

              Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
              1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
              I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

              After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

              1 tbsp oil
              2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
              3 garlic cloves, chopped
              Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
              Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
              1/4 cup soy sauce
              1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
              1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
              1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
              1-2 tsp sesame oil

              Sauce:
              Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

              Boil noodles according to package directions.

              Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

              In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
              Oriental Flavoring:

              2 tablespoons onion powder
              2 tablespoons ground ginger
              2 tablespoons garlic powder
              1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
              1/2 teaspoon salt
              1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

              Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
              1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.

              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
              • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
              • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
              • Perform a family service project.
              • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
              • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
              • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
              • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
              • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
              • Tie green balloons to the car.
              • Dye the milk green.
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson
              Illustration by: Richard Svensson

              I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

              A little Irish History

              Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

              There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

              The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

              Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

              • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
              • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
              • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
              • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.

                Chicken Lo Mein

                I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                1 tbsp oil
                2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                3 garlic cloves, chopped
                Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                1/4 cup soy sauce
                1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                1-2 tsp sesame oil

                Sauce:
                Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                Boil noodles according to package directions.

                Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                Serves 4

                In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                Oriental Flavoring
                Source: Adapted from Spark People
                2 tablespoons onion powder
                2 tablespoons ground ginger
                2 tablespoons garlic powder
                1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                1/2 teaspoon salt
                1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                1 tbsp oil
                2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                3 garlic cloves, chopped
                Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                1/4 cup soy sauce
                1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                1-2 tsp sesame oil

                Sauce:
                Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                Boil noodles according to package directions.

                Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                Oriental Flavoring:

                2 tablespoons onion powder
                2 tablespoons ground ginger
                2 tablespoons garlic powder
                1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                1/2 teaspoon salt
                1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, more about grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, physician organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                1 tbsp oil
                2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                3 garlic cloves, chopped
                Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                1/4 cup soy sauce
                1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                1-2 tsp sesame oil

                Sauce:
                Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                Boil noodles according to package directions.

                Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                Oriental Flavoring
                Source: Adapted from Spark People
                2 tablespoons onion powder
                2 tablespoons ground ginger
                2 tablespoons garlic powder
                1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                1/2 teaspoon salt
                1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.

                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                • Perform a family service project.
                • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                • Tie green balloons to the car.
                • Dye the milk green.
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                A little Irish History

                Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.

                  Chicken Lo Mein

                  I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                  After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                  1 tbsp oil
                  2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                  3 garlic cloves, chopped
                  Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                  Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                  1/4 cup soy sauce
                  1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                  1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                  1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                  1-2 tsp sesame oil

                  Sauce:
                  Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                  Boil noodles according to package directions.

                  Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                  Serves 4

                  In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                  Oriental Flavoring
                  Source: Adapted from Spark People
                  2 tablespoons onion powder
                  2 tablespoons ground ginger
                  2 tablespoons garlic powder
                  1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                  1/2 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                  Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                  1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                  I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                  After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                  1 tbsp oil
                  2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                  3 garlic cloves, chopped
                  Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                  Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                  1/4 cup soy sauce
                  1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                  1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                  1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                  1-2 tsp sesame oil

                  Sauce:
                  Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                  Boil noodles according to package directions.

                  Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                  In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                  Oriental Flavoring:

                  2 tablespoons onion powder
                  2 tablespoons ground ginger
                  2 tablespoons garlic powder
                  1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                  1/2 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                  Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                  1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                  I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, more about grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, physician organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                  After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                  1 tbsp oil
                  2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                  3 garlic cloves, chopped
                  Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                  Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                  1/4 cup soy sauce
                  1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                  1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                  1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                  1-2 tsp sesame oil

                  Sauce:
                  Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                  Boil noodles according to package directions.

                  Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                  In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                  Oriental Flavoring
                  Source: Adapted from Spark People
                  2 tablespoons onion powder
                  2 tablespoons ground ginger
                  2 tablespoons garlic powder
                  1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                  1/2 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                  Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                  1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                  I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit this pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, tadalafil organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                  After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                  1 tbsp oil
                  2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                  3 garlic cloves, chopped
                  Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                  Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                  1/4 cup soy sauce
                  1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                  1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                  1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                  1-2 tsp sesame oil

                  Sauce:
                  Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                  Boil noodles according to package directions.

                  Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                  Serves 4

                  In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                  Oriental Flavoring
                  Source: Adapted from Spark People
                  2 tablespoons onion powder
                  2 tablespoons ground ginger
                  2 tablespoons garlic powder
                  1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                  1/2 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                  Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                  1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.

                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra buy patient filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, this old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sildenafil the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                  • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                  • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                  • Perform a family service project.
                  • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                  • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                  • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                  • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                  • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                  • Tie green balloons to the car.
                  • Dye the milk green.
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                  Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                  I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, healing filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                  A little Irish History

                  Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                  There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, information pills old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                  The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                  Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                  • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                  • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                  • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                  • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                    • Perform a family service project.
                    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                    • Tie green balloons to the car.
                    • Dye the milk green.
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                    A little Irish History

                    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                    • Perform a family service project.
                    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                    • Tie green balloons to the car.
                    • Dye the milk green.
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, cheap filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                    A little Irish History

                    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                    • Perform a family service project.
                    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                    • Tie green balloons to the car.
                    • Dye the milk green.
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
                    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

                    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, drugs filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

                    A little Irish History

                    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

                    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

                    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

                    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

                    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
                    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
                    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
                    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
                    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
                    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
                    • Perform a family service project.
                    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
                    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
                    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
                    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
                    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
                    • Tie green balloons to the car.
                    • Dye the milk green.

                    Chicken Lo Mein

                    I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, dosage grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, cure organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                    After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                    1 tbsp oil
                    2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                    3 garlic cloves, chopped
                    Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                    Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                    1/4 cup soy sauce
                    1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                    1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                    1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                    1-2 tsp sesame oil

                    Sauce:
                    Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                    Boil noodles according to package directions.

                    Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                    Serves 4

                    In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                    Oriental Flavoring
                    Source: Adapted from Spark People
                    2 tablespoons onion powder
                    2 tablespoons ground ginger
                    2 tablespoons garlic powder
                    1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                    Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                    1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                    I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, adiposity pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                    After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                    1 tbsp oil
                    2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                    3 garlic cloves, chopped
                    Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                    Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                    1/4 cup soy sauce
                    1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                    1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                    1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                    1-2 tsp sesame oil

                    Sauce:
                    Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                    Boil noodles according to package directions.

                    Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                    In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                    Oriental Flavoring:

                    2 tablespoons onion powder
                    2 tablespoons ground ginger
                    2 tablespoons garlic powder
                    1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                    Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                    1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                    I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, more about grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, physician organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                    After all of the commotion this week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                    1 tbsp oil
                    2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                    3 garlic cloves, chopped
                    Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                    Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles
                    1/4 cup soy sauce
                    1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                    1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                    1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                    1-2 tsp sesame oil

                    Sauce:
                    Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                    Boil noodles according to package directions.

                    Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                    In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                    Oriental Flavoring
                    Source: Adapted from Spark People
                    2 tablespoons onion powder
                    2 tablespoons ground ginger
                    2 tablespoons garlic powder
                    1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                    Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                    1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                    I try to start every week prepared. Sunday night we sit down and have a family pow wow to discuss the family issues and the upcoming week’s schedule. I finish the weekly menu and write up the grocery list. Sunday I was in control. Monday I was frustrated. Monday’s are always packed. There is laundry to do, clinic grocery shopping and it is my day to volunteer at school. The cupboards, visit this pantry and refrigerator were bare after a week of trying to use up what we already had. This made for a very long shopping day as I had to stop off at several places for the best deals. Then there was the call from the doctor asking if I could bring Mason in for some lab tests. I was hoping the nurse was going to say I could pick up the health examination form I dropped off the following Monday that was only supposed to take them 48 hours to fill out. The deadline to submit all the school registration paperwork was fast approaching and I needed that form by week’s end. Tuesday was fulfilling yet exhausting. I spent all Tuesday morning cleaning the house, tadalafil organizing and playing Taxi driver. Wednesday afternoon I spent at the doctor’s office holding my six year old son down while they gave him three shots. I was feeling relieved the evening’s dinner party was canceled; our guests had something come up last minute. Worried because I still needed a babysitter for Friday afternoon; parent/teacher conference. And guilty because I did not do a very good job selling tickets for the school’s tri-tip fundraiser due on Friday.

                    After all of the commotion that week I was looking forward to a bowl of Pork Lo Mein. Problem was I forgot to take the pork chops out of the freezer to thaw. Luckily I had left over roasted chicken. The next obstacle in my way was I accidentally threw out the magazine page with the Lo Mein recipe I wanted to try. So I winged it using Top Ramen.

                    1 tbsp oil
                    2 cups chopped chicken, 1-inch pieces
                    3 garlic cloves, chopped
                    Any combination of the following Vegetables- 1 celery stalk sliced, 2 cups shredded cabbage, a handful water chestnuts, shitake mushrooms sliced, handful snow peas, 1 bok choy chopped roughly, bean sprouts, sliced red pepper, 1 carrot cut julienne, 1 small onion sliced, 1 crown broccoli
                    Noodles- rice noodles, Soba Noodles, Top Ramen noodles

                    1/4 cup soy sauce
                    1/2 cup Top Ramen Oriental broth
                    1 tsp powdered ginger, 1 tbsp grated
                    1-2 tsp Chinese rice wine vinegar
                    1-2 tsp sesame oil

                    Sauce:
                    Mix together the soy sauce, broth, ginger, vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside.

                    Boil noodles according to package directions.

                    Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet or wok. If using raw chicken add the chicken to the wok; cooking until no longer pink. Remove. Add the garlic and vegetables; saute until tender but still crisp. Return the chicken and pour in the sauce. Let simmer for five minutes. Serve mixture over noodles or without noodles.

                    Serves 4

                    In the sauce I used 1 Top Ramen Oriental flavoring packet. You can substitute chicken stock or make your Oriental flavoring with less sodium.
                    Oriental Flavoring
                    Source: Adapted from Spark People
                    2 tablespoons onion powder
                    2 tablespoons ground ginger
                    2 tablespoons garlic powder
                    1/2 tablespoon ground black pepper
                    1/2 teaspoon salt
                    1/2 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice Powder

                    Mix all the spices together; store in an airtight container.
                    1 teaspoon = 1 Top Ramen packet.
                    Vinaigrette

                    • 1 tbsp fresh ginger, search minced
                    • 2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    • 2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    • 1/2 cup sesame oil
                    • 1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad

                    • 1 tbsp olive oil
                    • 1 cup shiitake mushrooms, ask sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    • 1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    • 4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    • 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    • 1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    • Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Source: Clean Eating Magazine
                    Vinaigrette
                    1 tbsp fresh ginger, information pills case minced
                    2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
                    2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
                    1/2 cup sesame oil
                    1/4 cup light or blended olive oil

                    Salad
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    1 cup shiitake mushrooms, see sliced into 1/4-inch pieces
                    1 cup shelled edamame beans
                    4 cups baby spinach leaves, washed and stemmed
                    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
                    1/4 cup unsalted dry roasted cashews
                    Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

                    In a small saucepan, combine all vinaigrette ingredients. Simmer over medium-low heat for 5 minutes; set aside.

                    To prepare salad heat a large saute pan over medium heat, add oil and mushrooms; saute until cooked through. Add edamame sauteing to heat through, about 2 minutes. Add spinach; heat until leaves just begin to wilt, about 1 minute.

                    Pour spinach mixture into a large mixing bowl. Add cilantro and cashews. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss with just enough vinaigrette to coat. Serve immediately.

                    Stuffed acorn squash is a fun way to present a delicious meal. The kids squealed in delight to see a “pumpkin” on their dinner plate. You can use hulled out squash or pumpkin to serve your favorite grilled meat and roasted veggies in. Acorn Squash in on this year’s Halloween dinner menu. It would also make a wonder side dish on Thanksgiving.

                    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
                    2 medium acorn squash, decease halved lengthwise, approved seeds removed
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    Coarse salt and black pepper, healing to taste
                    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
                    1 medium onion, diced
                    2 celery stalks, diced
                    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
                    4 garlic cloves, minced
                    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
                    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
                    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
                    Parsley to garnish

                    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

                    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

                    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

                    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

                    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

                    Variations:
                    — Replace the sausage with black beans, chopped pork chops or curry chicken.

                    — Add 1 tablespoon cumin and sprinkle with cilantro.

                    — Skip mixing in the sour cream. Mix 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper with the sour cream and serve on the side.

                    October Resolution: Face the Lion- Accomplish a Difficult Task

                    The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
                    Source: Better Homes and Gardens
                    4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
                    1 cup water
                    1 tbsp salt
                    1 tbsp sugar
                    2 tsp vanilla
                    2 tbsp packed brown sugar
                    2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    2 tbsp peach preserves
                    1 tbsp horseradish mustard
                    1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

                    In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

                    Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

                    Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

                    Makes 4 servings.

                    The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
                    Source: Better Homes and Gardens
                    4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
                    1 cup water
                    1 tbsp salt
                    1 tbsp sugar
                    2 tsp vanilla
                    2 tbsp packed brown sugar
                    2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    2 tbsp peach preserves
                    1 tbsp horseradish mustard
                    1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

                    In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

                    Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

                    Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

                    Makes 4 servings.

                    Dutch Apple Pancakes

                    Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

                    Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, seek sausage, approved fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

                    We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples.

                    2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh or Gala, more about cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
                    1 cup flour
                    2 tbsp sugar
                    1/2 tsp baking powder
                    A pinch of salt
                    2 eggs
                    Milk 1 1/4 cup

                    Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and a little milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter.

                    Heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

                    Makes 6 large pancakes

                    The kids and I waited all spring and early summer for the nectarines to ripen on the the tree in the backyard. Finally our patience paid off. One day while making our routine check of the fruit we found several ripe ones. The nectarines tasted so sweet and juicy. We ate them raw, this web we sliced them for salads, web used them in scones and canned the rest. This recipe for vanilla pork chops tasted like we were eating dessert for dinner. I would have never thought to use vanilla with pork but when paired with the brown sugary neca
                    Source: Better Homes and Gardens
                    4 boneless pork loin chops, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick (about 1 pound)
                    1 cup water
                    1 tbsp salt
                    1 tbsp sugar
                    2 tsp vanilla
                    2 tbsp packed brown sugar
                    2 large peaches or nectarines, halved and pitted
                    1 tbsp olive oil
                    2 tbsp peach preserves
                    1 tbsp horseradish mustard
                    1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat a grill to medium heat or oven to 350 degrees.

                    In a large ziplock bag combine the water, salt, sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Seal the bag. Mix liquid until salt and sugar are dissolved. Add the pork chops to the bag; turn to coat. Let sit at least 30 minutes or refrigerate up to 24 hours.

                    Pat brown sugar onto cut sides of peach halves. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. In small bowl combine preserves, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.

                    Drain chops, discarding brine. Pat chops dry with paper towels. Spread preserves mixture on both sides of chops. Grill peaches and pork chops until the peaches are tender and the pork chops are no longer pink inside.

                    Makes 4 servings.

                    Dutch Apple Pancakes

                    Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

                    Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, seek sausage, approved fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

                    We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples.

                    2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh or Gala, more about cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
                    1 cup flour
                    2 tbsp sugar
                    1/2 tsp baking powder
                    A pinch of salt
                    2 eggs
                    Milk 1 1/4 cup

                    Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and a little milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter.

                    Heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

                    Makes 6 large pancakes

                    Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, viagra 100mg

                    Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

                    I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

                    I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, what is ed “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.” The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

                    With the final exam approaching fast, nurse I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

                    My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

                    I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

                    This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

                    –If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
                    –Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
                    –Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
                    –Learn that new hobby or trade.
                    –Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
                    –Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
                    Host a dinner party.
                    –Simplify your life and home.
                    –Reconnect severed ties with family.
                    –Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
                    –Break off unhealthy relationships.
                    –Go back to school.
                    –Stand up to a bully.
                    –Be positive.

                    Pumpkin Walnut Bread

                    Art Work: Celebration of Halloween by Ryan Conners

                    The Witch’s Tavern

                    Beverage

                    Frog’s Bane – Apricot Cider

                    Appetizer

                    Eyeball Soup – Tomato Soup with Cheese Tortillini

                    Main Dish

                    Stuffed Hobgoblin heads – Stuffed Acorn Squash

                    Dessert

                    Shrunken Stuffed Mummy Heads- Baked Apples

                    Art Work: Celebration of Halloween by Ryan Conners

                    The Witch’s Tavern

                    Beverage

                    Frog’s Bane – Apricot Cider

                    Appetizer

                    Eyeball Soup – Tomato Soup with Cheese Tortillini

                    Main Dish

                    Stuffed Hobgoblin heads – Stuffed Acorn Squash

                    Dessert

                    Shrunken Stuffed Mummy Heads- Baked Apples

                    The week after Autumn Solstice the soccer league voted to cancel soccer practice because it was too hot. I wanted to make Vegan Pumpkin Walnut Bread but the grocery store did not carry cans of pureed pumpkin yet. While I was trying hang up a curtain the rod fell and smacked my forehead. I was behind on laundry. The house was a mess. I took the kids to the shoe store against my better judgment. Alexander would agree with me that it was a terrible, patient horrible, no good, very bad day. The moral of the story? Stock up on cans of puree pumpkin. Then when you are having a bad day no matter what the season you can make Pumpkin Walnut Bread.

                    This recipe from Joy the Baker is by far our favorite. We love the crunchy walnuts and the wonderful fragrant spices. I have tried walnuts in a pumpkin roll before and was not impressed. Here they add a wonderful layer of texture it is almost like capping the bread with a nutty caramel topping.

                    This recipe for pumpkin walnut bread is Vegan in that there are no eggs. It makes a great snack for kids who have egg allergies. I would avoid the temptation to substitute applesauce for part of the oil because the recipe already has plenty of sugar from the syrup and sugars. You could reduce the oil slightly and replace some of the sugar with applesauce.

                    Source: Joy the Baker
                    –makes 2 loaves–
                    2 cups all-purpose flour
                    1 1/2 cups white whole wheat flour ( or whole wheat flour… or just use only all-purpose flour)
                    2 cups light brown sugar, packed
                    1/3 cups granulated sugar
                    2 teaspoons baking soda
                    1 teaspoon baking powder
                    1 teaspoon salt
                    1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
                    1 teaspoon cinnamon
                    1 teaspoon allspice
                    1/2 teaspoon cloves
                    1 15-ounce can pumpkin puree, or just under two cups
                    1 cup vegetable oil
                    1/3 cup maple syrup
                    1/3 cup water
                    1 cup chopped walnuts

                    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Place a rack in the center of the oven. Grease and flour two loaf pans and set aside.

                    In a large bowl, whisk together flours, sugars, baking soda, baking powder, salt and spices.

                    In a medium bowl, carefully whisk together pumpkin puree, oil, maple syrup and water.

                    Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and use a spatula to fold all of the ingredients together. Make sure to scrape the bottom of the bowl well, finding any stray flour bits to mix in. Fold in most of the chopped walnuts, reserving some to sprinkle on top of the batter once in the pan.

                    Divide the dough between the two greased pans and sprinkle with a few walnut pieces. Bake for 1 hour to 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove from the oven. Let rest in the pans for 20 minutes, then invert onto a cooling rack.

                    October Website Review: On Being Frugal

                    http://www.joythebaker.com/blog/2009/11/vegan-pumpkin-walnut-bread/
                    As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

                    This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

                    Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

                    As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

                    The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

                    Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
                    Visualize
                    prepare

                    As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

                    This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

                    Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

                    As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

                    The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

                    Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
                    Visualize
                    prepare

                    http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

                    • 2 c all purpose flour
                    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
                    • 1/2 c white sugar
                    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
                    • 1/4 tsp salt
                    • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
                    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
                    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
                    • 2 pinches of allspice
                    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
                    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
                    • 2 large eggs
                    • 6 Tbs butter, melted
                    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

                    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

                    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

                    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
                    As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

                    This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

                    Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

                    As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

                    The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

                    Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
                    Visualize
                    prepare

                    http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

                    • 2 c all purpose flour
                    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
                    • 1/2 c white sugar
                    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
                    • 1/4 tsp salt
                    • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
                    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
                    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
                    • 2 pinches of allspice
                    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
                    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
                    • 2 large eggs
                    • 6 Tbs butter, melted
                    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

                    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

                    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

                    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, side effects sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

                    This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

                    Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

                    As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

                    The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

                    Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
                    Visualize
                    prepare

                    http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

                    • 2 c all purpose flour
                    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
                    • 1/2 c white sugar
                    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
                    • 1/4 tsp salt
                    • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
                    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
                    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
                    • 2 pinches of allspice
                    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
                    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
                    • 2 large eggs
                    • 6 Tbs butter, melted
                    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

                    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

                    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

                    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, side effects sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
                    Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

                    This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

                    Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

                    As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

                    The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

                    Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
                    Visualize
                    prepare

                    http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

                    • 2 c all purpose flour
                    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
                    • 1/2 c white sugar
                    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
                    • 1/4 tsp salt
                    • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
                    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
                    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
                    • 2 pinches of allspice
                    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
                    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
                    • 2 large eggs
                    • 6 Tbs butter, melted
                    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

                    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

                    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

                    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, side effects sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
                    Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 cup flour (optional)
                    1 medium onion, doctor sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    This next step is optional. If you dredge or
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

                    This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

                    Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

                    As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

                    The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

                    Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
                    Visualize
                    prepare

                    http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

                    • 2 c all purpose flour
                    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
                    • 1/2 c white sugar
                    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
                    • 1/4 tsp salt
                    • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
                    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
                    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
                    • 2 pinches of allspice
                    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
                    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
                    • 2 large eggs
                    • 6 Tbs butter, melted
                    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

                    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

                    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

                    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, side effects sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
                    Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 cup flour (optional)
                    1 medium onion, doctor sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    This next step is optional. If you dredge or
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts, healing purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
                    Flour
                    1 medium onion, sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

                    Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

                    Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.

                    As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

                    This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

                    Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

                    As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

                    The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

                    Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
                    Visualize
                    prepare

                    http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

                    • 2 c all purpose flour
                    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
                    • 1/2 c white sugar
                    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
                    • 1/4 tsp salt
                    • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
                    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
                    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
                    • 2 pinches of allspice
                    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
                    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
                    • 2 large eggs
                    • 6 Tbs butter, melted
                    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

                    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

                    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

                    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, side effects sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
                    Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 cup flour (optional)
                    1 medium onion, doctor sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    This next step is optional. If you dredge or
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts, healing purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
                    Flour
                    1 medium onion, sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

                    Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

                    Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.

                    Photo: Property of the CupcakeProject.com

                    When my oldest child was about to start kindergarten I had not begun to think about the yearly rites of passage. I was too consumed with the swirling emotions of sending my baby off to all day kindergarten. Stephen delightedly recalled memories of school clothes shopping and the first day of school photo. The mention of school shopping sent my mind back to the Saw Grass Mills Mall in South Florida. Who could ever forget retail bliss a mile long. As I reminisced a little while longer I remembered a few of the odious haunts of the 80’s I chose to leave buried in the past. The K-Swiss sneakers from 10th grade were not so embarrassing as the white Reebok high-tops I had to have in 9th grade and the orange neon pleather purse I just could not live without in 6th grade. Just Scary.

                    This year our daughter is about to embark on her first year in Kindergarten. In keeping with our newly found family traditions she got a new backpack, visit web a lunch box, viagra 40mg and a new coat in addition to several new outfits. When the big day arrives we will take the much anticipated “first day of school” snapshot. To let her know we are thinking of her she will find a special note attached to a yummy (but healthy) treat inside her lunch pail. That night the dinner menu is kids choice (within reason). It is always nice to have a relaxing comforting meal at the end of a high anxiety day.

                    The following is a list of fun ways to help motivate the kids in preparing them for back to school.

                    1. Back to School Shopping: Make a special day of it. Take your daughter for a pedicure, buy take the boys to the movies.
                    2. Back Packs and Lunch Boxes: We have a tradition once the kids start Kindergarten they get a new backpack and lunch box.
                    3. Special Breakfast: Try to avoid sugary foods that tend to cause the kids to crash. Fill their bellies and minds with hearty oatmeal or protein boosting eggs and toast. Pair proteins like nuts, eggs or yogurt with sugary dishes like pancakes.
                    4. Back to School Brunch: The day before the big day invite friends or keep it just family to a back to school brunch. This is a more appropriate time to serve favorites such as cinnamon rolls or doughnuts. Set up a table with packages of needed school supplies such as crayons, pencils, rulers, paper, ect. Help the kids put their supplies in their backpacks so they are all ready for school in the morning.
                    5. Back to School Dinner: If breakfast is too rushed plan a  special dinner. The menu can be kids choice, a family favorite, or go out to eat.
                    6. Ice cream sundaes: Treat the kids to an ice cream dessert. Invite friends over after school or serve as a dessert with dinner.
                    7. 1st day of School Photo: The first day of school picture can be a fun group photo or a single snapshot of each child. Some families like to use the same backdrop year after year. Have the kids hold up the same number of fingers as the grade they are entering or create a banner with their name and grade to stand in front of.
                    8. Decorations: Secretly hang up balloons and streamers the night before to surprise them in the morning. Make a banner with glitter and markers for the front door that includes the kids names and grade.
                    9. Make Goals: At breakfast or the day before gather as a family to come up with individual and family goals. Review goals once a month. Discuss what is expected of them at home and at school. No TV until chores and homework are done. If the week is hectic maybe you plan to move chores to saturday. If someone has a hard time with math discuss ways to help them.
                    10. After School Treat: Bake homemade cookies for when they get home. Nothing says love like fresh baked bread or cookies.
                    11. The Back to School Fairy or Magic School Bus: Leave a backpack filled with snacks and school supplies by their pillow or by the front door.
                    12. German Schultuete: This giant posterboard cone is filled with back-to-school goodies and supplies as a token of good luck. Similar to a Christmas stocking. Decorate with stickers and markers or use fancy paper. Fill the Schultuete with edible treats, fun bright supplies (markers, glue, pens, erasers, Post-it notes, magnet letters, ect), and small trinkets or toys.
                    13. 12 Days Before School: Hang the kid’s backpacks on their door. Put something new in it each day to count down the days to school.
                    14. Color of the Day: Choose a color the whole family will wear on the first day.
                    15. Swim and BBQ party: Plan a swim party before school starts or a week or two after. Waiting a week allows the kids to invite a friend or two from school. Have games to play or another kind of fun activity.
                    16. Letter to Child: The start of school is a major milestone. Take the time to write a heart felt letter pointing out how proud you are of your child. List several attributes you admire about them and why.
                    17. Classic Tradition: Come up with a fun song to sing or a story to read during breakfast each year on the 1st day of school.
                    18. Walk to school together: If possible park several block away and walk your child to school. The leisurely stroll will help release some of the tention.
                    19. Special Touches: Send the kids to school with a special treat in their lunch bag- a love note, a sandwich cut into a fun shape using cookie cutters, or a favorite snack.

                    As I reflect on the past year looking toward the future I am reminded of my ninth grade history teacher. Upon the close of the school year he counseled us that if we wanted to have a successful year come next fall we would have to come to school believing our classes will not be difficult. On the first day of school that fall I walked onto the campus sure of my future successes. It was not long before my phobia of exams triumphed leaving me feeling defeated like an extinguishing flame.

                    This mind over matter mantra was most apparent at school and church dances. Some of my friends who lingered by the wall would always complain afterwards that they were bored. I never shared their lack of enthusiasm for these activities because I always had fun. I think what helped me most was my brother. He taught by his example to go out there and have fun. No one ever critized his corny… I mean fabulous dancing. We all thought he was “way cool”. I went to the dance with a mind set that I was going to have fun no matter what. Some of my friends on the wall believed that the event should make them happy regardless of the effort or lack of effort they put forth. A few others showed up at the event convinced it was going to be boring.

                    Our attitude plays a pivitol part in our daily achievements. My favorite yoga instrutor tried to encourage us when he would say, patient information pills “you must put in what you want to get back.” My mind knew that bending my knees to lower deeper in Warrior prose was going to push my thighs to their limit. If I wanted more from my workout I needed to change my attitude and work harder. As we come face to face with new opportunities we can’t afford to allow negative thoughts to take residence within our conscience. If we believe we are going to fail we will most definitely fail. However, more about if we stand tall with confidence, treatment a host to an abundance of positive thoughts, we have a better chance at succeeding. More over, a positive attitude will help us overcome disappointment in the unlikely event that things do not happen as planned. With a positive attitude in command we are more likely to entertain pleasant feelings and constructive thoughts. This euphoria gives us joy which in turn lends us energy. Thus, our happiness leads to better health and ultimately confidence.

                    As I approach the new year I admit I am hesitant at the distant probabilities that a new year brings. I know that if I want a successful year I need to put in what I want back. I must start the new year with a positive attitude. But what exactly do I want this year to bring. New years resolutions rely on three components to guarantee success.

                    The first is visualization. Visualize your goal. Map out every detail from start to finish.

                    Second, be prepared. Do the necessary things from the v
                    Visualize
                    prepare

                    http://www.goodlifeeats.com/2009/04/orange-spice-banana-bread.html

                    • 2 c all purpose flour
                    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
                    • 1/2 c white sugar
                    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
                    • 1/4 tsp salt
                    • zest of 1 large orange, view about 2 1/2 Tbs
                    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
                    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
                    • 2 pinches of allspice
                    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
                    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
                    • 2 large eggs
                    • 6 Tbs butter, melted
                    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

                    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

                    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

                    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

                    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, side effects sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called debasting to make the sauce. Debasting is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer debasting feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce for roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 medium onion, symptoms sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1 cup flour
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine
                    Pound the chicken breasts on a cutting board, using a meat tenderizer or the handle of a heavy knife (don’t poke your eye out!  ). You want them to be a uniform thickness (like 1/2? or so?), so they cook evenly and rather quickly.
                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Add the lemon juice and stir for a minute. Remove the onions and mushrooms with a slotted spoon, leaving as much oil/juice as possible.
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts
                    1 cup flour (optional)
                    1 medium onion, doctor sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    This next step is optional. If you dredge or
                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Place them in the skillet and let cook over medium heat until done. Don’t worry if some flour gets stuck on the bottom of the pan. When the chicken is done, remove from pan to a plate.
                    Put the mushrooms and onions back in, and pour in the white wine. Stir with a spatula for several minutes, scraping any extra flour off the bottom of the pan. When the sauce starts to thicken, remove pan from heat. Pour sauce over the chicken pieces on the plate and serve immediately.
                    When I serve this with my crepes, I’ll do everything the same, except I’ll cut the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces after cooking, and put them in with the sauce, which goes inside the crepes.
                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts, healing purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
                    Flour
                    1 medium onion, sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

                    Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

                    Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.

                    Photo: Property of the CupcakeProject.com

                    When my oldest child was about to start kindergarten I had not begun to think about the yearly rites of passage. I was too consumed with the swirling emotions of sending my baby off to all day kindergarten. Stephen delightedly recalled memories of school clothes shopping and the first day of school photo. The mention of school shopping sent my mind back to the Saw Grass Mills Mall in South Florida. Who could ever forget retail bliss a mile long. As I reminisced a little while longer I remembered a few of the odious haunts of the 80’s I chose to leave buried in the past. The K-Swiss sneakers from 10th grade were not so embarrassing as the white Reebok high-tops I had to have in 9th grade and the orange neon pleather purse I just could not live without in 6th grade. Just Scary.

                    This year our daughter is about to embark on her first year in Kindergarten. In keeping with our newly found family traditions she got a new backpack, visit web a lunch box, viagra 40mg and a new coat in addition to several new outfits. When the big day arrives we will take the much anticipated “first day of school” snapshot. To let her know we are thinking of her she will find a special note attached to a yummy (but healthy) treat inside her lunch pail. That night the dinner menu is kids choice (within reason). It is always nice to have a relaxing comforting meal at the end of a high anxiety day.

                    The following is a list of fun ways to help motivate the kids in preparing them for back to school.

                    1. Back to School Shopping: Make a special day of it. Take your daughter for a pedicure, buy take the boys to the movies.
                    2. Back Packs and Lunch Boxes: We have a tradition once the kids start Kindergarten they get a new backpack and lunch box.
                    3. Special Breakfast: Try to avoid sugary foods that tend to cause the kids to crash. Fill their bellies and minds with hearty oatmeal or protein boosting eggs and toast. Pair proteins like nuts, eggs or yogurt with sugary dishes like pancakes.
                    4. Back to School Brunch: The day before the big day invite friends or keep it just family to a back to school brunch. This is a more appropriate time to serve favorites such as cinnamon rolls or doughnuts. Set up a table with packages of needed school supplies such as crayons, pencils, rulers, paper, ect. Help the kids put their supplies in their backpacks so they are all ready for school in the morning.
                    5. Back to School Dinner: If breakfast is too rushed plan a  special dinner. The menu can be kids choice, a family favorite, or go out to eat.
                    6. Ice cream sundaes: Treat the kids to an ice cream dessert. Invite friends over after school or serve as a dessert with dinner.
                    7. 1st day of School Photo: The first day of school picture can be a fun group photo or a single snapshot of each child. Some families like to use the same backdrop year after year. Have the kids hold up the same number of fingers as the grade they are entering or create a banner with their name and grade to stand in front of.
                    8. Decorations: Secretly hang up balloons and streamers the night before to surprise them in the morning. Make a banner with glitter and markers for the front door that includes the kids names and grade.
                    9. Make Goals: At breakfast or the day before gather as a family to come up with individual and family goals. Review goals once a month. Discuss what is expected of them at home and at school. No TV until chores and homework are done. If the week is hectic maybe you plan to move chores to saturday. If someone has a hard time with math discuss ways to help them.
                    10. After School Treat: Bake homemade cookies for when they get home. Nothing says love like fresh baked bread or cookies.
                    11. The Back to School Fairy or Magic School Bus: Leave a backpack filled with snacks and school supplies by their pillow or by the front door.
                    12. German Schultuete: This giant posterboard cone is filled with back-to-school goodies and supplies as a token of good luck. Similar to a Christmas stocking. Decorate with stickers and markers or use fancy paper. Fill the Schultuete with edible treats, fun bright supplies (markers, glue, pens, erasers, Post-it notes, magnet letters, ect), and small trinkets or toys.
                    13. 12 Days Before School: Hang the kid’s backpacks on their door. Put something new in it each day to count down the days to school.
                    14. Color of the Day: Choose a color the whole family will wear on the first day.
                    15. Swim and BBQ party: Plan a swim party before school starts or a week or two after. Waiting a week allows the kids to invite a friend or two from school. Have games to play or another kind of fun activity.
                    16. Letter to Child: The start of school is a major milestone. Take the time to write a heart felt letter pointing out how proud you are of your child. List several attributes you admire about them and why.
                    17. Classic Tradition: Come up with a fun song to sing or a story to read during breakfast each year on the 1st day of school.
                    18. Walk to school together: If possible park several block away and walk your child to school. The leisurely stroll will help release some of the tention.
                    19. Special Touches: Send the kids to school with a special treat in their lunch bag- a love note, a sandwich cut into a fun shape using cookie cutters, or a favorite snack.

                    This month’s website review covers several websites. I am sure there are thousands of fabulous sites that offer the latest in coupons and deals. These are just a few of my favorites from this year. I use them all. It takes me about an hour to write up my weekly dinner menu and comb the coupon sites, hospital grocery store site and local advertisements for deals.

                    If you are new to clipping coupons, just curious or even a veteran this story “If I Didn’t See It With My Own Eyes” by Jaye Watson, will take you on a step by step journey on how to get the most for your buck.

                    The following websites offer coupons, giveaways as well as tips on the trade.

                    My Frugal Adventures

                    Becentsable

                    Money Saving Mom

                    Coupon Cooking

                    Hip 2 Save

                    Coupon Cravings

                    True Couponing

                    Saucy Lemony Mushroom Chicken

                    Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

                    Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

                    Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

                    Serve with a variety of sliced apples.
                    Caramel dip is one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, treat birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

                    Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

                    Serve with a variety of sliced apples.
                    Caramel dip is one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, treat birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
                    Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, tadalafil birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, mind softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

                    Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

                    Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, drugs sales birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

                    Serve with a variety of sliced apples.
                    Caramel dip is one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, treat birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
                    Caramel apple dip was once one of my favorite sweet guilty pleasures. It was all the rave in my circle of friends. If there was a baby shower, tadalafil birthday party or get together you can bet caramel apple dip was on the table. I have not had caramel apple dip for years now and thought it would make a lovely appetizer or after school snack using the delicious apple just coming in season.

                    8 ounces cream cheese, mind softened
                    1/2 cup brown sugar
                    1/4 cup white sugar
                    1 tsp vanilla
                    1/2 package Heath Toffee Bits

                    Mix the cream cheese, sugars and vanilla until smooth. Stir in toffee bits. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

                    Serve with a variety of sliced apples.

                    Lemony mushroom chicken is a quick 30 minute meal. You can jazz it up by adding a few tablespoons of capers or cilantro. You can even omit the mushrooms.

                    In this recipe you will learn a simple technique called deglazing to make the sauce. Deglazing is used a lot in cooking to create sauces/gravy or to add rich flavor to soups or meat. You know that crusty stuff on the bottom of the pan from grilling meat? The stuff you can never get off? When you add liquid to the hot pan you can easily scrape the bits of charred meat off. This is called deglazing. This broth that is formed is chocked full of amazing flavor that will transform a flavorless soup into something mouth watering. Deglazing is also the first step in preparing gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. Once you conquer deglazing feel free to play around with the flavors by adding different types of juices or cooking wines. Try butter and garlic for a garlic sauce with roasted veggies.

                    4 chicken breasts, visit this purchase the thin fillets or fillet two thick chicken breasts
                    Flour
                    1 medium onion, sliced
                    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
                    2 tbsp oil
                    3 tbsp lemon juice
                    1/2 cup chicken stock or dry white wine

                    In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautée the onions until translucent about 8 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sautée until soft about 7 minutes. Remove the onions and mushrooms.

                    This next step is optional. If you dredge (meaning to coat) the chicken in the flour now then you do not have to add flour when making the sauce.

                    Dredge the chicken pieces in the flour until they are coated well. Add oil to the pan if necessary. Place the chicken pieces in the skillet; cook over medium heat until no longer pink in the middle about 3 minutes each side. Remove from pan.

                    Add chicken broth or wine to the hot pan scraping up the burnt bits on the bottom of the pan. If you did not dredge the chicken in the flour add 2 tablespoons flour now, whisking until completely dissolved. Continue to cook the sauce over medium heat until it starts to thicken. Remove from heat.

                    Place the mushrooms, onions and chicken back in the pan and toss. Serve over noodles or other favorite grain or with roasted vegetables or squash.