January’s Website Review: The Happiness Project & My Simpler Life

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.
I could never stand the wiggly looking stuff in the bowl. Cranberry chutney takes on a whole new meaning for cranberry sauce. Just make sure to use ripe cranberries.

Source: GOOP
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/3 cup water
4 cups fresh cranberries
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
grated zest of 1 small orange or tangerine

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, patient bring to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients. Turn the heat to low and let the mixture simmer for about ten minutes or until thick. Let the chutney cool before serving. Makes about 2 cups
Variations:
Use brown sugar in place of the white.

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.
I could never stand the wiggly looking stuff in the bowl. Cranberry chutney takes on a whole new meaning for cranberry sauce. Just make sure to use ripe cranberries.

Source: GOOP
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/3 cup water
4 cups fresh cranberries
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
grated zest of 1 small orange or tangerine

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, patient bring to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients. Turn the heat to low and let the mixture simmer for about ten minutes or until thick. Let the chutney cool before serving. Makes about 2 cups
Variations:
Use brown sugar in place of the white.
When I was girl my mom would make a special milkshake for me when I was too sick to eat anything. So when Everett got a canker sore in his mouth and would not eat anything I set out to recreate my mom’s milkshake. All she gave me to go on was milk, price vanilla and egg. The result was watery and bland. As I mulled it over a thought hit me. Eggnog. My mom’s milkshake was the same base as eggnog. I knew I just needed something to sweeten the shake up and alter the measurements a little.

Since I was planning on giving it to my toddler, more about the next task was to figure out how to cook the eggs. I did not have any pasteurized eggs or powder around. The first time I made the milkshake I cooked the egg in in a water bath. Set a bowl over a pot of simmering water and whisk the egg until the the thermometer read 160 degrees; but, more about I felt the taste was a little off. I can’t say if it was the cooked egg or the lack of sugar. My first thought was to add the sugar to the egg then I figured hey why not cook all the ingredients together. It took a long time to get the mixture up to 160 degrees. I think next time I will just heat it in a sauce pan.

1 egg
1 cup milk
1 to 1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1/4-1/2 tsp vanilla

Heat a pot over medium heat; bring to a simmer. Place a heat prof bowl over the pot. The bowl should not touch the water. Whisk the egg in the bowl until combined. Add the sugar and beat well. Add the milk, sugar and vanilla mixing well. Heat the mixture until a thermometer inserted reads about 160 degrees. If heating in a sauce pan, add all the ingredients to the sauce pan and heat on low heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and cool. Place in the refrigerator until cold.

If you do not have any concerns about Salmonella, then by all means mix all the ingredients in the blender and bottoms up.

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.
I could never stand the wiggly looking stuff in the bowl. Cranberry chutney takes on a whole new meaning for cranberry sauce. Just make sure to use ripe cranberries.

Source: GOOP
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/3 cup water
4 cups fresh cranberries
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
grated zest of 1 small orange or tangerine

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, patient bring to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients. Turn the heat to low and let the mixture simmer for about ten minutes or until thick. Let the chutney cool before serving. Makes about 2 cups
Variations:
Use brown sugar in place of the white.
When I was girl my mom would make a special milkshake for me when I was too sick to eat anything. So when Everett got a canker sore in his mouth and would not eat anything I set out to recreate my mom’s milkshake. All she gave me to go on was milk, price vanilla and egg. The result was watery and bland. As I mulled it over a thought hit me. Eggnog. My mom’s milkshake was the same base as eggnog. I knew I just needed something to sweeten the shake up and alter the measurements a little.

Since I was planning on giving it to my toddler, more about the next task was to figure out how to cook the eggs. I did not have any pasteurized eggs or powder around. The first time I made the milkshake I cooked the egg in in a water bath. Set a bowl over a pot of simmering water and whisk the egg until the the thermometer read 160 degrees; but, more about I felt the taste was a little off. I can’t say if it was the cooked egg or the lack of sugar. My first thought was to add the sugar to the egg then I figured hey why not cook all the ingredients together. It took a long time to get the mixture up to 160 degrees. I think next time I will just heat it in a sauce pan.

1 egg
1 cup milk
1 to 1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1/4-1/2 tsp vanilla

Heat a pot over medium heat; bring to a simmer. Place a heat prof bowl over the pot. The bowl should not touch the water. Whisk the egg in the bowl until combined. Add the sugar and beat well. Add the milk, sugar and vanilla mixing well. Heat the mixture until a thermometer inserted reads about 160 degrees. If heating in a sauce pan, add all the ingredients to the sauce pan and heat on low heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and cool. Place in the refrigerator until cold.

If you do not have any concerns about Salmonella, then by all means mix all the ingredients in the blender and bottoms up.
When I think of an Advent calendar the first thing that comes to mind is the familiar story “The 12 Days of Christmas.” I have had my fun leaving presents on doorsteps with friends and family as we created our own version of The 12 Days of Christmas or in many an office, recipe Secret Santa. Advent calendars are a fun and can be a magical way to hasten in a holiday such as Christmas.

  • Stephen remembers the piece of cardboard with perforated windows when punched out reveal a piece of chocolate. Building paper chains, candy necklaces, felt projects and hanging a decorative stocking or picture hung each day are some ways families countdown Christmas.
  • Many years ago Stephen’s mom bought an advent cabinet for all her children and their families. She asked me to help her gather items to put in each box. Each compartment contained an object related to the accompanying story, game, craft or recipe. There was a bag of marshmallows for hot chocolate, mini musical instruments for songs, and the last week had Nativity stories, Bible verses and mini figurines.
  • A few years ago my sister-n-law, Alison, sent us a binder filled with 24 tender religious Christmas stories to count down the days until Christmas Eve. Each heart touching story reminds us of exactly why we celebrate Christmas. I loved the book so much I made copies for my friends the following year. I have since added to the binder and instead of ending on Christmas Eve we have enough stories for the whole month of December.
  • Last year Mason was old enough to become excited over Santa. I found a really cute little mailbox on a post at Target that became Santa’s mailbox. Periodically a letter would appear in the mailbox from the Elves at the North Pole explaining what was going on around the village. This year as soon as the mailbox went up Mason and Adelin were busily writing many letters to their dear friend Santa explaining what we have been up to and a mention of what they would like for Christmas.

I am always one ready for a party so when I heard about all the year long traditions Stephen’s sister Natalie tries to carry on with her children I was inspired to start organizing my own family traditions. This is the slowest December we have had in ages. It has been nice taking it easy and really having the opportunity to share some magical experiences with my children.

  • December 6th was traditionally called a day of feasts. Shoes were filled with candies, nuts and fruit. It is a nice welcome to the month of December when the kids are bouncing off the walls with excitement over Christmas.
  • December 13th is known Saint Lucia’s Day. The legend states a young girl dressed in white with an evergreen garland and candles in her hair, carries a tray of saffron buns to the bedside of the members in her family. While she will not be doneing a wreath of candles we will place a halo of flowers like my sister-n-law does in her family.
  • In years past we went on an outing on Christmas Eve. One year we took a train ride on the Polar Express, the next year we went to see the WWII planes decorated with lights at the Air Museum. This year will be the first Christmas without my mom. We are planning on spending the evening driving around looking at Christmas lights. Then we will enjoy our new tradition of Christmas Eve doughnuts and hot chocolate.
  • The first gift of Christmas is given on Christmas Eve. Our children are met with a surprise gift on their beds. Christmas pajamas from Santa.
  • Christmas morning the table is already set with a holiday tablecloth and serveware. A few years ago Stephen’s sister Jennifer gave us snowman plates and mugs and his brother’s wife Alison gave us felt santa utensil holders and santa candle holders. All that is missing is our traditional Ebelskivers or Danish pancakes.
  • When I was a teenager I used to babysit for a family, the Bogarts. Their Christmas present to their little children every year was a book. I thought that was coolest idea and now that I have a family we carry on that tradition.
  • We save all the bows from Christmas day to make a New Year’s Eve hats to bring in the new year with.

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.
I could never stand the wiggly looking stuff in the bowl. Cranberry chutney takes on a whole new meaning for cranberry sauce. Just make sure to use ripe cranberries.

Source: GOOP
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/3 cup water
4 cups fresh cranberries
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
grated zest of 1 small orange or tangerine

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, patient bring to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients. Turn the heat to low and let the mixture simmer for about ten minutes or until thick. Let the chutney cool before serving. Makes about 2 cups
Variations:
Use brown sugar in place of the white.
When I was girl my mom would make a special milkshake for me when I was too sick to eat anything. So when Everett got a canker sore in his mouth and would not eat anything I set out to recreate my mom’s milkshake. All she gave me to go on was milk, price vanilla and egg. The result was watery and bland. As I mulled it over a thought hit me. Eggnog. My mom’s milkshake was the same base as eggnog. I knew I just needed something to sweeten the shake up and alter the measurements a little.

Since I was planning on giving it to my toddler, more about the next task was to figure out how to cook the eggs. I did not have any pasteurized eggs or powder around. The first time I made the milkshake I cooked the egg in in a water bath. Set a bowl over a pot of simmering water and whisk the egg until the the thermometer read 160 degrees; but, more about I felt the taste was a little off. I can’t say if it was the cooked egg or the lack of sugar. My first thought was to add the sugar to the egg then I figured hey why not cook all the ingredients together. It took a long time to get the mixture up to 160 degrees. I think next time I will just heat it in a sauce pan.

1 egg
1 cup milk
1 to 1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1/4-1/2 tsp vanilla

Heat a pot over medium heat; bring to a simmer. Place a heat prof bowl over the pot. The bowl should not touch the water. Whisk the egg in the bowl until combined. Add the sugar and beat well. Add the milk, sugar and vanilla mixing well. Heat the mixture until a thermometer inserted reads about 160 degrees. If heating in a sauce pan, add all the ingredients to the sauce pan and heat on low heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and cool. Place in the refrigerator until cold.

If you do not have any concerns about Salmonella, then by all means mix all the ingredients in the blender and bottoms up.
When I think of an Advent calendar the first thing that comes to mind is the familiar story “The 12 Days of Christmas.” I have had my fun leaving presents on doorsteps with friends and family as we created our own version of The 12 Days of Christmas or in many an office, recipe Secret Santa. Advent calendars are a fun and can be a magical way to hasten in a holiday such as Christmas.

  • Stephen remembers the piece of cardboard with perforated windows when punched out reveal a piece of chocolate. Building paper chains, candy necklaces, felt projects and hanging a decorative stocking or picture hung each day are some ways families countdown Christmas.
  • Many years ago Stephen’s mom bought an advent cabinet for all her children and their families. She asked me to help her gather items to put in each box. Each compartment contained an object related to the accompanying story, game, craft or recipe. There was a bag of marshmallows for hot chocolate, mini musical instruments for songs, and the last week had Nativity stories, Bible verses and mini figurines.
  • A few years ago my sister-n-law, Alison, sent us a binder filled with 24 tender religious Christmas stories to count down the days until Christmas Eve. Each heart touching story reminds us of exactly why we celebrate Christmas. I loved the book so much I made copies for my friends the following year. I have since added to the binder and instead of ending on Christmas Eve we have enough stories for the whole month of December.
  • Last year Mason was old enough to become excited over Santa. I found a really cute little mailbox on a post at Target that became Santa’s mailbox. Periodically a letter would appear in the mailbox from the Elves at the North Pole explaining what was going on around the village. This year as soon as the mailbox went up Mason and Adelin were busily writing many letters to their dear friend Santa explaining what we have been up to and a mention of what they would like for Christmas.

I am always one ready for a party so when I heard about all the year long traditions Stephen’s sister Natalie tries to carry on with her children I was inspired to start organizing my own family traditions. This is the slowest December we have had in ages. It has been nice taking it easy and really having the opportunity to share some magical experiences with my children.

  • December 6th was traditionally called a day of feasts. Shoes were filled with candies, nuts and fruit. It is a nice welcome to the month of December when the kids are bouncing off the walls with excitement over Christmas.
  • December 13th is known Saint Lucia’s Day. The legend states a young girl dressed in white with an evergreen garland and candles in her hair, carries a tray of saffron buns to the bedside of the members in her family. While she will not be doneing a wreath of candles we will place a halo of flowers like my sister-n-law does in her family.
  • In years past we went on an outing on Christmas Eve. One year we took a train ride on the Polar Express, the next year we went to see the WWII planes decorated with lights at the Air Museum. This year will be the first Christmas without my mom. We are planning on spending the evening driving around looking at Christmas lights. Then we will enjoy our new tradition of Christmas Eve doughnuts and hot chocolate.
  • The first gift of Christmas is given on Christmas Eve. Our children are met with a surprise gift on their beds. Christmas pajamas from Santa.
  • Christmas morning the table is already set with a holiday tablecloth and serveware. A few years ago Stephen’s sister Jennifer gave us snowman plates and mugs and his brother’s wife Alison gave us felt santa utensil holders and santa candle holders. All that is missing is our traditional Ebelskivers or Danish pancakes.
  • When I was a teenager I used to babysit for a family, the Bogarts. Their Christmas present to their little children every year was a book. I thought that was coolest idea and now that I have a family we carry on that tradition.
  • We save all the bows from Christmas day to make a New Year’s Eve hats to bring in the new year with.

Artwork: The Queen of Lights by Pamela Delli Colli

Saint Lucy of Syracuse Day, ampoule also known as Saint Lucia, ed honors a young Christian woman during the time of the Diocletian Persecution in Italy. The Empire was still housed in Pagan beliefs. The government severely persecuting those who followed Christianity.

Many legends have been passed down through the generations of time. It is unclear, cialis 40mg however, which of the details is fact or fiction. We do know, Lucy was martyred for her unwavering devotion to God and her refusal to marry due to a previous commitment to God. According to legends she was denounced for being a Christian, out of spite, by her betrothed.

Some legends tell of several miraculous deliverances from torture and execution. It is said that when the soldiers came to take her away, she was so filled with the Holy Spirit that they could not move her. The guards may have removed her eyes and yet she was still able to see. She was then sentenced to death but the fire was unable to consume her. Consequently she was stabbed to death.

Other accounts describe Lucy dressed in white bearing a tray laden with food for the Christians who where hiding from the Roman persecutors. A crown like garland of candles encircled her head, lighting her way through the dark underground tunnels. While other rumors place her on a ship with her white robes and halo delivering food to starving groups of people in Sicily and as far north as Sweden, Norway and Denmark; who were suffering from famine.  Many believe the latter is the result of Viking traders, who traveled the Mediterranean taking her legends home with them.

December 13th commemorates the feast of Saint Lucia’s martyrdom. It is also coincides with the first day of Christmas Celebration or Winter Solstice in Scandinavia. Young girls dress in white and done a halo of evergreen, flowers or candles. In some parts of the world boys and girls gather in a parade to honor Lucy’s love for the poor and testimony of faith by going door to door with a tray of saffron buns and coffee. While others, such as my sister-n-law Natalie, quietly pay homage to the Saint by choosing the oldest or youngest daughter to serve sweet breads and Cuccia (a sweet porridge made with wheat berries, chocolate, sugar and milk) and coffee to all the family members or just the parents in bed.

Natalie was searching for fun year round traditions. In her search she found the story of Saint Lucia. I believe the oldest wears the flower head piece and carries the tray of sweets to the children in their beds. This year we start our own Saint Lucia tradition. I like the idea of the traditional saffron buns and Cuccia. There is something warm and inviting about lit candles but Adelin will not be wearing them. Instead we plan on putting our Christmas lights up outside and battery operated candles in the windows.

Saint Lucia Buns or Saffron Buns:
Cardamon is another common Scandinavian ingredient sometimes added to saffron buns. These buns are meant to be formed in delightful shapes. A fantastic task fit for a kid. Let them get really creative making cats, dogs, the traditional figure eight or in Mason’s case a Clone trooper.

1 package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup (1 stick ) butter, melted
1 teaspoon saffron threads (a good pinch)
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup currants
2 eggs, warmed
4 to 4 1/2 cups flour
1 large egg, beaten
Sugar sprinkles, optional

To make the dough: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water. Add a pinch of sugar. Heat the milk and add the melted butter to it; cool until the mixture is lukewarm.

Grind the saffron with 1 teaspoon of the sugar, using a mortar and pestle or with the back of a spoon in a small dish. Add 1 tablespoon of the warm milk-and-butter mixture and allow the saffron to steep for 5 minutes.

Add the saffron mixture, milk-and-butter mixture, sugar, salt, currants and eggs to the yeast. Using an electric blender on medium speed, beat until blended. Add 2 cups flour and beat on medium speed for 2 minutes. Add 2 cups of the remaining flour and mix with a wooden spoon to make a medium-stiff dough. Let dough rest for 15 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board. Knead for 8 minutes or until the dough is smooth and satiny. Place the dough in a clean, lightly oiled bowl. Turn the dough over to lightly oil the top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

To make a braided wreath: Punch the dough down and divide into 3 parts. With the palms of your hands, roll and shape each part into a rope-like strand about 36 inches long. Braid the strands by aligning them vertically and alternately crossing each outer strand over the center strand. Shape the braid into a circle and place on a greased or parchment-covered baking sheet. Pinch the ends together where they meet to seal the strands and to conceal the beginning and end of the braid.

Transfer to the baking sheet. Brush with the beaten egg. Sprinkle with sugar sprinkles if using. Let rise for about 45 minutes or just until puffy.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until lightly browned, or until a wooden skewer inserted into the center of the dough comes out clean and dry. Cool on a rack. Makes 16 servings.

Note: To make two smaller wreaths: Divide the dough into 2 parts and braid as above. Place each wreath on a baking sheet, allow to rise and bake for about 20 minutes.

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.
I could never stand the wiggly looking stuff in the bowl. Cranberry chutney takes on a whole new meaning for cranberry sauce. Just make sure to use ripe cranberries.

Source: GOOP
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/3 cup water
4 cups fresh cranberries
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
grated zest of 1 small orange or tangerine

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, patient bring to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients. Turn the heat to low and let the mixture simmer for about ten minutes or until thick. Let the chutney cool before serving. Makes about 2 cups
Variations:
Use brown sugar in place of the white.
When I was girl my mom would make a special milkshake for me when I was too sick to eat anything. So when Everett got a canker sore in his mouth and would not eat anything I set out to recreate my mom’s milkshake. All she gave me to go on was milk, price vanilla and egg. The result was watery and bland. As I mulled it over a thought hit me. Eggnog. My mom’s milkshake was the same base as eggnog. I knew I just needed something to sweeten the shake up and alter the measurements a little.

Since I was planning on giving it to my toddler, more about the next task was to figure out how to cook the eggs. I did not have any pasteurized eggs or powder around. The first time I made the milkshake I cooked the egg in in a water bath. Set a bowl over a pot of simmering water and whisk the egg until the the thermometer read 160 degrees; but, more about I felt the taste was a little off. I can’t say if it was the cooked egg or the lack of sugar. My first thought was to add the sugar to the egg then I figured hey why not cook all the ingredients together. It took a long time to get the mixture up to 160 degrees. I think next time I will just heat it in a sauce pan.

1 egg
1 cup milk
1 to 1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1/4-1/2 tsp vanilla

Heat a pot over medium heat; bring to a simmer. Place a heat prof bowl over the pot. The bowl should not touch the water. Whisk the egg in the bowl until combined. Add the sugar and beat well. Add the milk, sugar and vanilla mixing well. Heat the mixture until a thermometer inserted reads about 160 degrees. If heating in a sauce pan, add all the ingredients to the sauce pan and heat on low heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and cool. Place in the refrigerator until cold.

If you do not have any concerns about Salmonella, then by all means mix all the ingredients in the blender and bottoms up.
When I think of an Advent calendar the first thing that comes to mind is the familiar story “The 12 Days of Christmas.” I have had my fun leaving presents on doorsteps with friends and family as we created our own version of The 12 Days of Christmas or in many an office, recipe Secret Santa. Advent calendars are a fun and can be a magical way to hasten in a holiday such as Christmas.

  • Stephen remembers the piece of cardboard with perforated windows when punched out reveal a piece of chocolate. Building paper chains, candy necklaces, felt projects and hanging a decorative stocking or picture hung each day are some ways families countdown Christmas.
  • Many years ago Stephen’s mom bought an advent cabinet for all her children and their families. She asked me to help her gather items to put in each box. Each compartment contained an object related to the accompanying story, game, craft or recipe. There was a bag of marshmallows for hot chocolate, mini musical instruments for songs, and the last week had Nativity stories, Bible verses and mini figurines.
  • A few years ago my sister-n-law, Alison, sent us a binder filled with 24 tender religious Christmas stories to count down the days until Christmas Eve. Each heart touching story reminds us of exactly why we celebrate Christmas. I loved the book so much I made copies for my friends the following year. I have since added to the binder and instead of ending on Christmas Eve we have enough stories for the whole month of December.
  • Last year Mason was old enough to become excited over Santa. I found a really cute little mailbox on a post at Target that became Santa’s mailbox. Periodically a letter would appear in the mailbox from the Elves at the North Pole explaining what was going on around the village. This year as soon as the mailbox went up Mason and Adelin were busily writing many letters to their dear friend Santa explaining what we have been up to and a mention of what they would like for Christmas.

I am always one ready for a party so when I heard about all the year long traditions Stephen’s sister Natalie tries to carry on with her children I was inspired to start organizing my own family traditions. This is the slowest December we have had in ages. It has been nice taking it easy and really having the opportunity to share some magical experiences with my children.

  • December 6th was traditionally called a day of feasts. Shoes were filled with candies, nuts and fruit. It is a nice welcome to the month of December when the kids are bouncing off the walls with excitement over Christmas.
  • December 13th is known Saint Lucia’s Day. The legend states a young girl dressed in white with an evergreen garland and candles in her hair, carries a tray of saffron buns to the bedside of the members in her family. While she will not be doneing a wreath of candles we will place a halo of flowers like my sister-n-law does in her family.
  • In years past we went on an outing on Christmas Eve. One year we took a train ride on the Polar Express, the next year we went to see the WWII planes decorated with lights at the Air Museum. This year will be the first Christmas without my mom. We are planning on spending the evening driving around looking at Christmas lights. Then we will enjoy our new tradition of Christmas Eve doughnuts and hot chocolate.
  • The first gift of Christmas is given on Christmas Eve. Our children are met with a surprise gift on their beds. Christmas pajamas from Santa.
  • Christmas morning the table is already set with a holiday tablecloth and serveware. A few years ago Stephen’s sister Jennifer gave us snowman plates and mugs and his brother’s wife Alison gave us felt santa utensil holders and santa candle holders. All that is missing is our traditional Ebelskivers or Danish pancakes.
  • When I was a teenager I used to babysit for a family, the Bogarts. Their Christmas present to their little children every year was a book. I thought that was coolest idea and now that I have a family we carry on that tradition.
  • We save all the bows from Christmas day to make a New Year’s Eve hats to bring in the new year with.

Artwork: The Queen of Lights by Pamela Delli Colli

Saint Lucy of Syracuse Day, ampoule also known as Saint Lucia, ed honors a young Christian woman during the time of the Diocletian Persecution in Italy. The Empire was still housed in Pagan beliefs. The government severely persecuting those who followed Christianity.

Many legends have been passed down through the generations of time. It is unclear, cialis 40mg however, which of the details is fact or fiction. We do know, Lucy was martyred for her unwavering devotion to God and her refusal to marry due to a previous commitment to God. According to legends she was denounced for being a Christian, out of spite, by her betrothed.

Some legends tell of several miraculous deliverances from torture and execution. It is said that when the soldiers came to take her away, she was so filled with the Holy Spirit that they could not move her. The guards may have removed her eyes and yet she was still able to see. She was then sentenced to death but the fire was unable to consume her. Consequently she was stabbed to death.

Other accounts describe Lucy dressed in white bearing a tray laden with food for the Christians who where hiding from the Roman persecutors. A crown like garland of candles encircled her head, lighting her way through the dark underground tunnels. While other rumors place her on a ship with her white robes and halo delivering food to starving groups of people in Sicily and as far north as Sweden, Norway and Denmark; who were suffering from famine.  Many believe the latter is the result of Viking traders, who traveled the Mediterranean taking her legends home with them.

December 13th commemorates the feast of Saint Lucia’s martyrdom. It is also coincides with the first day of Christmas Celebration or Winter Solstice in Scandinavia. Young girls dress in white and done a halo of evergreen, flowers or candles. In some parts of the world boys and girls gather in a parade to honor Lucy’s love for the poor and testimony of faith by going door to door with a tray of saffron buns and coffee. While others, such as my sister-n-law Natalie, quietly pay homage to the Saint by choosing the oldest or youngest daughter to serve sweet breads and Cuccia (a sweet porridge made with wheat berries, chocolate, sugar and milk) and coffee to all the family members or just the parents in bed.

Natalie was searching for fun year round traditions. In her search she found the story of Saint Lucia. I believe the oldest wears the flower head piece and carries the tray of sweets to the children in their beds. This year we start our own Saint Lucia tradition. I like the idea of the traditional saffron buns and Cuccia. There is something warm and inviting about lit candles but Adelin will not be wearing them. Instead we plan on putting our Christmas lights up outside and battery operated candles in the windows.

Saint Lucia Buns or Saffron Buns:
Cardamon is another common Scandinavian ingredient sometimes added to saffron buns. These buns are meant to be formed in delightful shapes. A fantastic task fit for a kid. Let them get really creative making cats, dogs, the traditional figure eight or in Mason’s case a Clone trooper.

1 package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup (1 stick ) butter, melted
1 teaspoon saffron threads (a good pinch)
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup currants
2 eggs, warmed
4 to 4 1/2 cups flour
1 large egg, beaten
Sugar sprinkles, optional

To make the dough: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water. Add a pinch of sugar. Heat the milk and add the melted butter to it; cool until the mixture is lukewarm.

Grind the saffron with 1 teaspoon of the sugar, using a mortar and pestle or with the back of a spoon in a small dish. Add 1 tablespoon of the warm milk-and-butter mixture and allow the saffron to steep for 5 minutes.

Add the saffron mixture, milk-and-butter mixture, sugar, salt, currants and eggs to the yeast. Using an electric blender on medium speed, beat until blended. Add 2 cups flour and beat on medium speed for 2 minutes. Add 2 cups of the remaining flour and mix with a wooden spoon to make a medium-stiff dough. Let dough rest for 15 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board. Knead for 8 minutes or until the dough is smooth and satiny. Place the dough in a clean, lightly oiled bowl. Turn the dough over to lightly oil the top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

To make a braided wreath: Punch the dough down and divide into 3 parts. With the palms of your hands, roll and shape each part into a rope-like strand about 36 inches long. Braid the strands by aligning them vertically and alternately crossing each outer strand over the center strand. Shape the braid into a circle and place on a greased or parchment-covered baking sheet. Pinch the ends together where they meet to seal the strands and to conceal the beginning and end of the braid.

Transfer to the baking sheet. Brush with the beaten egg. Sprinkle with sugar sprinkles if using. Let rise for about 45 minutes or just until puffy.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until lightly browned, or until a wooden skewer inserted into the center of the dough comes out clean and dry. Cool on a rack. Makes 16 servings.

Note: To make two smaller wreaths: Divide the dough into 2 parts and braid as above. Place each wreath on a baking sheet, allow to rise and bake for about 20 minutes.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, more about and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.
I could never stand the wiggly looking stuff in the bowl. Cranberry chutney takes on a whole new meaning for cranberry sauce. Just make sure to use ripe cranberries.

Source: GOOP
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/3 cup water
4 cups fresh cranberries
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
grated zest of 1 small orange or tangerine

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, patient bring to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients. Turn the heat to low and let the mixture simmer for about ten minutes or until thick. Let the chutney cool before serving. Makes about 2 cups
Variations:
Use brown sugar in place of the white.
When I was girl my mom would make a special milkshake for me when I was too sick to eat anything. So when Everett got a canker sore in his mouth and would not eat anything I set out to recreate my mom’s milkshake. All she gave me to go on was milk, price vanilla and egg. The result was watery and bland. As I mulled it over a thought hit me. Eggnog. My mom’s milkshake was the same base as eggnog. I knew I just needed something to sweeten the shake up and alter the measurements a little.

Since I was planning on giving it to my toddler, more about the next task was to figure out how to cook the eggs. I did not have any pasteurized eggs or powder around. The first time I made the milkshake I cooked the egg in in a water bath. Set a bowl over a pot of simmering water and whisk the egg until the the thermometer read 160 degrees; but, more about I felt the taste was a little off. I can’t say if it was the cooked egg or the lack of sugar. My first thought was to add the sugar to the egg then I figured hey why not cook all the ingredients together. It took a long time to get the mixture up to 160 degrees. I think next time I will just heat it in a sauce pan.

1 egg
1 cup milk
1 to 1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1/4-1/2 tsp vanilla

Heat a pot over medium heat; bring to a simmer. Place a heat prof bowl over the pot. The bowl should not touch the water. Whisk the egg in the bowl until combined. Add the sugar and beat well. Add the milk, sugar and vanilla mixing well. Heat the mixture until a thermometer inserted reads about 160 degrees. If heating in a sauce pan, add all the ingredients to the sauce pan and heat on low heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and cool. Place in the refrigerator until cold.

If you do not have any concerns about Salmonella, then by all means mix all the ingredients in the blender and bottoms up.
When I think of an Advent calendar the first thing that comes to mind is the familiar story “The 12 Days of Christmas.” I have had my fun leaving presents on doorsteps with friends and family as we created our own version of The 12 Days of Christmas or in many an office, recipe Secret Santa. Advent calendars are a fun and can be a magical way to hasten in a holiday such as Christmas.

  • Stephen remembers the piece of cardboard with perforated windows when punched out reveal a piece of chocolate. Building paper chains, candy necklaces, felt projects and hanging a decorative stocking or picture hung each day are some ways families countdown Christmas.
  • Many years ago Stephen’s mom bought an advent cabinet for all her children and their families. She asked me to help her gather items to put in each box. Each compartment contained an object related to the accompanying story, game, craft or recipe. There was a bag of marshmallows for hot chocolate, mini musical instruments for songs, and the last week had Nativity stories, Bible verses and mini figurines.
  • A few years ago my sister-n-law, Alison, sent us a binder filled with 24 tender religious Christmas stories to count down the days until Christmas Eve. Each heart touching story reminds us of exactly why we celebrate Christmas. I loved the book so much I made copies for my friends the following year. I have since added to the binder and instead of ending on Christmas Eve we have enough stories for the whole month of December.
  • Last year Mason was old enough to become excited over Santa. I found a really cute little mailbox on a post at Target that became Santa’s mailbox. Periodically a letter would appear in the mailbox from the Elves at the North Pole explaining what was going on around the village. This year as soon as the mailbox went up Mason and Adelin were busily writing many letters to their dear friend Santa explaining what we have been up to and a mention of what they would like for Christmas.

I am always one ready for a party so when I heard about all the year long traditions Stephen’s sister Natalie tries to carry on with her children I was inspired to start organizing my own family traditions. This is the slowest December we have had in ages. It has been nice taking it easy and really having the opportunity to share some magical experiences with my children.

  • December 6th was traditionally called a day of feasts. Shoes were filled with candies, nuts and fruit. It is a nice welcome to the month of December when the kids are bouncing off the walls with excitement over Christmas.
  • December 13th is known Saint Lucia’s Day. The legend states a young girl dressed in white with an evergreen garland and candles in her hair, carries a tray of saffron buns to the bedside of the members in her family. While she will not be doneing a wreath of candles we will place a halo of flowers like my sister-n-law does in her family.
  • In years past we went on an outing on Christmas Eve. One year we took a train ride on the Polar Express, the next year we went to see the WWII planes decorated with lights at the Air Museum. This year will be the first Christmas without my mom. We are planning on spending the evening driving around looking at Christmas lights. Then we will enjoy our new tradition of Christmas Eve doughnuts and hot chocolate.
  • The first gift of Christmas is given on Christmas Eve. Our children are met with a surprise gift on their beds. Christmas pajamas from Santa.
  • Christmas morning the table is already set with a holiday tablecloth and serveware. A few years ago Stephen’s sister Jennifer gave us snowman plates and mugs and his brother’s wife Alison gave us felt santa utensil holders and santa candle holders. All that is missing is our traditional Ebelskivers or Danish pancakes.
  • When I was a teenager I used to babysit for a family, the Bogarts. Their Christmas present to their little children every year was a book. I thought that was coolest idea and now that I have a family we carry on that tradition.
  • We save all the bows from Christmas day to make a New Year’s Eve hats to bring in the new year with.

Artwork: The Queen of Lights by Pamela Delli Colli

Saint Lucy of Syracuse Day, ampoule also known as Saint Lucia, ed honors a young Christian woman during the time of the Diocletian Persecution in Italy. The Empire was still housed in Pagan beliefs. The government severely persecuting those who followed Christianity.

Many legends have been passed down through the generations of time. It is unclear, cialis 40mg however, which of the details is fact or fiction. We do know, Lucy was martyred for her unwavering devotion to God and her refusal to marry due to a previous commitment to God. According to legends she was denounced for being a Christian, out of spite, by her betrothed.

Some legends tell of several miraculous deliverances from torture and execution. It is said that when the soldiers came to take her away, she was so filled with the Holy Spirit that they could not move her. The guards may have removed her eyes and yet she was still able to see. She was then sentenced to death but the fire was unable to consume her. Consequently she was stabbed to death.

Other accounts describe Lucy dressed in white bearing a tray laden with food for the Christians who where hiding from the Roman persecutors. A crown like garland of candles encircled her head, lighting her way through the dark underground tunnels. While other rumors place her on a ship with her white robes and halo delivering food to starving groups of people in Sicily and as far north as Sweden, Norway and Denmark; who were suffering from famine.  Many believe the latter is the result of Viking traders, who traveled the Mediterranean taking her legends home with them.

December 13th commemorates the feast of Saint Lucia’s martyrdom. It is also coincides with the first day of Christmas Celebration or Winter Solstice in Scandinavia. Young girls dress in white and done a halo of evergreen, flowers or candles. In some parts of the world boys and girls gather in a parade to honor Lucy’s love for the poor and testimony of faith by going door to door with a tray of saffron buns and coffee. While others, such as my sister-n-law Natalie, quietly pay homage to the Saint by choosing the oldest or youngest daughter to serve sweet breads and Cuccia (a sweet porridge made with wheat berries, chocolate, sugar and milk) and coffee to all the family members or just the parents in bed.

Natalie was searching for fun year round traditions. In her search she found the story of Saint Lucia. I believe the oldest wears the flower head piece and carries the tray of sweets to the children in their beds. This year we start our own Saint Lucia tradition. I like the idea of the traditional saffron buns and Cuccia. There is something warm and inviting about lit candles but Adelin will not be wearing them. Instead we plan on putting our Christmas lights up outside and battery operated candles in the windows.

Saint Lucia Buns or Saffron Buns:
Cardamon is another common Scandinavian ingredient sometimes added to saffron buns. These buns are meant to be formed in delightful shapes. A fantastic task fit for a kid. Let them get really creative making cats, dogs, the traditional figure eight or in Mason’s case a Clone trooper.

1 package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup (1 stick ) butter, melted
1 teaspoon saffron threads (a good pinch)
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup currants
2 eggs, warmed
4 to 4 1/2 cups flour
1 large egg, beaten
Sugar sprinkles, optional

To make the dough: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water. Add a pinch of sugar. Heat the milk and add the melted butter to it; cool until the mixture is lukewarm.

Grind the saffron with 1 teaspoon of the sugar, using a mortar and pestle or with the back of a spoon in a small dish. Add 1 tablespoon of the warm milk-and-butter mixture and allow the saffron to steep for 5 minutes.

Add the saffron mixture, milk-and-butter mixture, sugar, salt, currants and eggs to the yeast. Using an electric blender on medium speed, beat until blended. Add 2 cups flour and beat on medium speed for 2 minutes. Add 2 cups of the remaining flour and mix with a wooden spoon to make a medium-stiff dough. Let dough rest for 15 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board. Knead for 8 minutes or until the dough is smooth and satiny. Place the dough in a clean, lightly oiled bowl. Turn the dough over to lightly oil the top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

To make a braided wreath: Punch the dough down and divide into 3 parts. With the palms of your hands, roll and shape each part into a rope-like strand about 36 inches long. Braid the strands by aligning them vertically and alternately crossing each outer strand over the center strand. Shape the braid into a circle and place on a greased or parchment-covered baking sheet. Pinch the ends together where they meet to seal the strands and to conceal the beginning and end of the braid.

Transfer to the baking sheet. Brush with the beaten egg. Sprinkle with sugar sprinkles if using. Let rise for about 45 minutes or just until puffy.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until lightly browned, or until a wooden skewer inserted into the center of the dough comes out clean and dry. Cool on a rack. Makes 16 servings.

Note: To make two smaller wreaths: Divide the dough into 2 parts and braid as above. Place each wreath on a baking sheet, allow to rise and bake for about 20 minutes.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, more about and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

The Crafty Crow

So I think I am going to start a Featured Link of the Month. I just have to gush about my absolutely favorite site right now, viagra The Crafty Crow. Fun crafts and fabulous book reviews, and I can’t forget the enormous long list of links to other wonderful and amazing websites.

I was on the hunt for something new this Christmas. We made our little beaded candy canes, glittery paper ornaments, a colorful paper chain garland and our traditional hand print Christmas tree. As we still have a couple more weeks to go I needed inspiration for more Christmas crafts.

Also the creator of Bella Dia, the designer of The Crafty Crow needed a spot to store her extensive and growing collection of children’s crafts. The categories make it easy to choose a craft by topic or age group. Each post is detailed with photos and step by step instructions and links to get the supplies needed for each project.

Right now she has a book and craft advent going on. She suggests a book to read and a craft to go with it. I am also digging the paper houses and felt reindeer ornament.

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.
I could never stand the wiggly looking stuff in the bowl. Cranberry chutney takes on a whole new meaning for cranberry sauce. Just make sure to use ripe cranberries.

Source: GOOP
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/3 cup water
4 cups fresh cranberries
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
grated zest of 1 small orange or tangerine

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, patient bring to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients. Turn the heat to low and let the mixture simmer for about ten minutes or until thick. Let the chutney cool before serving. Makes about 2 cups
Variations:
Use brown sugar in place of the white.
When I was girl my mom would make a special milkshake for me when I was too sick to eat anything. So when Everett got a canker sore in his mouth and would not eat anything I set out to recreate my mom’s milkshake. All she gave me to go on was milk, price vanilla and egg. The result was watery and bland. As I mulled it over a thought hit me. Eggnog. My mom’s milkshake was the same base as eggnog. I knew I just needed something to sweeten the shake up and alter the measurements a little.

Since I was planning on giving it to my toddler, more about the next task was to figure out how to cook the eggs. I did not have any pasteurized eggs or powder around. The first time I made the milkshake I cooked the egg in in a water bath. Set a bowl over a pot of simmering water and whisk the egg until the the thermometer read 160 degrees; but, more about I felt the taste was a little off. I can’t say if it was the cooked egg or the lack of sugar. My first thought was to add the sugar to the egg then I figured hey why not cook all the ingredients together. It took a long time to get the mixture up to 160 degrees. I think next time I will just heat it in a sauce pan.

1 egg
1 cup milk
1 to 1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1/4-1/2 tsp vanilla

Heat a pot over medium heat; bring to a simmer. Place a heat prof bowl over the pot. The bowl should not touch the water. Whisk the egg in the bowl until combined. Add the sugar and beat well. Add the milk, sugar and vanilla mixing well. Heat the mixture until a thermometer inserted reads about 160 degrees. If heating in a sauce pan, add all the ingredients to the sauce pan and heat on low heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and cool. Place in the refrigerator until cold.

If you do not have any concerns about Salmonella, then by all means mix all the ingredients in the blender and bottoms up.
When I think of an Advent calendar the first thing that comes to mind is the familiar story “The 12 Days of Christmas.” I have had my fun leaving presents on doorsteps with friends and family as we created our own version of The 12 Days of Christmas or in many an office, recipe Secret Santa. Advent calendars are a fun and can be a magical way to hasten in a holiday such as Christmas.

  • Stephen remembers the piece of cardboard with perforated windows when punched out reveal a piece of chocolate. Building paper chains, candy necklaces, felt projects and hanging a decorative stocking or picture hung each day are some ways families countdown Christmas.
  • Many years ago Stephen’s mom bought an advent cabinet for all her children and their families. She asked me to help her gather items to put in each box. Each compartment contained an object related to the accompanying story, game, craft or recipe. There was a bag of marshmallows for hot chocolate, mini musical instruments for songs, and the last week had Nativity stories, Bible verses and mini figurines.
  • A few years ago my sister-n-law, Alison, sent us a binder filled with 24 tender religious Christmas stories to count down the days until Christmas Eve. Each heart touching story reminds us of exactly why we celebrate Christmas. I loved the book so much I made copies for my friends the following year. I have since added to the binder and instead of ending on Christmas Eve we have enough stories for the whole month of December.
  • Last year Mason was old enough to become excited over Santa. I found a really cute little mailbox on a post at Target that became Santa’s mailbox. Periodically a letter would appear in the mailbox from the Elves at the North Pole explaining what was going on around the village. This year as soon as the mailbox went up Mason and Adelin were busily writing many letters to their dear friend Santa explaining what we have been up to and a mention of what they would like for Christmas.

I am always one ready for a party so when I heard about all the year long traditions Stephen’s sister Natalie tries to carry on with her children I was inspired to start organizing my own family traditions. This is the slowest December we have had in ages. It has been nice taking it easy and really having the opportunity to share some magical experiences with my children.

  • December 6th was traditionally called a day of feasts. Shoes were filled with candies, nuts and fruit. It is a nice welcome to the month of December when the kids are bouncing off the walls with excitement over Christmas.
  • December 13th is known Saint Lucia’s Day. The legend states a young girl dressed in white with an evergreen garland and candles in her hair, carries a tray of saffron buns to the bedside of the members in her family. While she will not be doneing a wreath of candles we will place a halo of flowers like my sister-n-law does in her family.
  • In years past we went on an outing on Christmas Eve. One year we took a train ride on the Polar Express, the next year we went to see the WWII planes decorated with lights at the Air Museum. This year will be the first Christmas without my mom. We are planning on spending the evening driving around looking at Christmas lights. Then we will enjoy our new tradition of Christmas Eve doughnuts and hot chocolate.
  • The first gift of Christmas is given on Christmas Eve. Our children are met with a surprise gift on their beds. Christmas pajamas from Santa.
  • Christmas morning the table is already set with a holiday tablecloth and serveware. A few years ago Stephen’s sister Jennifer gave us snowman plates and mugs and his brother’s wife Alison gave us felt santa utensil holders and santa candle holders. All that is missing is our traditional Ebelskivers or Danish pancakes.
  • When I was a teenager I used to babysit for a family, the Bogarts. Their Christmas present to their little children every year was a book. I thought that was coolest idea and now that I have a family we carry on that tradition.
  • We save all the bows from Christmas day to make a New Year’s Eve hats to bring in the new year with.

Artwork: The Queen of Lights by Pamela Delli Colli

Saint Lucy of Syracuse Day, ampoule also known as Saint Lucia, ed honors a young Christian woman during the time of the Diocletian Persecution in Italy. The Empire was still housed in Pagan beliefs. The government severely persecuting those who followed Christianity.

Many legends have been passed down through the generations of time. It is unclear, cialis 40mg however, which of the details is fact or fiction. We do know, Lucy was martyred for her unwavering devotion to God and her refusal to marry due to a previous commitment to God. According to legends she was denounced for being a Christian, out of spite, by her betrothed.

Some legends tell of several miraculous deliverances from torture and execution. It is said that when the soldiers came to take her away, she was so filled with the Holy Spirit that they could not move her. The guards may have removed her eyes and yet she was still able to see. She was then sentenced to death but the fire was unable to consume her. Consequently she was stabbed to death.

Other accounts describe Lucy dressed in white bearing a tray laden with food for the Christians who where hiding from the Roman persecutors. A crown like garland of candles encircled her head, lighting her way through the dark underground tunnels. While other rumors place her on a ship with her white robes and halo delivering food to starving groups of people in Sicily and as far north as Sweden, Norway and Denmark; who were suffering from famine.  Many believe the latter is the result of Viking traders, who traveled the Mediterranean taking her legends home with them.

December 13th commemorates the feast of Saint Lucia’s martyrdom. It is also coincides with the first day of Christmas Celebration or Winter Solstice in Scandinavia. Young girls dress in white and done a halo of evergreen, flowers or candles. In some parts of the world boys and girls gather in a parade to honor Lucy’s love for the poor and testimony of faith by going door to door with a tray of saffron buns and coffee. While others, such as my sister-n-law Natalie, quietly pay homage to the Saint by choosing the oldest or youngest daughter to serve sweet breads and Cuccia (a sweet porridge made with wheat berries, chocolate, sugar and milk) and coffee to all the family members or just the parents in bed.

Natalie was searching for fun year round traditions. In her search she found the story of Saint Lucia. I believe the oldest wears the flower head piece and carries the tray of sweets to the children in their beds. This year we start our own Saint Lucia tradition. I like the idea of the traditional saffron buns and Cuccia. There is something warm and inviting about lit candles but Adelin will not be wearing them. Instead we plan on putting our Christmas lights up outside and battery operated candles in the windows.

Saint Lucia Buns or Saffron Buns:
Cardamon is another common Scandinavian ingredient sometimes added to saffron buns. These buns are meant to be formed in delightful shapes. A fantastic task fit for a kid. Let them get really creative making cats, dogs, the traditional figure eight or in Mason’s case a Clone trooper.

1 package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup (1 stick ) butter, melted
1 teaspoon saffron threads (a good pinch)
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup currants
2 eggs, warmed
4 to 4 1/2 cups flour
1 large egg, beaten
Sugar sprinkles, optional

To make the dough: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water. Add a pinch of sugar. Heat the milk and add the melted butter to it; cool until the mixture is lukewarm.

Grind the saffron with 1 teaspoon of the sugar, using a mortar and pestle or with the back of a spoon in a small dish. Add 1 tablespoon of the warm milk-and-butter mixture and allow the saffron to steep for 5 minutes.

Add the saffron mixture, milk-and-butter mixture, sugar, salt, currants and eggs to the yeast. Using an electric blender on medium speed, beat until blended. Add 2 cups flour and beat on medium speed for 2 minutes. Add 2 cups of the remaining flour and mix with a wooden spoon to make a medium-stiff dough. Let dough rest for 15 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board. Knead for 8 minutes or until the dough is smooth and satiny. Place the dough in a clean, lightly oiled bowl. Turn the dough over to lightly oil the top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

To make a braided wreath: Punch the dough down and divide into 3 parts. With the palms of your hands, roll and shape each part into a rope-like strand about 36 inches long. Braid the strands by aligning them vertically and alternately crossing each outer strand over the center strand. Shape the braid into a circle and place on a greased or parchment-covered baking sheet. Pinch the ends together where they meet to seal the strands and to conceal the beginning and end of the braid.

Transfer to the baking sheet. Brush with the beaten egg. Sprinkle with sugar sprinkles if using. Let rise for about 45 minutes or just until puffy.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until lightly browned, or until a wooden skewer inserted into the center of the dough comes out clean and dry. Cool on a rack. Makes 16 servings.

Note: To make two smaller wreaths: Divide the dough into 2 parts and braid as above. Place each wreath on a baking sheet, allow to rise and bake for about 20 minutes.

Felted Beads

I learned the art of felting a couple of years ago with a friend. We drove up to Sonora to visit a little Waldorf supply shop and could have easily spent hundreds of dollars on the amazing creations displayed there.

Felting is one of the oldest forms of fabric making. There are two ways to felt. One is needle felting and the other is wet felting. You can make felted beads using the needle felting method but for today we are going to avoid piercing our fingers with sharp needles and instead burn them in hot water.

Felted beads are really fun to make and create a wonderful learning experience in the use of natural products. Felted beads can be easily jazzed up with the addition of beads and ribbon. If you want to be a little more creative after the balls have dried you can use the needle method to add flowers or other designs. Little kids love to rub them, more about and bounce them and pretend they are treasures.

Some people like to roll tuffs of the undyed wool into a ball then add the color. I prefer to get it done with no fuss and just use the colored roving.

Wool Roving

Supplies:
Merino Wool Roving
(wool that has been washed and combed but not yet spun into yarn. Can be found in a variety of colors on Etsy.com, some natural craft stores (such as a Waldorf supply store) or a sheep farm.)
Hot Water
Dish Soap

Tuff of Wool

Grab a tuff of wool.

Wet the roving

I use a pot of hot water (as hot as I can stand). Place the wool roving in soapy water.

Ready to felt

Gently pass the roving back and forth between the palms of your hands; wetting the ball frequently in the soapy water.

Felting beads

As the ball begins to form start to apply a little more pressure. Keep rolling, pressing and wetting until the ball is firm and hard.

Rinse the felt

Rinse under cold water.
Continuously rolling and pressing to get all the soap out.

For a simple tutorial watch the following video from Sara’s Textured Crafts. She really makes the process look easy.

The Crafty Crow

So I think I am going to start a Featured Link of the Month. I just have to gush about my absolutely favorite site right now, viagra The Crafty Crow. Fun crafts and fabulous book reviews, and I can’t forget the enormous long list of links to other wonderful and amazing websites.

I was on the hunt for something new this Christmas. We made our little beaded candy canes, glittery paper ornaments, a colorful paper chain garland and our traditional hand print Christmas tree. As we still have a couple more weeks to go I needed inspiration for more Christmas crafts.

Also the creator of Bella Dia, the designer of The Crafty Crow needed a spot to store her extensive and growing collection of children’s crafts. The categories make it easy to choose a craft by topic or age group. Each post is detailed with photos and step by step instructions and links to get the supplies needed for each project.

Right now she has a book and craft advent going on. She suggests a book to read and a craft to go with it. I am also digging the paper houses and felt reindeer ornament.
This month’s website review happens to include two websites; The Happiness Project and My Simpler Life.

THE HAPPINESS PROJECT is a memoir written by Gretchen Rubin about her year long adventure as she sets out to test every theory, click tip and scientific study on being happier. The website is her daily blog on the subject.

MY SIMPLER LIFE – SIMPLE LIVING
Beth Dargis is a simplicity coach. Her goal is to help teach others how to love life, work hard and have fun, how to stay positive and take time to relax. She helps her clients “uncover what is the most important things for them to be doing.” She coaches those individuals “searching for something more in their life while releasing what they no longer need.” There is no need to become a client in order to become inspired or get tips on time management off of Beth’s website.

Both The Happiness Project and My Simpler Life teach how to step back, breathe and enjoy what we have at the moment. My brother once told me you are who you are now, unless you change who you are today. I have come to realize their is never going to be a better day than today unless I make it so. I find I am happier when I break free of me. When I can step back and think of all the joy around me. It takes time and a lot of practice. I am also trying to laugh more. Something I lost for a while. It is really hard to be angry when I am laughing or singing.

Almond Crescents with Burnt Butter Icing

The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
I have been searching for a mac and cheese recipe that does not contain canned soup or processed cheese. Better yet this recipe does not require flour and can be made completely gluten free just by substituting gluten free pasta for regular pasta. The first time I made this I was overcome with shock at how creamy the pasta came out.

source: Heavenly Homemakers
2 1/2 cups pasta
3 cups whole milk
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup shredded cheese

Mix pasta, discount milk and salt in a large sauce pan.  Cook over medium-high heat STIRRING ALMOST CONSTANTLY until the pasta is tender (10-15 minutes).  

Remove from heat. Add cheese and stir until melted. Serve immediately.
The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
I have been searching for a mac and cheese recipe that does not contain canned soup or processed cheese. Better yet this recipe does not require flour and can be made completely gluten free just by substituting gluten free pasta for regular pasta. The first time I made this I was overcome with shock at how creamy the pasta came out.

source: Heavenly Homemakers
2 1/2 cups pasta
3 cups whole milk
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup shredded cheese

Mix pasta, discount milk and salt in a large sauce pan.  Cook over medium-high heat STIRRING ALMOST CONSTANTLY until the pasta is tender (10-15 minutes).  

Remove from heat. Add cheese and stir until melted. Serve immediately.
Found on Pittsburgh Needs Eated, illness adapted from America’s Best Lost Recipes. Similar to a bear claw.

Makes 2 crescents, sick each serving 6

Dough:
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1 package rapid-rise or instant yeast
1 tsp salt
8 tbsp (1 stick) unsalted butter, visit this cut into 1/2 inch pieces and chilled
1/4 cup warm evaporated milk (110 degrees)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees)
2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 large egg

Filling:
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Burnt Butter Icing:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 tbsp milk

1. For the dough: Pulse the flour, yeast, and salt in a food processor until blended. Add the butter and pulse until the flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal. Turn the mixture into a large bowl.

2. Beat the milk, water, sugar, and egg in a medium bowl. Using a rubber spatula, fold the milk mixture into the flour mixture, then press against the side of the bowl. (The dough will be sticky.) Divide the dough into two pieces, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours.

3. For the filling: Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Stir the brown sugar and almonds together in a small bowl.

4. Working with one piece of dough at a time on a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to a 14×9 inch rectangle. Brush the dough with half the melted butter, then sprinkle with half the almond mixture, leaving a 1/4 inch border around the edges. Starting at the long end, roll the dough into an even cylinder and pinch the dough to seal. Form the cylinder into a crescent shape on a prepared baking sheet and, with a paring knife, make cuts around the outside of the ring, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Rotate each piece cut side up. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Cover with plastic wrap coated with cooking spray and let rise until the dough is almost doubled in size, about 1 hour.

5. Adjust two oven racks to the upper-middle and lower-middle positions and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake until the crescents are golden brown, about 20 minutes, rotating and switching the sheets halfway through baking. Cool on a rack until just warm, at least 40 minutes.

6. For the icing: While the crescents are cooling, heat the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, swiring the pan constantly, until the butter is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the butter to a bowl and whisk in the confectioners’ sugar and milk. Drizzle the icing over the crescents. Serve.

The Good Fortune Tree

Last summer a friend invited us over for a BBQ. This is Kate’s mother’s recipe.

2 boxes chocolate pudding mix
3 cups milk
1 medium tub cool whip
Hershey Chocolate bars

Mix milk and pudding mix in a blender. Add tub of cool whip. Pour into glasses. Add a dollop cool whip on top. Shave some chocolate. Serve with a square Hershey chocolate.
Last summer a friend invited us over for a BBQ. This is Kate’s mother’s recipe.

2 boxes chocolate pudding mix
3 cups milk
1 medium tub cool whip
Hershey Chocolate bars

Mix milk and pudding mix in a blender. Add tub of cool whip. Pour into glasses. Add a dollop cool whip on top. Shave some chocolate. Serve with a square Hershey chocolate.

Apple and Ice Cream Pie

In many parts of the world September brings show tail signs that fall is close at hand. Here in the valley we will not feel the effects for another couple of months. I should have been born or at least moved to the northern east coast. I love the fall colors, ambulance the nippy air, more about basements and apple farms.

This recipe has been on my “to try” list for years. Sad really that I never got around to making it. There is a lot of time consuming prep work involved (4 1/2 hours worth) that maybe psychologically added to the delay. When we heard the nieces were coming to visit I pulled out the recipe and dove right in. The pie was a hit. The yogurt melted fairly quickly but if it does not sit in the refrigerator long enough the apples remain frozen and personally I am not a fan of frozen apple. My conclusion it this. Apple and Ice Cream Pie is meant to resemble a bowl of warm apple pie in a pool of semi melted ice cream. Not a perfectly cut slice.

Crust:
10 reduced-fat graham cracker sheets
2 tbsp brown sugar
2 tbsp butter, melted
1 large egg white
Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. To prepare the crust, place crackers in a food processor; process until fine crumbs form. Add 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons melted butter, and egg white; pulse 8 times or until moist.

Press crumb mixture into a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 8 minutes; cool on a wire rack. Freeze 30 minutes to overnight.

Filling:
1 tbsp butter
5 cups (2 lbs) thinly sliced peeled Granny Smith apple
3/4 cup water
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp brown sugar
4 cups reduced-fat vanilla frozen yogurt, softened
1 ground cinnamon, divided
6 tbsp caramel topping, divided
1 tablespoon chopped pecans, toasted
1 reduced-fat graham cracker sheet, coarsely crumbled

To prepare filling, melt 1 tablespoon butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add apple; cook 10 minutes or until lightly browned, stirring frequently. Add water; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, and nutmeg; cook, uncovered, 3 minutes or until liquid evaporates. Remove from pan. Cover and chill 2 hours.

Place frozen yogurt in a chilled bowl. Stir in 1teaspoon cinnamon and 3/4 cup apple mixture. Cover and chill 30 minutes. Spread half of yogurt mixture into frozen crust (keep remaining yogurt mixture in freezer). Top the yogurt mixture with the remaining apple mixture. Drizzle with 1/4 cup caramel topping. Cover and freeze 1 hour. Carefully spread reserved yogurt mixture over caramel. Top with graham cracker crumbs and pecans. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons caramel topping. Freeze overnight or until solid. Place pie in the refrigerator for 30 minutes before serving.
Last summer a friend invited us over for a BBQ. This is Kate’s mother’s recipe.

2 boxes chocolate pudding mix
3 cups milk
1 medium tub cool whip
Hershey Chocolate bars

Mix milk and pudding mix in a blender. Add tub of cool whip. Pour into glasses. Add a dollop cool whip on top. Shave some chocolate. Serve with a square Hershey chocolate.

Apple and Ice Cream Pie

In many parts of the world September brings show tail signs that fall is close at hand. Here in the valley we will not feel the effects for another couple of months. I should have been born or at least moved to the northern east coast. I love the fall colors, ambulance the nippy air, more about basements and apple farms.

This recipe has been on my “to try” list for years. Sad really that I never got around to making it. There is a lot of time consuming prep work involved (4 1/2 hours worth) that maybe psychologically added to the delay. When we heard the nieces were coming to visit I pulled out the recipe and dove right in. The pie was a hit. The yogurt melted fairly quickly but if it does not sit in the refrigerator long enough the apples remain frozen and personally I am not a fan of frozen apple. My conclusion it this. Apple and Ice Cream Pie is meant to resemble a bowl of warm apple pie in a pool of semi melted ice cream. Not a perfectly cut slice.

Crust:
10 reduced-fat graham cracker sheets
2 tbsp brown sugar
2 tbsp butter, melted
1 large egg white
Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. To prepare the crust, place crackers in a food processor; process until fine crumbs form. Add 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons melted butter, and egg white; pulse 8 times or until moist.

Press crumb mixture into a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 8 minutes; cool on a wire rack. Freeze 30 minutes to overnight.

Filling:
1 tbsp butter
5 cups (2 lbs) thinly sliced peeled Granny Smith apple
3/4 cup water
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp brown sugar
4 cups reduced-fat vanilla frozen yogurt, softened
1 ground cinnamon, divided
6 tbsp caramel topping, divided
1 tablespoon chopped pecans, toasted
1 reduced-fat graham cracker sheet, coarsely crumbled

To prepare filling, melt 1 tablespoon butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add apple; cook 10 minutes or until lightly browned, stirring frequently. Add water; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, and nutmeg; cook, uncovered, 3 minutes or until liquid evaporates. Remove from pan. Cover and chill 2 hours.

Place frozen yogurt in a chilled bowl. Stir in 1teaspoon cinnamon and 3/4 cup apple mixture. Cover and chill 30 minutes. Spread half of yogurt mixture into frozen crust (keep remaining yogurt mixture in freezer). Top the yogurt mixture with the remaining apple mixture. Drizzle with 1/4 cup caramel topping. Cover and freeze 1 hour. Carefully spread reserved yogurt mixture over caramel. Top with graham cracker crumbs and pecans. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons caramel topping. Freeze overnight or until solid. Place pie in the refrigerator for 30 minutes before serving.
This is an old recipe I collected while in Texas. I became friends with a family come to find out one evening that the woman’s (the girl I got the recipe from) husband knew my brother. They met years earlier in Southern California. I can’t remember how the conversation turned to my brother but I remember thinking, price what a small world.

Peanut butter pie is to be eaten among friends because you do not want any left overs.

1 cup crunchy peanut butter
1/2 gallon vanilla ice cream
1/2 cup cool whip
Graham cracker crust

Mix ingredients only until smooth (not like a shake).
Press into graham cracker crust. Freeze. Top with melted chocolate, hot fudge or chopped Reeses Peanut Butter cups. Serve.
Last summer a friend invited us over for a BBQ. This is Kate’s mother’s recipe.

2 boxes chocolate pudding mix
3 cups milk
1 medium tub cool whip
Hershey Chocolate bars

Mix milk and pudding mix in a blender. Add tub of cool whip. Pour into glasses. Add a dollop cool whip on top. Shave some chocolate. Serve with a square Hershey chocolate.

Apple and Ice Cream Pie

In many parts of the world September brings show tail signs that fall is close at hand. Here in the valley we will not feel the effects for another couple of months. I should have been born or at least moved to the northern east coast. I love the fall colors, ambulance the nippy air, more about basements and apple farms.

This recipe has been on my “to try” list for years. Sad really that I never got around to making it. There is a lot of time consuming prep work involved (4 1/2 hours worth) that maybe psychologically added to the delay. When we heard the nieces were coming to visit I pulled out the recipe and dove right in. The pie was a hit. The yogurt melted fairly quickly but if it does not sit in the refrigerator long enough the apples remain frozen and personally I am not a fan of frozen apple. My conclusion it this. Apple and Ice Cream Pie is meant to resemble a bowl of warm apple pie in a pool of semi melted ice cream. Not a perfectly cut slice.

Crust:
10 reduced-fat graham cracker sheets
2 tbsp brown sugar
2 tbsp butter, melted
1 large egg white
Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. To prepare the crust, place crackers in a food processor; process until fine crumbs form. Add 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons melted butter, and egg white; pulse 8 times or until moist.

Press crumb mixture into a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 8 minutes; cool on a wire rack. Freeze 30 minutes to overnight.

Filling:
1 tbsp butter
5 cups (2 lbs) thinly sliced peeled Granny Smith apple
3/4 cup water
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp brown sugar
4 cups reduced-fat vanilla frozen yogurt, softened
1 ground cinnamon, divided
6 tbsp caramel topping, divided
1 tablespoon chopped pecans, toasted
1 reduced-fat graham cracker sheet, coarsely crumbled

To prepare filling, melt 1 tablespoon butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add apple; cook 10 minutes or until lightly browned, stirring frequently. Add water; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, and nutmeg; cook, uncovered, 3 minutes or until liquid evaporates. Remove from pan. Cover and chill 2 hours.

Place frozen yogurt in a chilled bowl. Stir in 1teaspoon cinnamon and 3/4 cup apple mixture. Cover and chill 30 minutes. Spread half of yogurt mixture into frozen crust (keep remaining yogurt mixture in freezer). Top the yogurt mixture with the remaining apple mixture. Drizzle with 1/4 cup caramel topping. Cover and freeze 1 hour. Carefully spread reserved yogurt mixture over caramel. Top with graham cracker crumbs and pecans. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons caramel topping. Freeze overnight or until solid. Place pie in the refrigerator for 30 minutes before serving.
This is an old recipe I collected while in Texas. I became friends with a family come to find out one evening that the woman’s (the girl I got the recipe from) husband knew my brother. They met years earlier in Southern California. I can’t remember how the conversation turned to my brother but I remember thinking, price what a small world.

Peanut butter pie is to be eaten among friends because you do not want any left overs.

1 cup crunchy peanut butter
1/2 gallon vanilla ice cream
1/2 cup cool whip
Graham cracker crust

Mix ingredients only until smooth (not like a shake).
Press into graham cracker crust. Freeze. Top with melted chocolate, hot fudge or chopped Reeses Peanut Butter cups. Serve.
My mom flew out to spend last Christmas with us. After picking her up from the airport, nurse I took her to a quaint French cafe for lunch. She saw the eclairs on display and just had to buy one. I actually thought my mom’s were just as good.

Cream puffs have become a Valentine’s Day tradition. Last year, this web I took some to a social gathering but I filled them too full and when a couple of people bit into them, check they exploded every where. Note to self, less filling. My mom’s recipe is simple and maybe that is why I like it so much. I did take a few tips from the Baking Illustrated cookbook. I left the temperature at 400 only for 30 minutes the reduced the temperature to 375 about 8 minutes longer until they were firm and golden brown. I turned off the oven and let them dry out for about an hour. To fill, I filled a decorators bag with the pudding mixture and piped it into the side of the cream puff.

1 cup water
1/2 cup butter
1 cup flour
4 eggs

Heat oven to 400 degrees.

In a saucepan, bring water and butter to a rolling boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to low. Add flour, stirring vigorously over low heat until mixture forms a ball (about 1 min). Remove from heat. Beat in eggs thoroughly, 1 at a time. Beat until smooth. Drop from spoon onto ungreased baking sheet into mounds 3” apart. Bake 45-50 minutes or until puffed, golden brown and dry. Allow to cool slowly, away from any drafts. Cut off tops and scoop out soft dough or pipe in filling. Top with chocolate frosting or powdered sugar.

Filling:
Cook and Serve Vanilla pudding (or homemade pudding)
1 container whip cream

Cook pudding according to directions. Cook completely. Mix pudding with whip cream and chill until ready to use.
Last summer a friend invited us over for a BBQ. This is Kate’s mother’s recipe.

2 boxes chocolate pudding mix
3 cups milk
1 medium tub cool whip
Hershey Chocolate bars

Mix milk and pudding mix in a blender. Add tub of cool whip. Pour into glasses. Add a dollop cool whip on top. Shave some chocolate. Serve with a square Hershey chocolate.

Apple and Ice Cream Pie

In many parts of the world September brings show tail signs that fall is close at hand. Here in the valley we will not feel the effects for another couple of months. I should have been born or at least moved to the northern east coast. I love the fall colors, ambulance the nippy air, more about basements and apple farms.

This recipe has been on my “to try” list for years. Sad really that I never got around to making it. There is a lot of time consuming prep work involved (4 1/2 hours worth) that maybe psychologically added to the delay. When we heard the nieces were coming to visit I pulled out the recipe and dove right in. The pie was a hit. The yogurt melted fairly quickly but if it does not sit in the refrigerator long enough the apples remain frozen and personally I am not a fan of frozen apple. My conclusion it this. Apple and Ice Cream Pie is meant to resemble a bowl of warm apple pie in a pool of semi melted ice cream. Not a perfectly cut slice.

Crust:
10 reduced-fat graham cracker sheets
2 tbsp brown sugar
2 tbsp butter, melted
1 large egg white
Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. To prepare the crust, place crackers in a food processor; process until fine crumbs form. Add 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons melted butter, and egg white; pulse 8 times or until moist.

Press crumb mixture into a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 8 minutes; cool on a wire rack. Freeze 30 minutes to overnight.

Filling:
1 tbsp butter
5 cups (2 lbs) thinly sliced peeled Granny Smith apple
3/4 cup water
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp brown sugar
4 cups reduced-fat vanilla frozen yogurt, softened
1 ground cinnamon, divided
6 tbsp caramel topping, divided
1 tablespoon chopped pecans, toasted
1 reduced-fat graham cracker sheet, coarsely crumbled

To prepare filling, melt 1 tablespoon butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add apple; cook 10 minutes or until lightly browned, stirring frequently. Add water; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, and nutmeg; cook, uncovered, 3 minutes or until liquid evaporates. Remove from pan. Cover and chill 2 hours.

Place frozen yogurt in a chilled bowl. Stir in 1teaspoon cinnamon and 3/4 cup apple mixture. Cover and chill 30 minutes. Spread half of yogurt mixture into frozen crust (keep remaining yogurt mixture in freezer). Top the yogurt mixture with the remaining apple mixture. Drizzle with 1/4 cup caramel topping. Cover and freeze 1 hour. Carefully spread reserved yogurt mixture over caramel. Top with graham cracker crumbs and pecans. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons caramel topping. Freeze overnight or until solid. Place pie in the refrigerator for 30 minutes before serving.
This is an old recipe I collected while in Texas. I became friends with a family come to find out one evening that the woman’s (the girl I got the recipe from) husband knew my brother. They met years earlier in Southern California. I can’t remember how the conversation turned to my brother but I remember thinking, price what a small world.

Peanut butter pie is to be eaten among friends because you do not want any left overs.

1 cup crunchy peanut butter
1/2 gallon vanilla ice cream
1/2 cup cool whip
Graham cracker crust

Mix ingredients only until smooth (not like a shake).
Press into graham cracker crust. Freeze. Top with melted chocolate, hot fudge or chopped Reeses Peanut Butter cups. Serve.
My mom flew out to spend last Christmas with us. After picking her up from the airport, nurse I took her to a quaint French cafe for lunch. She saw the eclairs on display and just had to buy one. I actually thought my mom’s were just as good.

Cream puffs have become a Valentine’s Day tradition. Last year, this web I took some to a social gathering but I filled them too full and when a couple of people bit into them, check they exploded every where. Note to self, less filling. My mom’s recipe is simple and maybe that is why I like it so much. I did take a few tips from the Baking Illustrated cookbook. I left the temperature at 400 only for 30 minutes the reduced the temperature to 375 about 8 minutes longer until they were firm and golden brown. I turned off the oven and let them dry out for about an hour. To fill, I filled a decorators bag with the pudding mixture and piped it into the side of the cream puff.

1 cup water
1/2 cup butter
1 cup flour
4 eggs

Heat oven to 400 degrees.

In a saucepan, bring water and butter to a rolling boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to low. Add flour, stirring vigorously over low heat until mixture forms a ball (about 1 min). Remove from heat. Beat in eggs thoroughly, 1 at a time. Beat until smooth. Drop from spoon onto ungreased baking sheet into mounds 3” apart. Bake 45-50 minutes or until puffed, golden brown and dry. Allow to cool slowly, away from any drafts. Cut off tops and scoop out soft dough or pipe in filling. Top with chocolate frosting or powdered sugar.

Filling:
Cook and Serve Vanilla pudding (or homemade pudding)
1 container whip cream

Cook pudding according to directions. Cook completely. Mix pudding with whip cream and chill until ready to use.

One of our favorite indulgences is nachos. I love nachos. The crispy salty texture of the nacho chips dipped in the cool spicy flavorful salsa makes it hard to stop at seven measly chips. When we first got married we would frequent this amazing hole-in-the-wall Mexican restaurant. The place has since changed owners and unfortunately the food is no longer as fresh and flavorful but we relish the fond memories of eating nachos together.

Source: Adapted from Rachael Ray magazine
Nacho Chips
1 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, cost chopped
3 cloves garlic, view minced
1 bunch broccoli, cut into small floret, stems peeled and thinly sliced
1 (15-oz) can cannellini or black beans, rinsed
2 cups cooked chicken, shredded
2-3 cups cheddar cheese
Salsa
Plain yogurt or sour cream

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a layer of chips on a baking sheet.Sprinkle with some cheese.

In a large skillet, heat one tablespoon oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook until lightly browned. Remove the onions and scatter over chips. Add the broccoli and 1/2 cup of water. Continue to cook until the broccoli is slightly tender, not mushy, and the water has evaporated.

Sprinkle the broccoli, cooked chicken, beans and cheese over the chips evenly. Bake until cheese has melted.
Scalloped potatoes were on the Christmas dinner menu but come last minute I did not want the same old dish of potato casserole. I turned to my Cooking with Shelburne Farms cookbook to see if they had anything exciting. I found Scalloped Potatoes with Mushrooms and Canadian Bacon. Problem was it called for half and half in addition to heavy cream. I did not have any half and half and I had barely enough cream. The idea of mushrooms intrigued me. I tend to shy away from canned cream of soups in casserole type dishes but was in a pinch and on a time schedule. This recipe was fast and supper easy. I missed the part about combining the spices with the soup and milk so I forgot to add the paprika, patient visit web salt and pepper. Everyone thought it was fine.

I happened to learn a thing or two about potatoes during this experience. Normally I stick with red potatoes as they are noted to be a healthier choice than their starchier counterparts. The only time I make anything other than roasted potatoes is on Holidays. This time I happened to pick up a bag of russet because it was the only kind they had at the time. Good thing I did. Red and gold potatoes are considered a waxy potato and used more in grilling or roasting. The starch in potatoes such as russet and Idaho help thicken sauces and are the best choice for casseroles.

Source: More than Burnt Toast
8 cups thinly sliced & peeled potatoes
1 large onion
1 T butter/garlic butter
8-12 large fresh mushrooms, ampoule thinly sliced
2 cans Cream of Mushroom soup
1 cup milk (skim, 1%, 2%)
1 -1/2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
sea salt, to taste
freshly ground pepper, to taste
paprika, to taste

Combine soup, milk and spices in a bowl. Sauté thinly sliced onion rings in 1 tablespoon butter.
Lightly oil a casserole dish or glass lasagna pan with olive oil.
Arrange potatoes in a single layer in bottom of dish. Drizzle soup mixture over top.
Arrange onions and mushrooms. Sprinkle cheese over each layer.
Continue to layer in this manner until all ingredients are used up. Place the dish on a baking sheet.
Bake at 375°F for approximately 1 hour or until potatoes reach desired texture.
For a crispy top layer, uncover during the last 10-15 minutes of cooking time.

To make the Shelburne Farms version:
1 1/2 pounds starchy potatoes, such as russet potatoes, peeled and sliced very thin, about 1/8 inch
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 pound mixed mushrooms, thinly sliced
Black pepper, to taste
6 oz Canadian bacon slices
3/4 cup heavy cream
3/4 half and half
3/4 cup (3 oz) grated cheddar or aged Colby cheese

Preheat the over to 375 degrees. Butter a 2-quart casserole dish.

Arrange half of the potatoes overlapping to form one layer on the bottom of the dish. Sprinkle with the garlic and season with 1/4 tsp salt. Spread mushrooms evenly over the potatoes and season with pepper. Arrange the bacon in one layer over the mushrooms and finish with remaining potatoes, overlapping to form final layer.

In a small bowl, whisk together the cream and half and half and pour evenly over potatoes. Sprinkle with remaining salt and then spread the cheese evenly over the top. Place the baking dish on a baking sheet to catch any overflow while baking. Bake for 65-75 minutes until bubbly and a deep golden brown. Let sit for 5-10 minutes before serving.

*Mixed mushrooms may include Hen of the Woods, honey and wine-cap Stropharia, Cremini or white button and cultivated oyster varieties.
Scalloped potatoes were on the Christmas dinner menu but come last minute I did not want the same old dish of potato casserole. I turned to my Cooking with Shelburne Farms cookbook to see if they had anything exciting. I found Scalloped Potatoes with Mushrooms and Canadian Bacon. Problem was it called for half and half in addition to heavy cream. I did not have any half and half and I had barely enough cream. The idea of mushrooms intrigued me. I tend to shy away from canned cream of soups in casserole type dishes but was in a pinch and on a time schedule. This recipe was fast and supper easy. I missed the part about combining the spices with the soup and milk so I forgot to add the paprika, patient visit web salt and pepper. Everyone thought it was fine.

I happened to learn a thing or two about potatoes during this experience. Normally I stick with red potatoes as they are noted to be a healthier choice than their starchier counterparts. The only time I make anything other than roasted potatoes is on Holidays. This time I happened to pick up a bag of russet because it was the only kind they had at the time. Good thing I did. Red and gold potatoes are considered a waxy potato and used more in grilling or roasting. The starch in potatoes such as russet and Idaho help thicken sauces and are the best choice for casseroles.

Source: More than Burnt Toast
8 cups thinly sliced & peeled potatoes
1 large onion
1 T butter/garlic butter
8-12 large fresh mushrooms, ampoule thinly sliced
2 cans Cream of Mushroom soup
1 cup milk (skim, 1%, 2%)
1 -1/2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
sea salt, to taste
freshly ground pepper, to taste
paprika, to taste

Combine soup, milk and spices in a bowl. Sauté thinly sliced onion rings in 1 tablespoon butter.
Lightly oil a casserole dish or glass lasagna pan with olive oil.
Arrange potatoes in a single layer in bottom of dish. Drizzle soup mixture over top.
Arrange onions and mushrooms. Sprinkle cheese over each layer.
Continue to layer in this manner until all ingredients are used up. Place the dish on a baking sheet.
Bake at 375°F for approximately 1 hour or until potatoes reach desired texture.
For a crispy top layer, uncover during the last 10-15 minutes of cooking time.

To make the Shelburne Farms version:
1 1/2 pounds starchy potatoes, such as russet potatoes, peeled and sliced very thin, about 1/8 inch
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 pound mixed mushrooms, thinly sliced
Black pepper, to taste
6 oz Canadian bacon slices
3/4 cup heavy cream
3/4 half and half
3/4 cup (3 oz) grated cheddar or aged Colby cheese

Preheat the over to 375 degrees. Butter a 2-quart casserole dish.

Arrange half of the potatoes overlapping to form one layer on the bottom of the dish. Sprinkle with the garlic and season with 1/4 tsp salt. Spread mushrooms evenly over the potatoes and season with pepper. Arrange the bacon in one layer over the mushrooms and finish with remaining potatoes, overlapping to form final layer.

In a small bowl, whisk together the cream and half and half and pour evenly over potatoes. Sprinkle with remaining salt and then spread the cheese evenly over the top. Place the baking dish on a baking sheet to catch any overflow while baking. Bake for 65-75 minutes until bubbly and a deep golden brown. Let sit for 5-10 minutes before serving.

*Mixed mushrooms may include Hen of the Woods, honey and wine-cap Stropharia, Cremini or white button and cultivated oyster varieties.
Source: Submitted to the Meridian Magazine by Diane Thomas

Don’t take down that Christmas tree yet. Turn it into a fun New Year’s Decoration!

Leftover Christmas tree, price undecorated
Balloons, 6″ to 8″
Chinese fortunes or wishes, typed on small pieces of paper
One-dollar bills
Ribbon
String confetti
Happy New Year’s hat

Remove the Christmas ornaments and lights from your tree and replace them with small balloons filled with New Year’s wishes, Chinese fortunes, and dollar bills. Tie the balloons to the tree with ribbon, being careful not to pop them. Finish decorating the tree with string confetti and a Happy New Year’s hat.

As the New Year rings in, guests can pop the balloons and claim the wishes, fortunes, and money inside.

Hamburger Stroganoff

http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
My goal in 2009 is to laugh more. I am focusing on joking around with my kids, this especially during tantrums and learning to discover the optimist in me. This list is taken from the Happiness Project website. She does state that helping others is one of the best ways of boosting your happiness; however, it is not listed as one of the top ten. Maybe that is because we should already be doing that.

10. Take action.
Some people assume happiness is mostly a matter of inborn temperament: You’re born an Eeyore or a Tigger, and that’s that. Taking time to reflect, and conscious steps to make your life happier, really does work.

9. Stop nagging. Replace nagging with…persuasive tools: wordless hints (for example, leaving a new light bulb on the counter); using just one word (saying “Milk!” instead of talking on and on); not insisting that something be done on my schedule; and, most effective of all, doing a task myself.

8. Exercise to boost energy. Exercise is one of the most dependable mood-boosters.

7. There are two types of decision makers. “Satisfiers”- make a decision once their criteria are met. “Maximizers”- want to make the best possible decision. Satisfiers tend to be happier than maximizers. Maximizers expend more time and energy reaching decisions, and they’re often anxious about their choices. Sometimes good enough is good enough.

6. Buy some happiness.
Our basic psychological needs include feeling loved, secure, being good at what we do and having a sense of control. Spend money to stay in closer contact with…family and friends, promote…health, work more efficiently, eliminate sources of irritation and marital conflict; to support important causes; and to have enlarging experiences.

5. Don’t treat the blues with a “treat. The pleasure lasts a minute, but then feelings of guilt and loss of control and other negative consequences deepen the lousiness of the day. Ask whether this will truly make things better.

4. People who do new things are happier than people who stick to familiar activities that they already do well.

3. Fake it till you feel it. Feelings follow actions. Feeling low? Deliberately act cheery and you will yourself actually feeling happier. Feeling angry at someone? Do something thoughtful for them.

2. Expressing anger related to minor, fleeting annoyances just amplifies bad feelings, while not expressing anger often allows it to dissipate.

1. Go to sleep at a decent hour and do not allow yourself to get too hungry.
http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
My goal in 2009 is to laugh more. I am focusing on joking around with my kids, this especially during tantrums and learning to discover the optimist in me. This list is taken from the Happiness Project website. She does state that helping others is one of the best ways of boosting your happiness; however, it is not listed as one of the top ten. Maybe that is because we should already be doing that.

10. Take action.
Some people assume happiness is mostly a matter of inborn temperament: You’re born an Eeyore or a Tigger, and that’s that. Taking time to reflect, and conscious steps to make your life happier, really does work.

9. Stop nagging. Replace nagging with…persuasive tools: wordless hints (for example, leaving a new light bulb on the counter); using just one word (saying “Milk!” instead of talking on and on); not insisting that something be done on my schedule; and, most effective of all, doing a task myself.

8. Exercise to boost energy. Exercise is one of the most dependable mood-boosters.

7. There are two types of decision makers. “Satisfiers”- make a decision once their criteria are met. “Maximizers”- want to make the best possible decision. Satisfiers tend to be happier than maximizers. Maximizers expend more time and energy reaching decisions, and they’re often anxious about their choices. Sometimes good enough is good enough.

6. Buy some happiness.
Our basic psychological needs include feeling loved, secure, being good at what we do and having a sense of control. Spend money to stay in closer contact with…family and friends, promote…health, work more efficiently, eliminate sources of irritation and marital conflict; to support important causes; and to have enlarging experiences.

5. Don’t treat the blues with a “treat. The pleasure lasts a minute, but then feelings of guilt and loss of control and other negative consequences deepen the lousiness of the day. Ask whether this will truly make things better.

4. People who do new things are happier than people who stick to familiar activities that they already do well.

3. Fake it till you feel it. Feelings follow actions. Feeling low? Deliberately act cheery and you will yourself actually feeling happier. Feeling angry at someone? Do something thoughtful for them.

2. Expressing anger related to minor, fleeting annoyances just amplifies bad feelings, while not expressing anger often allows it to dissipate.

1. Go to sleep at a decent hour and do not allow yourself to get too hungry.
In today’s economic uncertainties proper money management is top on the list of priorities when it comes to preparing my children for the real world. When I was in college I did not drive anywhere on the weekends because I did not have the money to pay for the extra gas spent. I did not take money from my parents nor was I out buying clothes or going to the movies. I made just enough money to cover living expenses and that was it.

A few of my friends invited me to a little get-together one evening. These were friends I respected so imagine my shock when one of them got up and announced we were there to discuss financial possibilities. The owner of the house was my age. By age 24 he had secured a Hummer and a sizable home with many amenities. The scheme was not so much about selling products but rather sign up as many people as you can naïve enough to fork over $1500. I thought how dumb could they be to allow themselves to become a part of this. They had managed to convince a girl to turn over one thousand dollars of money she did not have to spend on get rich quick schemes. I had to hold them back as I ushered her out of the room and to her car. Not even one month later the gentlemen who started this scheme over in Switzerland went under taking all the blind that followed with him. I wonder how much of the oversized housing market was due to individuals like these who had not been taught the fundamentals of financial responsibility (or ignored it) and saw a quick buck.

My kids are still too young to recognize the value of money. I can only imagine the tantrum that would ensue over my giving Mason a dime and Adelin ten pennies. All they would see is one of them has more coins than the other. But, sildenafil there are other ways to teach the little guys about money and the value of work.

By the age of one our children knew how to throw their diapers away, wash dishes and pick up toys. Toddlers love to put objects into things. In our home when we clean up I try to include our one year old, making it into a game. The other kids are driven by the excitement of teaching their baby brother how to put things away. By three the older two knew how to clean their own rooms (by themselves without me telling them too, I do not know how that happened), the bathrooms, mop the floors, pull weeds, vacuum, sweep, dust, set the table and help cook. At this age they help out because they want to and they do a pretty good job. I love it when Mason excitedly asks us to “come see.” Proudly he announces that he cleaned his room. Yes it was very clean. The funny part was he had thrown every article of clothing and all his toys into the hallway. They are practicing now how to work. And we give them every opportunity to do so. If they are bored I immediately find them something to do. At this age they are happy to comply when it is on their terms so I try to let perfection go and have fun.

I do believe in allowances, however; I believe that chores are part of being a family. Mason begins Kindergarten next year and will most likely start receiving a monthly, age appropriate, allowance when he has learned to associate a value to the coins. For now they love to sort the coins and play grocery store. They learn to conserve energy by turning off the lights and take care of their clothes by tackling stains right away and hanging them up to dry. By age twelve and thirteen they will be capable of finding odd jobs in the community such as babysitting, mowing the neighbor’s lawns, washing cars or selling homemade baked goods. They will learn about giving to charity, savings and being frugal.

Budgeting and a good sound worth ethic are the two most valuable tools my mom taught me. It did not happen on my way off to college. It happened when I was very young when my mom refused to give in to my demands and made me wash the dishes. I want to send my children off with the knowledge we work hard, we save for a rainy day, use what we have and go without when we have to.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.

The Columbia Restaurant Black Bean Soup

http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
My goal in 2009 is to laugh more. I am focusing on joking around with my kids, this especially during tantrums and learning to discover the optimist in me. This list is taken from the Happiness Project website. She does state that helping others is one of the best ways of boosting your happiness; however, it is not listed as one of the top ten. Maybe that is because we should already be doing that.

10. Take action.
Some people assume happiness is mostly a matter of inborn temperament: You’re born an Eeyore or a Tigger, and that’s that. Taking time to reflect, and conscious steps to make your life happier, really does work.

9. Stop nagging. Replace nagging with…persuasive tools: wordless hints (for example, leaving a new light bulb on the counter); using just one word (saying “Milk!” instead of talking on and on); not insisting that something be done on my schedule; and, most effective of all, doing a task myself.

8. Exercise to boost energy. Exercise is one of the most dependable mood-boosters.

7. There are two types of decision makers. “Satisfiers”- make a decision once their criteria are met. “Maximizers”- want to make the best possible decision. Satisfiers tend to be happier than maximizers. Maximizers expend more time and energy reaching decisions, and they’re often anxious about their choices. Sometimes good enough is good enough.

6. Buy some happiness.
Our basic psychological needs include feeling loved, secure, being good at what we do and having a sense of control. Spend money to stay in closer contact with…family and friends, promote…health, work more efficiently, eliminate sources of irritation and marital conflict; to support important causes; and to have enlarging experiences.

5. Don’t treat the blues with a “treat. The pleasure lasts a minute, but then feelings of guilt and loss of control and other negative consequences deepen the lousiness of the day. Ask whether this will truly make things better.

4. People who do new things are happier than people who stick to familiar activities that they already do well.

3. Fake it till you feel it. Feelings follow actions. Feeling low? Deliberately act cheery and you will yourself actually feeling happier. Feeling angry at someone? Do something thoughtful for them.

2. Expressing anger related to minor, fleeting annoyances just amplifies bad feelings, while not expressing anger often allows it to dissipate.

1. Go to sleep at a decent hour and do not allow yourself to get too hungry.
http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
My goal in 2009 is to laugh more. I am focusing on joking around with my kids, this especially during tantrums and learning to discover the optimist in me. This list is taken from the Happiness Project website. She does state that helping others is one of the best ways of boosting your happiness; however, it is not listed as one of the top ten. Maybe that is because we should already be doing that.

10. Take action.
Some people assume happiness is mostly a matter of inborn temperament: You’re born an Eeyore or a Tigger, and that’s that. Taking time to reflect, and conscious steps to make your life happier, really does work.

9. Stop nagging. Replace nagging with…persuasive tools: wordless hints (for example, leaving a new light bulb on the counter); using just one word (saying “Milk!” instead of talking on and on); not insisting that something be done on my schedule; and, most effective of all, doing a task myself.

8. Exercise to boost energy. Exercise is one of the most dependable mood-boosters.

7. There are two types of decision makers. “Satisfiers”- make a decision once their criteria are met. “Maximizers”- want to make the best possible decision. Satisfiers tend to be happier than maximizers. Maximizers expend more time and energy reaching decisions, and they’re often anxious about their choices. Sometimes good enough is good enough.

6. Buy some happiness.
Our basic psychological needs include feeling loved, secure, being good at what we do and having a sense of control. Spend money to stay in closer contact with…family and friends, promote…health, work more efficiently, eliminate sources of irritation and marital conflict; to support important causes; and to have enlarging experiences.

5. Don’t treat the blues with a “treat. The pleasure lasts a minute, but then feelings of guilt and loss of control and other negative consequences deepen the lousiness of the day. Ask whether this will truly make things better.

4. People who do new things are happier than people who stick to familiar activities that they already do well.

3. Fake it till you feel it. Feelings follow actions. Feeling low? Deliberately act cheery and you will yourself actually feeling happier. Feeling angry at someone? Do something thoughtful for them.

2. Expressing anger related to minor, fleeting annoyances just amplifies bad feelings, while not expressing anger often allows it to dissipate.

1. Go to sleep at a decent hour and do not allow yourself to get too hungry.
In today’s economic uncertainties proper money management is top on the list of priorities when it comes to preparing my children for the real world. When I was in college I did not drive anywhere on the weekends because I did not have the money to pay for the extra gas spent. I did not take money from my parents nor was I out buying clothes or going to the movies. I made just enough money to cover living expenses and that was it.

A few of my friends invited me to a little get-together one evening. These were friends I respected so imagine my shock when one of them got up and announced we were there to discuss financial possibilities. The owner of the house was my age. By age 24 he had secured a Hummer and a sizable home with many amenities. The scheme was not so much about selling products but rather sign up as many people as you can naïve enough to fork over $1500. I thought how dumb could they be to allow themselves to become a part of this. They had managed to convince a girl to turn over one thousand dollars of money she did not have to spend on get rich quick schemes. I had to hold them back as I ushered her out of the room and to her car. Not even one month later the gentlemen who started this scheme over in Switzerland went under taking all the blind that followed with him. I wonder how much of the oversized housing market was due to individuals like these who had not been taught the fundamentals of financial responsibility (or ignored it) and saw a quick buck.

My kids are still too young to recognize the value of money. I can only imagine the tantrum that would ensue over my giving Mason a dime and Adelin ten pennies. All they would see is one of them has more coins than the other. But, sildenafil there are other ways to teach the little guys about money and the value of work.

By the age of one our children knew how to throw their diapers away, wash dishes and pick up toys. Toddlers love to put objects into things. In our home when we clean up I try to include our one year old, making it into a game. The other kids are driven by the excitement of teaching their baby brother how to put things away. By three the older two knew how to clean their own rooms (by themselves without me telling them too, I do not know how that happened), the bathrooms, mop the floors, pull weeds, vacuum, sweep, dust, set the table and help cook. At this age they help out because they want to and they do a pretty good job. I love it when Mason excitedly asks us to “come see.” Proudly he announces that he cleaned his room. Yes it was very clean. The funny part was he had thrown every article of clothing and all his toys into the hallway. They are practicing now how to work. And we give them every opportunity to do so. If they are bored I immediately find them something to do. At this age they are happy to comply when it is on their terms so I try to let perfection go and have fun.

I do believe in allowances, however; I believe that chores are part of being a family. Mason begins Kindergarten next year and will most likely start receiving a monthly, age appropriate, allowance when he has learned to associate a value to the coins. For now they love to sort the coins and play grocery store. They learn to conserve energy by turning off the lights and take care of their clothes by tackling stains right away and hanging them up to dry. By age twelve and thirteen they will be capable of finding odd jobs in the community such as babysitting, mowing the neighbor’s lawns, washing cars or selling homemade baked goods. They will learn about giving to charity, savings and being frugal.

Budgeting and a good sound worth ethic are the two most valuable tools my mom taught me. It did not happen on my way off to college. It happened when I was very young when my mom refused to give in to my demands and made me wash the dishes. I want to send my children off with the knowledge we work hard, we save for a rainy day, use what we have and go without when we have to.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
I had some left over rice from dinner that I wanted to use up rather than waste. This recipe comes from my sister-n-law Emily’s Grandpa Joe.

The recipe does not specify how much milk, more about sugar and vanilla to use so I guessed 3 cups milk, online 1 teaspoon vanilla, rx 1/4 cup sugar and I substituted 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon for the nutmeg. Whole milk is preferred but all I had on hand was fat free and I used long grain Jasmine rice.

2 cups of cooked rice
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 tsp salt
Sugar, to sweeten
1/2 cup raisins
Vanilla
Nutmeg

Mix rice and milk in a baking dish. Add the beaten eggs, salt and sugar. Add raisins, vanilla and nutmeg to taste. Bake in low oven until the egg mixture is done. 325 degrees for 1 hour.

For the stove top version: Mix the eggs, milk, salt and sugar in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil. Add rice, vanilla and cinnamon. Simmer 20 to 30 minutes until thick and creamy.

Variations:
Lemon zest
1/2 vanilla bean in the place of vanilla flavoring
Replace some of the milk with Coconut milk

Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
I had some left over rice from dinner that I wanted to use up rather than waste. This recipe comes from my sister-n-law Emily’s Grandpa Joe.

The recipe does not specify how much milk, more about sugar and vanilla to use so I guessed 3 cups milk, online 1 teaspoon vanilla, rx 1/4 cup sugar and I substituted 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon for the nutmeg. Whole milk is preferred but all I had on hand was fat free and I used long grain Jasmine rice.

2 cups of cooked rice
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 tsp salt
Sugar, to sweeten
1/2 cup raisins
Vanilla
Nutmeg

Mix rice and milk in a baking dish. Add the beaten eggs, salt and sugar. Add raisins, vanilla and nutmeg to taste. Bake in low oven until the egg mixture is done. 325 degrees for 1 hour.

For the stove top version: Mix the eggs, milk, salt and sugar in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil. Add rice, vanilla and cinnamon. Simmer 20 to 30 minutes until thick and creamy.

Variations:
Lemon zest
1/2 vanilla bean in the place of vanilla flavoring
Replace some of the milk with Coconut milk

I made this recipe several years ago for a Valentine’s Day dinner party. It was so rich and chocolaty, order I did not crave chocolate for a whole month. I did not make the whipped cream. Instead, story we ate ours with strawberries and vanilla ice cream. I read somewhere to place a ball of ganache in the middle of the cakes before baking. That could be why they were so gooey.

Source: Emeril
1 1/2 teaspoons unsalted butter, plus 1/4 pound (1 stick)
4 teaspoons all-purpose flour, plus 2 tablespoons
6 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons cold heavy cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Pinch salt
1/2 cup cold heavy cream

Garnish:
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon nut-flavored liqueur
1/2 pint fresh raspberries
4 sprigs mint
Sweetened cocoa, as garnish

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Grease and flour 4 (6-ounce) ramekins or baking dishes with the 1 1/2 teaspoons of butter and 1 teaspoon of flour in each, tapping out the excess flour. Set on a baking sheet.

In a double boiler, or a metal bowl set over a pan of simmering water, melt the remaining 1/4 pound of butter with the chocolate, cream, and powdered sugar, stirring until smooth. Remove from the heat.

In a bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, sugar, vanilla, and salt until thick ribbons form, about 3 minutes. Sift 2 tablespoons flour into the egg mixture and fold together. Fold the chocolate into the egg mixture. Divide among the prepared dishes and bake until the sides of the cake are set and the tops are puffed but still soft, about 12 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool in the ramekins for 2 minutes, then unmold onto dessert plates.

Meanwhile, in a bowl whip the cream until beginning to form soft peaks. Add the sugar and nut liqueur and beat until stiff peaks start to form. Spoon a dollop of the whipped cream on each unmolded cake, and garnish each plate with raspberries and a sprig of mint. Sprinkle cocoa over the cakes, and serve.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
I had some left over rice from dinner that I wanted to use up rather than waste. This recipe comes from my sister-n-law Emily’s Grandpa Joe.

The recipe does not specify how much milk, more about sugar and vanilla to use so I guessed 3 cups milk, online 1 teaspoon vanilla, rx 1/4 cup sugar and I substituted 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon for the nutmeg. Whole milk is preferred but all I had on hand was fat free and I used long grain Jasmine rice.

2 cups of cooked rice
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 tsp salt
Sugar, to sweeten
1/2 cup raisins
Vanilla
Nutmeg

Mix rice and milk in a baking dish. Add the beaten eggs, salt and sugar. Add raisins, vanilla and nutmeg to taste. Bake in low oven until the egg mixture is done. 325 degrees for 1 hour.

For the stove top version: Mix the eggs, milk, salt and sugar in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil. Add rice, vanilla and cinnamon. Simmer 20 to 30 minutes until thick and creamy.

Variations:
Lemon zest
1/2 vanilla bean in the place of vanilla flavoring
Replace some of the milk with Coconut milk

I made this recipe several years ago for a Valentine’s Day dinner party. It was so rich and chocolaty, order I did not crave chocolate for a whole month. I did not make the whipped cream. Instead, story we ate ours with strawberries and vanilla ice cream. I read somewhere to place a ball of ganache in the middle of the cakes before baking. That could be why they were so gooey.

Source: Emeril
1 1/2 teaspoons unsalted butter, plus 1/4 pound (1 stick)
4 teaspoons all-purpose flour, plus 2 tablespoons
6 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons cold heavy cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Pinch salt
1/2 cup cold heavy cream

Garnish:
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon nut-flavored liqueur
1/2 pint fresh raspberries
4 sprigs mint
Sweetened cocoa, as garnish

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Grease and flour 4 (6-ounce) ramekins or baking dishes with the 1 1/2 teaspoons of butter and 1 teaspoon of flour in each, tapping out the excess flour. Set on a baking sheet.

In a double boiler, or a metal bowl set over a pan of simmering water, melt the remaining 1/4 pound of butter with the chocolate, cream, and powdered sugar, stirring until smooth. Remove from the heat.

In a bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, sugar, vanilla, and salt until thick ribbons form, about 3 minutes. Sift 2 tablespoons flour into the egg mixture and fold together. Fold the chocolate into the egg mixture. Divide among the prepared dishes and bake until the sides of the cake are set and the tops are puffed but still soft, about 12 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool in the ramekins for 2 minutes, then unmold onto dessert plates.

Meanwhile, in a bowl whip the cream until beginning to form soft peaks. Add the sugar and nut liqueur and beat until stiff peaks start to form. Spoon a dollop of the whipped cream on each unmolded cake, and garnish each plate with raspberries and a sprig of mint. Sprinkle cocoa over the cakes, and serve.
10-inch loaf of Cuban bread
4 thin slices smoked ham
2 thin slices fresh pork ham
2 slices Genoa salami, and cut in half
2 slices Swiss cheese
3 sour pickle slices (may also use dill)
Yellow mustard

Slice bread down middle lengthwise. Layer ingredients to cover bottom half of bread in the following order: ham, story pork, salami, cheese, and pickles. Spread mustard on top half of bread. Cover bottom half and slice sandwich diagonally. Sandwich may be heated in oven or served at room temperature. If Cuban bread is not available, you may use French bread (baguette type) or Italian bread.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
I had some left over rice from dinner that I wanted to use up rather than waste. This recipe comes from my sister-n-law Emily’s Grandpa Joe.

The recipe does not specify how much milk, more about sugar and vanilla to use so I guessed 3 cups milk, online 1 teaspoon vanilla, rx 1/4 cup sugar and I substituted 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon for the nutmeg. Whole milk is preferred but all I had on hand was fat free and I used long grain Jasmine rice.

2 cups of cooked rice
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 tsp salt
Sugar, to sweeten
1/2 cup raisins
Vanilla
Nutmeg

Mix rice and milk in a baking dish. Add the beaten eggs, salt and sugar. Add raisins, vanilla and nutmeg to taste. Bake in low oven until the egg mixture is done. 325 degrees for 1 hour.

For the stove top version: Mix the eggs, milk, salt and sugar in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil. Add rice, vanilla and cinnamon. Simmer 20 to 30 minutes until thick and creamy.

Variations:
Lemon zest
1/2 vanilla bean in the place of vanilla flavoring
Replace some of the milk with Coconut milk

I made this recipe several years ago for a Valentine’s Day dinner party. It was so rich and chocolaty, order I did not crave chocolate for a whole month. I did not make the whipped cream. Instead, story we ate ours with strawberries and vanilla ice cream. I read somewhere to place a ball of ganache in the middle of the cakes before baking. That could be why they were so gooey.

Source: Emeril
1 1/2 teaspoons unsalted butter, plus 1/4 pound (1 stick)
4 teaspoons all-purpose flour, plus 2 tablespoons
6 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons cold heavy cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Pinch salt
1/2 cup cold heavy cream

Garnish:
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon nut-flavored liqueur
1/2 pint fresh raspberries
4 sprigs mint
Sweetened cocoa, as garnish

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Grease and flour 4 (6-ounce) ramekins or baking dishes with the 1 1/2 teaspoons of butter and 1 teaspoon of flour in each, tapping out the excess flour. Set on a baking sheet.

In a double boiler, or a metal bowl set over a pan of simmering water, melt the remaining 1/4 pound of butter with the chocolate, cream, and powdered sugar, stirring until smooth. Remove from the heat.

In a bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, sugar, vanilla, and salt until thick ribbons form, about 3 minutes. Sift 2 tablespoons flour into the egg mixture and fold together. Fold the chocolate into the egg mixture. Divide among the prepared dishes and bake until the sides of the cake are set and the tops are puffed but still soft, about 12 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool in the ramekins for 2 minutes, then unmold onto dessert plates.

Meanwhile, in a bowl whip the cream until beginning to form soft peaks. Add the sugar and nut liqueur and beat until stiff peaks start to form. Spoon a dollop of the whipped cream on each unmolded cake, and garnish each plate with raspberries and a sprig of mint. Sprinkle cocoa over the cakes, and serve.
10-inch loaf of Cuban bread
4 thin slices smoked ham
2 thin slices fresh pork ham
2 slices Genoa salami, and cut in half
2 slices Swiss cheese
3 sour pickle slices (may also use dill)
Yellow mustard

Slice bread down middle lengthwise. Layer ingredients to cover bottom half of bread in the following order: ham, story pork, salami, cheese, and pickles. Spread mustard on top half of bread. Cover bottom half and slice sandwich diagonally. Sandwich may be heated in oven or served at room temperature. If Cuban bread is not available, you may use French bread (baguette type) or Italian bread.

Growing up, ed the Columbia Restaurant in Ybor City was one of our favorite places to eat when visiting Tampa. The Cuban sandwiches were to die for and the black bean soup was just as amazing. I have since concocted my own version adapted from the back of a bag of black beans. It is tasty and most importantly Stephen and the kids love it. Still, it is not the Columbia. My mom is town for Christmas and black beans and rice were on the menu. On a whim we started searching the internet for a Columbia black bean soup imitation. I never thought the restaurant would post their most prize recipe on their site along with a few other favorites on their website. Lucy us.

This is a soup that is served over rice. With my own version I puree the soup slightly to get a thick consistency. That is not necessary with the Columbia’s version as the rice soaks up much of the liquid. I simmered the beans for about an hour before I added the other ingredients. Estimated time is probably 1 1/2 to 2 hours complete cooking time.

1 pound black beans
3 quarts water
1 ounce (2 tbsp) olive oil
1/2 ounce (1 tbsp) garlic
1 1/2 ounce (3 tbsp) chopped onion
1 ounce (2 tbsp) green pepper,
1/2 ounce (1 tbsp) salt
1/8 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon oregano
1/4 ounce (1 tbsp + 1/2 tsp) sugar
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Soak beans in water overnight in a 4-quart pot.
Bring beans to a boil in the pot, using the same liquid that beans were soaked with and then simmer.
Heat oil and then brown garlic in a pan
Puree onion and peppers, then add puree mixture to oil and garlic in pan, sauté for 4 minutes. Then add mixture to the beans simmering in the pot.
Add salt, cumin, oregano, sugar and pepper to the mixture in pot.
Stir, simmer until beans are tender. cuisine

Columbia Cuban Sandwiches

http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
My goal in 2009 is to laugh more. I am focusing on joking around with my kids, this especially during tantrums and learning to discover the optimist in me. This list is taken from the Happiness Project website. She does state that helping others is one of the best ways of boosting your happiness; however, it is not listed as one of the top ten. Maybe that is because we should already be doing that.

10. Take action.
Some people assume happiness is mostly a matter of inborn temperament: You’re born an Eeyore or a Tigger, and that’s that. Taking time to reflect, and conscious steps to make your life happier, really does work.

9. Stop nagging. Replace nagging with…persuasive tools: wordless hints (for example, leaving a new light bulb on the counter); using just one word (saying “Milk!” instead of talking on and on); not insisting that something be done on my schedule; and, most effective of all, doing a task myself.

8. Exercise to boost energy. Exercise is one of the most dependable mood-boosters.

7. There are two types of decision makers. “Satisfiers”- make a decision once their criteria are met. “Maximizers”- want to make the best possible decision. Satisfiers tend to be happier than maximizers. Maximizers expend more time and energy reaching decisions, and they’re often anxious about their choices. Sometimes good enough is good enough.

6. Buy some happiness.
Our basic psychological needs include feeling loved, secure, being good at what we do and having a sense of control. Spend money to stay in closer contact with…family and friends, promote…health, work more efficiently, eliminate sources of irritation and marital conflict; to support important causes; and to have enlarging experiences.

5. Don’t treat the blues with a “treat. The pleasure lasts a minute, but then feelings of guilt and loss of control and other negative consequences deepen the lousiness of the day. Ask whether this will truly make things better.

4. People who do new things are happier than people who stick to familiar activities that they already do well.

3. Fake it till you feel it. Feelings follow actions. Feeling low? Deliberately act cheery and you will yourself actually feeling happier. Feeling angry at someone? Do something thoughtful for them.

2. Expressing anger related to minor, fleeting annoyances just amplifies bad feelings, while not expressing anger often allows it to dissipate.

1. Go to sleep at a decent hour and do not allow yourself to get too hungry.
http://eatingsmallpotatoes.wordpress.com/
My goal in 2009 is to laugh more. I am focusing on joking around with my kids, this especially during tantrums and learning to discover the optimist in me. This list is taken from the Happiness Project website. She does state that helping others is one of the best ways of boosting your happiness; however, it is not listed as one of the top ten. Maybe that is because we should already be doing that.

10. Take action.
Some people assume happiness is mostly a matter of inborn temperament: You’re born an Eeyore or a Tigger, and that’s that. Taking time to reflect, and conscious steps to make your life happier, really does work.

9. Stop nagging. Replace nagging with…persuasive tools: wordless hints (for example, leaving a new light bulb on the counter); using just one word (saying “Milk!” instead of talking on and on); not insisting that something be done on my schedule; and, most effective of all, doing a task myself.

8. Exercise to boost energy. Exercise is one of the most dependable mood-boosters.

7. There are two types of decision makers. “Satisfiers”- make a decision once their criteria are met. “Maximizers”- want to make the best possible decision. Satisfiers tend to be happier than maximizers. Maximizers expend more time and energy reaching decisions, and they’re often anxious about their choices. Sometimes good enough is good enough.

6. Buy some happiness.
Our basic psychological needs include feeling loved, secure, being good at what we do and having a sense of control. Spend money to stay in closer contact with…family and friends, promote…health, work more efficiently, eliminate sources of irritation and marital conflict; to support important causes; and to have enlarging experiences.

5. Don’t treat the blues with a “treat. The pleasure lasts a minute, but then feelings of guilt and loss of control and other negative consequences deepen the lousiness of the day. Ask whether this will truly make things better.

4. People who do new things are happier than people who stick to familiar activities that they already do well.

3. Fake it till you feel it. Feelings follow actions. Feeling low? Deliberately act cheery and you will yourself actually feeling happier. Feeling angry at someone? Do something thoughtful for them.

2. Expressing anger related to minor, fleeting annoyances just amplifies bad feelings, while not expressing anger often allows it to dissipate.

1. Go to sleep at a decent hour and do not allow yourself to get too hungry.
In today’s economic uncertainties proper money management is top on the list of priorities when it comes to preparing my children for the real world. When I was in college I did not drive anywhere on the weekends because I did not have the money to pay for the extra gas spent. I did not take money from my parents nor was I out buying clothes or going to the movies. I made just enough money to cover living expenses and that was it.

A few of my friends invited me to a little get-together one evening. These were friends I respected so imagine my shock when one of them got up and announced we were there to discuss financial possibilities. The owner of the house was my age. By age 24 he had secured a Hummer and a sizable home with many amenities. The scheme was not so much about selling products but rather sign up as many people as you can naïve enough to fork over $1500. I thought how dumb could they be to allow themselves to become a part of this. They had managed to convince a girl to turn over one thousand dollars of money she did not have to spend on get rich quick schemes. I had to hold them back as I ushered her out of the room and to her car. Not even one month later the gentlemen who started this scheme over in Switzerland went under taking all the blind that followed with him. I wonder how much of the oversized housing market was due to individuals like these who had not been taught the fundamentals of financial responsibility (or ignored it) and saw a quick buck.

My kids are still too young to recognize the value of money. I can only imagine the tantrum that would ensue over my giving Mason a dime and Adelin ten pennies. All they would see is one of them has more coins than the other. But, sildenafil there are other ways to teach the little guys about money and the value of work.

By the age of one our children knew how to throw their diapers away, wash dishes and pick up toys. Toddlers love to put objects into things. In our home when we clean up I try to include our one year old, making it into a game. The other kids are driven by the excitement of teaching their baby brother how to put things away. By three the older two knew how to clean their own rooms (by themselves without me telling them too, I do not know how that happened), the bathrooms, mop the floors, pull weeds, vacuum, sweep, dust, set the table and help cook. At this age they help out because they want to and they do a pretty good job. I love it when Mason excitedly asks us to “come see.” Proudly he announces that he cleaned his room. Yes it was very clean. The funny part was he had thrown every article of clothing and all his toys into the hallway. They are practicing now how to work. And we give them every opportunity to do so. If they are bored I immediately find them something to do. At this age they are happy to comply when it is on their terms so I try to let perfection go and have fun.

I do believe in allowances, however; I believe that chores are part of being a family. Mason begins Kindergarten next year and will most likely start receiving a monthly, age appropriate, allowance when he has learned to associate a value to the coins. For now they love to sort the coins and play grocery store. They learn to conserve energy by turning off the lights and take care of their clothes by tackling stains right away and hanging them up to dry. By age twelve and thirteen they will be capable of finding odd jobs in the community such as babysitting, mowing the neighbor’s lawns, washing cars or selling homemade baked goods. They will learn about giving to charity, savings and being frugal.

Budgeting and a good sound worth ethic are the two most valuable tools my mom taught me. It did not happen on my way off to college. It happened when I was very young when my mom refused to give in to my demands and made me wash the dishes. I want to send my children off with the knowledge we work hard, we save for a rainy day, use what we have and go without when we have to.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
I had some left over rice from dinner that I wanted to use up rather than waste. This recipe comes from my sister-n-law Emily’s Grandpa Joe.

The recipe does not specify how much milk, more about sugar and vanilla to use so I guessed 3 cups milk, online 1 teaspoon vanilla, rx 1/4 cup sugar and I substituted 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon for the nutmeg. Whole milk is preferred but all I had on hand was fat free and I used long grain Jasmine rice.

2 cups of cooked rice
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 tsp salt
Sugar, to sweeten
1/2 cup raisins
Vanilla
Nutmeg

Mix rice and milk in a baking dish. Add the beaten eggs, salt and sugar. Add raisins, vanilla and nutmeg to taste. Bake in low oven until the egg mixture is done. 325 degrees for 1 hour.

For the stove top version: Mix the eggs, milk, salt and sugar in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil. Add rice, vanilla and cinnamon. Simmer 20 to 30 minutes until thick and creamy.

Variations:
Lemon zest
1/2 vanilla bean in the place of vanilla flavoring
Replace some of the milk with Coconut milk

Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
I had some left over rice from dinner that I wanted to use up rather than waste. This recipe comes from my sister-n-law Emily’s Grandpa Joe.

The recipe does not specify how much milk, more about sugar and vanilla to use so I guessed 3 cups milk, online 1 teaspoon vanilla, rx 1/4 cup sugar and I substituted 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon for the nutmeg. Whole milk is preferred but all I had on hand was fat free and I used long grain Jasmine rice.

2 cups of cooked rice
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 tsp salt
Sugar, to sweeten
1/2 cup raisins
Vanilla
Nutmeg

Mix rice and milk in a baking dish. Add the beaten eggs, salt and sugar. Add raisins, vanilla and nutmeg to taste. Bake in low oven until the egg mixture is done. 325 degrees for 1 hour.

For the stove top version: Mix the eggs, milk, salt and sugar in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil. Add rice, vanilla and cinnamon. Simmer 20 to 30 minutes until thick and creamy.

Variations:
Lemon zest
1/2 vanilla bean in the place of vanilla flavoring
Replace some of the milk with Coconut milk

I made this recipe several years ago for a Valentine’s Day dinner party. It was so rich and chocolaty, order I did not crave chocolate for a whole month. I did not make the whipped cream. Instead, story we ate ours with strawberries and vanilla ice cream. I read somewhere to place a ball of ganache in the middle of the cakes before baking. That could be why they were so gooey.

Source: Emeril
1 1/2 teaspoons unsalted butter, plus 1/4 pound (1 stick)
4 teaspoons all-purpose flour, plus 2 tablespoons
6 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons cold heavy cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Pinch salt
1/2 cup cold heavy cream

Garnish:
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon nut-flavored liqueur
1/2 pint fresh raspberries
4 sprigs mint
Sweetened cocoa, as garnish

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Grease and flour 4 (6-ounce) ramekins or baking dishes with the 1 1/2 teaspoons of butter and 1 teaspoon of flour in each, tapping out the excess flour. Set on a baking sheet.

In a double boiler, or a metal bowl set over a pan of simmering water, melt the remaining 1/4 pound of butter with the chocolate, cream, and powdered sugar, stirring until smooth. Remove from the heat.

In a bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, sugar, vanilla, and salt until thick ribbons form, about 3 minutes. Sift 2 tablespoons flour into the egg mixture and fold together. Fold the chocolate into the egg mixture. Divide among the prepared dishes and bake until the sides of the cake are set and the tops are puffed but still soft, about 12 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool in the ramekins for 2 minutes, then unmold onto dessert plates.

Meanwhile, in a bowl whip the cream until beginning to form soft peaks. Add the sugar and nut liqueur and beat until stiff peaks start to form. Spoon a dollop of the whipped cream on each unmolded cake, and garnish each plate with raspberries and a sprig of mint. Sprinkle cocoa over the cakes, and serve.
Looking for a warm comforting meal during the long cold months of winter? Stroganoff is one of my favorite dishes to break the chill and fill bellies on the cheap. Serve with a side salad or green beans.

Source: my Grandmother Lois Jepson
1 tablespoon butter
1 pound ground beef
1 large onion, viagra buy website diced
1/2 pound mushrooms, drugs diced
3 cloves garlic, clinic minced
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 cup sour cream
1 pound egg noodles, cooked and drained

In a large skillet, saute onions, mushrooms and garlic in the butter until tender. Add ground beef, cook until browned. Cook until beef is completely browned, about 8-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and Italian seasoning.

Stir in flour and cook for 2-3 minutes to thicken. Slowly add beef stock and vinegar. Stir, bring to a boil, and let simmer until thickened. Stir in sour cream until combined. Remove from heat. Stir in noodles.

Variations:
– Serve over rice or baked potato.
– Use ground turkey in the place of ground beef.
– Substitute Worcestershire sauce for red wine vinegar.
Family bike night was an integral part of my early childhood. I can’t say when it stopped, viagra 60mg most likely when our evenings were filled up with youth group, treat sports and scouts. I can remember a feeling of closeness to my family as we rode through the streets with the wind in our faces.

I wanted to create the same experience for our children for as long as possible. We have enjoyed cruising  around the neighborhood together and creating new adventures while riding to the park. It is a nice relaxing way to end the day or start one. Choose a night, viagra order or day, when all the kids are home such as a lazy Sunday afternoon. Sure the older ones will fight you about it at first but in reality they will not miss the TV show or the video game. If it is one thing I have learned even with little ones is deep down they will be glad of the effort even if they do not show it.
2-lb. chicken fryer, this site cut in quarters
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 cup olive oil
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups long-grain white rice, uncooked
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup small green peas (cooked)
4 asparagus tips
2 roasted red peppers, cut in strips
1/4 cup white wine (white grape juice or chicken broth)

In a skillet, saute chicken in heated oil until skin is golden. Remove chicken and place in casserole dish. In same oil in the skillet, saute onion, green pepper, tomatoes, and garlic for 5 minutes. Pour over chicken. In same skillet, add chicken broth, white wine, saffron, salt, bay leaf and rice. When mixture begins to boil, pour over casserole, cover and bake in oven at 350 for 20 minutes or until chicken is done. Sprinkle with a splash of wine and garnish with peas, roasted red peppers, and asparagus tips. Serves 4.
I had some left over rice from dinner that I wanted to use up rather than waste. This recipe comes from my sister-n-law Emily’s Grandpa Joe.

The recipe does not specify how much milk, more about sugar and vanilla to use so I guessed 3 cups milk, online 1 teaspoon vanilla, rx 1/4 cup sugar and I substituted 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon for the nutmeg. Whole milk is preferred but all I had on hand was fat free and I used long grain Jasmine rice.

2 cups of cooked rice
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 tsp salt
Sugar, to sweeten
1/2 cup raisins
Vanilla
Nutmeg

Mix rice and milk in a baking dish. Add the beaten eggs, salt and sugar. Add raisins, vanilla and nutmeg to taste. Bake in low oven until the egg mixture is done. 325 degrees for 1 hour.

For the stove top version: Mix the eggs, milk, salt and sugar in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil. Add rice, vanilla and cinnamon. Simmer 20 to 30 minutes until thick and creamy.

Variations:
Lemon zest
1/2 vanilla bean in the place of vanilla flavoring
Replace some of the milk with Coconut milk

I made this recipe several years ago for a Valentine’s Day dinner party. It was so rich and chocolaty, order I did not crave chocolate for a whole month. I did not make the whipped cream. Instead, story we ate ours with strawberries and vanilla ice cream. I read somewhere to place a ball of ganache in the middle of the cakes before baking. That could be why they were so gooey.

Source: Emeril
1 1/2 teaspoons unsalted butter, plus 1/4 pound (1 stick)
4 teaspoons all-purpose flour, plus 2 tablespoons
6 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons cold heavy cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Pinch salt
1/2 cup cold heavy cream

Garnish:
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon nut-flavored liqueur
1/2 pint fresh raspberries
4 sprigs mint
Sweetened cocoa, as garnish

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Grease and flour 4 (6-ounce) ramekins or baking dishes with the 1 1/2 teaspoons of butter and 1 teaspoon of flour in each, tapping out the excess flour. Set on a baking sheet.

In a double boiler, or a metal bowl set over a pan of simmering water, melt the remaining 1/4 pound of butter with the chocolate, cream, and powdered sugar, stirring until smooth. Remove from the heat.

In a bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, sugar, vanilla, and salt until thick ribbons form, about 3 minutes. Sift 2 tablespoons flour into the egg mixture and fold together. Fold the chocolate into the egg mixture. Divide among the prepared dishes and bake until the sides of the cake are set and the tops are puffed but still soft, about 12 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool in the ramekins for 2 minutes, then unmold onto dessert plates.

Meanwhile, in a bowl whip the cream until beginning to form soft peaks. Add the sugar and nut liqueur and beat until stiff peaks start to form. Spoon a dollop of the whipped cream on each unmolded cake, and garnish each plate with raspberries and a sprig of mint. Sprinkle cocoa over the cakes, and serve.
10-inch loaf of Cuban bread
4 thin slices smoked ham
2 thin slices fresh pork ham
2 slices Genoa salami, and cut in half
2 slices Swiss cheese
3 sour pickle slices (may also use dill)
Yellow mustard

Slice bread down middle lengthwise. Layer ingredients to cover bottom half of bread in the following order: ham, story pork, salami, cheese, and pickles. Spread mustard on top half of bread. Cover bottom half and slice sandwich diagonally. Sandwich may be heated in oven or served at room temperature. If Cuban bread is not available, you may use French bread (baguette type) or Italian bread.

Pumpkin Ice Cream Pie with Maple Whipped Cream

“A cool alternative to traditional pumpkin pie. If you can find pumpkin ice cream, by all means use that. If not, here’s a quick and easy way to make some using vanilla ice cream, good canned pumpkin and lots of wonderful spices. When you first make the mixture the spices might seem strong, but remember that their flavors get a bit muted when they’re ice cold. If you’re doing Thanksgiving for a large crowd, make two of these. One is good for a small crowd and the ice cream alone is a simple, fun desert for a party of two.”

Source: GOOP
TIME: 20 minutes + at least 3 hours in the freezer
1 cup of graham cracker crumbs (about 1 sleeve, ground in the food processor)
1 tablespoon sugar
5 tablespoons melted butter
1 pint vanilla ice cream, softened
1 can pureed pumpkin (or 1-3/4 cups fresh)
1/4 teaspoon each ground allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves
Maple Whipped Cream (see recipe below)

Preheat the oven to 350º F.
Combine the graham cracker crumbs, sugar and melted butter in a pie pan. Mix together with your fingers and then press evenly to cover the bottom and sides of the pan. It helps to press the mixture with the bottom of a small measuring cup. Bake for ten minutes or until light brown. Let cool while you prepare the filling.

In a large bowl, beat together the ice cream, pumpkin and spices. Spread evenly into the cooled pie shell and stick in the freezer for at least three hours before serving. When ready to serve, spread the top with Maple Whipped Cream. Serves 6, very generously

Maple Whipped Cream
1 cup heavy cream
2-3 tablespoons real Vermont maple syrup

Whip the cream using a standing mixer, hand held mixer or whisk until stiff peaks form. Whisk in maple syrup to taste.

Greens with Goat Cheese, Walnuts and Dried Cranberries

Source: GOOP
3 small cloves garlic, visit this site pushed through a press
2 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons real Vermont maple syrup
1/3 red wine vinegar
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
coarse sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
2 1/2 large heads of endive, health washed, visit this site chopped
1 1/3 large head radicchio, washed, chopped
4 large handfuls arugula, washed
1 1/3 cup goat cheese
3/4 cup walnuts, broken into pieces
3/4 cup dried cranberries

In a small bowl, whisk together the garlic, Dijon, maple syrup and vinegar. While whisking, slowly drizzle in the olive oil. Season the dressing to taste with salt and pepper. Combine the greens in a large salad bowl. Dress with about two thirds of the dressing. Divide the greens on eight plates and scatter over the goat cheese, walnuts and dried cranberries over the greens. Drizzle each salad with a bit of the leftover dressing. Serves 12

Cranberry Chutney

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.

For anyone who knows my kids, they actually allowed three bananas to turn brown. Shocking I know. I was faced with the dilemma of what to with them. Banana bread was out of the question. Muffins and cookies maybe. I settled on the banana bars because the fact that we have brown bananas calls for a celebration. I cringed at the amount of sugar but bit my lip and went ahead and made them. They were also a great way to use up that container or whipped cream cheese frosting left over from Mason’s birthday. Frosted banana bars would make a nice gift or treat at a party.

I substituted plain low fat yogurt for the sour cream. The next time I will try replacing a little of the all-purpose flour with wheat pastry and maybe a little wheat germ. I do not know how much good it will do but I makes me feel better. This time around the kids opted for no frosting on theirs. To appease the masses I frosted half the pan and sprinkled chopped walnuts on top.

Source Allrecipes.com
1/2 cup butter, sildenafil softened
1 1/2 cups white sugar
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (About 3 ripe bananas)
Cream cheese frosting or make your own

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 10 x 15 inch jellyroll pan or one 9X13 pan and an additional 8X8 pan. In a large bowl, cialis 40mg cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the sour cream and vanilla. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl; stir into the batter. Finally, mix in the mashed banana. Spread evenly into the prepared pan(s). Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow bars to cool completely before frosting.
I could never stand the wiggly looking stuff in the bowl. Cranberry chutney takes on a whole new meaning for cranberry sauce. Just make sure to use ripe cranberries.

Source: GOOP
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/3 cup water
4 cups fresh cranberries
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
grated zest of 1 small orange or tangerine

Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan, patient bring to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients. Turn the heat to low and let the mixture simmer for about ten minutes or until thick. Let the chutney cool before serving. Makes about 2 cups
Variations:
Use brown sugar in place of the white.

Apple Pear Raisin Syrup

Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
My kids love it when I put out the muffin pan filled with fun snacks. They think we are having a party.

Set out a large bowl of popcorn. Fill smaller bowls, cheapest muffin pans or mini loaf pans with various snacks such as the ones listed.

Nuts and seeds
Crackers
Cereal
Pretzel
Dried fruit
cheese
Chocolate chips
Spices: Cinnamon, and brown sugar, viagra nutmeg, Cajun seasoning, garlic,

Give the kids bowls, bags or ice cream cones to fill with their favorite snacks.

Popping popcorn on the stove top: pour about three tablespoons of vegetable oil (don’t use butter, it will burn) in a large pot. heat the oil over medium heat. To test if the oil is hot enough drop a single kernel in the pot and cover allowing steam to escape. If it sizzles and pops right away it is ready. Pour 1/2 cup (enough to cover the bottom of the pot, a single layer). Cover and shake to evenly spread the oil. When the popping begins to slow to a few seconds apart, remove the pan from the stove. Season to taste.

Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
My kids love it when I put out the muffin pan filled with fun snacks. They think we are having a party.

Set out a large bowl of popcorn. Fill smaller bowls, cheapest muffin pans or mini loaf pans with various snacks such as the ones listed.

Nuts and seeds
Crackers
Cereal
Pretzel
Dried fruit
cheese
Chocolate chips
Spices: Cinnamon, and brown sugar, viagra nutmeg, Cajun seasoning, garlic,

Give the kids bowls, bags or ice cream cones to fill with their favorite snacks.

Popping popcorn on the stove top: pour about three tablespoons of vegetable oil (don’t use butter, it will burn) in a large pot. heat the oil over medium heat. To test if the oil is hot enough drop a single kernel in the pot and cover allowing steam to escape. If it sizzles and pops right away it is ready. Pour 1/2 cup (enough to cover the bottom of the pot, a single layer). Cover and shake to evenly spread the oil. When the popping begins to slow to a few seconds apart, remove the pan from the stove. Season to taste.

One of our Christmas traditions has been to rush out a batch of sugar cookies for Santa and a basket of nibbles for the reindeer all last minute. Then we rush the kids up stairs and wait for a scream of delight when they spy a wrapped present on their bed. Faster than you can say eggnog the boxes are ripped open to reveal the first gift of Christmas- Pajamas.

I thought of my sister-n-law who continued a family tradition of serving scrumptious cinnamon rolls and hot chocolate every Christmas Eve. Ever since I saw the doughnut pan in the Pottery Barn holiday catalog last year I have been dreaming of doughnuts and hot chocolate on Christmas Eve. And if we once again forget to make Santa’s cookies until last minute, cheapest I am sure he would not mind a oh so yummy chocolate glazed doughnut with sprinkles.

Makes 1 dozen doughnuts
1 (1/4-oz) package active dry yeast (2 1/2 teaspoons)
2 tablespoons warm water (105–115°F)
3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour plus additional for sprinkling and rolling out dough
1 cup whole milk at room temperature
1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, discount softened
3 large egg yolks
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
About 10 cups vegetable oil for deep frying

Stir together yeast and warm water in a small bowl until yeast is dissolved. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. (If yeast doesn’t foam, discard and start over with new yeast.)

Mix together flour, milk, butter, yolks, sugar, salt, cinnamon, and yeast mixture in mixer at low speed until a soft dough forms. Increase speed to medium-high and beat 3 minutes more. Scrape dough down side of bowl (all around) into center, then sprinkle lightly with flour (to keep a crust from forming). Cover bowl with a clean kitchen towel (not terry cloth) and let dough rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until doubled in bulk, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. (Alternatively, let dough rise in bowl in refrigerator 8 to 12 hours.)

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and roll out with a lightly floured rolling pin into a 12-inch round (1/2 inch thick). Cut out as many rounds as possible with 3-inch cutter, then cut a hole in center of each round with 1-inch cutter and transfer doughnuts to a lightly floured large baking sheet. Cover doughnuts with a clean kitchen towel and let rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until slightly puffed, about 30 minutes (45 minutes if dough was cold when cutting out doughnuts). Do not re-roll scraps.

Heat 2 1/2 inches oil in a deep 4-quart heavy pot until it registers 350°F on thermometer. Fry doughnuts, 2 at a time, turning occasionally with a wire or mesh skimmer or a slotted spoon, until puffed and golden brown, about 2 minutes per batch. Transfer to paper towels to drain. (Return oil to 350°F between batches.) I also fried the doughnut holes for about 1 minute and them tossed them in powdered sugar and cinnamon sugar straight out of the hot grease.

Source: Gourmet, December 2006

Chocolate Glaze: This is enough glaze for a double batch of doughnuts!
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/4 cup whole milk, warmed
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped
2 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted

Combine butter, milk, corn syrup, and vanilla in medium saucepan and heat over medium heat until butter is melted. Decrease the heat to low, add the chocolate, and whisk until melted. Turn off heat, add the powdered sugar, and whisk until smooth. Place the mixture over a bowl of warm water and dip the doughnuts immediately. Allow glaze to set for 30 minutes before serving. Recipe from Alton Brown.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

This recipe comes from a woman I met in Baybrook Texas. I wish I could remember her name because she really deserves the recognition. She is one of those die hard Christmas bakers but her goodies are the ones you look forward to all year. I have tried other versions of the pumpkin roll but Stephen and I agree we like taste and texture of this version best. So, more about the pumpkin roll has become a regular at our Thanksgiving table.

Many of my friends comment on how intimidated they are of making a rolled cake. It looks pretty daunting but is actually as simple as cutting and frosting a layer cake. I felt the same way before I made my first one. May I side with GI-Joe when I say knowing is half the battle. There is not that much batter, which has made a few people nervous. The cake is supposed to be thin so that it can be rolled up. There are two ways to roll the cake. I was taught to roll the cake with the short side facing me rolling short side toward the other shorts side. Last year I made a different recipe with a friend and she rolled it with the longest side towards her rolling longest side to long side. The only difference I could tell is the way my friend does it produces a much longer roll which means more to go around but they pieces are thinner and smaller. I prefer the denser version of rolling it into a shorter loaf.

Cake:
1 cup sugar
2/3 cups pumpkin
3 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 cups flour
1 tsp cinnamon

Filling:
1 (8 oz) pkg cream cheese
2 tbsp butter, softened
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 375. Spray a jelly roll pan with cooking spray or lightly spritz with water. This is to hold the waxed paper in place. Then line the pan with waxed or parchment paper. Spray the paper with cooking spray.
Combine the sugar, pumpkin and eggs; mix well. Add the soda, salt, flour and cinnamon; mix well.

Spread the batter in pan evenly. Bake 14-18 minutes. (Do Not Over Bake). Cover the pan with a clean dry dish towel then top with a wire cooling rack. Immediately invert pan onto hand/dish towel.

Peel off paper. With the long side in front of you, roll the cake up in the towel. Let cool rolled up.

Combine filling ingredients, mixing well. Unroll the cake, remove the towel, spread filling evenly. Roll cake back up (without the towel), wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

This recipe comes from a woman I met in Baybrook Texas. I wish I could remember her name because she really deserves the recognition. She is one of those die hard Christmas bakers but her goodies are the ones you look forward to all year. I have tried other versions of the pumpkin roll but Stephen and I agree we like taste and texture of this version best. So, more about the pumpkin roll has become a regular at our Thanksgiving table.

Many of my friends comment on how intimidated they are of making a rolled cake. It looks pretty daunting but is actually as simple as cutting and frosting a layer cake. I felt the same way before I made my first one. May I side with GI-Joe when I say knowing is half the battle. There is not that much batter, which has made a few people nervous. The cake is supposed to be thin so that it can be rolled up. There are two ways to roll the cake. I was taught to roll the cake with the short side facing me rolling short side toward the other shorts side. Last year I made a different recipe with a friend and she rolled it with the longest side towards her rolling longest side to long side. The only difference I could tell is the way my friend does it produces a much longer roll which means more to go around but they pieces are thinner and smaller. I prefer the denser version of rolling it into a shorter loaf.

Cake:
1 cup sugar
2/3 cups pumpkin
3 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 cups flour
1 tsp cinnamon

Filling:
1 (8 oz) pkg cream cheese
2 tbsp butter, softened
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 375. Spray a jelly roll pan with cooking spray or lightly spritz with water. This is to hold the waxed paper in place. Then line the pan with waxed or parchment paper. Spray the paper with cooking spray.
Combine the sugar, pumpkin and eggs; mix well. Add the soda, salt, flour and cinnamon; mix well.

Spread the batter in pan evenly. Bake 14-18 minutes. (Do Not Over Bake). Cover the pan with a clean dry dish towel then top with a wire cooling rack. Immediately invert pan onto hand/dish towel.

Peel off paper. With the long side in front of you, roll the cake up in the towel. Let cool rolled up.

Combine filling ingredients, mixing well. Unroll the cake, remove the towel, spread filling evenly. Roll cake back up (without the towel), wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

I think I found this recipe in an Everyday Food issue. My first thought was “balsalmic vinegar and maple syrup? What an interesting combination.” It turned out to be amazing. Well maybe not amazing but pretty darn good. I use 2-4 cutlets and reduce the time.

I love the show Hells Kitchen. My friends look at me like I am crazy but they like “Dancing With the Stars”. I have picked up many helpful cooking tips from watching Hells Kitchen. The most important being, viagra meat continues to cook as it rests. To avoid dry pork chops I watch them closely cooking them until they are just done. I take them out and cover them with tin foil for about 5 minutes.

1/4 c Balsalmic Vinegar
1 tbsp maple syrup

2 pork tenderloins (12 oz each)
2-3 apples, ed cut into wedges
1 large red onion, cut into wedges
1 tbsp olive oil
salt/pepper

Preheat oven to 450.
Glaze: In a sauce pan bring vinegar and syrup to a boil over high heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce is reduced to 1/4 cup. Remove from heat. Reserve 1 tbsp.

Place apples and onions on a baking sheet. Drizzle with oil, and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Arrange in a single layer. Roast about 15 minutes, until golden. Remove from oven and toss.
Meanwhile, place pork chops in a baking dish lined with foil. Season with salt and pepper. Brush with glaze from sauce pan.

Return apples/onions to the oven on a rack in the bottom 1/3 of the oven. Place pork on a rack in the top 1/3 of oven. Roast 10 minutes. Remove pork and brush with remaining glaze. Roast until cooked through and apples are tender, about 10 minutes more. Serve with apples and onions.
One December several years ago I was making pancakes for the family and realized I did not have any syrup. The spices remind me of Christmas time.

2 small pears, pharmacy capsule peeled, more about cored and sliced
1 small apple, erectile peeled, cored and sliced
Dash Nutmeg
1 / 8 tsp Cinnamon
1/3 cup raisins
Dash ground cloves
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 / 2 cup water
1 tbsp butter

In a sauce pan add all ingredients let come to a boil then simmer until pears and apples are soft. Mash up some of the pears and apples slightly to blend.  If syrup is to runny, in a small bowl mix juice from pan and a little flour until smooth. Add to syrup.  Serve with pancakes, waffles or French toast.
Note: use older pears and apples that are on the mushy side.