Quinoa Southwestern Stuffed Bell Peppers

http://www.xobobox.com/lunchboxes/lunchbox-happy-sacks-reusable-sandwich-bags.html

The countdown to the last day of school is close at hand. With two months left I find myself
http://www.xobobox.com/lunchboxes/lunchbox-happy-sacks-reusable-sandwich-bags.html

The countdown to the last day of school is close at hand. With two months left I find myself
http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, this water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, clinic the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 cup whole grain flour
2/3 cup honey
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

Notes:
If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.
http://www.xobobox.com/lunchboxes/lunchbox-happy-sacks-reusable-sandwich-bags.html

The countdown to the last day of school is close at hand. With two months left I find myself
http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, this water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, clinic the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 cup whole grain flour
2/3 cup honey
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

Notes:
If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

vangogh-self-portait-as_an_artist
Self Portrait of Vincent Van Gogh

March 30th marks the birth of the great painter Vincent Van Gogh.Van Gogh was born March 30, prostate 1853 in Groot-Zundert, Holland. During the brief 10 years that Van Gogh pursued painting he produced some 900 paintings and 1100 drawings.  Though he had little success during his lifetime his status as an artist has been compared to the likes of Rembrandt.

Potato Eaters

Van Gogh was taught drawing in middle school by a successful artist from Paris. Although he excelled in the subject he found the boarding school “gloomy…cold and sterile…” He immediately dropped out of school and returned home. His Uncle persuaded him to take a job with a local art dealer in London where he was successful for a time later commenting it was the “happiest year of his life.” However after accepting a 2nd transfer to the Paris office he became notably displeased with his situation and was shortly thereafter terminated.

Cafe Terrace at Night (1888)

Van Gogh had thought to become a Pastor like his father and in May 1877  left for Amsterdam to study Theology. Religion would later prove to be an unsuitable profession for the emotional Van Gogh. After he failed the Theology exam he took a position as a missionary in a coal mining village in Belgium. He was later released for being “too overzealous.” The church authorities felt his choice of living conditions undermined the church. All was not lost for while Van Gogh was in Belgium he spent much of his time drawing portraits of the villagers. After his dismissal he lingered for a spell in Belgium working on his drawings.

the-red-vineyard
The Red Vineyard was the only painting Van Gogh sold.

In 1886 Van Gogh traveled to Paris at the behest of his parents and brother Theo. Theo, the manager of Goupil’s gallery, was so impressed by Vincent’s drawings he convinced Van Gogh to study with the accomplished Willem Roelofs. Willem was dissatisfied with Van Gogh’s dark somber palette and recommended he attend the Royal Academy of Art. Van Gogh would later be influenced in the art of Impressionism by greats such as Cormon, Pissarro, Monet and Gauguin.

auvers-town-hall-1890

starry_night
Starry Night was the only work he managed to produce while checked into the Insane Asylum at Saint Remy in 1889.
The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death. The piece was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.
The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.

Unfortunately Van Gogh was plagued with mental illness that ultimately lead to his demise. SadlyVan Gogh only sold one painting while alive. His fame would not come until eleven years after his death at a gallery showing in his name organized by his widow Johanna Gesina Bonger van Gogh. After the death of Van Gogh Johanna actively began collecting all his letters and artworks.  It was her hard work  and dedication that brought about the recognition Van Gogh so rightly deserved.

On March 30th we pay tribute to the remarkable artist Vincent Van Gogh was.

  • Visit an art museum.
  • Make a Sunflower Cake.
  • Plant Sunflowers.
  • Take a nature walk.
  • Take the night off to star gaze.
  • Make a craft, draw or paint one of your favorite Van Gogh pieces. For inspiration visit the Van Gogh Gallery to view all 2000 works of art.
  • Beach at Scheveningen in Calm Weather

    irises

    vase-with-12-sunflowers
    Vase with 12 Sunflowers was considered a masterpiece and still remains one of Van Gogh's most popular works of art.

    http://www.xobobox.com/lunchboxes/lunchbox-happy-sacks-reusable-sandwich-bags.html

    The countdown to the last day of school is close at hand. With two months left I find myself
    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
    Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, this water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, clinic the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

    You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

    During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

    I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

    1/2 cup butter, melted
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp baking soda
    1 cup whole grain flour
    2/3 cup honey
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    1/2 tsp salt

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

    In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

    In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

    Notes:
    If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

    vangogh-self-portait-as_an_artist
    Self Portrait of Vincent Van Gogh

    March 30th marks the birth of the great painter Vincent Van Gogh.Van Gogh was born March 30, prostate 1853 in Groot-Zundert, Holland. During the brief 10 years that Van Gogh pursued painting he produced some 900 paintings and 1100 drawings.  Though he had little success during his lifetime his status as an artist has been compared to the likes of Rembrandt.

    Potato Eaters

    Van Gogh was taught drawing in middle school by a successful artist from Paris. Although he excelled in the subject he found the boarding school “gloomy…cold and sterile…” He immediately dropped out of school and returned home. His Uncle persuaded him to take a job with a local art dealer in London where he was successful for a time later commenting it was the “happiest year of his life.” However after accepting a 2nd transfer to the Paris office he became notably displeased with his situation and was shortly thereafter terminated.

    Cafe Terrace at Night (1888)

    Van Gogh had thought to become a Pastor like his father and in May 1877  left for Amsterdam to study Theology. Religion would later prove to be an unsuitable profession for the emotional Van Gogh. After he failed the Theology exam he took a position as a missionary in a coal mining village in Belgium. He was later released for being “too overzealous.” The church authorities felt his choice of living conditions undermined the church. All was not lost for while Van Gogh was in Belgium he spent much of his time drawing portraits of the villagers. After his dismissal he lingered for a spell in Belgium working on his drawings.

    the-red-vineyard
    The Red Vineyard was the only painting Van Gogh sold.

    In 1886 Van Gogh traveled to Paris at the behest of his parents and brother Theo. Theo, the manager of Goupil’s gallery, was so impressed by Vincent’s drawings he convinced Van Gogh to study with the accomplished Willem Roelofs. Willem was dissatisfied with Van Gogh’s dark somber palette and recommended he attend the Royal Academy of Art. Van Gogh would later be influenced in the art of Impressionism by greats such as Cormon, Pissarro, Monet and Gauguin.

    auvers-town-hall-1890

    starry_night
    Starry Night was the only work he managed to produce while checked into the Insane Asylum at Saint Remy in 1889.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death. The piece was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.

    Unfortunately Van Gogh was plagued with mental illness that ultimately lead to his demise. SadlyVan Gogh only sold one painting while alive. His fame would not come until eleven years after his death at a gallery showing in his name organized by his widow Johanna Gesina Bonger van Gogh. After the death of Van Gogh Johanna actively began collecting all his letters and artworks.  It was her hard work  and dedication that brought about the recognition Van Gogh so rightly deserved.

    On March 30th we pay tribute to the remarkable artist Vincent Van Gogh was.

  • Visit an art museum.
  • Make a Sunflower Cake.
  • Plant Sunflowers.
  • Take a nature walk.
  • Take the night off to star gaze.
  • Make a craft, draw or paint one of your favorite Van Gogh pieces. For inspiration visit the Van Gogh Gallery to view all 2000 works of art.
  • Beach at Scheveningen in Calm Weather

    irises

    vase-with-12-sunflowers
    Vase with 12 Sunflowers was considered a masterpiece and still remains one of Van Gogh's most popular works of art.

    I have a banana bread recipe I like very much from the Baker’s Illustrated Cook Book, capsule however; with that said, I get a little antsy and enjoy searching for something new. Something interesting. I have tried many variations of banana bread, yet none of them have have sparked my interest enough to make them again.

    This weekend I had several ripe bananas that needed a purpose. I found a wonderful banana bread recipe on the whippedtheblog.com website. What first interested me, was how simple the recipe is.  Some of the best recipes are comprised of only a few ingredients. I was amazed how moist and flavorful the bread was. The family gobbled every last crumb and has already put in a request for more. I like this version too, because texture is more like a pumpkin bread moist and dense rather than the more delicate and flavorful recipe I normally use. The recipes states a yield of two 7 X 3 loaf pans or 4 mini loaf pans. My batter produced three mini load pans.

    Whippedtheblog.com Banana Bread:

    1 1/2 cup all purpose flour
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 cup white sugar
    2 eggs, lightly beaten
    3 large, ripe bananas, mashed
    1/4 cup butter, melted

    Grease and flour loaf pans. The original recipe called for two 7 x 3 inch loaf pans, but Stephen prefers four mini loaf pans. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    In a bowl, whisk together flour, soda, salt and sugar. Mix in the slightly beaten eggs and mashed bananas. Slowly stir in the melted butter just until incorporated. Pour into prepared pans. Bake at 350 for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean from the center. If you use the mini loaf pans, adjust to about 30 minutes. Just take a peek and if the top is starting to brown and looks cooked, try the toothpick to test for doneness. Let cool in pans for 5 minutes then turn out onto a rack to cool completely.

    Additional Thoughts:
    – Banana size varies drastically. If you have really small bananas, add an extra half.
    – What is a ripe banana? Almost all brown with some specs of yellow.
    – Mash bananas well with a potato masher or fork but leave some small chunks. Don’t go all the way to baby food consistency.
    – Do NOT over mix this batter. I would not use an electric mixer – just a few circles of the wrist while incorporating the ingredients.
    – Do NOT overbake. The moist, banana-y center should be soft and crumbly.
    – Let the bread cool completely before storing. The edges and outside will get sticky and icky if you wrap it or put it in a ziploc too soon.

    Dazzledish Variations:
    Add white chocolate chips, cranberries, raisins, apricots, coconut or nuts.
    This recipe can be made without eggs. Increase the butter to 1/2 cup, add 2 cups flour, omit the salt and add only 1 tsp baking soda.
    Replace half the flour with wheat, oats and wheat germ.
    Replace some of the sugar with honey.
    To make muffins bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

    Baker’s Illustrated Banana Bread:

    2 cups flour, plus more for dusting the pans
    1 1/4 cups walnuts, chopped coarse
    3/4 cup sugar
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp salt
    3 very ripe bananas, mashed well (about 1 1/2 cups)
    1/4 cup plain yogurt
    2 eggs, beaten lightly
    6 tbsp unsalted butter, melted and cooled
    1 tsp vanilla

    Adjust the lower middle position. Heat over to 350 degrees. Grease and flour the bottom and sides of a 9x5x3 loaf pan. Spread the walnuts on a baking sheet and toast until fragrant, 5 to 10 minutes. Set aside to cool. Sprinkle the baking soda over the mashed bananas. Let sit.

    Whisk the flour, sugar, salt and walnuts together in a large bowl, set aside. Mix the mashed bananas, yogurt, eggs, butter and vanilla with a wooden spoon in a medium bowl. Lightly fold in the banana mixture in to dry ingredients with a rubber spatula until just combine and the batter looks thick and chunky. Scrape the batter unto prepared loaf pans. Bake until the loaf is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, 55 minutes. Cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temp. Wrap with plastic wrap and store at room temp for 3 days or freeze.

    Variations:
    Chocolate bread: Reduce sugar to 10 tbsp and add 2 1/2 oz (a heaping 2 1.2 cup) grated bittersweet chocolate into dry ingredients.

    Coconut and Macadamia but: Adjust rack to middle position. Substitute for walnuts 1/2 cup sweetened coconut and 1 cup chopped macadamia.toast until golden brown about 6 min.

    Orange spice: Add 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg, 2 tbsp grated orange zest to dry ingredients.
    http://www.xobobox.com/lunchboxes/lunchbox-happy-sacks-reusable-sandwich-bags.html

    The countdown to the last day of school is close at hand. With two months left I find myself
    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
    Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, this water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, clinic the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

    You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

    During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

    I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

    1/2 cup butter, melted
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp baking soda
    1 cup whole grain flour
    2/3 cup honey
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    1/2 tsp salt

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

    In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

    In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

    Notes:
    If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

    vangogh-self-portait-as_an_artist
    Self Portrait of Vincent Van Gogh

    March 30th marks the birth of the great painter Vincent Van Gogh.Van Gogh was born March 30, prostate 1853 in Groot-Zundert, Holland. During the brief 10 years that Van Gogh pursued painting he produced some 900 paintings and 1100 drawings.  Though he had little success during his lifetime his status as an artist has been compared to the likes of Rembrandt.

    Potato Eaters

    Van Gogh was taught drawing in middle school by a successful artist from Paris. Although he excelled in the subject he found the boarding school “gloomy…cold and sterile…” He immediately dropped out of school and returned home. His Uncle persuaded him to take a job with a local art dealer in London where he was successful for a time later commenting it was the “happiest year of his life.” However after accepting a 2nd transfer to the Paris office he became notably displeased with his situation and was shortly thereafter terminated.

    Cafe Terrace at Night (1888)

    Van Gogh had thought to become a Pastor like his father and in May 1877  left for Amsterdam to study Theology. Religion would later prove to be an unsuitable profession for the emotional Van Gogh. After he failed the Theology exam he took a position as a missionary in a coal mining village in Belgium. He was later released for being “too overzealous.” The church authorities felt his choice of living conditions undermined the church. All was not lost for while Van Gogh was in Belgium he spent much of his time drawing portraits of the villagers. After his dismissal he lingered for a spell in Belgium working on his drawings.

    the-red-vineyard
    The Red Vineyard was the only painting Van Gogh sold.

    In 1886 Van Gogh traveled to Paris at the behest of his parents and brother Theo. Theo, the manager of Goupil’s gallery, was so impressed by Vincent’s drawings he convinced Van Gogh to study with the accomplished Willem Roelofs. Willem was dissatisfied with Van Gogh’s dark somber palette and recommended he attend the Royal Academy of Art. Van Gogh would later be influenced in the art of Impressionism by greats such as Cormon, Pissarro, Monet and Gauguin.

    auvers-town-hall-1890

    starry_night
    Starry Night was the only work he managed to produce while checked into the Insane Asylum at Saint Remy in 1889.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death. The piece was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.

    Unfortunately Van Gogh was plagued with mental illness that ultimately lead to his demise. SadlyVan Gogh only sold one painting while alive. His fame would not come until eleven years after his death at a gallery showing in his name organized by his widow Johanna Gesina Bonger van Gogh. After the death of Van Gogh Johanna actively began collecting all his letters and artworks.  It was her hard work  and dedication that brought about the recognition Van Gogh so rightly deserved.

    On March 30th we pay tribute to the remarkable artist Vincent Van Gogh was.

  • Visit an art museum.
  • Make a Sunflower Cake.
  • Plant Sunflowers.
  • Take a nature walk.
  • Take the night off to star gaze.
  • Make a craft, draw or paint one of your favorite Van Gogh pieces. For inspiration visit the Van Gogh Gallery to view all 2000 works of art.
  • Beach at Scheveningen in Calm Weather

    irises

    vase-with-12-sunflowers
    Vase with 12 Sunflowers was considered a masterpiece and still remains one of Van Gogh's most popular works of art.

    I have a banana bread recipe I like very much from the Baker’s Illustrated Cook Book, capsule however; with that said, I get a little antsy and enjoy searching for something new. Something interesting. I have tried many variations of banana bread, yet none of them have have sparked my interest enough to make them again.

    This weekend I had several ripe bananas that needed a purpose. I found a wonderful banana bread recipe on the whippedtheblog.com website. What first interested me, was how simple the recipe is.  Some of the best recipes are comprised of only a few ingredients. I was amazed how moist and flavorful the bread was. The family gobbled every last crumb and has already put in a request for more. I like this version too, because texture is more like a pumpkin bread moist and dense rather than the more delicate and flavorful recipe I normally use. The recipes states a yield of two 7 X 3 loaf pans or 4 mini loaf pans. My batter produced three mini load pans.

    Whippedtheblog.com Banana Bread:

    1 1/2 cup all purpose flour
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 cup white sugar
    2 eggs, lightly beaten
    3 large, ripe bananas, mashed
    1/4 cup butter, melted

    Grease and flour loaf pans. The original recipe called for two 7 x 3 inch loaf pans, but Stephen prefers four mini loaf pans. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    In a bowl, whisk together flour, soda, salt and sugar. Mix in the slightly beaten eggs and mashed bananas. Slowly stir in the melted butter just until incorporated. Pour into prepared pans. Bake at 350 for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean from the center. If you use the mini loaf pans, adjust to about 30 minutes. Just take a peek and if the top is starting to brown and looks cooked, try the toothpick to test for doneness. Let cool in pans for 5 minutes then turn out onto a rack to cool completely.

    Additional Thoughts:
    – Banana size varies drastically. If you have really small bananas, add an extra half.
    – What is a ripe banana? Almost all brown with some specs of yellow.
    – Mash bananas well with a potato masher or fork but leave some small chunks. Don’t go all the way to baby food consistency.
    – Do NOT over mix this batter. I would not use an electric mixer – just a few circles of the wrist while incorporating the ingredients.
    – Do NOT overbake. The moist, banana-y center should be soft and crumbly.
    – Let the bread cool completely before storing. The edges and outside will get sticky and icky if you wrap it or put it in a ziploc too soon.

    Dazzledish Variations:
    Add white chocolate chips, cranberries, raisins, apricots, coconut or nuts.
    This recipe can be made without eggs. Increase the butter to 1/2 cup, add 2 cups flour, omit the salt and add only 1 tsp baking soda.
    Replace half the flour with wheat, oats and wheat germ.
    Replace some of the sugar with honey.
    To make muffins bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

    Baker’s Illustrated Banana Bread:

    2 cups flour, plus more for dusting the pans
    1 1/4 cups walnuts, chopped coarse
    3/4 cup sugar
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp salt
    3 very ripe bananas, mashed well (about 1 1/2 cups)
    1/4 cup plain yogurt
    2 eggs, beaten lightly
    6 tbsp unsalted butter, melted and cooled
    1 tsp vanilla

    Adjust the lower middle position. Heat over to 350 degrees. Grease and flour the bottom and sides of a 9x5x3 loaf pan. Spread the walnuts on a baking sheet and toast until fragrant, 5 to 10 minutes. Set aside to cool. Sprinkle the baking soda over the mashed bananas. Let sit.

    Whisk the flour, sugar, salt and walnuts together in a large bowl, set aside. Mix the mashed bananas, yogurt, eggs, butter and vanilla with a wooden spoon in a medium bowl. Lightly fold in the banana mixture in to dry ingredients with a rubber spatula until just combine and the batter looks thick and chunky. Scrape the batter unto prepared loaf pans. Bake until the loaf is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, 55 minutes. Cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temp. Wrap with plastic wrap and store at room temp for 3 days or freeze.

    Variations:
    Chocolate bread: Reduce sugar to 10 tbsp and add 2 1/2 oz (a heaping 2 1.2 cup) grated bittersweet chocolate into dry ingredients.

    Coconut and Macadamia but: Adjust rack to middle position. Substitute for walnuts 1/2 cup sweetened coconut and 1 cup chopped macadamia.toast until golden brown about 6 min.

    Orange spice: Add 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg, 2 tbsp grated orange zest to dry ingredients.
    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
    2 medium acorn squash, stomach halved lengthwise, capsule seeds removed
    1 tbsp olive oil
    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
    1 medium onion, diced
    2 celery stalks, diced
    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
    Parsley to garnish

    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

    Variations:
    — Replace the sausage with black beans.

    http://www.xobobox.com/lunchboxes/lunchbox-happy-sacks-reusable-sandwich-bags.html

    The countdown to the last day of school is close at hand. With two months left I find myself
    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
    Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, this water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, clinic the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

    You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

    During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

    I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

    1/2 cup butter, melted
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp baking soda
    1 cup whole grain flour
    2/3 cup honey
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    1/2 tsp salt

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

    In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

    In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

    Notes:
    If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

    vangogh-self-portait-as_an_artist
    Self Portrait of Vincent Van Gogh

    March 30th marks the birth of the great painter Vincent Van Gogh.Van Gogh was born March 30, prostate 1853 in Groot-Zundert, Holland. During the brief 10 years that Van Gogh pursued painting he produced some 900 paintings and 1100 drawings.  Though he had little success during his lifetime his status as an artist has been compared to the likes of Rembrandt.

    Potato Eaters

    Van Gogh was taught drawing in middle school by a successful artist from Paris. Although he excelled in the subject he found the boarding school “gloomy…cold and sterile…” He immediately dropped out of school and returned home. His Uncle persuaded him to take a job with a local art dealer in London where he was successful for a time later commenting it was the “happiest year of his life.” However after accepting a 2nd transfer to the Paris office he became notably displeased with his situation and was shortly thereafter terminated.

    Cafe Terrace at Night (1888)

    Van Gogh had thought to become a Pastor like his father and in May 1877  left for Amsterdam to study Theology. Religion would later prove to be an unsuitable profession for the emotional Van Gogh. After he failed the Theology exam he took a position as a missionary in a coal mining village in Belgium. He was later released for being “too overzealous.” The church authorities felt his choice of living conditions undermined the church. All was not lost for while Van Gogh was in Belgium he spent much of his time drawing portraits of the villagers. After his dismissal he lingered for a spell in Belgium working on his drawings.

    the-red-vineyard
    The Red Vineyard was the only painting Van Gogh sold.

    In 1886 Van Gogh traveled to Paris at the behest of his parents and brother Theo. Theo, the manager of Goupil’s gallery, was so impressed by Vincent’s drawings he convinced Van Gogh to study with the accomplished Willem Roelofs. Willem was dissatisfied with Van Gogh’s dark somber palette and recommended he attend the Royal Academy of Art. Van Gogh would later be influenced in the art of Impressionism by greats such as Cormon, Pissarro, Monet and Gauguin.

    auvers-town-hall-1890

    starry_night
    Starry Night was the only work he managed to produce while checked into the Insane Asylum at Saint Remy in 1889.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death. The piece was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.

    Unfortunately Van Gogh was plagued with mental illness that ultimately lead to his demise. SadlyVan Gogh only sold one painting while alive. His fame would not come until eleven years after his death at a gallery showing in his name organized by his widow Johanna Gesina Bonger van Gogh. After the death of Van Gogh Johanna actively began collecting all his letters and artworks.  It was her hard work  and dedication that brought about the recognition Van Gogh so rightly deserved.

    On March 30th we pay tribute to the remarkable artist Vincent Van Gogh was.

  • Visit an art museum.
  • Make a Sunflower Cake.
  • Plant Sunflowers.
  • Take a nature walk.
  • Take the night off to star gaze.
  • Make a craft, draw or paint one of your favorite Van Gogh pieces. For inspiration visit the Van Gogh Gallery to view all 2000 works of art.
  • Beach at Scheveningen in Calm Weather

    irises

    vase-with-12-sunflowers
    Vase with 12 Sunflowers was considered a masterpiece and still remains one of Van Gogh's most popular works of art.

    I have a banana bread recipe I like very much from the Baker’s Illustrated Cook Book, capsule however; with that said, I get a little antsy and enjoy searching for something new. Something interesting. I have tried many variations of banana bread, yet none of them have have sparked my interest enough to make them again.

    This weekend I had several ripe bananas that needed a purpose. I found a wonderful banana bread recipe on the whippedtheblog.com website. What first interested me, was how simple the recipe is.  Some of the best recipes are comprised of only a few ingredients. I was amazed how moist and flavorful the bread was. The family gobbled every last crumb and has already put in a request for more. I like this version too, because texture is more like a pumpkin bread moist and dense rather than the more delicate and flavorful recipe I normally use. The recipes states a yield of two 7 X 3 loaf pans or 4 mini loaf pans. My batter produced three mini load pans.

    Whippedtheblog.com Banana Bread:

    1 1/2 cup all purpose flour
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 cup white sugar
    2 eggs, lightly beaten
    3 large, ripe bananas, mashed
    1/4 cup butter, melted

    Grease and flour loaf pans. The original recipe called for two 7 x 3 inch loaf pans, but Stephen prefers four mini loaf pans. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    In a bowl, whisk together flour, soda, salt and sugar. Mix in the slightly beaten eggs and mashed bananas. Slowly stir in the melted butter just until incorporated. Pour into prepared pans. Bake at 350 for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean from the center. If you use the mini loaf pans, adjust to about 30 minutes. Just take a peek and if the top is starting to brown and looks cooked, try the toothpick to test for doneness. Let cool in pans for 5 minutes then turn out onto a rack to cool completely.

    Additional Thoughts:
    – Banana size varies drastically. If you have really small bananas, add an extra half.
    – What is a ripe banana? Almost all brown with some specs of yellow.
    – Mash bananas well with a potato masher or fork but leave some small chunks. Don’t go all the way to baby food consistency.
    – Do NOT over mix this batter. I would not use an electric mixer – just a few circles of the wrist while incorporating the ingredients.
    – Do NOT overbake. The moist, banana-y center should be soft and crumbly.
    – Let the bread cool completely before storing. The edges and outside will get sticky and icky if you wrap it or put it in a ziploc too soon.

    Dazzledish Variations:
    Add white chocolate chips, cranberries, raisins, apricots, coconut or nuts.
    This recipe can be made without eggs. Increase the butter to 1/2 cup, add 2 cups flour, omit the salt and add only 1 tsp baking soda.
    Replace half the flour with wheat, oats and wheat germ.
    Replace some of the sugar with honey.
    To make muffins bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

    Baker’s Illustrated Banana Bread:

    2 cups flour, plus more for dusting the pans
    1 1/4 cups walnuts, chopped coarse
    3/4 cup sugar
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp salt
    3 very ripe bananas, mashed well (about 1 1/2 cups)
    1/4 cup plain yogurt
    2 eggs, beaten lightly
    6 tbsp unsalted butter, melted and cooled
    1 tsp vanilla

    Adjust the lower middle position. Heat over to 350 degrees. Grease and flour the bottom and sides of a 9x5x3 loaf pan. Spread the walnuts on a baking sheet and toast until fragrant, 5 to 10 minutes. Set aside to cool. Sprinkle the baking soda over the mashed bananas. Let sit.

    Whisk the flour, sugar, salt and walnuts together in a large bowl, set aside. Mix the mashed bananas, yogurt, eggs, butter and vanilla with a wooden spoon in a medium bowl. Lightly fold in the banana mixture in to dry ingredients with a rubber spatula until just combine and the batter looks thick and chunky. Scrape the batter unto prepared loaf pans. Bake until the loaf is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, 55 minutes. Cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temp. Wrap with plastic wrap and store at room temp for 3 days or freeze.

    Variations:
    Chocolate bread: Reduce sugar to 10 tbsp and add 2 1/2 oz (a heaping 2 1.2 cup) grated bittersweet chocolate into dry ingredients.

    Coconut and Macadamia but: Adjust rack to middle position. Substitute for walnuts 1/2 cup sweetened coconut and 1 cup chopped macadamia.toast until golden brown about 6 min.

    Orange spice: Add 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg, 2 tbsp grated orange zest to dry ingredients.
    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
    2 medium acorn squash, stomach halved lengthwise, capsule seeds removed
    1 tbsp olive oil
    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
    1 medium onion, diced
    2 celery stalks, diced
    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
    Parsley to garnish

    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

    Variations:
    — Replace the sausage with black beans.

    This orange spice banana bread smells absolutely amazing. The aroma fills the house with the pungent fall spices. It is so hard to wait until the bread is completely cooled before pinching off a nibble.

    The most important tips I can pass on is to make sure the cream cheese is completely softened. Unwrap the bar and leave it out for at least 25 to 30 minutes to soften. Brown speckled very ripe bananas are the best type of banana to use in banana bread, see it gives the bread a more intense banana flavor. This rule may be broken if you are looking for a subtle banana flavor to showcase the orange. Lastly blend the wet ingredients well, no lumps remaining in the cream cheese, before combining with the dry ingredients.

    Source: Good Life Eats
    2 cups all purpose flour
    1/4 cup packed brown sugar
    1/2 cup white sugar
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/4 tsp salt
    2 1/2 Tbs orange zest, (about 2 medium sized oranges)
    1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
    1/2 tsp nutmeg
    2 pinches of allspice
    1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, mashed
    1 (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
    2 large eggs
    6 tbsp butter, melted
    1 1/2 tsp vanilla

    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking.

    Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Do not overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.
    http://www.xobobox.com/lunchboxes/lunchbox-happy-sacks-reusable-sandwich-bags.html

    The countdown to the last day of school is close at hand. With two months left I find myself
    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
    Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, this water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, clinic the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

    You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

    During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

    I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

    1/2 cup butter, melted
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp baking soda
    1 cup whole grain flour
    2/3 cup honey
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    1/2 tsp salt

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

    In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

    In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

    Notes:
    If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

    vangogh-self-portait-as_an_artist
    Self Portrait of Vincent Van Gogh

    March 30th marks the birth of the great painter Vincent Van Gogh.Van Gogh was born March 30, prostate 1853 in Groot-Zundert, Holland. During the brief 10 years that Van Gogh pursued painting he produced some 900 paintings and 1100 drawings.  Though he had little success during his lifetime his status as an artist has been compared to the likes of Rembrandt.

    Potato Eaters

    Van Gogh was taught drawing in middle school by a successful artist from Paris. Although he excelled in the subject he found the boarding school “gloomy…cold and sterile…” He immediately dropped out of school and returned home. His Uncle persuaded him to take a job with a local art dealer in London where he was successful for a time later commenting it was the “happiest year of his life.” However after accepting a 2nd transfer to the Paris office he became notably displeased with his situation and was shortly thereafter terminated.

    Cafe Terrace at Night (1888)

    Van Gogh had thought to become a Pastor like his father and in May 1877  left for Amsterdam to study Theology. Religion would later prove to be an unsuitable profession for the emotional Van Gogh. After he failed the Theology exam he took a position as a missionary in a coal mining village in Belgium. He was later released for being “too overzealous.” The church authorities felt his choice of living conditions undermined the church. All was not lost for while Van Gogh was in Belgium he spent much of his time drawing portraits of the villagers. After his dismissal he lingered for a spell in Belgium working on his drawings.

    the-red-vineyard
    The Red Vineyard was the only painting Van Gogh sold.

    In 1886 Van Gogh traveled to Paris at the behest of his parents and brother Theo. Theo, the manager of Goupil’s gallery, was so impressed by Vincent’s drawings he convinced Van Gogh to study with the accomplished Willem Roelofs. Willem was dissatisfied with Van Gogh’s dark somber palette and recommended he attend the Royal Academy of Art. Van Gogh would later be influenced in the art of Impressionism by greats such as Cormon, Pissarro, Monet and Gauguin.

    auvers-town-hall-1890

    starry_night
    Starry Night was the only work he managed to produce while checked into the Insane Asylum at Saint Remy in 1889.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death. The piece was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.

    Unfortunately Van Gogh was plagued with mental illness that ultimately lead to his demise. SadlyVan Gogh only sold one painting while alive. His fame would not come until eleven years after his death at a gallery showing in his name organized by his widow Johanna Gesina Bonger van Gogh. After the death of Van Gogh Johanna actively began collecting all his letters and artworks.  It was her hard work  and dedication that brought about the recognition Van Gogh so rightly deserved.

    On March 30th we pay tribute to the remarkable artist Vincent Van Gogh was.

  • Visit an art museum.
  • Make a Sunflower Cake.
  • Plant Sunflowers.
  • Take a nature walk.
  • Take the night off to star gaze.
  • Make a craft, draw or paint one of your favorite Van Gogh pieces. For inspiration visit the Van Gogh Gallery to view all 2000 works of art.
  • Beach at Scheveningen in Calm Weather

    irises

    vase-with-12-sunflowers
    Vase with 12 Sunflowers was considered a masterpiece and still remains one of Van Gogh's most popular works of art.

    I have a banana bread recipe I like very much from the Baker’s Illustrated Cook Book, capsule however; with that said, I get a little antsy and enjoy searching for something new. Something interesting. I have tried many variations of banana bread, yet none of them have have sparked my interest enough to make them again.

    This weekend I had several ripe bananas that needed a purpose. I found a wonderful banana bread recipe on the whippedtheblog.com website. What first interested me, was how simple the recipe is.  Some of the best recipes are comprised of only a few ingredients. I was amazed how moist and flavorful the bread was. The family gobbled every last crumb and has already put in a request for more. I like this version too, because texture is more like a pumpkin bread moist and dense rather than the more delicate and flavorful recipe I normally use. The recipes states a yield of two 7 X 3 loaf pans or 4 mini loaf pans. My batter produced three mini load pans.

    Whippedtheblog.com Banana Bread:

    1 1/2 cup all purpose flour
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 cup white sugar
    2 eggs, lightly beaten
    3 large, ripe bananas, mashed
    1/4 cup butter, melted

    Grease and flour loaf pans. The original recipe called for two 7 x 3 inch loaf pans, but Stephen prefers four mini loaf pans. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    In a bowl, whisk together flour, soda, salt and sugar. Mix in the slightly beaten eggs and mashed bananas. Slowly stir in the melted butter just until incorporated. Pour into prepared pans. Bake at 350 for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean from the center. If you use the mini loaf pans, adjust to about 30 minutes. Just take a peek and if the top is starting to brown and looks cooked, try the toothpick to test for doneness. Let cool in pans for 5 minutes then turn out onto a rack to cool completely.

    Additional Thoughts:
    – Banana size varies drastically. If you have really small bananas, add an extra half.
    – What is a ripe banana? Almost all brown with some specs of yellow.
    – Mash bananas well with a potato masher or fork but leave some small chunks. Don’t go all the way to baby food consistency.
    – Do NOT over mix this batter. I would not use an electric mixer – just a few circles of the wrist while incorporating the ingredients.
    – Do NOT overbake. The moist, banana-y center should be soft and crumbly.
    – Let the bread cool completely before storing. The edges and outside will get sticky and icky if you wrap it or put it in a ziploc too soon.

    Dazzledish Variations:
    Add white chocolate chips, cranberries, raisins, apricots, coconut or nuts.
    This recipe can be made without eggs. Increase the butter to 1/2 cup, add 2 cups flour, omit the salt and add only 1 tsp baking soda.
    Replace half the flour with wheat, oats and wheat germ.
    Replace some of the sugar with honey.
    To make muffins bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

    Baker’s Illustrated Banana Bread:

    2 cups flour, plus more for dusting the pans
    1 1/4 cups walnuts, chopped coarse
    3/4 cup sugar
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp salt
    3 very ripe bananas, mashed well (about 1 1/2 cups)
    1/4 cup plain yogurt
    2 eggs, beaten lightly
    6 tbsp unsalted butter, melted and cooled
    1 tsp vanilla

    Adjust the lower middle position. Heat over to 350 degrees. Grease and flour the bottom and sides of a 9x5x3 loaf pan. Spread the walnuts on a baking sheet and toast until fragrant, 5 to 10 minutes. Set aside to cool. Sprinkle the baking soda over the mashed bananas. Let sit.

    Whisk the flour, sugar, salt and walnuts together in a large bowl, set aside. Mix the mashed bananas, yogurt, eggs, butter and vanilla with a wooden spoon in a medium bowl. Lightly fold in the banana mixture in to dry ingredients with a rubber spatula until just combine and the batter looks thick and chunky. Scrape the batter unto prepared loaf pans. Bake until the loaf is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, 55 minutes. Cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temp. Wrap with plastic wrap and store at room temp for 3 days or freeze.

    Variations:
    Chocolate bread: Reduce sugar to 10 tbsp and add 2 1/2 oz (a heaping 2 1.2 cup) grated bittersweet chocolate into dry ingredients.

    Coconut and Macadamia but: Adjust rack to middle position. Substitute for walnuts 1/2 cup sweetened coconut and 1 cup chopped macadamia.toast until golden brown about 6 min.

    Orange spice: Add 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg, 2 tbsp grated orange zest to dry ingredients.
    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
    2 medium acorn squash, stomach halved lengthwise, capsule seeds removed
    1 tbsp olive oil
    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
    1 medium onion, diced
    2 celery stalks, diced
    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
    Parsley to garnish

    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

    Variations:
    — Replace the sausage with black beans.

    This orange spice banana bread smells absolutely amazing. The aroma fills the house with the pungent fall spices. It is so hard to wait until the bread is completely cooled before pinching off a nibble.

    The most important tips I can pass on is to make sure the cream cheese is completely softened. Unwrap the bar and leave it out for at least 25 to 30 minutes to soften. Brown speckled very ripe bananas are the best type of banana to use in banana bread, see it gives the bread a more intense banana flavor. This rule may be broken if you are looking for a subtle banana flavor to showcase the orange. Lastly blend the wet ingredients well, no lumps remaining in the cream cheese, before combining with the dry ingredients.

    Source: Good Life Eats
    2 cups all purpose flour
    1/4 cup packed brown sugar
    1/2 cup white sugar
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/4 tsp salt
    2 1/2 Tbs orange zest, (about 2 medium sized oranges)
    1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
    1/2 tsp nutmeg
    2 pinches of allspice
    1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, mashed
    1 (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
    2 large eggs
    6 tbsp butter, melted
    1 1/2 tsp vanilla

    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking.

    Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Do not overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

    • 2 c all purpose flour
    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
    • 1/2 c white sugar
    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
    • 1/4 tsp salt
    • zest of 1 large orange, web about 2 1/2 Tbs
    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
    • 2 pinches of allspice
    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
    • 2 large eggs
    • 6 Tbs butter, adiposity melted
    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.
    http://www.xobobox.com/lunchboxes/lunchbox-happy-sacks-reusable-sandwich-bags.html

    The countdown to the last day of school is close at hand. With two months left I find myself
    http://www.themayfiles.com/2009/01/scrumptious-honey-whole-grain-cornbread.html
    Historically cornbread has been around long before the first European settlers arrived. The Native American Indians taught the new settlers how to grind corn into corn meal to make “Pone”. Using a simple mixture of ground corn meal, this water and salt this early version of cornbread became a valuable staple to the New settlers those first few years after their arrival. Cornbread was especially popular throughout the Civil War as it was quick and cheap to make. The ingredients used depended on the region; for instance, clinic the addition of sugar and flour was typical of the North while the South favored an unsweetened version cooked in a cast iron skillet. Cornbread has had quite a makeover over the years. The variations are endless with each family claiming to have the best recipe ever.

    You would think my dad being a farmer from Georgia would have passed along a treasured recipe. All we got was Betty Crocker and Jiffy. Needless to say I was never a fan of cornbread as it was always dry and flavorless. Then I met the Odoms in Woodville Texas. A loverly little town in East Texas with fresh air, tons of trees and lots of old 19th century houses. Odomville was a small community comprised of the descendants of the Odom family located about 30 minutes out of town heading East toward Fred Texas.

    During my visits in Odomville I mostly enjoyed sitting at the kitchen table with Mr. Odom and Alice eating a square of cornbread. Alice died of old age shortly after I arrived in Woodville. It was a somber time for us all even more so for her beloved Mr. Odom. They had known one another since childhood and the loss was almost more than he could bare. I continued to visit Mr. Odom when in the area as I so enjoyed his stories of Odomville. And so it was on my last day in East Texas I was with him at the kitchen table once again sharing a meager snack of cornbread and milk.

    I am extremely particular about cornbread. There are but two recipes I can say I have enjoyed one being Alice Odom’s recipe and the other one is this recipe for honey whole grain cornbread. The sweet kiss of honey mingles well with scrumptious earth grains. Serve as a side with chili or a salad.

    1/2 cup butter, melted
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp baking soda
    1 cup whole grain flour
    2/3 cup honey
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    1/2 tsp salt

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9X13 baking dish; set aside.

    In a medium bowl, mix honey and butter until combined. Add eggs, buttermilk and soda; mix well.

    In a separate bowl, mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add flour mixture to milk mixture; folding just until combined. Pour batter into prepared baking dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

    Notes:
    If you do not have a natural foods market near by Whole Grain Flour can be found in most supermarkets that sell Bob’s Red Mill flours. If you cannot find whole grain try blending 1 part kamut + 1 part spelt + 1 part hard white wheat.

    vangogh-self-portait-as_an_artist
    Self Portrait of Vincent Van Gogh

    March 30th marks the birth of the great painter Vincent Van Gogh.Van Gogh was born March 30, prostate 1853 in Groot-Zundert, Holland. During the brief 10 years that Van Gogh pursued painting he produced some 900 paintings and 1100 drawings.  Though he had little success during his lifetime his status as an artist has been compared to the likes of Rembrandt.

    Potato Eaters

    Van Gogh was taught drawing in middle school by a successful artist from Paris. Although he excelled in the subject he found the boarding school “gloomy…cold and sterile…” He immediately dropped out of school and returned home. His Uncle persuaded him to take a job with a local art dealer in London where he was successful for a time later commenting it was the “happiest year of his life.” However after accepting a 2nd transfer to the Paris office he became notably displeased with his situation and was shortly thereafter terminated.

    Cafe Terrace at Night (1888)

    Van Gogh had thought to become a Pastor like his father and in May 1877  left for Amsterdam to study Theology. Religion would later prove to be an unsuitable profession for the emotional Van Gogh. After he failed the Theology exam he took a position as a missionary in a coal mining village in Belgium. He was later released for being “too overzealous.” The church authorities felt his choice of living conditions undermined the church. All was not lost for while Van Gogh was in Belgium he spent much of his time drawing portraits of the villagers. After his dismissal he lingered for a spell in Belgium working on his drawings.

    the-red-vineyard
    The Red Vineyard was the only painting Van Gogh sold.

    In 1886 Van Gogh traveled to Paris at the behest of his parents and brother Theo. Theo, the manager of Goupil’s gallery, was so impressed by Vincent’s drawings he convinced Van Gogh to study with the accomplished Willem Roelofs. Willem was dissatisfied with Van Gogh’s dark somber palette and recommended he attend the Royal Academy of Art. Van Gogh would later be influenced in the art of Impressionism by greats such as Cormon, Pissarro, Monet and Gauguin.

    auvers-town-hall-1890

    starry_night
    Starry Night was the only work he managed to produce while checked into the Insane Asylum at Saint Remy in 1889.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death. The piece was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.
    The Blossoming Almond Tree painted in the Saint Remy asylum 1890 a few months before his death was dedicated to Theo's newborn baby, Vincent.

    Unfortunately Van Gogh was plagued with mental illness that ultimately lead to his demise. SadlyVan Gogh only sold one painting while alive. His fame would not come until eleven years after his death at a gallery showing in his name organized by his widow Johanna Gesina Bonger van Gogh. After the death of Van Gogh Johanna actively began collecting all his letters and artworks.  It was her hard work  and dedication that brought about the recognition Van Gogh so rightly deserved.

    On March 30th we pay tribute to the remarkable artist Vincent Van Gogh was.

  • Visit an art museum.
  • Make a Sunflower Cake.
  • Plant Sunflowers.
  • Take a nature walk.
  • Take the night off to star gaze.
  • Make a craft, draw or paint one of your favorite Van Gogh pieces. For inspiration visit the Van Gogh Gallery to view all 2000 works of art.
  • Beach at Scheveningen in Calm Weather

    irises

    vase-with-12-sunflowers
    Vase with 12 Sunflowers was considered a masterpiece and still remains one of Van Gogh's most popular works of art.

    I have a banana bread recipe I like very much from the Baker’s Illustrated Cook Book, capsule however; with that said, I get a little antsy and enjoy searching for something new. Something interesting. I have tried many variations of banana bread, yet none of them have have sparked my interest enough to make them again.

    This weekend I had several ripe bananas that needed a purpose. I found a wonderful banana bread recipe on the whippedtheblog.com website. What first interested me, was how simple the recipe is.  Some of the best recipes are comprised of only a few ingredients. I was amazed how moist and flavorful the bread was. The family gobbled every last crumb and has already put in a request for more. I like this version too, because texture is more like a pumpkin bread moist and dense rather than the more delicate and flavorful recipe I normally use. The recipes states a yield of two 7 X 3 loaf pans or 4 mini loaf pans. My batter produced three mini load pans.

    Whippedtheblog.com Banana Bread:

    1 1/2 cup all purpose flour
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 cup white sugar
    2 eggs, lightly beaten
    3 large, ripe bananas, mashed
    1/4 cup butter, melted

    Grease and flour loaf pans. The original recipe called for two 7 x 3 inch loaf pans, but Stephen prefers four mini loaf pans. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    In a bowl, whisk together flour, soda, salt and sugar. Mix in the slightly beaten eggs and mashed bananas. Slowly stir in the melted butter just until incorporated. Pour into prepared pans. Bake at 350 for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean from the center. If you use the mini loaf pans, adjust to about 30 minutes. Just take a peek and if the top is starting to brown and looks cooked, try the toothpick to test for doneness. Let cool in pans for 5 minutes then turn out onto a rack to cool completely.

    Additional Thoughts:
    – Banana size varies drastically. If you have really small bananas, add an extra half.
    – What is a ripe banana? Almost all brown with some specs of yellow.
    – Mash bananas well with a potato masher or fork but leave some small chunks. Don’t go all the way to baby food consistency.
    – Do NOT over mix this batter. I would not use an electric mixer – just a few circles of the wrist while incorporating the ingredients.
    – Do NOT overbake. The moist, banana-y center should be soft and crumbly.
    – Let the bread cool completely before storing. The edges and outside will get sticky and icky if you wrap it or put it in a ziploc too soon.

    Dazzledish Variations:
    Add white chocolate chips, cranberries, raisins, apricots, coconut or nuts.
    This recipe can be made without eggs. Increase the butter to 1/2 cup, add 2 cups flour, omit the salt and add only 1 tsp baking soda.
    Replace half the flour with wheat, oats and wheat germ.
    Replace some of the sugar with honey.
    To make muffins bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

    Baker’s Illustrated Banana Bread:

    2 cups flour, plus more for dusting the pans
    1 1/4 cups walnuts, chopped coarse
    3/4 cup sugar
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp salt
    3 very ripe bananas, mashed well (about 1 1/2 cups)
    1/4 cup plain yogurt
    2 eggs, beaten lightly
    6 tbsp unsalted butter, melted and cooled
    1 tsp vanilla

    Adjust the lower middle position. Heat over to 350 degrees. Grease and flour the bottom and sides of a 9x5x3 loaf pan. Spread the walnuts on a baking sheet and toast until fragrant, 5 to 10 minutes. Set aside to cool. Sprinkle the baking soda over the mashed bananas. Let sit.

    Whisk the flour, sugar, salt and walnuts together in a large bowl, set aside. Mix the mashed bananas, yogurt, eggs, butter and vanilla with a wooden spoon in a medium bowl. Lightly fold in the banana mixture in to dry ingredients with a rubber spatula until just combine and the batter looks thick and chunky. Scrape the batter unto prepared loaf pans. Bake until the loaf is golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, 55 minutes. Cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temp. Wrap with plastic wrap and store at room temp for 3 days or freeze.

    Variations:
    Chocolate bread: Reduce sugar to 10 tbsp and add 2 1/2 oz (a heaping 2 1.2 cup) grated bittersweet chocolate into dry ingredients.

    Coconut and Macadamia but: Adjust rack to middle position. Substitute for walnuts 1/2 cup sweetened coconut and 1 cup chopped macadamia.toast until golden brown about 6 min.

    Orange spice: Add 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp grated nutmeg, 2 tbsp grated orange zest to dry ingredients.
    Source: Adapted from Clean Eating Magazine
    2 medium acorn squash, stomach halved lengthwise, capsule seeds removed
    1 tbsp olive oil
    Coarse salt and black pepper, to taste
    2 spicy chicken or turkey sausage, casings removed, crumbled
    1 medium onion, diced
    2 celery stalks, diced
    2 tbsp chopped celery leaves from the inner celery stalk
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 cup fresh spinach, washed and stemmed
    8 oz low-fat sour cream or plain yogurt
    1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
    Parsley to garnish

    Preheat oven to 400°F. Season cavity of squash with salt and pepper. Brush with oil and place cavity-side-down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake squash until fork tender, approximately 45 minutes.

    Meanwhile, in a large skillet, brown sausage over medium heat until cooked through. Drain on a paper-towel-lined plate, if necessary.

    Add onion and celery. Sweat over low heat, scraping fond (sausage bits that have stuck to the bottom of the pan) until onions become translucent. Add garlic to onion mixture and sauté 1 to 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

    In a large bowl, combine sausage, onion mixture, spinach and sour cream. Stir well to combine and season, if necessary. When squash are tender, remove from oven and flip over so cavity is facing upwards. Divide stuffing evenly between the 4 halves. Sprinkle with cheese.

    Bake squash for an additional 15 minutes at 350ºF until stuffing is heated throughout and top begins to turn golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley to garnish.

    Variations:
    — Replace the sausage with black beans.

    This orange spice banana bread smells absolutely amazing. The aroma fills the house with the pungent fall spices. It is so hard to wait until the bread is completely cooled before pinching off a nibble.

    The most important tips I can pass on is to make sure the cream cheese is completely softened. Unwrap the bar and leave it out for at least 25 to 30 minutes to soften. Brown speckled very ripe bananas are the best type of banana to use in banana bread, see it gives the bread a more intense banana flavor. This rule may be broken if you are looking for a subtle banana flavor to showcase the orange. Lastly blend the wet ingredients well, no lumps remaining in the cream cheese, before combining with the dry ingredients.

    Source: Good Life Eats
    2 cups all purpose flour
    1/4 cup packed brown sugar
    1/2 cup white sugar
    3/4 tsp baking soda
    1/4 tsp salt
    2 1/2 Tbs orange zest, (about 2 medium sized oranges)
    1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
    1/2 tsp nutmeg
    2 pinches of allspice
    1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, mashed
    1 (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
    2 large eggs
    6 tbsp butter, melted
    1 1/2 tsp vanilla

    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking.

    Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Do not overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

    • 2 c all purpose flour
    • 1/4 c packed brown sugar
    • 1/2 c white sugar
    • 3/4 tsp baking soda
    • 1/4 tsp salt
    • zest of 1 large orange, web about 2 1/2 Tbs
    • 1 1/8 tsp cinnamon
    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
    • 2 pinches of allspice
    • 1 1/2 c very ripe bananas, here mashed
    • 4 oz. softened cream cheese
    • 2 large eggs
    • 6 Tbs butter, adiposity melted
    • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla

    Preheat oven to 35o degrees F. Grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Sift together the flour, sugars, baking soda, salt, orange zest, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Set aside.

    Mix the mashed bananas, cream cheese, eggs, butter and vanilla using a wooden spoon. Gently combine the flour mixture with the mashed banana mixture until just combined. Don’t overmix; the batter should look slightly lumpy and thick.

    Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the pan before removing. Cool on a wire rack.

    If you have any leftovers (good luck with that!), store cooled bread wrapped with plastic wrap at room temperature for up to three days.

    Quinoa Stuffed Red Peppers

    Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers makes for a delectable main dish paired with a side of garlic toast or a light salad. It is one of those feel good meals I would choose over a piece of chocolate any day. Please Do Not let the bell peppers deter you from trying the quinoa stuffing. If bell peppers are not your thing try a bed of arugula, troche a stuffed zucchini or serve the stuffing by itself like you would a casserole. As for serving sizes Katie suggests one half pepper if you have an accompanying side. Otherwise 1 whole pepper would be considered a serving.

    Now, lets talk ingredients. I found a small package of quinoa at the supermarket for $10.99. I ended up purchasing the same amount at the health food store for .99 cents a pound. A huge savings. The poblano pepper is the new hot chili pepper fad right now. I could not find a poblano pepper in the produce section at the market. When I asked the produce manager for a suitable replacement he admitted he had heard of them but did not know what a poblano pepper was. Poblano peppers are used to make chile relleno in the place of pasilla peppers and they are also used in mole. Cook’s Thesaurus suggests using Anaheim or Ancho as a substitute. I tried half of an Anaheim but because I used a Monterey Jack and Cheddar blend cheese instead of pepper jack I could have used the whole pepper. Definitely season well with salt and pepper. You could use broth instead of water to cook the quinoa for more flavor too.

    Source: GoodLifeEats
    2 tablespoon olive oil
    1 medium onion, finely chopped
    2 ribs celery, finely chopped
    1 (8 ounce) Package mushrooms, stems removed and caps sliced very thin
    1/2 of a poblano pepper, diced
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    1 (15 ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, liquid reserved
    1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
    3/4 cup quinoa
    1 3/4 cups water or broth
    1 1/2 cups grated carrot
    1 1/2 cups grated reduced-fat pepper Jack cheese, divided
    4 large red bell peppers, halved lengthwise, ribs removed

    Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour liquid from tomatoes in bottom of baking dish.

    Heat oil in a large pan with a lid over medium heat. Add onion, celery, and poblano pepper cooking 5 minutes, or until soft. Add cumin and garlic; sauté 1 minute. Stir in mushrooms and drained tomatoes. Cook 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated.

    Meanwhile bring the quinoa, carrots and water to a boil in a covered sauce pan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 20 minutes or until quinoa is tender.

    Add the quinoa to the onion mixture. Toss in the black beans and 1 cup of cheese.  Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

    Fill each bell pepper half with heaping 3/4-cup quinoa mixture, and place in baking dish. Cover with foil, and bake 40 minutes. Uncover, and sprinkle each pepper with 1 tablespoon of remaining cheese. Bake 15 minutes more, or until tops of stuffed peppers are browned. Let stand 5 minutes. Transfer stuffed peppers to serving plates, and drizzle each with pan juices before serving.

    Quinoa, the Ancient Mother Grain

    frukostdags-hanna-pauli

    “Frukostdags” by Hanna Pauli

    Wednesday morning breakfasts appeared one day without any solicitation on my part. On Wednesday mornings I like to make pancakes. They make for a nice variation from the typical egg burritos or oatmeal. One Wednesday morning I was surprised to discover the whole family sitting at the kitchen table ready to eat. I know the kids were just as delighted as I was to have dad at the breakfast table. The kitchen was filled with smiles and laughter as we shared our crazy dreams and our anticipation for the day ahead. The usual rush of morning events was placed on hold as if the world had stopped and time had ceased to exist. When breakfast was over we each went about our routine happy as larks. I find my heart swelling within my bosom each Wednesday as I turn around to see everyone present at the table. I love the closeness we feel as we sit down together in the middle of the week. There are never any stragglers. They are all there because they want to be. I like it.

    Often times it can be difficult to cram a family dinner  in with late week night activities. Setting aside one morning out of the week allows us to reconnect and can provide a relaxing start to the day.  Give the family a question to think about during the day. Share profound quotes from classic literature. Tell stories and try to have fun.

    frukostdags-hanna-pauli

    “Frukostdags” by Hanna Pauli

    Wednesday morning breakfasts appeared one day without any solicitation on my part. On Wednesday mornings I like to make pancakes. They make for a nice variation from the typical egg burritos or oatmeal. One Wednesday morning I was surprised to discover the whole family sitting at the kitchen table ready to eat. I know the kids were just as delighted as I was to have dad at the breakfast table. The kitchen was filled with smiles and laughter as we shared our crazy dreams and our anticipation for the day ahead. The usual rush of morning events was placed on hold as if the world had stopped and time had ceased to exist. When breakfast was over we each went about our routine happy as larks. I find my heart swelling within my bosom each Wednesday as I turn around to see everyone present at the table. I love the closeness we feel as we sit down together in the middle of the week. There are never any stragglers. They are all there because they want to be. I like it.

    Often times it can be difficult to cram a family dinner  in with late week night activities. Setting aside one morning out of the week allows us to reconnect and can provide a relaxing start to the day.  Give the family a question to think about during the day. Share profound quotes from classic literature. Tell stories and try to have fun.
    Quinoa

    Ancient in its origins, erectile Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-WAH) has been a staple in it’s native lands of Chile, Peru and the colonies in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, for almost 5,000 years. Quinoa translated in the Incan language meas “Mother Grain” and was once considered “the gold of the Incas.” While Quinoa is commonly referred to as a grain, similar to buckwheat and amaranth, it is grown from an edible leafy green vegetable plant relative to Swiss chard, sugar beet, table beet, and spinach whereas grains are born from grassy plants. The seed like granule comes in a range of colors that vary from white, yellow, and pink, to darker red, purple, and black.

    quinoa plant

    Quinoa may be eaten hot or cold in salads soups, stews, pilafs and casseroles. Quinoa is used in bread, muffins, bagels, cookies, pancakes, granola and other baked goods. Use Quinoa in the place of potatoes, couscous and rice. It is also a yummy nutritional replacement for oatmeal. Top with a drizzle of honey, nuts or berries. Quinoa is a complete protein and an excellent source of magnesium, a mineral that helps relax blood vessels. Increased intake of magnesium has been shown to reduce the severity of migraine headaches and arteriosclerosis.

    To prepare quinoa, always rinse it as you would rice to remove any powdery residue. Bring one part quinoa and two parts liquid to a boil; cover and reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes or until the grains are translucent.

    Spinach Linguini with Ham and Broccoli

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Oliver Twist

    I was in the parking lot loading the groceries into my car one morning when I was approached by an older woman begging for money. I recognized her from the previous month the familiar story of grief and financial woes. How do you know? How do you know if she really needs it for her hungry child at home or is she taking advantage of the economic backlash she is aware we are all suffering through? The store is not far from an area officially deemed as “tent city”. The population consists of thieves, visit web vagrants and a host of inhabitants who are down on their luck reminiscent of the barrow as described in Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist.” The book paints an illuminated picture of a dark 19th Century London plagued with contempt and greed. The only redeeming element is Oliver an orphan boy who remains pure-hearted and honorable despite a life of abuse and neglect as a result of the corrupt and flawed social institutions. Oliver was deemed a “troublesome” boy from birth with the propensity to amount to nothing when he was rescued by caring souls who saw him not as a delinquent but merely a lost soul in need of basic human sustenance. I surmise it was Oliver’s gracious gentle nature that procured a place in the hearts of those who saw fit to provide him with the opportunity escape his prison to prosperity. His story like many others touch us because they provide hope that anyone can overcome tribulation with their dignity still in tacked as long as they hold fast with integrity. His story also gives merit to those individuals who see a need and act to fulfill that need with selfless devotion.

    Is there not someone in our mist that is in need of some form of Motherly Adoration? That when met with unbiased attentions could provide the healing power necessary to recover from years of torment and abuse? We pass people everyday on the streets, cure at work, at home, at school, in a store, at church who suffer in silence. They feel lost and helpless. Their afflictions come in many different ways from sickness, physical and mental abuse, peer pressure, financial worries, addictions, loss, shyness, embarrassment and pride to begin with. When in public they hide behind a facade that everything is ok. Their false appearance may sometimes present itself to others as haughtiness (they are better than us) or strength (their life is perfect). When in reality what they need most is a kind hello, a polite acknowledgment they exist or an invitation to chat.

    I did not know this woman who approached me in the parking lot. I could not discern her true intentions. Whatever her story is she is human and so I gave her a few groceries to take with her. We never know when our acts of kindness will touch someone. Unbeknownst to Oliver his forgiving nature had an enormous impact on Nancy, a girl acquainted with Fagin’s group of thieves in London. The streets had been her home since she was a child. Through Oliver’s example she found courage and risked her life to save him.

    This month’s resolution is Share. When I made my list of resolutions in January my intention was to write real letters instead of emails. Email is my favorite form of communication. It is fast, no waiting days for the letter to reach the intended. Phones calls have a way of interrupting at the worst possible time and I always forget to send snail mail. Share also meant to record Memories. I have really been awful about keeping memories since our second child came along. Then last month I had an “email” conversation with my sister about strengthening our families. I was already working on my immediate family as my resolution for April was Family. Originally I had planned on recreating stronger ties with my extended family but there were a few set backs in March that placed my focus here at home. I finished off the month accomplishing both. Then I almost lost a very close friend in childbirth. Baby and mom are well and safely at home thankfully. Later the same week I had a conversation with a group of friends over dinner about the negativity they often feel in social circles. The topic of Share began to take on a new meaning.

    Sharing is not about us. When we teach our little ones to share it is because we want them to learn to think about other peoples feelings. When we share we help make another living being happy and in turn we feel joy. When we share advice ideally it is given with good intent to help that person through a difficult problem because we want to see them happy.

    To share means to think about others. Some ways we can do this are:

    • Send your friend or family member a letter. Yes we live in a fast paced world but there will never be a comparable replacement for an old fashioned letter. Think of something uplifting to say such as how they were a positive influence on you and how much you appreciate them.
    • Share your feelings. The goal is to help not impede by keeping negative comments to yourself. If you are not used to sharing your feelings it can be quite difficult at first. Start out small by telling your children and those close to you how much they mean to you or how much you appreciate your son when he helps around the house.
    • Praise your children constantly. Avoid coarse and abrasive language. Think of your kids as a coworker. Would you talk to your boss that way?
    • Share your time. Help a young mother at church by offering to hold their baby. Set up a co-op to babysit for your friend one day a week for a couple of hours. Organize a service project.
    • Do not judge. We cannot know what another person is suffering. As moms we can be highly judgmental of each other. We need to band together not tear one another apart.
    • Share your talents: Start a book club, game night, dessert night, mom’s club, art class, babysitting club, cooking club and invite friends from church, school or work both young and old

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Oliver Twist

    I was in the parking lot loading the groceries into my car one morning when I was approached by an older woman begging for money. I recognized her from the previous month the familiar story of grief and financial woes. How do you know? How do you know if she really needs it for her hungry child at home or is she taking advantage of the economic backlash she is aware we are all suffering through? The store is not far from an area officially deemed as “tent city”. The population consists of thieves, visit web vagrants and a host of inhabitants who are down on their luck reminiscent of the barrow as described in Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist.” The book paints an illuminated picture of a dark 19th Century London plagued with contempt and greed. The only redeeming element is Oliver an orphan boy who remains pure-hearted and honorable despite a life of abuse and neglect as a result of the corrupt and flawed social institutions. Oliver was deemed a “troublesome” boy from birth with the propensity to amount to nothing when he was rescued by caring souls who saw him not as a delinquent but merely a lost soul in need of basic human sustenance. I surmise it was Oliver’s gracious gentle nature that procured a place in the hearts of those who saw fit to provide him with the opportunity escape his prison to prosperity. His story like many others touch us because they provide hope that anyone can overcome tribulation with their dignity still in tacked as long as they hold fast with integrity. His story also gives merit to those individuals who see a need and act to fulfill that need with selfless devotion.

    Is there not someone in our mist that is in need of some form of Motherly Adoration? That when met with unbiased attentions could provide the healing power necessary to recover from years of torment and abuse? We pass people everyday on the streets, cure at work, at home, at school, in a store, at church who suffer in silence. They feel lost and helpless. Their afflictions come in many different ways from sickness, physical and mental abuse, peer pressure, financial worries, addictions, loss, shyness, embarrassment and pride to begin with. When in public they hide behind a facade that everything is ok. Their false appearance may sometimes present itself to others as haughtiness (they are better than us) or strength (their life is perfect). When in reality what they need most is a kind hello, a polite acknowledgment they exist or an invitation to chat.

    I did not know this woman who approached me in the parking lot. I could not discern her true intentions. Whatever her story is she is human and so I gave her a few groceries to take with her. We never know when our acts of kindness will touch someone. Unbeknownst to Oliver his forgiving nature had an enormous impact on Nancy, a girl acquainted with Fagin’s group of thieves in London. The streets had been her home since she was a child. Through Oliver’s example she found courage and risked her life to save him.

    This month’s resolution is Share. When I made my list of resolutions in January my intention was to write real letters instead of emails. Email is my favorite form of communication. It is fast, no waiting days for the letter to reach the intended. Phones calls have a way of interrupting at the worst possible time and I always forget to send snail mail. Share also meant to record Memories. I have really been awful about keeping memories since our second child came along. Then last month I had an “email” conversation with my sister about strengthening our families. I was already working on my immediate family as my resolution for April was Family. Originally I had planned on recreating stronger ties with my extended family but there were a few set backs in March that placed my focus here at home. I finished off the month accomplishing both. Then I almost lost a very close friend in childbirth. Baby and mom are well and safely at home thankfully. Later the same week I had a conversation with a group of friends over dinner about the negativity they often feel in social circles. The topic of Share began to take on a new meaning.

    Sharing is not about us. When we teach our little ones to share it is because we want them to learn to think about other peoples feelings. When we share we help make another living being happy and in turn we feel joy. When we share advice ideally it is given with good intent to help that person through a difficult problem because we want to see them happy.

    To share means to think about others. Some ways we can do this are:

    • Send your friend or family member a letter. Yes we live in a fast paced world but there will never be a comparable replacement for an old fashioned letter. Think of something uplifting to say such as how they were a positive influence on you and how much you appreciate them.
    • Share your feelings. The goal is to help not impede by keeping negative comments to yourself. If you are not used to sharing your feelings it can be quite difficult at first. Start out small by telling your children and those close to you how much they mean to you or how much you appreciate your son when he helps around the house.
    • Praise your children constantly. Avoid coarse and abrasive language. Think of your kids as a coworker. Would you talk to your boss that way?
    • Share your time. Help a young mother at church by offering to hold their baby. Set up a co-op to babysit for your friend one day a week for a couple of hours. Organize a service project.
    • Do not judge. We cannot know what another person is suffering. As moms we can be highly judgmental of each other. We need to band together not tear one another apart.
    • Share your talents: Start a book club, game night, dessert night, mom’s club, art class, babysitting club, cooking club and invite friends from church, school or work both young and old

    banana cookies

    There is a never ending conundrum about what to do with old bananas. Banana bread is always a good option. It freezes well and makes nice little gifts. I did consider Frosted Banana Bars because they are oh so heavenly but decided against them because they seemed a little to fussy for a light afternoon snack. In the end the kids and I chose door number 3- Banana Cookies. They are actually called Banana Whoopie Cookies; however, sickness on this occasion we omitted the extra sugary frosting and gobbled down two cookies each instead one.

    Source: Adapted from Martha Stewart
    Makes about 3 dozen
    2 cups all-purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 cup mashed banana (from 1 large ripe banana)
    1/2 cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
    1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, clinic softened
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    1 large egg
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    Mash bananas and stir in baking soda.

    Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl.

    Combine banana and sour cream in another bowl.

    Cream butter and granulated and brown sugars with a mixer on medium-high speed, until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, beating until incorporated. Add banana mixture in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture.

    Drop spoonful of dough on prepared baking sheet. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Slide parchment, with cookies, onto wire racks. Let cool.

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Oliver Twist

    I was in the parking lot loading the groceries into my car one morning when I was approached by an older woman begging for money. I recognized her from the previous month the familiar story of grief and financial woes. How do you know? How do you know if she really needs it for her hungry child at home or is she taking advantage of the economic backlash she is aware we are all suffering through? The store is not far from an area officially deemed as “tent city”. The population consists of thieves, visit web vagrants and a host of inhabitants who are down on their luck reminiscent of the barrow as described in Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist.” The book paints an illuminated picture of a dark 19th Century London plagued with contempt and greed. The only redeeming element is Oliver an orphan boy who remains pure-hearted and honorable despite a life of abuse and neglect as a result of the corrupt and flawed social institutions. Oliver was deemed a “troublesome” boy from birth with the propensity to amount to nothing when he was rescued by caring souls who saw him not as a delinquent but merely a lost soul in need of basic human sustenance. I surmise it was Oliver’s gracious gentle nature that procured a place in the hearts of those who saw fit to provide him with the opportunity escape his prison to prosperity. His story like many others touch us because they provide hope that anyone can overcome tribulation with their dignity still in tacked as long as they hold fast with integrity. His story also gives merit to those individuals who see a need and act to fulfill that need with selfless devotion.

    Is there not someone in our mist that is in need of some form of Motherly Adoration? That when met with unbiased attentions could provide the healing power necessary to recover from years of torment and abuse? We pass people everyday on the streets, cure at work, at home, at school, in a store, at church who suffer in silence. They feel lost and helpless. Their afflictions come in many different ways from sickness, physical and mental abuse, peer pressure, financial worries, addictions, loss, shyness, embarrassment and pride to begin with. When in public they hide behind a facade that everything is ok. Their false appearance may sometimes present itself to others as haughtiness (they are better than us) or strength (their life is perfect). When in reality what they need most is a kind hello, a polite acknowledgment they exist or an invitation to chat.

    I did not know this woman who approached me in the parking lot. I could not discern her true intentions. Whatever her story is she is human and so I gave her a few groceries to take with her. We never know when our acts of kindness will touch someone. Unbeknownst to Oliver his forgiving nature had an enormous impact on Nancy, a girl acquainted with Fagin’s group of thieves in London. The streets had been her home since she was a child. Through Oliver’s example she found courage and risked her life to save him.

    This month’s resolution is Share. When I made my list of resolutions in January my intention was to write real letters instead of emails. Email is my favorite form of communication. It is fast, no waiting days for the letter to reach the intended. Phones calls have a way of interrupting at the worst possible time and I always forget to send snail mail. Share also meant to record Memories. I have really been awful about keeping memories since our second child came along. Then last month I had an “email” conversation with my sister about strengthening our families. I was already working on my immediate family as my resolution for April was Family. Originally I had planned on recreating stronger ties with my extended family but there were a few set backs in March that placed my focus here at home. I finished off the month accomplishing both. Then I almost lost a very close friend in childbirth. Baby and mom are well and safely at home thankfully. Later the same week I had a conversation with a group of friends over dinner about the negativity they often feel in social circles. The topic of Share began to take on a new meaning.

    Sharing is not about us. When we teach our little ones to share it is because we want them to learn to think about other peoples feelings. When we share we help make another living being happy and in turn we feel joy. When we share advice ideally it is given with good intent to help that person through a difficult problem because we want to see them happy.

    To share means to think about others. Some ways we can do this are:

    • Send your friend or family member a letter. Yes we live in a fast paced world but there will never be a comparable replacement for an old fashioned letter. Think of something uplifting to say such as how they were a positive influence on you and how much you appreciate them.
    • Share your feelings. The goal is to help not impede by keeping negative comments to yourself. If you are not used to sharing your feelings it can be quite difficult at first. Start out small by telling your children and those close to you how much they mean to you or how much you appreciate your son when he helps around the house.
    • Praise your children constantly. Avoid coarse and abrasive language. Think of your kids as a coworker. Would you talk to your boss that way?
    • Share your time. Help a young mother at church by offering to hold their baby. Set up a co-op to babysit for your friend one day a week for a couple of hours. Organize a service project.
    • Do not judge. We cannot know what another person is suffering. As moms we can be highly judgmental of each other. We need to band together not tear one another apart.
    • Share your talents: Start a book club, game night, dessert night, mom’s club, art class, babysitting club, cooking club and invite friends from church, school or work both young and old

    banana cookies

    There is a never ending conundrum about what to do with old bananas. Banana bread is always a good option. It freezes well and makes nice little gifts. I did consider Frosted Banana Bars because they are oh so heavenly but decided against them because they seemed a little to fussy for a light afternoon snack. In the end the kids and I chose door number 3- Banana Cookies. They are actually called Banana Whoopie Cookies; however, sickness on this occasion we omitted the extra sugary frosting and gobbled down two cookies each instead one.

    Source: Adapted from Martha Stewart
    Makes about 3 dozen
    2 cups all-purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 cup mashed banana (from 1 large ripe banana)
    1/2 cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
    1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, clinic softened
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    1 large egg
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    Mash bananas and stir in baking soda.

    Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl.

    Combine banana and sour cream in another bowl.

    Cream butter and granulated and brown sugars with a mixer on medium-high speed, until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, beating until incorporated. Add banana mixture in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture.

    Drop spoonful of dough on prepared baking sheet. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Slide parchment, with cookies, onto wire racks. Let cool.
    Makes about 3 dozen

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 cup mashed banana (from 1 large ripe banana)
    * 1/2 cup sour cream
    * 4 ounces (1 stick) unsalted butter, web softened
    * 1/2 cup granulated sugar
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 1 large egg
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 16 ounces cream cheese, softened
    * 1 cup confectioners’ sugar, plus more for dusting

    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment. Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl. Combine banana and sour cream in another bowl.
    2. Beat butter and granulated and brown sugars with a mixer on medium-high speed, until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, beating until incorporated. Add banana mixture in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture.
    3. Transfer batter to a pastry bag fitted with a 1/4-inch plain tip. Pipe batter into 1 1/4-inch rounds on baking sheets, spacing rounds 1 1/2 inches apart.
    4. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Slide parchment, with cookies, onto wire racks. Let cool. (Unfilled cookies can be stored for up to 1 day.)
    5. Beat cream cheese, confectioners’ sugar, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon vanilla with a mixer on medium speed until smooth, about 2 minutes.
    6. Pipe or spoon 1 tablespoon cream cheese mixture onto the flat sides of half the cookies. Sandwich with remaining cookies. Dust with confectioners’ sugar, and serve immediately.

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Oliver Twist

    I was in the parking lot loading the groceries into my car one morning when I was approached by an older woman begging for money. I recognized her from the previous month the familiar story of grief and financial woes. How do you know? How do you know if she really needs it for her hungry child at home or is she taking advantage of the economic backlash she is aware we are all suffering through? The store is not far from an area officially deemed as “tent city”. The population consists of thieves, visit web vagrants and a host of inhabitants who are down on their luck reminiscent of the barrow as described in Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist.” The book paints an illuminated picture of a dark 19th Century London plagued with contempt and greed. The only redeeming element is Oliver an orphan boy who remains pure-hearted and honorable despite a life of abuse and neglect as a result of the corrupt and flawed social institutions. Oliver was deemed a “troublesome” boy from birth with the propensity to amount to nothing when he was rescued by caring souls who saw him not as a delinquent but merely a lost soul in need of basic human sustenance. I surmise it was Oliver’s gracious gentle nature that procured a place in the hearts of those who saw fit to provide him with the opportunity escape his prison to prosperity. His story like many others touch us because they provide hope that anyone can overcome tribulation with their dignity still in tacked as long as they hold fast with integrity. His story also gives merit to those individuals who see a need and act to fulfill that need with selfless devotion.

    Is there not someone in our mist that is in need of some form of Motherly Adoration? That when met with unbiased attentions could provide the healing power necessary to recover from years of torment and abuse? We pass people everyday on the streets, cure at work, at home, at school, in a store, at church who suffer in silence. They feel lost and helpless. Their afflictions come in many different ways from sickness, physical and mental abuse, peer pressure, financial worries, addictions, loss, shyness, embarrassment and pride to begin with. When in public they hide behind a facade that everything is ok. Their false appearance may sometimes present itself to others as haughtiness (they are better than us) or strength (their life is perfect). When in reality what they need most is a kind hello, a polite acknowledgment they exist or an invitation to chat.

    I did not know this woman who approached me in the parking lot. I could not discern her true intentions. Whatever her story is she is human and so I gave her a few groceries to take with her. We never know when our acts of kindness will touch someone. Unbeknownst to Oliver his forgiving nature had an enormous impact on Nancy, a girl acquainted with Fagin’s group of thieves in London. The streets had been her home since she was a child. Through Oliver’s example she found courage and risked her life to save him.

    This month’s resolution is Share. When I made my list of resolutions in January my intention was to write real letters instead of emails. Email is my favorite form of communication. It is fast, no waiting days for the letter to reach the intended. Phones calls have a way of interrupting at the worst possible time and I always forget to send snail mail. Share also meant to record Memories. I have really been awful about keeping memories since our second child came along. Then last month I had an “email” conversation with my sister about strengthening our families. I was already working on my immediate family as my resolution for April was Family. Originally I had planned on recreating stronger ties with my extended family but there were a few set backs in March that placed my focus here at home. I finished off the month accomplishing both. Then I almost lost a very close friend in childbirth. Baby and mom are well and safely at home thankfully. Later the same week I had a conversation with a group of friends over dinner about the negativity they often feel in social circles. The topic of Share began to take on a new meaning.

    Sharing is not about us. When we teach our little ones to share it is because we want them to learn to think about other peoples feelings. When we share we help make another living being happy and in turn we feel joy. When we share advice ideally it is given with good intent to help that person through a difficult problem because we want to see them happy.

    To share means to think about others. Some ways we can do this are:

    • Send your friend or family member a letter. Yes we live in a fast paced world but there will never be a comparable replacement for an old fashioned letter. Think of something uplifting to say such as how they were a positive influence on you and how much you appreciate them.
    • Share your feelings. The goal is to help not impede by keeping negative comments to yourself. If you are not used to sharing your feelings it can be quite difficult at first. Start out small by telling your children and those close to you how much they mean to you or how much you appreciate your son when he helps around the house.
    • Praise your children constantly. Avoid coarse and abrasive language. Think of your kids as a coworker. Would you talk to your boss that way?
    • Share your time. Help a young mother at church by offering to hold their baby. Set up a co-op to babysit for your friend one day a week for a couple of hours. Organize a service project.
    • Do not judge. We cannot know what another person is suffering. As moms we can be highly judgmental of each other. We need to band together not tear one another apart.
    • Share your talents: Start a book club, game night, dessert night, mom’s club, art class, babysitting club, cooking club and invite friends from church, school or work both young and old

    banana cookies

    There is a never ending conundrum about what to do with old bananas. Banana bread is always a good option. It freezes well and makes nice little gifts. I did consider Frosted Banana Bars because they are oh so heavenly but decided against them because they seemed a little to fussy for a light afternoon snack. In the end the kids and I chose door number 3- Banana Cookies. They are actually called Banana Whoopie Cookies; however, sickness on this occasion we omitted the extra sugary frosting and gobbled down two cookies each instead one.

    Source: Adapted from Martha Stewart
    Makes about 3 dozen
    2 cups all-purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 cup mashed banana (from 1 large ripe banana)
    1/2 cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
    1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, clinic softened
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    1 large egg
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    Mash bananas and stir in baking soda.

    Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl.

    Combine banana and sour cream in another bowl.

    Cream butter and granulated and brown sugars with a mixer on medium-high speed, until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, beating until incorporated. Add banana mixture in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture.

    Drop spoonful of dough on prepared baking sheet. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Slide parchment, with cookies, onto wire racks. Let cool.
    Makes about 3 dozen

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 cup mashed banana (from 1 large ripe banana)
    * 1/2 cup sour cream
    * 4 ounces (1 stick) unsalted butter, web softened
    * 1/2 cup granulated sugar
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 1 large egg
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 16 ounces cream cheese, softened
    * 1 cup confectioners’ sugar, plus more for dusting

    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment. Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl. Combine banana and sour cream in another bowl.
    2. Beat butter and granulated and brown sugars with a mixer on medium-high speed, until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, beating until incorporated. Add banana mixture in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture.
    3. Transfer batter to a pastry bag fitted with a 1/4-inch plain tip. Pipe batter into 1 1/4-inch rounds on baking sheets, spacing rounds 1 1/2 inches apart.
    4. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Slide parchment, with cookies, onto wire racks. Let cool. (Unfilled cookies can be stored for up to 1 day.)
    5. Beat cream cheese, confectioners’ sugar, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon vanilla with a mixer on medium speed until smooth, about 2 minutes.
    6. Pipe or spoon 1 tablespoon cream cheese mixture onto the flat sides of half the cookies. Sandwich with remaining cookies. Dust with confectioners’ sugar, and serve immediately.

    Several years ago during Christmas time my mom bought a package of lobster stuffed ravioli. We thought it would be interesting to try. I was a bit leery as to how the kids would react to salmon colored stripped pasta knowing their phobia to anything out of the ordinary. Surprisingly they devoured every last one. To this day they still ask for them. I was sitting at my desk trying to come up with a weeks worth of dinners when the oldest pipped up that he wanted the red pasta. I gently told him that I would do my best. I knew the grocery store would not have it and so opted for the spinach stuffed ravioli instead. May I suggest that if you have a picky eater you might consider vegetable stuffed pasta. I used the leftover ham from Sunday dinner at the inlaws and replaced the green spinach linguini with the spinach stuffed ravioli. Even the picky eater ate his fill spinach linguini with ham and broccoli.

    Source: Martha Stewart
    Serves 4
    2 teaspoons olive oil
    2 ounces cooked ham, shop cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    3 garlic cloves, visit web minced
    3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    2 1/2 cups low-fat (1 percent) milk
    Coarse salt and ground pepper
    2 ounces reduced-fat bar cream cheese
    10 ounces spinach linguine
    1 head broccoli, cheap stems peeled and sliced 1/4-inch thick, florets cut into bite-size pieces
    3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

    In a 3-quart heavy-bottom saucepan, heat oil over medium. Add ham, and cook, stirring occasionally, until starting to brown, about 3 minutes. Add garlic; cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in flour; cook 1 minute.

    Stir in milk, and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until mixture is slightly thickened, 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in cream cheese; cook until melted, about 1 minute.

    Meanwhile, in a large pot of boiling salted water, cook pasta until al dente according to package instructions, adding broccoli during final 3 minutes. Drain; transfer pasta and broccoli to a large bowl. Add cream-cheese sauce and Parmesan, and toss to combine. Serve immediately.

    Add A Bit of Ambiance

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, page making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, dosage Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), prostate who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, page making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, dosage Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), prostate who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, store making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, viagra Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, page making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, dosage Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), prostate who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, store making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, viagra Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, abortion filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    A little Irish History

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, hospital old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    • Perform a family service project.
    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
    • Tie green balloons to the car.
    • Dye the milk green.

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, page making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, dosage Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), prostate who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, store making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, viagra Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, abortion filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    A little Irish History

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, hospital old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    • Perform a family service project.
    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
    • Tie green balloons to the car.
    • Dye the milk green.

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra 100mg filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  He believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted but despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting that the color green became part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies.It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage or Green Eggs and Ham.
    Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    Perform a family service project.
    Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, page making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, dosage Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), prostate who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    mom-dad

    I met the Bogarts when I was teenager. I took dance classes at the same ballet studio as Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Bogart was a music producer and Christian music artist. They lived in a vintage home a few streets from my house, store making it convenient for both them and myself on the nights they asked me to babysit. They had two children, viagra Sammy and Alex (3 and 2), who I adored immensely. The children loved to watch the “Sammy and Alex” home videos. And so after our adventurous excursions outdoors we would clean up and then sit down to enjoy the  life of Sammy and Alex.

    I love to pick through photos. I read a book once about a girl who loved to collect old photographs. She enjoyed imagining a story behind the photo. Creating a life for an unknown character, as an author would when writing a book. Stories give us courage, hope, a place to escape, a reason to weep. Family stories told through the generations create ties that bind each generation to the next.

    Several years back I took on the task of creating a family cookbook. The preface of the cookbook told the story of how my Grandparents met, married and ended with the courting and marriage of my parents. I loved hearing the tantalizing tail of my Grandparents riding off into the sunset on my Granddad’s motorcycle to elope. As a parent, I can see why the elopement was only mentioned once or twice. Maybe my mom did not want to give us any ideas. But for my mom to hold out on her own love story is an injustice to all hopelessly romantic teenagers.

    At family gatherings we always had to bring up my playing in the motor oil in my Uncle JK’s barn. I was five years old. Hey it looked like mud and I oh so loved playing in mud. (I can’t get my kids near the stuff) My Aunt Ruth was great for stories. She told so many stories of her life growing up and about my dad I felt like I was there. Stories are so much fun, well unless you were the one they were laughing at in the story. Still, I doubt a young man has lost his girlfriend because a loving mother revealed his naked baby pictures or told his intended he used to shoot peas out of his nose.

    Many of us replay our daily stories to our spouses or even perhaps our friends. But you know who would love to hear how about the day they came home from the hospital or the first time they laughed or the day they sprinkled fairy dust all over the kitchen or that Grammy went sky diving when she was young. Things we may think are unimportant even boring to us are fascinating to a kid. To a child stories give them a sense or where they belong. They love to see themselves coo as a baby and hear about the adventures they created as a preschooler. Teenagers love to hear about the lives their parents lead. It makes them seem human.

    I have the worst memory but every night I try to remember some part of years past to tell the kids at their bedside. My kids remind me of my two friends Sammy and Alex every time they beg me to tell them another baby story. Reminiscing has reminded me of all the fun and happy times we have had together. Sometimes that has a way of getting lost in a hectic life. Stories are another fun topic at dinnertime, while we are playing games as a family and at family reunions.

    A tradition of telling our stories will bring us closer together as a family. We learn to laugh at the embarrassments and share a common inside joke. Keep a written record to give the kids when they are older. They will enjoy looking back at all the mishaps and sillies of childhood.

    Illustration by: Richard Svensson
    Illustration by: Richard Svensson

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, abortion filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    A little Irish History

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years as a slave tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  St. Patrick believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, hospital old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green and other symbols we have come to associate with St. Patrick’s Day. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting for the color green to become part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies. It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    • Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage.
    • Fry up Green Eggs and Ham.
    • Cook up a batch of rainbow colored pancakes.
    • Serve a bowl of pineapple jello (Pot of coins).
    • Leave gold coins in the kid’s shoes.
    • Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    • Perform a family service project.
    • Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    • Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    • Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    • Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.
    • Make green cupcakes or cookies with green frosting.
    • Tie green balloons to the car.
    • Dye the milk green.

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, viagra 100mg filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  He believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted but despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting that the color green became part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies.It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage or Green Eggs and Ham.
    Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    Perform a family service project.
    Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.

    I have been referred to as the “Kool Aide Mom” once or twice because our home is the place to be if you want to have fun. There is always something going on here. We love celebrating holidays official and corny made up ones. That is why we put just as much effort into Saint Patty’s Day as we do any other holiday. I started a tradition years ago when the cousins still lived nearby. That year I made a hat out of paper, ed filled it with spritz cookies and left it on their doorstep. Down the walkway I placed little Leprechaun footprints running every which way leading into a bush. I also dropped a half eaten apple for extra fun. The little kids went nuts. They searched the yard trying to find the little Leprechaun.

    Maewyn Succat was born to a Roman Official sometime around 385 AD near Wales. He was later taken prisoner (at the age of 16) by Irish sea-faring raiders and sold into slavery in Ireland. Maewyn was not a religious boy before his time spent in Ireland where he turned to God in prayer in search of solace. He wrote that he believed his misfortune was due to his apostate attitude toward God. He remained captive for six years tending the sheep and pigs before  he had a vision from God telling him he would soon return home. Maewyn escaped by ship to Gaul where he dedicated his life to serving God. He changed his name to Saint Patrick while attending the Seminary in France.  He believed that his calling was to convert the pagan Irish to Christianity. Eleven years later he would return to Ireland to fulfill that calling . He was revered by those whom he converted yet despised by those who favored the Celtic pagan ways and saw him as a threat. He spent 30 years  building monasteries and schools working to establish Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick died March 17th 461 AD.

    There are many old Irish legends that describe the miracles Saint Patrick performed but they are just that, rx old legends.  St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated in America in 1737. The Saint Patrick feast day remains a religious holiday in Ireland while here in the states it is a festive occasion celebrated by wearing something green. The use of the shamrock was believed to have originated with Saint Patrick. As legend states he used the shamrock to explain the holy trinity being the Father, sick the Son and the Holy Spirit. The shamrock thus became a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. To the Celtic people of ancient Ireland, the shamrock represented the rebirth of spring. (Ireland is referred to as “The Emerald Isle” due to the lush green landscape.) Historically, the color green was used by revolutionary groups in Ireland. By the 17th century, when the English began to suppress the Irish, the shamrock became a symbol of hope and Irish nationalism. Thus it was only fitting that the color green became part of the official Irish flag in 1919.

    The Leprechaun with his pot of gold at the end of the rainbow is a mythical creature. The Leprechaun stems from the Irish pagan belief in fairies.It is said that the Leprechaun is a crafty workman who guards the pot of fairy gold. The Leprechaun, the rainbow, the pot of gold and the clover are symbols celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day here in the United States to make St. Patrick’s Day a fun family affair.

    Other ways to celebrate Saint Patty’s day may include:

    Cook up a pot of Stew and a loaf of Brown Bread or Corned Beef and Cabbage or Green Eggs and Ham.
    Go on a picnic to enjoy nature.
    Perform a family service project.
    Attend a St. Patrick’s Day parade.
    Play Rainbow Bowling. Fill water bottles with different colored water.
    Go on a scavenger hunt in search of a pot of gold (chocolate) coins using paper shamrocks for clues.
    Set up a Leprechaun maze stringing different colored string throughout the house with a prize at the end.

    Music appreciation

    I learned long ago in music appreciation class about the surreal power of music. Years later I felt that power as I sat in the front row of the music hall, diagnosis buy information pills with tears streaming down my cheeks, ed side effects listening to a classical pianist’s rendition of Chopin. Music can evoke joy, peace and relaxation. It can also invigorate us, make us feel anxious, rage, and even confidence.

    The effects of music is most prevalent in film. Music composers are just as crucial as the actors for their ability to shift our emotions moment to moment. Great composers have the ability to guide us through the journey as though we were a part of the action. They can convey through music the pain a character is feeling. They stir the depths of our imagination to conjure fear. Musical scores can arouse our hearts to feel compassion or love.

    Music can set the mood whether it be in a film or in our homes. The rhythmic sounds of an electric fan, waves breaking on the shore or gentle bedtimes lullaby’s can lull a child to sleep. While the menacing metallic twang of a guitar, the raging beat of the drum and rock’n electronic vibes can of  stir up fits of aggression and excitement. Music can heal. Studies have shown that music can lower the heart rate, regulate blood pressure and slow respiration. Music provokes memories and promotes creativity. Music can manage stress and ease physical and emotional pain.

    As parents and caregivers we have an amazing powerful tool at our immediate disposal. When I was in college the field of Music Therapy was relativly new. Since then great strides have been made in understanding the vast effects of music on humans and animals as well. We can use the power of music to help cultivate a pleasant mood in our lively and often times chaotic homes. During the day when the kids are too full of energy we let them rock out to uptempo music until they collaspe exhausted. When the atmosphere becomes too negative we turn on soothing meditative music to calm them down. During dinner or before bed we play classical music to create a reverent ambiance. If your music library is limited try free programs such as Pandora or Rhapsody. Look up classical artists, yoga, meditation or acoustic. Enya Radio on Pandora is really nice and relaxing. Add a few candles to go with dinner and your tranquil music to set a lovely welcoming mood at your next dinner service.

    Banana Cookies

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Oliver Twist

    I was in the parking lot loading the groceries into my car one morning when I was approached by an older woman begging for money. I recognized her from the previous month the familiar story of grief and financial woes. How do you know? How do you know if she really needs it for her hungry child at home or is she taking advantage of the economic backlash she is aware we are all suffering through? The store is not far from an area officially deemed as “tent city”. The population consists of thieves, visit web vagrants and a host of inhabitants who are down on their luck reminiscent of the barrow as described in Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist.” The book paints an illuminated picture of a dark 19th Century London plagued with contempt and greed. The only redeeming element is Oliver an orphan boy who remains pure-hearted and honorable despite a life of abuse and neglect as a result of the corrupt and flawed social institutions. Oliver was deemed a “troublesome” boy from birth with the propensity to amount to nothing when he was rescued by caring souls who saw him not as a delinquent but merely a lost soul in need of basic human sustenance. I surmise it was Oliver’s gracious gentle nature that procured a place in the hearts of those who saw fit to provide him with the opportunity escape his prison to prosperity. His story like many others touch us because they provide hope that anyone can overcome tribulation with their dignity still in tacked as long as they hold fast with integrity. His story also gives merit to those individuals who see a need and act to fulfill that need with selfless devotion.

    Is there not someone in our mist that is in need of some form of Motherly Adoration? That when met with unbiased attentions could provide the healing power necessary to recover from years of torment and abuse? We pass people everyday on the streets, cure at work, at home, at school, in a store, at church who suffer in silence. They feel lost and helpless. Their afflictions come in many different ways from sickness, physical and mental abuse, peer pressure, financial worries, addictions, loss, shyness, embarrassment and pride to begin with. When in public they hide behind a facade that everything is ok. Their false appearance may sometimes present itself to others as haughtiness (they are better than us) or strength (their life is perfect). When in reality what they need most is a kind hello, a polite acknowledgment they exist or an invitation to chat.

    I did not know this woman who approached me in the parking lot. I could not discern her true intentions. Whatever her story is she is human and so I gave her a few groceries to take with her. We never know when our acts of kindness will touch someone. Unbeknownst to Oliver his forgiving nature had an enormous impact on Nancy, a girl acquainted with Fagin’s group of thieves in London. The streets had been her home since she was a child. Through Oliver’s example she found courage and risked her life to save him.

    This month’s resolution is Share. When I made my list of resolutions in January my intention was to write real letters instead of emails. Email is my favorite form of communication. It is fast, no waiting days for the letter to reach the intended. Phones calls have a way of interrupting at the worst possible time and I always forget to send snail mail. Share also meant to record Memories. I have really been awful about keeping memories since our second child came along. Then last month I had an “email” conversation with my sister about strengthening our families. I was already working on my immediate family as my resolution for April was Family. Originally I had planned on recreating stronger ties with my extended family but there were a few set backs in March that placed my focus here at home. I finished off the month accomplishing both. Then I almost lost a very close friend in childbirth. Baby and mom are well and safely at home thankfully. Later the same week I had a conversation with a group of friends over dinner about the negativity they often feel in social circles. The topic of Share began to take on a new meaning.

    Sharing is not about us. When we teach our little ones to share it is because we want them to learn to think about other peoples feelings. When we share we help make another living being happy and in turn we feel joy. When we share advice ideally it is given with good intent to help that person through a difficult problem because we want to see them happy.

    To share means to think about others. Some ways we can do this are:

    • Send your friend or family member a letter. Yes we live in a fast paced world but there will never be a comparable replacement for an old fashioned letter. Think of something uplifting to say such as how they were a positive influence on you and how much you appreciate them.
    • Share your feelings. The goal is to help not impede by keeping negative comments to yourself. If you are not used to sharing your feelings it can be quite difficult at first. Start out small by telling your children and those close to you how much they mean to you or how much you appreciate your son when he helps around the house.
    • Praise your children constantly. Avoid coarse and abrasive language. Think of your kids as a coworker. Would you talk to your boss that way?
    • Share your time. Help a young mother at church by offering to hold their baby. Set up a co-op to babysit for your friend one day a week for a couple of hours. Organize a service project.
    • Do not judge. We cannot know what another person is suffering. As moms we can be highly judgmental of each other. We need to band together not tear one another apart.
    • Share your talents: Start a book club, game night, dessert night, mom’s club, art class, babysitting club, cooking club and invite friends from church, school or work both young and old

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Oliver Twist

    I was in the parking lot loading the groceries into my car one morning when I was approached by an older woman begging for money. I recognized her from the previous month the familiar story of grief and financial woes. How do you know? How do you know if she really needs it for her hungry child at home or is she taking advantage of the economic backlash she is aware we are all suffering through? The store is not far from an area officially deemed as “tent city”. The population consists of thieves, visit web vagrants and a host of inhabitants who are down on their luck reminiscent of the barrow as described in Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist.” The book paints an illuminated picture of a dark 19th Century London plagued with contempt and greed. The only redeeming element is Oliver an orphan boy who remains pure-hearted and honorable despite a life of abuse and neglect as a result of the corrupt and flawed social institutions. Oliver was deemed a “troublesome” boy from birth with the propensity to amount to nothing when he was rescued by caring souls who saw him not as a delinquent but merely a lost soul in need of basic human sustenance. I surmise it was Oliver’s gracious gentle nature that procured a place in the hearts of those who saw fit to provide him with the opportunity escape his prison to prosperity. His story like many others touch us because they provide hope that anyone can overcome tribulation with their dignity still in tacked as long as they hold fast with integrity. His story also gives merit to those individuals who see a need and act to fulfill that need with selfless devotion.

    Is there not someone in our mist that is in need of some form of Motherly Adoration? That when met with unbiased attentions could provide the healing power necessary to recover from years of torment and abuse? We pass people everyday on the streets, cure at work, at home, at school, in a store, at church who suffer in silence. They feel lost and helpless. Their afflictions come in many different ways from sickness, physical and mental abuse, peer pressure, financial worries, addictions, loss, shyness, embarrassment and pride to begin with. When in public they hide behind a facade that everything is ok. Their false appearance may sometimes present itself to others as haughtiness (they are better than us) or strength (their life is perfect). When in reality what they need most is a kind hello, a polite acknowledgment they exist or an invitation to chat.

    I did not know this woman who approached me in the parking lot. I could not discern her true intentions. Whatever her story is she is human and so I gave her a few groceries to take with her. We never know when our acts of kindness will touch someone. Unbeknownst to Oliver his forgiving nature had an enormous impact on Nancy, a girl acquainted with Fagin’s group of thieves in London. The streets had been her home since she was a child. Through Oliver’s example she found courage and risked her life to save him.

    This month’s resolution is Share. When I made my list of resolutions in January my intention was to write real letters instead of emails. Email is my favorite form of communication. It is fast, no waiting days for the letter to reach the intended. Phones calls have a way of interrupting at the worst possible time and I always forget to send snail mail. Share also meant to record Memories. I have really been awful about keeping memories since our second child came along. Then last month I had an “email” conversation with my sister about strengthening our families. I was already working on my immediate family as my resolution for April was Family. Originally I had planned on recreating stronger ties with my extended family but there were a few set backs in March that placed my focus here at home. I finished off the month accomplishing both. Then I almost lost a very close friend in childbirth. Baby and mom are well and safely at home thankfully. Later the same week I had a conversation with a group of friends over dinner about the negativity they often feel in social circles. The topic of Share began to take on a new meaning.

    Sharing is not about us. When we teach our little ones to share it is because we want them to learn to think about other peoples feelings. When we share we help make another living being happy and in turn we feel joy. When we share advice ideally it is given with good intent to help that person through a difficult problem because we want to see them happy.

    To share means to think about others. Some ways we can do this are:

    • Send your friend or family member a letter. Yes we live in a fast paced world but there will never be a comparable replacement for an old fashioned letter. Think of something uplifting to say such as how they were a positive influence on you and how much you appreciate them.
    • Share your feelings. The goal is to help not impede by keeping negative comments to yourself. If you are not used to sharing your feelings it can be quite difficult at first. Start out small by telling your children and those close to you how much they mean to you or how much you appreciate your son when he helps around the house.
    • Praise your children constantly. Avoid coarse and abrasive language. Think of your kids as a coworker. Would you talk to your boss that way?
    • Share your time. Help a young mother at church by offering to hold their baby. Set up a co-op to babysit for your friend one day a week for a couple of hours. Organize a service project.
    • Do not judge. We cannot know what another person is suffering. As moms we can be highly judgmental of each other. We need to band together not tear one another apart.
    • Share your talents: Start a book club, game night, dessert night, mom’s club, art class, babysitting club, cooking club and invite friends from church, school or work both young and old

    banana cookies

    There is a never ending conundrum about what to do with old bananas. Banana bread is always a good option. It freezes well and makes nice little gifts. I did consider Frosted Banana Bars because they are oh so heavenly but decided against them because they seemed a little to fussy for a light afternoon snack. In the end the kids and I chose door number 3- Banana Cookies. They are actually called Banana Whoopie Cookies; however, sickness on this occasion we omitted the extra sugary frosting and gobbled down two cookies each instead one.

    Source: Adapted from Martha Stewart
    Makes about 3 dozen
    2 cups all-purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 cup mashed banana (from 1 large ripe banana)
    1/2 cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
    1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, clinic softened
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    1 large egg
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    Mash bananas and stir in baking soda.

    Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl.

    Combine banana and sour cream in another bowl.

    Cream butter and granulated and brown sugars with a mixer on medium-high speed, until pale and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, beating until incorporated. Add banana mixture in 2 additions, alternating with flour mixture.

    Drop spoonful of dough on prepared baking sheet. Bake until edges are golden, about 12 minutes. Slide parchment, with cookies, onto wire racks. Let cool.

    May Share

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Jeff Eusebio – CEO/Co-Founder

    Jeff Eusebiois the CEO and Co-Founder of Family Mint. Jeff created Family mint to give families an easy fun way to teach children and teenagers how to manage their money.

    Family Mint is a free website. The way it works is you, rx the parent, cheap sign up creating a virtual bank. As owner of the bank you manage your client’s (your children) funds matching interest rates, visit web handling deposits and withdrawls just as a bank would for you. Family Mint takes the stress off parents by automatically depositing allowance money in each child’s account. Allowance deposits can be made weekly or monthly. Each child creates their own account to keep track of their progress. They can manage deposits, withdrawls, transfers and plan long and short term expenses and saving goals. As the banker you can help motivate your child to save by giving them interest for so much money they save or by offering to price match when they reach a decided goal.

    We know that kids love to spend money. It is up to us as their parents to teach them fiscal responsibility.

    Oliver Twist

    I was in the parking lot loading the groceries into my car one morning when I was approached by an older woman begging for money. I recognized her from the previous month the familiar story of grief and financial woes. How do you know? How do you know if she really needs it for her hungry child at home or is she taking advantage of the economic backlash she is aware we are all suffering through? The store is not far from an area officially deemed as “tent city”. The population consists of thieves, visit web vagrants and a host of inhabitants who are down on their luck reminiscent of the barrow as described in Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist.” The book paints an illuminated picture of a dark 19th Century London plagued with contempt and greed. The only redeeming element is Oliver an orphan boy who remains pure-hearted and honorable despite a life of abuse and neglect as a result of the corrupt and flawed social institutions. Oliver was deemed a “troublesome” boy from birth with the propensity to amount to nothing when he was rescued by caring souls who saw him not as a delinquent but merely a lost soul in need of basic human sustenance. I surmise it was Oliver’s gracious gentle nature that procured a place in the hearts of those who saw fit to provide him with the opportunity escape his prison to prosperity. His story like many others touch us because they provide hope that anyone can overcome tribulation with their dignity still in tacked as long as they hold fast with integrity. His story also gives merit to those individuals who see a need and act to fulfill that need with selfless devotion.

    Is there not someone in our mist that is in need of some form of Motherly Adoration? That when met with unbiased attentions could provide the healing power necessary to recover from years of torment and abuse? We pass people everyday on the streets, cure at work, at home, at school, in a store, at church who suffer in silence. They feel lost and helpless. Their afflictions come in many different ways from sickness, physical and mental abuse, peer pressure, financial worries, addictions, loss, shyness, embarrassment and pride to begin with. When in public they hide behind a facade that everything is ok. Their false appearance may sometimes present itself to others as haughtiness (they are better than us) or strength (their life is perfect). When in reality what they need most is a kind hello, a polite acknowledgment they exist or an invitation to chat.

    I did not know this woman who approached me in the parking lot. I could not discern her true intentions. Whatever her story is she is human and so I gave her a few groceries to take with her. We never know when our acts of kindness will touch someone. Unbeknownst to Oliver his forgiving nature had an enormous impact on Nancy, a girl acquainted with Fagin’s group of thieves in London. The streets had been her home since she was a child. Through Oliver’s example she found courage and risked her life to save him.

    This month’s resolution is Share. When I made my list of resolutions in January my intention was to write real letters instead of emails. Email is my favorite form of communication. It is fast, no waiting days for the letter to reach the intended. Phones calls have a way of interrupting at the worst possible time and I always forget to send snail mail. Share also meant to record Memories. I have really been awful about keeping memories since our second child came along. Then last month I had an “email” conversation with my sister about strengthening our families. I was already working on my immediate family as my resolution for April was Family. Originally I had planned on recreating stronger ties with my extended family but there were a few set backs in March that placed my focus here at home. I finished off the month accomplishing both. Then I almost lost a very close friend in childbirth. Baby and mom are well and safely at home thankfully. Later the same week I had a conversation with a group of friends over dinner about the negativity they often feel in social circles. The topic of Share began to take on a new meaning.

    Sharing is not about us. When we teach our little ones to share it is because we want them to learn to think about other peoples feelings. When we share we help make another living being happy and in turn we feel joy. When we share advice ideally it is given with good intent to help that person through a difficult problem because we want to see them happy.

    To share means to think about others. Some ways we can do this are:

    • Send your friend or family member a letter. Yes we live in a fast paced world but there will never be a comparable replacement for an old fashioned letter. Think of something uplifting to say such as how they were a positive influence on you and how much you appreciate them.
    • Share your feelings. The goal is to help not impede by keeping negative comments to yourself. If you are not used to sharing your feelings it can be quite difficult at first. Start out small by telling your children and those close to you how much they mean to you or how much you appreciate your son when he helps around the house.
    • Praise your children constantly. Avoid coarse and abrasive language. Think of your kids as a coworker. Would you talk to your boss that way?
    • Share your time. Help a young mother at church by offering to hold their baby. Set up a co-op to babysit for your friend one day a week for a couple of hours. Organize a service project.
    • Do not judge. We cannot know what another person is suffering. As moms we can be highly judgmental of each other. We need to band together not tear one another apart.
    • Share your talents: Start a book club, game night, dessert night, mom’s club, art class, babysitting club, cooking club and invite friends from church, school or work both young and old

    Chicken and Roasted Red Pepper Panini with Cilantro Pesto and Feta

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, viagra buy quick, visit easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, .

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, viagra buy quick, visit easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, .

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, price quick, sildenafil easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, drug chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu, ect.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, broccoli, ect.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, viagra buy quick, visit easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, .

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, price quick, sildenafil easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, drug chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu, ect.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, broccoli, ect.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, about it land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilled quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    –Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade your neighbor’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, there because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    Encourage manners each time the family sits down to eat a home, school or in a restaurant. Help them practice setting the table.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, viagra buy quick, visit easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, .

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, price quick, sildenafil easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, drug chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu, ect.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, broccoli, ect.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, about it land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilled quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    –Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade your neighbor’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, there because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    Encourage manners each time the family sits down to eat a home, school or in a restaurant. Help them practice setting the table.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, more about land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilt quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone else’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade someone else’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, ask because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, viagra buy quick, visit easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, .

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, price quick, sildenafil easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, drug chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu, ect.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, broccoli, ect.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, about it land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilled quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    –Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade your neighbor’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, there because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    Encourage manners each time the family sits down to eat a home, school or in a restaurant. Help them practice setting the table.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, more about land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilt quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone else’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade someone else’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, ask because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.


    http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/banana-nut-buttermilk-waffles
    Serves 4 to 6

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    * 1 tablespoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 3 large eggs, cheapest separated
    * 2 cups nonfat buttermilk
    * 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, drugs melted
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 3 very ripe bananas (about 1 1/4 pounds)
    * 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    * 2/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    Directions

    1. Preheat a waffle iron. Into a large bowl, cheapest sift together flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, buttermilk, butter, and vanilla. Pour into dry ingredients; stir until just combined.
    3. In a separate bowl, coarsely mash bananas and lemon juice; stir into batter along with the walnuts. In a medium bowl, beat egg whites with a hand-mixer until stiff but not dry. Fold into the batter.
    4. Ladle about 1/3 cup batter onto each section of the waffle grid; spread batter almost to the edges. Close lid; bake until no steam emerges from waffle iron, 5 to 6 minutes.
    5. Transfer cooked waffles to a baking sheet; place in an oven set to low heat, about 200 degrees, while using remaining batter. Serve.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, viagra buy quick, visit easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, .

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, price quick, sildenafil easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, drug chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu, ect.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, broccoli, ect.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, about it land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilled quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    –Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade your neighbor’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, there because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    Encourage manners each time the family sits down to eat a home, school or in a restaurant. Help them practice setting the table.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, more about land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilt quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone else’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade someone else’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, ask because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.


    http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/banana-nut-buttermilk-waffles
    Serves 4 to 6

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    * 1 tablespoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 3 large eggs, cheapest separated
    * 2 cups nonfat buttermilk
    * 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, drugs melted
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 3 very ripe bananas (about 1 1/4 pounds)
    * 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    * 2/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    Directions

    1. Preheat a waffle iron. Into a large bowl, cheapest sift together flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, buttermilk, butter, and vanilla. Pour into dry ingredients; stir until just combined.
    3. In a separate bowl, coarsely mash bananas and lemon juice; stir into batter along with the walnuts. In a medium bowl, beat egg whites with a hand-mixer until stiff but not dry. Fold into the batter.
    4. Ladle about 1/3 cup batter onto each section of the waffle grid; spread batter almost to the edges. Close lid; bake until no steam emerges from waffle iron, 5 to 6 minutes.
    5. Transfer cooked waffles to a baking sheet; place in an oven set to low heat, about 200 degrees, while using remaining batter. Serve.
    http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/banana-nut-buttermilk-waffles
    Serves 4 to 6

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    * 1 tablespoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 3 large eggs, erectile separated
    * 2 cups nonfat buttermilk
    * 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, diagnosis melted
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 3 very ripe bananas (about 1 1/4 pounds)
    * 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    * 2/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    Directions

    1. Preheat a waffle iron. Into a large bowl, cost sift together flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, buttermilk, butter, and vanilla. Pour into dry ingredients; stir until just combined.
    3. In a separate bowl, coarsely mash bananas and lemon juice; stir into batter along with the walnuts. In a medium bowl, beat egg whites with a hand-mixer until stiff but not dry. Fold into the batter.
    4. Ladle about 1/3 cup batter onto each section of the waffle grid; spread batter almost to the edges. Close lid; bake until no steam emerges from waffle iron, 5 to 6 minutes.
    5. Transfer cooked waffles to a baking sheet; place in an oven set to low heat, about 200 degrees, while using remaining batter. Serve.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, viagra buy quick, visit easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, .

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, price quick, sildenafil easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, drug chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu, ect.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, broccoli, ect.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, about it land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilled quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    –Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade your neighbor’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, there because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    Encourage manners each time the family sits down to eat a home, school or in a restaurant. Help them practice setting the table.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, more about land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilt quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone else’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade someone else’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, ask because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.


    http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/banana-nut-buttermilk-waffles
    Serves 4 to 6

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    * 1 tablespoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 3 large eggs, cheapest separated
    * 2 cups nonfat buttermilk
    * 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, drugs melted
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 3 very ripe bananas (about 1 1/4 pounds)
    * 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    * 2/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    Directions

    1. Preheat a waffle iron. Into a large bowl, cheapest sift together flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, buttermilk, butter, and vanilla. Pour into dry ingredients; stir until just combined.
    3. In a separate bowl, coarsely mash bananas and lemon juice; stir into batter along with the walnuts. In a medium bowl, beat egg whites with a hand-mixer until stiff but not dry. Fold into the batter.
    4. Ladle about 1/3 cup batter onto each section of the waffle grid; spread batter almost to the edges. Close lid; bake until no steam emerges from waffle iron, 5 to 6 minutes.
    5. Transfer cooked waffles to a baking sheet; place in an oven set to low heat, about 200 degrees, while using remaining batter. Serve.
    http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/banana-nut-buttermilk-waffles
    Serves 4 to 6

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    * 1 tablespoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 3 large eggs, erectile separated
    * 2 cups nonfat buttermilk
    * 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, diagnosis melted
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 3 very ripe bananas (about 1 1/4 pounds)
    * 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    * 2/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    Directions

    1. Preheat a waffle iron. Into a large bowl, cost sift together flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, buttermilk, butter, and vanilla. Pour into dry ingredients; stir until just combined.
    3. In a separate bowl, coarsely mash bananas and lemon juice; stir into batter along with the walnuts. In a medium bowl, beat egg whites with a hand-mixer until stiff but not dry. Fold into the batter.
    4. Ladle about 1/3 cup batter onto each section of the waffle grid; spread batter almost to the edges. Close lid; bake until no steam emerges from waffle iron, 5 to 6 minutes.
    5. Transfer cooked waffles to a baking sheet; place in an oven set to low heat, about 200 degrees, while using remaining batter. Serve.

    Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, try

    Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

    I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

    I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, dosage “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.”

    The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

    With the final exam approaching fast, sildenafil I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

    My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

    I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

    This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

    –If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
    –Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
    –Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
    –Learn that new hobby or trade.
    –Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
    –Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
    Host a dinner party.
    –Simplify your life and home.
    –Reconnect severed ties with family.
    –Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
    –Break off unhealthy relationships.
    –Go back to school.
    –Stand up to a bully.
    –Be positive.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, healing quick, cure easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    3 ounces Italian Sausage

    1 small red onion, troche sliced

    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces

    1 medium bell pepper, sliced

    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

    Pepper

    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Add

    mini pigs in a blanket

    Talk about blast from the past. I have not eaten a “pig in the blanket” since I was a little girl. The kids were a little skeptical at first, ampoule you know the whole something new hurdle. My sister-n-law Roxanne showed us how to make these mini pigs in a blanket.

    1 package refrigerated biscuits
    1-2 packages hot dogs

    Preheat oven to 400. Cut each biscuit and hot dog in half. Wrap the biscuits around each hot dog. Seal the seam and place face down on a baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Or until golden brown.

    Variations:
    Use croissants or bread dough in the place of biscuit dough. We used the temperature and time as indicated on the package.

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, viagra buy quick, visit easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, .

    Grilled vegetables with Pasta

    Grilled vegetables with pasta is one of my favorite ways to use up vegetables and left over meat. Except in winter when they all go in a pot for soup. This dish is a throw back to my days in college. It is cheap, price quick, sildenafil easy and the variations are endless. Back then I used Top Ramen onions and peppers. On a college budget 10 for $1.00 for Top Ramen was not bad. The grilled vegetables seemed to turn an ordinary plate of noodles into an elegant meal. Throw in some black beans and I had a sustainable meal for all those hiking trips in the mountains.

    6 ounces Italian Sausage, drug chicken, pork, steak or 1 can of black or garbanzo beans,
    1 small red onion, sliced
    2 zucchini, halved then chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 medium bell pepper, sliced
    2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
    Pepper
    1 pound pasta of you choice

    Boil pasta according to package directions.

    Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook. Remove all but 1 tablespoon of the grease. Add the vegetables. Let cook a few minutes before stirring. Continue sauteing a few minutes longer. The vegetables should be tender but still have a bite to them.

    Drain pasta. Dish pasta onto plates or bowls and top with a serving of vegetables.

    Serves 4

    Variations:
    Meats: chicken, steak, pork chops, bacon, black beans, garbanzo beans, Kidney beans, tofu, ect.
    Vegetables: eggplant, squash, tomatoes, peas, asparagus, artichoke hearts, bok choy, broccoli, ect.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, about it land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilled quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    –Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade your neighbor’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, there because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    Encourage manners each time the family sits down to eat a home, school or in a restaurant. Help them practice setting the table.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.

    place-setting-guide

    If we want to have an enjoyable and civilized dining experience with our kids we have to take the time to teach them. That means eating together as a family and practicing good habits at home. Etiquette is defined as the rules for socially acceptable behavior. Bad table manners are a form of disrespect. If you want to make a great first impression on a first date, more about land a job interview or be ready for Thanksgiving at Aunt Bertha’s practice makes perfect.

    Consider dinnertime as an intimate social event. You are not only there to eat but to enjoy each other’s company. Etiquette helps us know what is expected of us and what we can expect from others. It is like a coordinated dance from the placement of the dinnerware to the movements of the dinner guests. Knowing and understanding table manners (the dance steps) allows everyone to enjoy the meal and avoid embarrassment.

    Younger children require constant reminders. Over time if we stick to it they will surprise us. Avoid saying “do not do that” and never scold them when they slip up. Small children lack the coordination therefore; meals are going to be messy. Making negative comments or yelling at them only embarrasses them and encourages them to misbehave. Instead use positive reinforcement to explain what they should be doing and why. When a glass of water is unintentionally spilt quietly help them clean it up. The same rule applies when adults tip a glass. We would use our napkin to calmly and quickly stop the spill from running over to the persons next to us. Withholding our agitation at the mess teaches them by example how to handle the situation properly. Should a child want to purposely cause mayhem remind them of the rules; food belongs on the plate not on the floor. If they insist on making a mess they can eat dinner alone in the other room or take their meal away.

    It is important to explain to children and teenagers precisely why we have rules of etiquette at the dinner table.
    Always wash your hands before eating.
    — We wait until everyone is served or the hostess says to start eating because that is the polite thing to do. It is rude to eat in front of someone especially when we are a guest in someone else’s home.
    — Always place a napkin in your lap so that food lands in the napkin and not on the floor. You also do not want your napkin to invade someone else’s eating space.
    — We don’t put our elbows on the table, ask because it crowds others and you could knock something over.
    — We don’t burp out loud, because it is unpleasant and offensive to those around you.
    — Chew with your mouth closed because no one wants to see your chewed food, it is gross.
    — Take small bites because you could choke.
    — Ask brother to pass the peas. Reaching for things far away on the table could knock something over.
    — Always say please and thank you to show gratitude.

    For everything you ever wanted to know about dinning etiquette visit EtiquetteScholar.com. The following videos will cover setting an informal dinner table and touch on a a few basic principles of etiquette.


    http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/banana-nut-buttermilk-waffles
    Serves 4 to 6

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    * 1 tablespoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 3 large eggs, cheapest separated
    * 2 cups nonfat buttermilk
    * 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, drugs melted
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 3 very ripe bananas (about 1 1/4 pounds)
    * 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    * 2/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    Directions

    1. Preheat a waffle iron. Into a large bowl, cheapest sift together flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, buttermilk, butter, and vanilla. Pour into dry ingredients; stir until just combined.
    3. In a separate bowl, coarsely mash bananas and lemon juice; stir into batter along with the walnuts. In a medium bowl, beat egg whites with a hand-mixer until stiff but not dry. Fold into the batter.
    4. Ladle about 1/3 cup batter onto each section of the waffle grid; spread batter almost to the edges. Close lid; bake until no steam emerges from waffle iron, 5 to 6 minutes.
    5. Transfer cooked waffles to a baking sheet; place in an oven set to low heat, about 200 degrees, while using remaining batter. Serve.
    http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/banana-nut-buttermilk-waffles
    Serves 4 to 6

    * 2 cups all-purpose flour
    * 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
    * 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    * 1 tablespoon baking powder
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 3 large eggs, erectile separated
    * 2 cups nonfat buttermilk
    * 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, diagnosis melted
    * 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * 3 very ripe bananas (about 1 1/4 pounds)
    * 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    * 2/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    Directions

    1. Preheat a waffle iron. Into a large bowl, cost sift together flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
    2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, buttermilk, butter, and vanilla. Pour into dry ingredients; stir until just combined.
    3. In a separate bowl, coarsely mash bananas and lemon juice; stir into batter along with the walnuts. In a medium bowl, beat egg whites with a hand-mixer until stiff but not dry. Fold into the batter.
    4. Ladle about 1/3 cup batter onto each section of the waffle grid; spread batter almost to the edges. Close lid; bake until no steam emerges from waffle iron, 5 to 6 minutes.
    5. Transfer cooked waffles to a baking sheet; place in an oven set to low heat, about 200 degrees, while using remaining batter. Serve.

    Photo: “Dandelions” by Kitchen Table Medicine, try

    Source: Courtesy Photo Bucket

    I am a horrible test taker. To this day I get sweaty palms and start to second guess myself. I learned in college that the answers to the tests were not straight out of the book as the teacher would profess but their own version of the answer. I am a hands on kinetic learner. I knew back then it was difficult for me to process information spouted out at me from the chalk board. So I always chose to sit in the front row and took almost word for word notes. At home I would faithfully read the text book and dutifully did my homework. I could explain the where and why verbally but once I sat down with a scantron in from of me the lights went out.

    I was venting to a friend of mine I worked with one day. She was older than I was but from the first time we met we became fast friends. It was like we were soul sisters. We must have known each other in a previous life. She gave me the best advice. With a big smile on her face she told me, dosage “You have to face the lion before it can become a dandelion.”

    The following Monday I marched into my professor’s office to see if he could help me figure out what I was doing wrong. I was really scared of the man. Talking to him was a difficult thing for me but I faced the lion and he actually was nice. He encouraged me to take notes then write an essay on the pages I read. An assignment I gladly took on in hopes of scoring higher than a C.

    With the final exam approaching fast, sildenafil I geared myself up. I sat in my usual front seat, took detailed notes (he actually gave us the test questions and answers), then went home and studied. I read the book, took notes and wrote and essay. I memorized the test questions and answers he gave us in class. A funny thing happened on test day. I was perplexed as to how I should answer several of his questions. For you see, there were two correct answers. One, I was certain I had read in the book; however, there was another answer straight from the professors list of questions and answers. I went with the professor’s answers and received my first A. Hallelujah!

    My quest to chase the lion was not yet over. I felt cheated. I thought what if every test I took that semester I actually scored higher. According to the book I was right. I was not about to let some arrogant professor fail me. So once again I marched into his office and explained to him my discovery. He was not happy to be told that he was wrong. The following week when the grades were posted I got an A in the class. “Once you face the lion, it will become a dandelion.”

    I use the same mantra with my children everyday. The little guys can become frustrated with everyday tasks that we take for granted. Simple actions such as putting on a shirt can drive them into a tantrum. I do not accept can’t in my house. Yoda tells us, “there is only do or do not, there is no try”. If you cannot do it you can ask for help. Accepting defeat and whining about it is not an option. There will be many things we cannot do in life. As long as we can stand there and honestly say that we did our absolute best then we have nothing to whine over. If we never made the attempt, however; how will we know that the lion starring back at us is nothing but a dandelion?

    This month’s resolution is to accomplish a difficult task. Think of things in your life that seem overwhelming or that you would like to change. Think of things you have been wanting to do but have not felt up to the task. Seek out help to overcome this burden or research ways to master the problem.

    –If you are shy that could mean breaking out of your shell a little.
    –Write down your biggest fears and come up with ways to overcome them. Make it your new goal for the New Year.
    –Accomplish a task that you have been afraid to do or keep procrastinating.
    –Learn that new hobby or trade.
    –Take a risk as long as it does not hurt anyone or result in negative consequences.
    –Learn to live within a budget to get out of debt.
    Host a dinner party.
    –Simplify your life and home.
    –Reconnect severed ties with family.
    –Stand up to peer-pressure. If you do not feel good about something stop participating.
    –Break off unhealthy relationships.
    –Go back to school.
    –Stand up to a bully.
    –Be positive.
    If you are ever on the hunt for something exciting to eat try combing through the Closet Cooking Blogspot. This guy comes up with the most lively lip smack’n tantalizing recipes. There is no going wrong with cilantro, healing chicken, decease red peppers and feta. Cut them up for hors d’oeuvres. Serve them for a girls night out or for the guys game night.

    If you do not have a panini press grill them in a skillet. Use a spatula to press down on the sandwich.

    Source: ClosetCooking
    (Serving Size 1)
    1 chicken breast (pounded thin)
    1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
    salt and pepper to taste
    1/2 tablespoon olive oil
    2 slices of bread (or 1 roll)
    1/2 roasted red pepper
    1 handful baby spinach
    2 tablespoons cilantro pesto, recipe below
    1 handful feta (mashed)
    1/2 tablespoon olive oil

    Make the cilantro pesto; set aside.

    Dust the chicken with the paprika and season it with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a pan. Add the chicken and cook until it is golden brown on both sides and cooked all the way through, about 4-7 minutes per side.

    To assemble the sandwich, spread the bottom slice of bread with some cilantro pesto. Top with chicken, red pepper, feta then spinach. Brush both sides of the sandwich with olive oil and grill until golden brown on both sides.

    Cilantro Pesto: Serving size 1 cup
    1 cup cilantro
    2 teaspoons ginger (grated)
    3 tablespoons sesame seeds (toasted and ground)
    1 red chili
    olive oil
    salt and pepper to taste
    1 splash lemon juice

    Puree everything in a food processor.

    Black Bean and Chicken Salad with Cilantro Lime Vinaigrette

    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department. At that time Al Bundy graced the night

    I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. The recipe calls for brown sugar but I swapped maple syrup for the sugar.

    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix

    2 tablespoons brown sugar

    2 eggs

    1 1/2 cups milk

    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese

    9 hot dogs, what is ed advice cost cut in half

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the eggs and cheese into the dry mixture until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full. Add 1 hot dog half to each muffin.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown
    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department. At that time Al Bundy graced the night

    I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. The recipe calls for brown sugar but I swapped maple syrup for the sugar.

    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix

    2 tablespoons brown sugar

    2 eggs

    1 1/2 cups milk

    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese

    9 hot dogs, advice cost cut in half

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the eggs and cheese into the dry mixture until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full. Add 1 hot dog half to each muffin.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown
    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department at the mall. It was not the most glamorous of professions, prostate standing around for 9 hours but it paid. Occasionally for breakfast I would stop by Cinnabon for a mini roll and wash it down with a pint of milk. Sometimes for lunch the owner of the Chinese Wok would cook up a special plate of spicy Tai food for me. But my favorite lunch was at the corn dog place. I loved the cheese sticks. A stick of cheese dipped in corn bread and then deep fried to perfection. As a teenager there was no such thing as eating healthy. I have not had a corn dog in an extremely long time. When I bit into a corn dog muffin I was sent back in time to the little table in the Sears break room where I sat and ate my cheese stick.

    These little guys are really great for an after school snack. I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. It is a little sweeter than the Jiffy mix so I swapped out the sugar for maple syrup. I am thinking I might play around with adding some vegetables, medicine carrots, peas or corn.

    Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix
    2 tablespoons brown sugar or maple syrup
    2 eggs
    1 1/2 cups milk
    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese
    9 hot dogs, cut in half lengthwise then chopped into half moons or diced

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the milk mixture, cheese and hot dogs into the dry ingredients until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown.
    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department. At that time Al Bundy graced the night

    I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. The recipe calls for brown sugar but I swapped maple syrup for the sugar.

    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix

    2 tablespoons brown sugar

    2 eggs

    1 1/2 cups milk

    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese

    9 hot dogs, advice cost cut in half

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the eggs and cheese into the dry mixture until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full. Add 1 hot dog half to each muffin.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown
    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department at the mall. It was not the most glamorous of professions, prostate standing around for 9 hours but it paid. Occasionally for breakfast I would stop by Cinnabon for a mini roll and wash it down with a pint of milk. Sometimes for lunch the owner of the Chinese Wok would cook up a special plate of spicy Tai food for me. But my favorite lunch was at the corn dog place. I loved the cheese sticks. A stick of cheese dipped in corn bread and then deep fried to perfection. As a teenager there was no such thing as eating healthy. I have not had a corn dog in an extremely long time. When I bit into a corn dog muffin I was sent back in time to the little table in the Sears break room where I sat and ate my cheese stick.

    These little guys are really great for an after school snack. I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. It is a little sweeter than the Jiffy mix so I swapped out the sugar for maple syrup. I am thinking I might play around with adding some vegetables, medicine carrots, peas or corn.

    Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix
    2 tablespoons brown sugar or maple syrup
    2 eggs
    1 1/2 cups milk
    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese
    9 hot dogs, cut in half lengthwise then chopped into half moons or diced

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the milk mixture, cheese and hot dogs into the dry ingredients until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown.
    I found this really great Cilantro Lime Chicken recipe in the Eating Healthy section of Woman’s Day magazine. Normally I glimpse over the section and toss because they rarely have any recipes, search that although I might enjoy them, I feel my kids would not eat it. This time I found a few recipes to try Cilantro Lime Chicken being one of them.

    A couple summers ago I had this obsession with cilantro and limes. I could not get enough. I tried several Cilantro Lime Chicken recipes but was never impressed. In this particular recipe the hint of sweetness from the honey, the pungent cilantro and tart lime build upon one another creating a nice mingling of flavors making this my go to recipe for fajitas. I doubled the marinade and used it to baste the chicken while cooking. The flavor was perfect.

    Source: Woman’s Day 2010
    Cilantro Lime Chicken:
    1 tbsp
    1 honey
    Juice of 1 lime
    1/4 cup chopped cilantro
    2 chicken breasts

    In a small bowl, whisk together the oil, honey, lime juice and cilantro. Pour this mixture over the chicken breast and marinate for 20 minutes. Discard marinade.

    Grill or broil chicken for 6-8 minutes per side until it is cooked through and no longer pink.
    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department. At that time Al Bundy graced the night

    I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. The recipe calls for brown sugar but I swapped maple syrup for the sugar.

    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix

    2 tablespoons brown sugar

    2 eggs

    1 1/2 cups milk

    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese

    9 hot dogs, advice cost cut in half

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the eggs and cheese into the dry mixture until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full. Add 1 hot dog half to each muffin.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown
    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department at the mall. It was not the most glamorous of professions, prostate standing around for 9 hours but it paid. Occasionally for breakfast I would stop by Cinnabon for a mini roll and wash it down with a pint of milk. Sometimes for lunch the owner of the Chinese Wok would cook up a special plate of spicy Tai food for me. But my favorite lunch was at the corn dog place. I loved the cheese sticks. A stick of cheese dipped in corn bread and then deep fried to perfection. As a teenager there was no such thing as eating healthy. I have not had a corn dog in an extremely long time. When I bit into a corn dog muffin I was sent back in time to the little table in the Sears break room where I sat and ate my cheese stick.

    These little guys are really great for an after school snack. I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. It is a little sweeter than the Jiffy mix so I swapped out the sugar for maple syrup. I am thinking I might play around with adding some vegetables, medicine carrots, peas or corn.

    Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix
    2 tablespoons brown sugar or maple syrup
    2 eggs
    1 1/2 cups milk
    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese
    9 hot dogs, cut in half lengthwise then chopped into half moons or diced

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the milk mixture, cheese and hot dogs into the dry ingredients until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown.
    I found this really great Cilantro Lime Chicken recipe in the Eating Healthy section of Woman’s Day magazine. Normally I glimpse over the section and toss because they rarely have any recipes, search that although I might enjoy them, I feel my kids would not eat it. This time I found a few recipes to try Cilantro Lime Chicken being one of them.

    A couple summers ago I had this obsession with cilantro and limes. I could not get enough. I tried several Cilantro Lime Chicken recipes but was never impressed. In this particular recipe the hint of sweetness from the honey, the pungent cilantro and tart lime build upon one another creating a nice mingling of flavors making this my go to recipe for fajitas. I doubled the marinade and used it to baste the chicken while cooking. The flavor was perfect.

    Source: Woman’s Day 2010
    Cilantro Lime Chicken:
    1 tbsp
    1 honey
    Juice of 1 lime
    1/4 cup chopped cilantro
    2 chicken breasts

    In a small bowl, whisk together the oil, honey, lime juice and cilantro. Pour this mixture over the chicken breast and marinate for 20 minutes. Discard marinade.

    Grill or broil chicken for 6-8 minutes per side until it is cooked through and no longer pink.
    I have to laugh because I think it comical I found a really great Cilantro Lime Chicken recipe in the Eating Healthy section of Woman’s Day magazine. Thanks to whom ever sent the subscription. Normally I glimpse over the section and toss because they rarely have any recipes that I feel my kids would eat. But this time I found a few recipes to try Cilantro Lime Chicken being one of them.

    I doubled the marinade and used it to baste the chicken while cooking. Doing so will lock in the flavor.

    Source: Woman’s Day 2010
    Cilantro Lime Chicken:
    1 tbsp
    1 honey
    Juice of 1 lime
    1/4 cup chopped cilantro
    2 chicken breasts

    In a small bowl, viagra whisk together the oil, website like this honey, lime juice and cilantro. Pour this mixture over the chicken breast and marinate for 20 minutes. Discard marinade.

    Grill or broil chicken for 6-8 minutes per side until it is cooked through and no longer pink.
    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department. At that time Al Bundy graced the night

    I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. The recipe calls for brown sugar but I swapped maple syrup for the sugar.

    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix

    2 tablespoons brown sugar

    2 eggs

    1 1/2 cups milk

    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese

    9 hot dogs, advice cost cut in half

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the eggs and cheese into the dry mixture until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full. Add 1 hot dog half to each muffin.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown
    corn dog muffins

    My first job after graduating high school was working in the Sears shoe department at the mall. It was not the most glamorous of professions, prostate standing around for 9 hours but it paid. Occasionally for breakfast I would stop by Cinnabon for a mini roll and wash it down with a pint of milk. Sometimes for lunch the owner of the Chinese Wok would cook up a special plate of spicy Tai food for me. But my favorite lunch was at the corn dog place. I loved the cheese sticks. A stick of cheese dipped in corn bread and then deep fried to perfection. As a teenager there was no such thing as eating healthy. I have not had a corn dog in an extremely long time. When I bit into a corn dog muffin I was sent back in time to the little table in the Sears break room where I sat and ate my cheese stick.

    These little guys are really great for an after school snack. I used one (16 ounce) package of Marie Calendar’s corn bread mix. It is a little sweeter than the Jiffy mix so I swapped out the sugar for maple syrup. I am thinking I might play around with adding some vegetables, medicine carrots, peas or corn.

    Source: Adapted from Allrecipes.com
    2 (8.5 ounce) packages cornbread mix
    2 tablespoons brown sugar or maple syrup
    2 eggs
    1 1/2 cups milk
    1 cup grated Cheddar cheese
    9 hot dogs, cut in half lengthwise then chopped into half moons or diced

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease muffin tins.

    Stir together the cornbread mix and the brown sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the eggs and milk in a small bowl until smooth. Fold the milk mixture, cheese and hot dogs into the dry ingredients until moistened. Spoon mixture into muffin tins until 2/3 full.

    Bake in a preheated oven 14 to 18 minutes, or until golden brown.
    I found this really great Cilantro Lime Chicken recipe in the Eating Healthy section of Woman’s Day magazine. Normally I glimpse over the section and toss because they rarely have any recipes, search that although I might enjoy them, I feel my kids would not eat it. This time I found a few recipes to try Cilantro Lime Chicken being one of them.

    A couple summers ago I had this obsession with cilantro and limes. I could not get enough. I tried several Cilantro Lime Chicken recipes but was never impressed. In this particular recipe the hint of sweetness from the honey, the pungent cilantro and tart lime build upon one another creating a nice mingling of flavors making this my go to recipe for fajitas. I doubled the marinade and used it to baste the chicken while cooking. The flavor was perfect.

    Source: Woman’s Day 2010
    Cilantro Lime Chicken:
    1 tbsp
    1 honey
    Juice of 1 lime
    1/4 cup chopped cilantro
    2 chicken breasts

    In a small bowl, whisk together the oil, honey, lime juice and cilantro. Pour this mixture over the chicken breast and marinate for 20 minutes. Discard marinade.

    Grill or broil chicken for 6-8 minutes per side until it is cooked through and no longer pink.
    I have to laugh because I think it comical I found a really great Cilantro Lime Chicken recipe in the Eating Healthy section of Woman’s Day magazine. Thanks to whom ever sent the subscription. Normally I glimpse over the section and toss because they rarely have any recipes that I feel my kids would eat. But this time I found a few recipes to try Cilantro Lime Chicken being one of them.

    I doubled the marinade and used it to baste the chicken while cooking. Doing so will lock in the flavor.

    Source: Woman’s Day 2010
    Cilantro Lime Chicken:
    1 tbsp
    1 honey
    Juice of 1 lime
    1/4 cup chopped cilantro
    2 chicken breasts

    In a small bowl, viagra whisk together the oil, website like this honey, lime juice and cilantro. Pour this mixture over the chicken breast and marinate for 20 minutes. Discard marinade.

    Grill or broil chicken for 6-8 minutes per side until it is cooked through and no longer pink.

    Black Bean Chicken Salad

    In the past I posted a Southwestern Chicken salad recipe and another recipe for Taco Salad. They are simple recipes with very few ingredients. This recipe for Black Bean Chicken Salad is a step up and showcases a zesty dressing that turns the ordinary into extraordinary. Yes it is a bit more work but oh so worth it especially if made with Cilantro Lime Chicken.

    Source: Allrecipes.com
    6 cups torn lettuce
    1 1/2 cups cubed cooked chicken breast
    1 (15 ounce) can black beans, website rinsed and
    drained
    1 cup chopped seeded tomatoes
    1 cup chopped green pepper
    1/2 cup sliced red onion
    1/2 cup shredded reduced-fat Cheddar
    cheese

    Lime Vinaigrette:
    1/4 cup minced fresh cilantro or parsley
    1/4 cup chopped seeded tomato
    1 tbsp cider vinegar
    1 tbsp olive or canola oil
    1 tbsp lime juice
    1/2 tsp grated lime peel
    1 garlic clove, click minced
    1/4 tsp salt
    1/4 tsp pepper
    1/4 tsp chili powder

    In a large serving bowl, combine the lettuce, chicken, beans, tomatoes, green pepper, onion and cheese. In a blender or food processor, combine the vinaigrette ingredients; cover and process until smooth. Pour over salad and toss to coat.

    May Website Review: Eating Small Potatoes

    small-potatoes

    Small Potatoes is another blog on the subject of eating seasonally and locally. The blog was started to catalog their journey as they shifted into a more provident way of eating. Eating locally is about using the resources around you namely farms and ranches to get the most nutrients out of the food we eat. Farmers markets and CSA’s are usually certified organic meaning they do not use pesticides or other harmful chemicals to treat their plants. Choosing locally grown produce over those that are shipped in from elsewhere ensures the food is picked fresh and full of vitamin packed flavor.

    Small Potatoes shares their struggles with staying true during the winter by overcoming the fears of preserving the bounty during the spring and summer. Click on the link for NCHP (National Center for Home Preservation) to learn more about preserving. Small Potatoes also offers yummy recipes to try in addition to simple tips and resources they have collected along the way. If you have been thinking about joining a CSA or do not know what a CSA is Small Potatoes can help point you in the right direction.