Frosted Banana Bars with Whipped Cream Cheese Frosting

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.

More Salad and Peas, Please!

Often on game nights we have pizza for dinner. The kids are so excited they forgo the veggies and salad filling up on pizza. Tonight the kids were outside playing and were grimy from the mud as well as exhausted. I packed them all into the bathtub for a quick scrub before dinner. By the time they reached the dinner table they were ravaging wolves. The pizza was not ready. The only thing on the table was a bowl of peas (seasoned with a little butter, look salt and pepper and a sprinkle of Parmesan cheese) and a salad. Maybe that was a good thing.

As I placed the salad and peas on their plates Adelin complained “I do not want that!” and Everett shoved the plate away, page as usual. Mason however started to devour his peas and was already on a second helping before everyone had been served. (Shocking…I did not think he liked peas) Adelin, Mason’s shadow, joined in eating all her peas and salad. Animosity towards vegetables soon turned into a contest of who could eat their salad and peas the fastest. Requests for more came as each competitor cleaned their plate. “More peas please.” “More salad please.” By the time the pizza was done their little tummies could only handle one small slice rather than two or three.

Experts agree if getting your kids to eat vegetables is a stress do not give up. There are a few ways combat a veggie-phobia.
–No snacking allowed. If they come to the dinner table hungry enough to eat wood they are more likely to eat better.
–Treats are just that. Save the treats for a special occasion or once a day. Kids are naturally drawn to the sweet taste of sugar. They can learn to enjoy fruits and vegetables as much as a cookie if we teach them how. It may take half their childhood, as I am beginning to think in Everett’s case, but it can be done.
–Let them dip. If it takes frosting, yogurt, cheese, peanut butter, hummus or ranch dressing so be it.
–To Chop or Dice. Try serving vegetables cooked, raw, diced, sliced or in sticks. Sometimes it is the texture or the presentation that has them turning their nose up.
–Use more fruits and vegetables. Add diced, chopped or pureed vegetables to recipes. Vegetables can add wonderful flavor which means less fat, added fiber and more filling.
–Set a good example.
–Start infants on vegetables. Limit the amount of starchy snack foods.
–Offer a variety of fruits and vegetables.
–Jazz it up. Add dried fruit, cheese or nuts to salads.
–Play with your food. Be cute and dress up fruits and vegetables by cutting flowers and making faces.
–Never force the issue. Give them the opportunity and one day they will surprise you.

Photo: Property of MyRecipes

Springtime Lemon Muffins

I made this cake last year for a luncheon I threw for a few friends; along with my favorite southwestern chicken salad. I used a small loaf of angel food cake making three layers rather than six. I tried to find lemon curd in the bakery and cold isle of the market but was unsuccessful. The lady at the bakery did not have a clue what I was talking about. I reminded her they are a bakery and must make something that calls for lemon curd. She then directed me to the canned fruit isle where I picked up a can of lemon pie filling. (This is a small town) It was nothing close to the lemon curb I know should be in a clear tub refrigerated but it was all I had. I think I used too much of the gourmet lemon curd because the layers kept slipping around. I ended up chopping it up and threw it in a trifle bowl. The simplicity of the angel food cake paired with the lemon curd was refreshing. Add good food and friends and all my frustrations disappeared.

Source: unknown
2 small angel food cakes
1 cup lemon curd
1 can whipped cream
1 cup crushed lemon cookies

Using a long serrated knife, clinic visit this slice each cake horizontally into 3 layers.
Using a spatula, online spread half the lemon curd on the 2 bottom cake layers. Top with a generous layer of whipped cream. Place the middle cake layers on top and spread with the remaining curd and more whipped cream. Place the remaining 2 cake layers on top, hospital cover with whipped cream and sprinkle with the crushed cookies. Refrigerate at least 1 hour before serving.

Alternative:
Use banana pudding in place of the lemon curd
Omit the whipped cream. Spread sides with lemon curd and press on sliced almonds. Dust the top with confectioners sugar. Make designs by placing a doily on top before dusting with sugar.

Lemon Curd:
Source: River Cottage Family Cookbook

6 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
3/4 cup superfine sugar
Zest of 3 lemons
2 eggs, plus 1 yolk
pint Mason jar or bowl with lid

Juice the three lemons and to the saucepan with the lemon zest,eggs and yolk, butter and sugar. Cook over low heat. Stir occasionally until butter has melted and the liquid is yellow and runny.

Stirring constantly gently cook until the eggs thicken and the mixture turns to a thick sauce; about 10 minutes. Too much heat will make lemon flavored scrambled eggs.

When the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon and leave a clear line if you wipe your finger across it, the curd is ready. Remove from the stove. Pour the curd through a sieve into either a clean jam jar or a bowl. Keep refrigerated for 1 week.

Variations:
Substitute a couple of limes for one of the lemons
I made this cake last year for a luncheon I threw for a few friends; along with my favorite southwestern chicken salad. I used a small loaf of angel food cake making three layers rather than six. I tried to find lemon curd in the bakery and cold isle of the market but was unsuccessful. The lady at the bakery did not have a clue what I was talking about. I reminded her they are a bakery and must make something that calls for lemon curd. She then directed me to the canned fruit isle where I picked up a can of lemon pie filling. (This is a small town) It was nothing close to the lemon curb I know should be in a clear tub refrigerated but it was all I had. I think I used too much of the gourmet lemon curd because the layers kept slipping around. I ended up chopping it up and threw it in a trifle bowl. The simplicity of the angel food cake paired with the lemon curd was refreshing. Add good food and friends and all my frustrations disappeared.

Source: unknown
2 small angel food cakes
1 cup lemon curd
1 can whipped cream
1 cup crushed lemon cookies

Using a long serrated knife, clinic visit this slice each cake horizontally into 3 layers.
Using a spatula, online spread half the lemon curd on the 2 bottom cake layers. Top with a generous layer of whipped cream. Place the middle cake layers on top and spread with the remaining curd and more whipped cream. Place the remaining 2 cake layers on top, hospital cover with whipped cream and sprinkle with the crushed cookies. Refrigerate at least 1 hour before serving.

Alternative:
Use banana pudding in place of the lemon curd
Omit the whipped cream. Spread sides with lemon curd and press on sliced almonds. Dust the top with confectioners sugar. Make designs by placing a doily on top before dusting with sugar.

Lemon Curd:
Source: River Cottage Family Cookbook

6 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
3/4 cup superfine sugar
Zest of 3 lemons
2 eggs, plus 1 yolk
pint Mason jar or bowl with lid

Juice the three lemons and to the saucepan with the lemon zest,eggs and yolk, butter and sugar. Cook over low heat. Stir occasionally until butter has melted and the liquid is yellow and runny.

Stirring constantly gently cook until the eggs thicken and the mixture turns to a thick sauce; about 10 minutes. Too much heat will make lemon flavored scrambled eggs.

When the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon and leave a clear line if you wipe your finger across it, the curd is ready. Remove from the stove. Pour the curd through a sieve into either a clean jam jar or a bowl. Keep refrigerated for 1 week.

Variations:
Substitute a couple of limes for one of the lemons
In February, price the local schools were out for Presidents week. The mother hen that I am, I loved having Mason home. We enjoyed sleeping in, staying up late, a morning in the mountains playing in the snow, a visit from Grandma and Grandpa, stomping in mud puddles and bike rides to the park on the days it was not raining.

Spring Break is coming up and like most families watching their cash, we want make the most of the week on very little spending. I learned about some really great ideas from the Family Fun website, Woman’s Day Magazine and other moms in the area for fun activities and adventures that will not break the bank.

At-home summer camp: Give each day a theme. Monday is park day, Tuesday is library day, Wednesday is swimming, Thursday is trip day- visit the zoo, go up the canyon for a hike, or some other fun activity. Friday is jar day- Write activities (bake cookies, jump on the trampoline, take a bath, play game, write a story, call a friend to play with) on slips of paper and place in a jar. Whatever they draw out, they need to do for at least a half hour.

Souvenirs: Kids mostly remember the special treats and souvenirs. If you plan on staying home, give the kids a little spending money. Take the kids out for a treat one evening. Going grocery shopping? Let them pick out a souvenir. It could be candy, a magazine or a pretty bar of soap.

The Plaza Hotel: Ever thought of getting into the Bed and Breakfast business? Now you can. Have the kids book a room at home. Complete with turn down service and a chocolate or an origami towel on the pillow. Make a mom and dad do not disturb sign. Create a room service breakfast menu with check off boxes. Clear the counter off and leave mini soaps and folded towels.

A Night Out: Fancy a little night life? Pull out the board games. Work on a puzzle. Watch a movie. Play glow in the dark volleyball or ghost in the graveyard.

Act like tourists: Take public transportation or walk.

Send Postcards: Buy or make postcards and send them to loved ones near or far.

Buy vacation food: Purchase single serving cereal boxes.

Back yard camping trip: Set up the tent in the backyard. Grab flashlights, the Coleman and a cooler of food and drinks. Tell stories and roast marshmallows just as you would on a camping trip.

Host an iron man chef contest: Host a family cook off.

Neighborhood Attractions: Take advantage of the best your state has to offer in your own backyard by spending the day carousing nearby cities and/or landmarks. Choose a different destination each day, returning home to sleep at night. Enjoy fishing, hiking, river rafting, whale watching, national parks, dinner cruises, the beach, an amusement park, museums, water parks, cave exploration, the zoo, historical tourist stops. Grab breakfast at home and do not forget to pack a cooler with snacks and lunch. Visit Trip Advisor for ideas on locales just  tank of gas .

Timeshares and camping: Book a timeshare or go camping. Both options are cheaper than a hotel stay and because the kitchen is on site you save on the cost of meals. Camp sites usually run from $16 dollars to $25 dollars a night. With the economy upside down a friend of mine says you can snag a timeshare for $200 a week.

Farm Stays: Ever wonder what life is like on a farm? Now you can get in the thick of things with a “haycation“. Dine on meals made with fresh picked food. Help gather eggs and milk a cow. Take a horse ride. Both working and non-working farms provide accommodations be it a room in the main farmhouse or a cabin located on the land. Farm stays can vary from bed and breakfast to dude ranch to actually lending a hand with the chores on the farm.

Airfare: Register with Airfare Watch Dog to get rock bottom steals on airfare tickets. A friend of mine purchased 2 round trip tickets to Iowa for $400 versus the $700 per ticket going rate. My sister found tickets from Florida to Califorina for under $200.
I made this cake last year for a luncheon I threw for a few friends; along with my favorite southwestern chicken salad. I used a small loaf of angel food cake making three layers rather than six. I tried to find lemon curd in the bakery and cold isle of the market but was unsuccessful. The lady at the bakery did not have a clue what I was talking about. I reminded her they are a bakery and must make something that calls for lemon curd. She then directed me to the canned fruit isle where I picked up a can of lemon pie filling. (This is a small town) It was nothing close to the lemon curb I know should be in a clear tub refrigerated but it was all I had. I think I used too much of the gourmet lemon curd because the layers kept slipping around. I ended up chopping it up and threw it in a trifle bowl. The simplicity of the angel food cake paired with the lemon curd was refreshing. Add good food and friends and all my frustrations disappeared.

Source: unknown
2 small angel food cakes
1 cup lemon curd
1 can whipped cream
1 cup crushed lemon cookies

Using a long serrated knife, clinic visit this slice each cake horizontally into 3 layers.
Using a spatula, online spread half the lemon curd on the 2 bottom cake layers. Top with a generous layer of whipped cream. Place the middle cake layers on top and spread with the remaining curd and more whipped cream. Place the remaining 2 cake layers on top, hospital cover with whipped cream and sprinkle with the crushed cookies. Refrigerate at least 1 hour before serving.

Alternative:
Use banana pudding in place of the lemon curd
Omit the whipped cream. Spread sides with lemon curd and press on sliced almonds. Dust the top with confectioners sugar. Make designs by placing a doily on top before dusting with sugar.

Lemon Curd:
Source: River Cottage Family Cookbook

6 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
3/4 cup superfine sugar
Zest of 3 lemons
2 eggs, plus 1 yolk
pint Mason jar or bowl with lid

Juice the three lemons and to the saucepan with the lemon zest,eggs and yolk, butter and sugar. Cook over low heat. Stir occasionally until butter has melted and the liquid is yellow and runny.

Stirring constantly gently cook until the eggs thicken and the mixture turns to a thick sauce; about 10 minutes. Too much heat will make lemon flavored scrambled eggs.

When the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon and leave a clear line if you wipe your finger across it, the curd is ready. Remove from the stove. Pour the curd through a sieve into either a clean jam jar or a bowl. Keep refrigerated for 1 week.

Variations:
Substitute a couple of limes for one of the lemons
In February, price the local schools were out for Presidents week. The mother hen that I am, I loved having Mason home. We enjoyed sleeping in, staying up late, a morning in the mountains playing in the snow, a visit from Grandma and Grandpa, stomping in mud puddles and bike rides to the park on the days it was not raining.

Spring Break is coming up and like most families watching their cash, we want make the most of the week on very little spending. I learned about some really great ideas from the Family Fun website, Woman’s Day Magazine and other moms in the area for fun activities and adventures that will not break the bank.

At-home summer camp: Give each day a theme. Monday is park day, Tuesday is library day, Wednesday is swimming, Thursday is trip day- visit the zoo, go up the canyon for a hike, or some other fun activity. Friday is jar day- Write activities (bake cookies, jump on the trampoline, take a bath, play game, write a story, call a friend to play with) on slips of paper and place in a jar. Whatever they draw out, they need to do for at least a half hour.

Souvenirs: Kids mostly remember the special treats and souvenirs. If you plan on staying home, give the kids a little spending money. Take the kids out for a treat one evening. Going grocery shopping? Let them pick out a souvenir. It could be candy, a magazine or a pretty bar of soap.

The Plaza Hotel: Ever thought of getting into the Bed and Breakfast business? Now you can. Have the kids book a room at home. Complete with turn down service and a chocolate or an origami towel on the pillow. Make a mom and dad do not disturb sign. Create a room service breakfast menu with check off boxes. Clear the counter off and leave mini soaps and folded towels.

A Night Out: Fancy a little night life? Pull out the board games. Work on a puzzle. Watch a movie. Play glow in the dark volleyball or ghost in the graveyard.

Act like tourists: Take public transportation or walk.

Send Postcards: Buy or make postcards and send them to loved ones near or far.

Buy vacation food: Purchase single serving cereal boxes.

Back yard camping trip: Set up the tent in the backyard. Grab flashlights, the Coleman and a cooler of food and drinks. Tell stories and roast marshmallows just as you would on a camping trip.

Host an iron man chef contest: Host a family cook off.

Neighborhood Attractions: Take advantage of the best your state has to offer in your own backyard by spending the day carousing nearby cities and/or landmarks. Choose a different destination each day, returning home to sleep at night. Enjoy fishing, hiking, river rafting, whale watching, national parks, dinner cruises, the beach, an amusement park, museums, water parks, cave exploration, the zoo, historical tourist stops. Grab breakfast at home and do not forget to pack a cooler with snacks and lunch. Visit Trip Advisor for ideas on locales just  tank of gas .

Timeshares and camping: Book a timeshare or go camping. Both options are cheaper than a hotel stay and because the kitchen is on site you save on the cost of meals. Camp sites usually run from $16 dollars to $25 dollars a night. With the economy upside down a friend of mine says you can snag a timeshare for $200 a week.

Farm Stays: Ever wonder what life is like on a farm? Now you can get in the thick of things with a “haycation“. Dine on meals made with fresh picked food. Help gather eggs and milk a cow. Take a horse ride. Both working and non-working farms provide accommodations be it a room in the main farmhouse or a cabin located on the land. Farm stays can vary from bed and breakfast to dude ranch to actually lending a hand with the chores on the farm.

Airfare: Register with Airfare Watch Dog to get rock bottom steals on airfare tickets. A friend of mine purchased 2 round trip tickets to Iowa for $400 versus the $700 per ticket going rate. My sister found tickets from Florida to Califorina for under $200.
A few years ago I attended a bake off held to raise money for a girls youth group. It was a yearly event many residents looked forward to as they stuffed their wallets with cash hoping to snag one of Mrs. A’s delectable delights. Lemon bars were on the block. The gavel rang at $72.00. Mrs. A is what I call her because I cannot for the life of me remember her name. She was a petite older woman but full of spunk. I asked her what the attraction was as I had never tried her lemon bars before. She pulled me closer and whispered in my ear, sick “I only use real lemon.” I supposed she was not about to give up the recipe but I have followed her rule of always using real lemon juice. Not the stuff from a bottle.

Source: Michelle Christensen
1/4 cup butter or margarine, sildenafil softened
1/2 cup sugar
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1 egg
3/4 cups, plus 1 tbsp flour
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 cup milk
1/2 tsp lemon zest, grated

In a medium bowl, cream together butter, sugar, lemon juice, and egg. Sift together dry ingredients. Alternately add dry ingredients and milk to make a thick batter. Stir in lemon zest. Spoon into paper-lined muffin tins (2/3 full) or loaf pan. Bake muffins at 350 degrees for 10–15 minutes or until golden brown. Bake loaf at 325 degrees for about 30 minutes. Just before the muffins or bread come out of the oven, combine syrup ingredients in medium saucepan.

Syrup:
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/4 cup sugar

Combine and heat just until sugar is dissolved. Prick small holes in top of baked bread or muffins with toothpick, then gently pour lemon syrup into holes. Cool. Makes 12 muffins or 1 loaf.

Spinach Salad with Pears

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion
2-lb. chicken fryer, cialis 40mg cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion
2-lb. chicken fryer, cialis 40mg cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.

I do not remember where I found this recipe. I thought it was in a book called Sugar-Free Toddlers by Susan Watson.  When I went looking for the recipe to verify, generic I could not find it in the book. These little pancake sandwiches have been a favorite snack since Mason was a toddler.

When my kids started solids, I took the homemade baby food route using So Easy Baby Food So Easy Baby by Joan Ahlers and Cheryl Tallman the creators of Fresh Baby. The book teaches how to puree and at what age to introduce each food. With weight issues and health problems at the forefront of today’s society, I was extremely cautious about what I gave Mason to eat. Mason ate the healthiest of the three. When he turned 1, he had no clue what cake was or what he was supposed to do with it. Instead of cheddar fish or cheerios, Mason munched on softened fruit and veggies or snacks made from the Sugar-free Toddler cookbook. That all changed after Adelin joined us. We still try to limit the sugar by making our own snacks, discussing healthy choices, and eating in moderation. We must be doing something right. Adelin calls Craisins candy and they still think my banana shakes are ice cream.

Source: unknown
Warm Pancakes
Pumpkin Butter
Cream Cheese

Spread some cream cheese on one pancake. Spread another pancake with a little pumpkin butter then sandwich together.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion
2-lb. chicken fryer, cialis 40mg cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.

I do not remember where I found this recipe. I thought it was in a book called Sugar-Free Toddlers by Susan Watson.  When I went looking for the recipe to verify, generic I could not find it in the book. These little pancake sandwiches have been a favorite snack since Mason was a toddler.

When my kids started solids, I took the homemade baby food route using So Easy Baby Food So Easy Baby by Joan Ahlers and Cheryl Tallman the creators of Fresh Baby. The book teaches how to puree and at what age to introduce each food. With weight issues and health problems at the forefront of today’s society, I was extremely cautious about what I gave Mason to eat. Mason ate the healthiest of the three. When he turned 1, he had no clue what cake was or what he was supposed to do with it. Instead of cheddar fish or cheerios, Mason munched on softened fruit and veggies or snacks made from the Sugar-free Toddler cookbook. That all changed after Adelin joined us. We still try to limit the sugar by making our own snacks, discussing healthy choices, and eating in moderation. We must be doing something right. Adelin calls Craisins candy and they still think my banana shakes are ice cream.

Source: unknown
Warm Pancakes
Pumpkin Butter
Cream Cheese

Spread some cream cheese on one pancake. Spread another pancake with a little pumpkin butter then sandwich together.

This recipe for bourbon chicken should be called “virgin” bourbon chicken because there is not an ounce of alcohol in the recipe. Which is the reasoning behind my choosing to make this version. I admit I was a bit nervous about the outcome as I read the ingredients list; ketchup, health apple cider, link soy sauce, apple juice? In the end we were not disappointed. I decreased the red pepper slightly for the kids. I should like to make a separate batch next time for Stephen and I and really spice it up.

Source: Blog Chef
2 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite sized pieces
Canola Oil
cornstarch (optional)

Sauce:
1 garlic clove, minced
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 cup apple juice
1/3 cup light brown sugar
2 tablespoon ketchup
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1/2 cup water
1/3 cup soy sauce

If using, lightly dust chicken with cornstarch. Heat oil in a wok or skillet. Toss in chicken, in batches, cook until lightly browned. Remove and set aside.

In a bowl combine all sauce ingredients. Pour into wok and bring to a boil. Add chicken bits back to the pan, reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion
2-lb. chicken fryer, cialis 40mg cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.

I do not remember where I found this recipe. I thought it was in a book called Sugar-Free Toddlers by Susan Watson.  When I went looking for the recipe to verify, generic I could not find it in the book. These little pancake sandwiches have been a favorite snack since Mason was a toddler.

When my kids started solids, I took the homemade baby food route using So Easy Baby Food So Easy Baby by Joan Ahlers and Cheryl Tallman the creators of Fresh Baby. The book teaches how to puree and at what age to introduce each food. With weight issues and health problems at the forefront of today’s society, I was extremely cautious about what I gave Mason to eat. Mason ate the healthiest of the three. When he turned 1, he had no clue what cake was or what he was supposed to do with it. Instead of cheddar fish or cheerios, Mason munched on softened fruit and veggies or snacks made from the Sugar-free Toddler cookbook. That all changed after Adelin joined us. We still try to limit the sugar by making our own snacks, discussing healthy choices, and eating in moderation. We must be doing something right. Adelin calls Craisins candy and they still think my banana shakes are ice cream.

Source: unknown
Warm Pancakes
Pumpkin Butter
Cream Cheese

Spread some cream cheese on one pancake. Spread another pancake with a little pumpkin butter then sandwich together.

This recipe for bourbon chicken should be called “virgin” bourbon chicken because there is not an ounce of alcohol in the recipe. Which is the reasoning behind my choosing to make this version. I admit I was a bit nervous about the outcome as I read the ingredients list; ketchup, health apple cider, link soy sauce, apple juice? In the end we were not disappointed. I decreased the red pepper slightly for the kids. I should like to make a separate batch next time for Stephen and I and really spice it up.

Source: Blog Chef
2 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite sized pieces
Canola Oil
cornstarch (optional)

Sauce:
1 garlic clove, minced
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 cup apple juice
1/3 cup light brown sugar
2 tablespoon ketchup
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1/2 cup water
1/3 cup soy sauce

If using, lightly dust chicken with cornstarch. Heat oil in a wok or skillet. Toss in chicken, in batches, cook until lightly browned. Remove and set aside.

In a bowl combine all sauce ingredients. Pour into wok and bring to a boil. Add chicken bits back to the pan, reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Apricot Mustard Pork Roast

Growing up, recipe we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temperature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Dutch Apple Pancakes

Last month I met some friends for breakfast at a local cafe. As a self-proclaimed pancake luver I decided to try the Dutch Apple Pancakes with sauteed apples. I was unsure with my decision because I am not a fan of the goopy sugary apple pie filling that typically smothers a beautiful stack of flap jacks at the more commercial establishments. I was more than pleasantly surprised when the waiter returned with my order. Our server placed before me three huge pancakes nestled on top of one another each one incorporated with sauteed apple slices and topped with a dollop of lightly whipped cream. They tasted as mouth watering as they looked with a crispy buttery outside and a tender pancake inside. The apple slices were actually cooked in each pancake. A clean simple dish.

Pannenkoek is a Dutch pancake that is larger and thinner than the fluffy American pancakes but slightly thicker than crepes. A traditional pannenkoek is about 10-12 inches in diameter and are usually infused with slices of bacon, check sausage, find fruits or sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. They can be made thinner and rolled up like a crepe or eaten like a pancake with an endless combination of fillings and toppings from salmon to pizza to sweet.

We took our regular pancake recipe and thinned it out with a little more milk and butter. You can choose to saute the apples in a little butter and cinnamon sugar beforehand or use thinly sliced raw apples. Add sliced almonds or chopped pecans for an nice variation.

2 sweet cooking apples such as McIntosh, Fuji or Gala, cored and thinly sliced or cut in rounds
3 cups flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tsp baking powder
2 good pinches of salt
4 eggs
2 cups plus 4 tbsp milk
5 tbsp melted butter

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk in eggs and half the milk until thickened. Add the rest of the milk to make a thin batter. Whisk in the melted butter. Mix until smooth.

Spray or heat a little butter or vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in the batter to make desired sized pancakes. Immediately arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes. Generously dust with cinnamon sugar. When tops start to set with bubbles flip over. Continue to cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more until bottoms are slightly browned.

Makes 10 large pancakes or 14 small.

My mom used to make egg noodles for her chicken soup. I thought making egg noodles would be a great project for the kids and I to try. I remember watching my mom roll out the dough and make the long effortless slices. I have also seen some people fold the dough over lengthwise to a 2-inch width and then cut. Just make sure to dust with flour before each fold.

Source: This is the recipe my mom always used. She got it from her friend Eunice Johnson.
(Serves 4)
1 cup flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/2 an egg shell of milk
Place flour in a small bowl, website make a dent in the center. Carefully crack the egg shell pouring the egg in the center of the flour. Fill 1/2 of the egg shell with milk and stir into the flour and egg mixture using a fork. If needed add just a touch more milk until moist enough that the dough holds together.

On a well floured bread board or surface, visit this carefully roll out the dough until very, viagra 100mg very thin (almost paper thin for thin noodles or as thick as you like for dumplings). Using a Pizza cutter, cut the dough into thin noodles -length of your choice. The noodles do not have to be perfect nor is it necessary to dry the noodles.

Slowly drop the cut noodles one by one into rapidly boiling water (chicken or beef broth) stirring constantly so they do not stick together in a lump. Turn down the heat and simmer at a low boil until tender (approx. 1/2 hour or less). Stir frequently while cooking to prevent sticking.
I stumbled upon Serious Eats while I was planning our summer vacation. It is always nice to have a list of recommended places to eat. In this case I was searching for popular pizza joints. I found a plethora of food inspiration.

** Serious Eats is more than the typical food blog/restaurant review resource. The site has the latest in food news and entertainment. Check out the Serious Eats home page for everything in food commentary.

** Serious Eats “Recipes” are proposed to be the best garnered from chefs, drugs cookbooks and the web. Browse by category or by featured column such as Sunday Brunch or Classic Cookbooks.

** For trusted advice on the best places to eat around the world turn to Serious Eat’s “Eating Out” section.

** Have any questions regarding anything food ask the Serious Eats community under “Talk”.

** “Slice”, viagra a family member of Serious Eats, prescription offers suggestions for the best pizza establishments across the country.

** “A Hamburger Today”, reveals hot spots for a tasty hamburger.

** There is even an area for those experienced to budding foodie photographers to post pictures, blogs and recipes under the heading “Photograzing”.

Roasted Rutabaga and Carrots

I have never tried rutabaga before. When I saw this recipe for zesty roasted rutabaga and carrots it seemed like the perfect introduction. The Rutabaga sounds like the name of a car but is a root vegetable that is similar to a turnip. I found mine next to the cabbage, viagra approved turnips and beets in my grocery store. It’s actually a great tasting vegetable.

There are several ways to enjoy the rutabaga. First, peel the rough exterior skin off. Rutabaga may be eaten raw. Cut them into sticks to add to a vegetable tray. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads, especially cole slaw or carrot salad. Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Boil them with potatoes to make mashed potatoes. Roast them along with other savory vegetables. Dice them and add to soups and stews.

Source: Straight from the Farm
4 medium carrots, cut into 3 inch julienne strips
2 rutabagas, peeled and cut into 3 inch julienne strips
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1/4 tsp dill weed
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

In a large saucepan, combine the carrots, rutabaga and water. Over high heat, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain off water.

In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and toss with the parboiled vegetables. Spread out into a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender. Serve hot as a dinner side dish or chilled as a light lunch. (serves 4)
This is a recipe I used to make all the time in college. Creamed Tune and Peas has been around since the great depression. I can see why. It is cheap to make, dosage filling and perfect for a rainy day. Traditionally it is served over toast. I like it with a baked potato.

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk, malady warmed
2 tsp chicken bullion
Salt and Pepper
1 large can tuna
2 cups frozen peas, order thawed

In a saucepan melt the butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until combined and smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the milk in a steady stream. Continue to whisk until there are no more lumps. Cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly. Remove from heat.

Season sauce with the bullion and salt and pepper. Add the tuna and peas. Serve over a slice of toast.

Variations:
Serve over biscuits, potatoes, rice or noodles
Add shredded Parmesan or cheddar cheese to the sauce
Add chopped cooked carrots and/or onion
2-lb. chicken fryer, cialis 40mg cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.

I do not remember where I found this recipe. I thought it was in a book called Sugar-Free Toddlers by Susan Watson.  When I went looking for the recipe to verify, generic I could not find it in the book. These little pancake sandwiches have been a favorite snack since Mason was a toddler.

When my kids started solids, I took the homemade baby food route using So Easy Baby Food So Easy Baby by Joan Ahlers and Cheryl Tallman the creators of Fresh Baby. The book teaches how to puree and at what age to introduce each food. With weight issues and health problems at the forefront of today’s society, I was extremely cautious about what I gave Mason to eat. Mason ate the healthiest of the three. When he turned 1, he had no clue what cake was or what he was supposed to do with it. Instead of cheddar fish or cheerios, Mason munched on softened fruit and veggies or snacks made from the Sugar-free Toddler cookbook. That all changed after Adelin joined us. We still try to limit the sugar by making our own snacks, discussing healthy choices, and eating in moderation. We must be doing something right. Adelin calls Craisins candy and they still think my banana shakes are ice cream.

Source: unknown
Warm Pancakes
Pumpkin Butter
Cream Cheese

Spread some cream cheese on one pancake. Spread another pancake with a little pumpkin butter then sandwich together.

This recipe for bourbon chicken should be called “virgin” bourbon chicken because there is not an ounce of alcohol in the recipe. Which is the reasoning behind my choosing to make this version. I admit I was a bit nervous about the outcome as I read the ingredients list; ketchup, health apple cider, link soy sauce, apple juice? In the end we were not disappointed. I decreased the red pepper slightly for the kids. I should like to make a separate batch next time for Stephen and I and really spice it up.

Source: Blog Chef
2 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite sized pieces
Canola Oil
cornstarch (optional)

Sauce:
1 garlic clove, minced
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 cup apple juice
1/3 cup light brown sugar
2 tablespoon ketchup
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
1/2 cup water
1/3 cup soy sauce

If using, lightly dust chicken with cornstarch. Heat oil in a wok or skillet. Toss in chicken, in batches, cook until lightly browned. Remove and set aside.

In a bowl combine all sauce ingredients. Pour into wok and bring to a boil. Add chicken bits back to the pan, reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Apricot Mustard Pork Roast

Growing up, recipe we always had turkey on Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter. Stephen is not a fan of turkey, so we only have it on Thanksgiving, because it just seems right to have turkey on Thanksgiving. For our Easter feasts so far, I have tried lamb and ham. With Spring comes all the beautiful and lush scenery. A pallet of pastels and fragrant flowers. For Easter, I felt we needed something light. This year, I was anxious to try this recipe for apricot and mustard glazed pork roast. The vibrant image of the apricot’s orange flesh felt like spring to me.

Source: Family Circle
2/3 cup apricot preserves
2 tbsp grainy Dijon mustard
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 pound lean boneless pork roast

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix preserves, mustard, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Place roast, fat side up, on a rack in a large roasting pan. Spread about 2/3 of the glaze all over roast.

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. Brush on remaining glaze and roast another 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees on an instant read thermometer.

Cover meat loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 minutes. Temperature will raise to 160 degrees. Cut into very thin slices and serve.

Note: can be made up to one day ahead; do not slice. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
My mother-n-law introduced me to the Partridge in a Pear Tree ornaments from USA pears. My Christmas tree has a Twelve Days of Christmas theme so the pear ornaments fit right in. The cost for a single ornament has been $7.50 plus a store receipt for 3 1/2 pounds of pears. Last year the price went up to $10.

Buying the pears used to be exciting. It was like saving the UPC codes off the cereal box when I was a kid to buy a Gremlin doll. Ten dollars sounds so expensive though; not to mention the cost of the pears. So what do I make with three and a half pounds of pears? I will only eat hard crisp pears as a snack or in salads. I was glad to come across this recipe from Health magazine that solves my soft pear dilemma. I love the flavor of Gorgonzola with pear anyway. I was a little hesitant about the cider vinegar as it can be overwhelming but the 2 tsp seemed a fair amount.

Source: Health Jan/Feb 2009
1/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans
1 tbsp canola oil, visit web divided
3 Bosc pears, sales peeled, cored and cut into 1/2 inch slices
1 tsp brown sugar
1 tbsp minced shallots
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/4 tsp ground pepper
1/2 cup apple juice
2 tsp cider vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1 (16-oz) bag spinach
2 ounces Gorgonzola cheese, about 1/2 cup

Toast the pecans in a skillet over medium heat for 3 minutes until fragrant; set aside. Add 2 teaspoons canola oil to the same skillet, and increase heat to medium-high. Add pears, and sprinkle with brown sugar; do not stir. Cook the pears 5 minutes or until lightly browned on the bottom. Stir to melt the brown sugar. Transfer the pears to a plate.

For dressing add remaining 1 teaspoon oil to pan. Add shallot, salt and pepper. Stir 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add apple juice, cider vinegar and mustard. Whisk; simmer 3-4 minutes or until slightly reduced. Add pears.

Place spinach in a large serving bowl. Pour pears and dressing on top and toss. Serve with Gorgonzola and pecans on top.

Lemon Angel Food Layer Cake

I made this cake last year for a luncheon I threw for a few friends; along with my favorite southwestern chicken salad. I used a small loaf of angel food cake making three layers rather than six. I tried to find lemon curd in the bakery and cold isle of the market but was unsuccessful. The lady at the bakery did not have a clue what I was talking about. I reminded her they are a bakery and must make something that calls for lemon curd. She then directed me to the canned fruit isle where I picked up a can of lemon pie filling. (This is a small town) It was nothing close to the lemon curb I know should be in a clear tub refrigerated but it was all I had. I think I used too much of the gourmet lemon curd because the layers kept slipping around. I ended up chopping it up and threw it in a trifle bowl. The simplicity of the angel food cake paired with the lemon curd was refreshing. Add good food and friends and all my frustrations disappeared.

Source: unknown
2 small angel food cakes
1 cup lemon curd
1 can whipped cream
1 cup crushed lemon cookies

Using a long serrated knife, clinic visit this slice each cake horizontally into 3 layers.
Using a spatula, online spread half the lemon curd on the 2 bottom cake layers. Top with a generous layer of whipped cream. Place the middle cake layers on top and spread with the remaining curd and more whipped cream. Place the remaining 2 cake layers on top, hospital cover with whipped cream and sprinkle with the crushed cookies. Refrigerate at least 1 hour before serving.

Alternative:
Use banana pudding in place of the lemon curd
Omit the whipped cream. Spread sides with lemon curd and press on sliced almonds. Dust the top with confectioners sugar. Make designs by placing a doily on top before dusting with sugar.

Lemon Curd:
Source: River Cottage Family Cookbook

6 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
3/4 cup superfine sugar
Zest of 3 lemons
2 eggs, plus 1 yolk
pint Mason jar or bowl with lid

Juice the three lemons and to the saucepan with the lemon zest,eggs and yolk, butter and sugar. Cook over low heat. Stir occasionally until butter has melted and the liquid is yellow and runny.

Stirring constantly gently cook until the eggs thicken and the mixture turns to a thick sauce; about 10 minutes. Too much heat will make lemon flavored scrambled eggs.

When the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon and leave a clear line if you wipe your finger across it, the curd is ready. Remove from the stove. Pour the curd through a sieve into either a clean jam jar or a bowl. Keep refrigerated for 1 week.

Variations:
Substitute a couple of limes for one of the lemons

Lemony Grilled Chicken Without the Sauce

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, treatment however, medical we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, diagnosis all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter, vanilla and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, treatment however, medical we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, diagnosis all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter, vanilla and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

beaterblade for kitchen aide

Years ago my mother-n-law handed down her Kitchen Aide mixer, viagra 60mg to me. Stephen thinks she has had the mixer for at least 30 years. That is what I call a wives tale or excellent quality. A few weeks ago the wire whisk attachment broke. I remembered last week when I went to make frosting for Mason’s birthday cake. (Canned frosting does not pipe very well.)

This week I decided to try searching for a replacement. While in the process I wanted to find a paddle since I did not have one. I found this really great gadget called the Beater Blade. It is not an authorized Kitchen Aide attachment though, pills which makes me a little hesitant. Especially since the attachment is made of a plastic rather than metal. It is certainly worth a shot for those of us who do not want to be bothered with scraping the sides of the bowl. Amazon carries them for both 5 and 6 quart, tilting head and raising bowl mixers. You can also get them in gray or pink.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, treatment however, medical we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, diagnosis all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter, vanilla and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

beaterblade for kitchen aide

Years ago my mother-n-law handed down her Kitchen Aide mixer, viagra 60mg to me. Stephen thinks she has had the mixer for at least 30 years. That is what I call a wives tale or excellent quality. A few weeks ago the wire whisk attachment broke. I remembered last week when I went to make frosting for Mason’s birthday cake. (Canned frosting does not pipe very well.)

This week I decided to try searching for a replacement. While in the process I wanted to find a paddle since I did not have one. I found this really great gadget called the Beater Blade. It is not an authorized Kitchen Aide attachment though, pills which makes me a little hesitant. Especially since the attachment is made of a plastic rather than metal. It is certainly worth a shot for those of us who do not want to be bothered with scraping the sides of the bowl. Amazon carries them for both 5 and 6 quart, tilting head and raising bowl mixers. You can also get them in gray or pink.
I love hiking. Stephen and I used to go all the time before we had kids. Before Mason was born I scored a brand new unused Kelty backpack for $10 at a garage sale. We used it until we moved to the valley, recipe where hiking trails are not as convenient, buy and we had another baby. I ended up giving it away now wising I had kept it. Who knew I would become brave enough to take 3 little kids hiking.

Last weekend we took a drive up into a small community near the mountains and let the kids go free. They played for hours jumping of rocks, generic climbing trees and running free, something they do not get to do very often in a city. They were the happiness we have seen them. This week we threw our plans to wind, loaded up the picnic basket and headed to the lake. The last time we were there I vowed to make the Lake our weekend home until next fall. There was a hill across the lake we were interested in exploring. The most important thing to remember when hiking with kids is to have water and snacks on hand. The cranberry and apricot granola bars are filling and easy enough for little chefs to make.

Cascadian Farms makes an organic granola that is pretty good for $2.99 a box. Add a sprinkle of chopped nuts to the batter for an added crunch.

Source: Parents
Baking spray
1 cup low-fat granola
1 cup rolled oats
1 cup finely chopped apricots and cranberries
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 egg
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup canola oil
1/4 tsp cinnamon

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Line an 8×8 baking pan with foil, letting it extend over the edges; spritz it with vegetable oil.

In a large bowl, mix granola, oats, apricots and cranberries, and wheat flour. In a small bowl, whisk together egg, honey, oil and cinnamon. Stir into granola mixture, then pat batter in the pan. Bake for 30 minutes or until browned. When cool, use foil to lift from pan. Cut into bars. Store at room temperature for 3 days or freeze for up to 3 months. Makes 15.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, treatment however, medical we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, diagnosis all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter, vanilla and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

beaterblade for kitchen aide

Years ago my mother-n-law handed down her Kitchen Aide mixer, viagra 60mg to me. Stephen thinks she has had the mixer for at least 30 years. That is what I call a wives tale or excellent quality. A few weeks ago the wire whisk attachment broke. I remembered last week when I went to make frosting for Mason’s birthday cake. (Canned frosting does not pipe very well.)

This week I decided to try searching for a replacement. While in the process I wanted to find a paddle since I did not have one. I found this really great gadget called the Beater Blade. It is not an authorized Kitchen Aide attachment though, pills which makes me a little hesitant. Especially since the attachment is made of a plastic rather than metal. It is certainly worth a shot for those of us who do not want to be bothered with scraping the sides of the bowl. Amazon carries them for both 5 and 6 quart, tilting head and raising bowl mixers. You can also get them in gray or pink.
I love hiking. Stephen and I used to go all the time before we had kids. Before Mason was born I scored a brand new unused Kelty backpack for $10 at a garage sale. We used it until we moved to the valley, recipe where hiking trails are not as convenient, buy and we had another baby. I ended up giving it away now wising I had kept it. Who knew I would become brave enough to take 3 little kids hiking.

Last weekend we took a drive up into a small community near the mountains and let the kids go free. They played for hours jumping of rocks, generic climbing trees and running free, something they do not get to do very often in a city. They were the happiness we have seen them. This week we threw our plans to wind, loaded up the picnic basket and headed to the lake. The last time we were there I vowed to make the Lake our weekend home until next fall. There was a hill across the lake we were interested in exploring. The most important thing to remember when hiking with kids is to have water and snacks on hand. The cranberry and apricot granola bars are filling and easy enough for little chefs to make.

Cascadian Farms makes an organic granola that is pretty good for $2.99 a box. Add a sprinkle of chopped nuts to the batter for an added crunch.

Source: Parents
Baking spray
1 cup low-fat granola
1 cup rolled oats
1 cup finely chopped apricots and cranberries
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 egg
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup canola oil
1/4 tsp cinnamon

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Line an 8×8 baking pan with foil, letting it extend over the edges; spritz it with vegetable oil.

In a large bowl, mix granola, oats, apricots and cranberries, and wheat flour. In a small bowl, whisk together egg, honey, oil and cinnamon. Stir into granola mixture, then pat batter in the pan. Bake for 30 minutes or until browned. When cool, use foil to lift from pan. Cut into bars. Store at room temperature for 3 days or freeze for up to 3 months. Makes 15.
I tried a recipe last week entitled Broccoli and Butternut Squash Fettuccini and Lemon Chicken. It was a little gormet for the kids and Stephen. I liked the idea but do not think I will ever make it again unless I make a few changes. The lemon chicken however was a hit.

1-2 tbsp Olive oil
Zest of half a lemon
Juice of a whole lemon, search or to taste
3 cloves garlic, abortion chopped
4 chicken breast or thighs
Salt and pepper

Season the chicken with the salt and pepper. Slice chicken into bit sized strips.

Heat oil in the pan. Add the garlic, chicken and lemon zest. Cook until no longer pink in the center. Sprinkle with lemon juice.

BeaterBlade for Kitchen Aide Mixers

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, treatment however, medical we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, diagnosis all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter, vanilla and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, treatment however, medical we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, diagnosis all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter, vanilla and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

beaterblade for kitchen aide

Years ago my mother-n-law handed down her Kitchen Aide mixer, viagra 60mg to me. Stephen thinks she has had the mixer for at least 30 years. That is what I call a wives tale or excellent quality. A few weeks ago the wire whisk attachment broke. I remembered last week when I went to make frosting for Mason’s birthday cake. (Canned frosting does not pipe very well.)

This week I decided to try searching for a replacement. While in the process I wanted to find a paddle since I did not have one. I found this really great gadget called the Beater Blade. It is not an authorized Kitchen Aide attachment though, pills which makes me a little hesitant. Especially since the attachment is made of a plastic rather than metal. It is certainly worth a shot for those of us who do not want to be bothered with scraping the sides of the bowl. Amazon carries them for both 5 and 6 quart, tilting head and raising bowl mixers. You can also get them in gray or pink.

Peanut Butter Cookies

I admit I am not the best baker. Baking is too precise for me. I enjoy throwing things like vegetables and herbs in a pot and hoping for the best. Movie night came and the gang wanted cookies. I wanted to oblige them, treatment however, medical we were all out of granulated sugar. The pleasing mom that I am I grabbed the brown sugar and went to work.

First I had to find a recipe. Some days I worship the internet for the great resource that it is. Other days I curse its very existence…like today. Today all I wanted was a golden star to appear on the screen next to a link to the greatest peanut butter cookie recipe ever. Instead, diagnosis all I got was page after page of hopefuls. I was short on time as well as ingredients so I went with the one that looked pretty and seemed easy. Then I altered it a bit. I had to figure out if I could even use all brown sugar in the recipe. I had heard once that using brown sugar in the place of granulated sugar would make a flatter cookie as well as slightly alter the taste. I did a little research and discovered that if I add a little baking soda they should be fine.

I added between 1/4 to 1/2 tsp baking soda to 1 cup packed brown sugar. We use Kirkland Organic peanut butter which has a runny consistency. I was worried about the brown sugar causing the cookies to spread too thin in addition to the runny peanut butter. I figured if I added a tad more flour then I should be fine. I added 1 tablespoon wheat pastry flour (to make me feel healthier) and 1 tablespoon wheat germ in addition to the 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour. Definitely my favorite peanut butter cookie recipe so far. It was tender and did not have the floury taste typical of peanut butter cookies.

Source: Adapted from Simply Recipes
1 cup packed brown sugar
Scant 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup peanut butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see notes above)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt

Mix scant 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with brown sugar. Mix the butter and sugar until combined. Add the peanut butter, vanilla and egg. Mix together the dry ingredients – flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Stir into the sugar butter mixture.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Using a scoop drop onto ungreased cookie sheets. If you do not have a scooper roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Place about 3 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Pressed slightly with a fork in a criss cross pattern then baked for 9 minutes. Cool on baking sheets for a minute; transfer to rack to cool completely.

Makes about 2 dozen cookies.

For chewier cookies, bake at 300°F for 15 minutes.

Asian Orange Chicken

Happy New Year!

Today we celebrated Chinese New Year. This week we worked on making Chinese Lanterns and masks.

Today the kids thought it would be fun to make fortune cookies. Adelin made all the fortunes to hide inside.

For dinner we had Teriyaki Pork with noodles (for long life) and steamed broccoli and carrots. We had fortune cookies and orange slices (for a sweet life) for dessert.

Happy New Year!

Today we celebrated Chinese New Year. This week we worked on making Chinese Lanterns and masks.

Today the kids thought it would be fun to make fortune cookies. Adelin made all the fortunes to hide inside.

For dinner we had Teriyaki Pork with noodles (for long life) and steamed broccoli and carrots. We had fortune cookies and orange slices (for a sweet life) for dessert.

For Chinese New Year we decided to make our own fortune cookies. They proved to be harder than anticipated. Fortunately we were able to make one really good one for show while the rest, case well… in Mason’s words, “Where are all the cookies?”

I started out with 6 cookies on a baking sheet. The first batch I baked for 13 minutes. I was able to remove one really good one and then the rest pretty much became scraps or misshapen. The next batch I decided to use waxed paper and baked them for 12 minutes. The waxed paper turned out to be a disaster. If I thought trying to scrape the cookies off a baking sheet was hard the waxed paper was worse. The baking time was too short producing gooey cookies while the 13 minutes produced crispy cookies. The flavor was wonderful. The amount of almond was perfect. I would suggest greasing the pan really well and baking fewer cookies per pan.

Once the baking sheet is removed from the over it is critical to remove all the cookies as fast as possible. I found that if I concentrated on removing the cookies first I still had time to go back and shape them. However, the shorter baking time resulted in a soft cookie that did not hold it’s shape well. It is equally important to make sure the batter is evenly spread out into circles on the baking sheets. The recipe suggested rotating the pan slightly rather than using the back of a spoon. I did not have much luck with rotating the pan. It seemed to work better dropping the batter from the spoon as you would when pouring pancake batter.

2 large egg whites
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
8 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon salt
8 tablespoons granulated sugar
3 teaspoons water

Preheat oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease 2 (9-X-13 inch) baking sheets.

In a medium bowl, lightly beat the egg white, vanilla, almond and vegetable oil until frothy, but not stiff. Sift flour, cornstarch, salt and sugar into a separate bowl. Stir in the water. Add the flour mixture into the egg mixture and stir until smooth. The batter should not be runny, but should drop easily off a wooden spoon.

Place level tablespoons of batter onto the cookie sheet, spacing them at least 3 inches apart. Gently tilt the baking sheet back and forth and from side to side so that each tablespoon of batter forms into a circle 4 inches in diameter. Bake until the outer 1/2-inch of each cookie turns golden brown and they are easy to remove from the baking sheet with a spatula, about 14 to 15 minutes.

Working quickly, remove the cookie with a spatula and flip it over in your hand. Place a fortune in the middle of a cookie. To form the fortune cookie shape, fold the cookie in half, then gently pull the edges downward. Place the finished cookie in the cup of the muffin tin so that it keeps its shape. Continue with the rest of the cookies.

Alternatives:
On our flight to Hawaii they served us chocolate covered fortune cookies. Dip fortune cookies in melted chocolate.

Happy New Year!

Today we celebrated Chinese New Year. This week we worked on making Chinese Lanterns and masks.

Today the kids thought it would be fun to make fortune cookies. Adelin made all the fortunes to hide inside.

For dinner we had Teriyaki Pork with noodles (for long life) and steamed broccoli and carrots. We had fortune cookies and orange slices (for a sweet life) for dessert.

For Chinese New Year we decided to make our own fortune cookies. They proved to be harder than anticipated. Fortunately we were able to make one really good one for show while the rest, case well… in Mason’s words, “Where are all the cookies?”

I started out with 6 cookies on a baking sheet. The first batch I baked for 13 minutes. I was able to remove one really good one and then the rest pretty much became scraps or misshapen. The next batch I decided to use waxed paper and baked them for 12 minutes. The waxed paper turned out to be a disaster. If I thought trying to scrape the cookies off a baking sheet was hard the waxed paper was worse. The baking time was too short producing gooey cookies while the 13 minutes produced crispy cookies. The flavor was wonderful. The amount of almond was perfect. I would suggest greasing the pan really well and baking fewer cookies per pan.

Once the baking sheet is removed from the over it is critical to remove all the cookies as fast as possible. I found that if I concentrated on removing the cookies first I still had time to go back and shape them. However, the shorter baking time resulted in a soft cookie that did not hold it’s shape well. It is equally important to make sure the batter is evenly spread out into circles on the baking sheets. The recipe suggested rotating the pan slightly rather than using the back of a spoon. I did not have much luck with rotating the pan. It seemed to work better dropping the batter from the spoon as you would when pouring pancake batter.

2 large egg whites
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
8 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon salt
8 tablespoons granulated sugar
3 teaspoons water

Preheat oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease 2 (9-X-13 inch) baking sheets.

In a medium bowl, lightly beat the egg white, vanilla, almond and vegetable oil until frothy, but not stiff. Sift flour, cornstarch, salt and sugar into a separate bowl. Stir in the water. Add the flour mixture into the egg mixture and stir until smooth. The batter should not be runny, but should drop easily off a wooden spoon.

Place level tablespoons of batter onto the cookie sheet, spacing them at least 3 inches apart. Gently tilt the baking sheet back and forth and from side to side so that each tablespoon of batter forms into a circle 4 inches in diameter. Bake until the outer 1/2-inch of each cookie turns golden brown and they are easy to remove from the baking sheet with a spatula, about 14 to 15 minutes.

Working quickly, remove the cookie with a spatula and flip it over in your hand. Place a fortune in the middle of a cookie. To form the fortune cookie shape, fold the cookie in half, then gently pull the edges downward. Place the finished cookie in the cup of the muffin tin so that it keeps its shape. Continue with the rest of the cookies.

Alternatives:
On our flight to Hawaii they served us chocolate covered fortune cookies. Dip fortune cookies in melted chocolate.
We really enjoyed this version of orange chicken. Last year my sister-n-law Jennifer sent me a wok that I am so in love with. It makes sauteing a cinch. Most of the prep work is all about the marinade which needs to be done at least two hours in advance. I skipped on the breaded chicken. Instead I sauteed the chicken in my wok. If you are a traditionalist definitely use breaded chicken. We served ours with stir-fry vegetables.

Source: Harry Wetzel the holiday spot
Sauce:
1 1/2 cups water
2 tablespoons orange juice
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/3 cup rice vinegar
2 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon grated orange zest
1 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon minced fresh ginger root
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
2 tablespoons chopped green onion
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
3 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons water

Chicken:
2 boneless, order skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
3 tablespoons olive oil

Pour into saucepan 1 1/2 cups water, orange juice, lemon juice, rice vinegar, and soy sauce; and set over medium-high heat. Stir in orange zest, brown sugar, ginger, garlic, and chopped onion. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat, and let cool 10 to 15 minutes.

Place chicken pieces into a resealable plastic bag. When contents of saucepan have cooled, pour 1 cup of sauce into bag. Reserve remaining sauce. Seal bag, and refrigerate at least 2 hours.

In another resealable plastic bag, mix the flour, salt, and pepper. Add marinated chicken pieces, and shake to coat.
Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Place chicken in skillet, and brown on both sides. Remove to paper towels, and cover with aluminum foil.

Wipe out the skillet, and add the sauce. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Mix together cornstarch and 2 tablespoons water, and stir into sauce. Reduce heat to medium low; stir in chicken pieces, and simmer, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.