Stone Soup: The Basics of Making Soups

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.
My sister recently sent an email with a recipe she created using ingredients from her pantry. It just so happened “stone soup” was on our menu that night. So, visit this it got me thinking about how easy it is to whip up a simple, no rx good for you, approved quick pot of soup.

Mason and I read the book Stone Soup last week at school. The premise of the book is a weary traveler stopped at the home of an old woman asking her for food. She snobbishly turned him away telling him she did not have any food in the house or garden. Before she could close the door he asked her for a stone from her yard. Confused she questioned him why would he want a stone. He told her to make stone soup. Intrigued the old woman obliged him with a pot and as the story goes on she offered him the vegetables needed to make the soup fit for a king. Like the stone soup in the story every soup starts with a base of water with vegetables or meat for flavoring.

Stock can be made up of chicken, vegetable or beef broths. It can be creamy, with flour or cream. A tomato base comprised of bits of tomato or tomato puree. Soups may also be thick or thin. The flavoring comes from a variety of herbs, seasonings, vegetables and fats from meat or butter.

* A general guideline when using fresh herbs in a recipe is to use 3 times as much as you would use of a dried herb. 1/4 teaspoon of a dried herb for a recipe that serves 4.

Allison’s Pantry Taco Style Soup:
Canned Goods- kidney beans, corn, carrots, french cut green beans, tomato sauce and diced tomatoes.
Add to browned meat with garlic and onions. Add taco seasoning and top with sour cream and cheese.

This is my clean out the refrigerator and pantry version of Minestrone Soup:
1 tbsp oil
1/2 cup bell pepper
1 cup Brussels sprouts, halved
1 carrot, sliced
2 celery stalks, chopped
2 oz Italian sausage or panchetta
1 cup onions
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup fresh parsley
1 tbsp fresh basil
salt and pepper to taste
5 cups broth, beef or chicken
2 cans diced tomatoes, puree one or both cans
1 can garbanzo beans

Heat oil in a pot; add peppers, brussels sprouts, celery and carrots. Let brown slightly then remove. Add sausage onions and garlic. Cook until sausage is no longer pink. Add the parsley and basil. Toss.
Add broth, salt, pepper and tomatoes. Simmer 30-45 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add the garbanzo beans. Simmer 5 minutes. To serve, top with Parmesan cheese.

Bacon, Apple & Cheddar Breakfast Panini

The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
I have been searching for a mac and cheese recipe that does not contain canned soup or processed cheese. Better yet this recipe does not require flour and can be made completely gluten free just by substituting gluten free pasta for regular pasta. The first time I made this I was overcome with shock at how creamy the pasta came out.

source: Heavenly Homemakers
2 1/2 cups pasta
3 cups whole milk
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup shredded cheese

Mix pasta, discount milk and salt in a large sauce pan.  Cook over medium-high heat STIRRING ALMOST CONSTANTLY until the pasta is tender (10-15 minutes).  

Remove from heat. Add cheese and stir until melted. Serve immediately.
The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
I have been searching for a mac and cheese recipe that does not contain canned soup or processed cheese. Better yet this recipe does not require flour and can be made completely gluten free just by substituting gluten free pasta for regular pasta. The first time I made this I was overcome with shock at how creamy the pasta came out.

source: Heavenly Homemakers
2 1/2 cups pasta
3 cups whole milk
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup shredded cheese

Mix pasta, discount milk and salt in a large sauce pan.  Cook over medium-high heat STIRRING ALMOST CONSTANTLY until the pasta is tender (10-15 minutes).  

Remove from heat. Add cheese and stir until melted. Serve immediately.
Found on Pittsburgh Needs Eated, illness adapted from America’s Best Lost Recipes. Similar to a bear claw.

Makes 2 crescents, sick each serving 6

Dough:
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1 package rapid-rise or instant yeast
1 tsp salt
8 tbsp (1 stick) unsalted butter, visit this cut into 1/2 inch pieces and chilled
1/4 cup warm evaporated milk (110 degrees)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees)
2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 large egg

Filling:
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Burnt Butter Icing:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 tbsp milk

1. For the dough: Pulse the flour, yeast, and salt in a food processor until blended. Add the butter and pulse until the flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal. Turn the mixture into a large bowl.

2. Beat the milk, water, sugar, and egg in a medium bowl. Using a rubber spatula, fold the milk mixture into the flour mixture, then press against the side of the bowl. (The dough will be sticky.) Divide the dough into two pieces, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours.

3. For the filling: Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Stir the brown sugar and almonds together in a small bowl.

4. Working with one piece of dough at a time on a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to a 14×9 inch rectangle. Brush the dough with half the melted butter, then sprinkle with half the almond mixture, leaving a 1/4 inch border around the edges. Starting at the long end, roll the dough into an even cylinder and pinch the dough to seal. Form the cylinder into a crescent shape on a prepared baking sheet and, with a paring knife, make cuts around the outside of the ring, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Rotate each piece cut side up. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Cover with plastic wrap coated with cooking spray and let rise until the dough is almost doubled in size, about 1 hour.

5. Adjust two oven racks to the upper-middle and lower-middle positions and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake until the crescents are golden brown, about 20 minutes, rotating and switching the sheets halfway through baking. Cool on a rack until just warm, at least 40 minutes.

6. For the icing: While the crescents are cooling, heat the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, swiring the pan constantly, until the butter is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the butter to a bowl and whisk in the confectioners’ sugar and milk. Drizzle the icing over the crescents. Serve.
The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
I have been searching for a mac and cheese recipe that does not contain canned soup or processed cheese. Better yet this recipe does not require flour and can be made completely gluten free just by substituting gluten free pasta for regular pasta. The first time I made this I was overcome with shock at how creamy the pasta came out.

source: Heavenly Homemakers
2 1/2 cups pasta
3 cups whole milk
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup shredded cheese

Mix pasta, discount milk and salt in a large sauce pan.  Cook over medium-high heat STIRRING ALMOST CONSTANTLY until the pasta is tender (10-15 minutes).  

Remove from heat. Add cheese and stir until melted. Serve immediately.
Found on Pittsburgh Needs Eated, illness adapted from America’s Best Lost Recipes. Similar to a bear claw.

Makes 2 crescents, sick each serving 6

Dough:
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1 package rapid-rise or instant yeast
1 tsp salt
8 tbsp (1 stick) unsalted butter, visit this cut into 1/2 inch pieces and chilled
1/4 cup warm evaporated milk (110 degrees)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees)
2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 large egg

Filling:
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Burnt Butter Icing:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 tbsp milk

1. For the dough: Pulse the flour, yeast, and salt in a food processor until blended. Add the butter and pulse until the flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal. Turn the mixture into a large bowl.

2. Beat the milk, water, sugar, and egg in a medium bowl. Using a rubber spatula, fold the milk mixture into the flour mixture, then press against the side of the bowl. (The dough will be sticky.) Divide the dough into two pieces, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours.

3. For the filling: Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Stir the brown sugar and almonds together in a small bowl.

4. Working with one piece of dough at a time on a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to a 14×9 inch rectangle. Brush the dough with half the melted butter, then sprinkle with half the almond mixture, leaving a 1/4 inch border around the edges. Starting at the long end, roll the dough into an even cylinder and pinch the dough to seal. Form the cylinder into a crescent shape on a prepared baking sheet and, with a paring knife, make cuts around the outside of the ring, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Rotate each piece cut side up. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Cover with plastic wrap coated with cooking spray and let rise until the dough is almost doubled in size, about 1 hour.

5. Adjust two oven racks to the upper-middle and lower-middle positions and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake until the crescents are golden brown, about 20 minutes, rotating and switching the sheets halfway through baking. Cool on a rack until just warm, at least 40 minutes.

6. For the icing: While the crescents are cooling, heat the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, swiring the pan constantly, until the butter is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the butter to a bowl and whisk in the confectioners’ sugar and milk. Drizzle the icing over the crescents. Serve.
Raspberry bars were a favorite when I was a teenager. They are so simple and easy to put together the kids can help out. I am posting two versions. One is close to the original raspberry bar I remember as I kid and the other, story my sister sent to me, drugs a healthier version (using less sugar and butter and adding wheat flour).

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
1 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups quick-cooking oats
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp table salt
1/2 cup finely chopped pecans, more about almonds, walnuts or a combination
12 tbsp (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened but still cool, cut into 12 pieces
1 cup raspberry preserves

Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 9-inch-square baking pan with nonstick cooking spray. Line pan with foil, enough to come up the sides. Spray foil with nonstick cooking spray.

Mix flour, oats, sugars, soda, salt, and nuts at low speed until combined, about 30 seconds. With mixer running at low speed, add butter pieces; continue to beat until mixture is well-blended and resembles wet sand, about 2 minutes.

Transfer 2/3 of mixture to prepared pan and use hands to press crumbs evenly into bottom. Bake until starting to brown, about 20 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, spread preserves evenly over hot bottom crust; sprinkle remaining oat-nut mixture evenly over preserves. Bake until bubbly around edges and top is golden brown, about 30 minutes, rotating pan from front to back halfway through baking time. Cool on wire rack to room temperature, about 1½ hours, then remove from pan using foil as handles. Cut into 1¼- to 1½-inch squares and serve.

Healthified Raspberry Bars:
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup whole wheat flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter, softened
1 egg white
3/4 cup raspberry fruit spread
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Heat oven to 350°F. Line 8-inch square pan with foil. In large bowl, mix flours, sugar, butter and egg white with electric mixer on low speed until crumbly.
Reserve 1/2 cup crumb mixture for topping. Press remaining crumb mixture firmly in bottom of pan. Spread fruit spread to within 1/2 inch of edges. Sprinkle reserved 1/2 cup crumb mixture over top; sprinkle with walnuts.
Bake 40 to 45 minutes or until light golden brow
The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
I have been searching for a mac and cheese recipe that does not contain canned soup or processed cheese. Better yet this recipe does not require flour and can be made completely gluten free just by substituting gluten free pasta for regular pasta. The first time I made this I was overcome with shock at how creamy the pasta came out.

source: Heavenly Homemakers
2 1/2 cups pasta
3 cups whole milk
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup shredded cheese

Mix pasta, discount milk and salt in a large sauce pan.  Cook over medium-high heat STIRRING ALMOST CONSTANTLY until the pasta is tender (10-15 minutes).  

Remove from heat. Add cheese and stir until melted. Serve immediately.
Found on Pittsburgh Needs Eated, illness adapted from America’s Best Lost Recipes. Similar to a bear claw.

Makes 2 crescents, sick each serving 6

Dough:
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1 package rapid-rise or instant yeast
1 tsp salt
8 tbsp (1 stick) unsalted butter, visit this cut into 1/2 inch pieces and chilled
1/4 cup warm evaporated milk (110 degrees)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees)
2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 large egg

Filling:
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Burnt Butter Icing:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 tbsp milk

1. For the dough: Pulse the flour, yeast, and salt in a food processor until blended. Add the butter and pulse until the flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal. Turn the mixture into a large bowl.

2. Beat the milk, water, sugar, and egg in a medium bowl. Using a rubber spatula, fold the milk mixture into the flour mixture, then press against the side of the bowl. (The dough will be sticky.) Divide the dough into two pieces, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours.

3. For the filling: Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Stir the brown sugar and almonds together in a small bowl.

4. Working with one piece of dough at a time on a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to a 14×9 inch rectangle. Brush the dough with half the melted butter, then sprinkle with half the almond mixture, leaving a 1/4 inch border around the edges. Starting at the long end, roll the dough into an even cylinder and pinch the dough to seal. Form the cylinder into a crescent shape on a prepared baking sheet and, with a paring knife, make cuts around the outside of the ring, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Rotate each piece cut side up. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Cover with plastic wrap coated with cooking spray and let rise until the dough is almost doubled in size, about 1 hour.

5. Adjust two oven racks to the upper-middle and lower-middle positions and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake until the crescents are golden brown, about 20 minutes, rotating and switching the sheets halfway through baking. Cool on a rack until just warm, at least 40 minutes.

6. For the icing: While the crescents are cooling, heat the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, swiring the pan constantly, until the butter is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the butter to a bowl and whisk in the confectioners’ sugar and milk. Drizzle the icing over the crescents. Serve.
Raspberry bars were a favorite when I was a teenager. They are so simple and easy to put together the kids can help out. I am posting two versions. One is close to the original raspberry bar I remember as I kid and the other, story my sister sent to me, drugs a healthier version (using less sugar and butter and adding wheat flour).

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
1 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups quick-cooking oats
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp table salt
1/2 cup finely chopped pecans, more about almonds, walnuts or a combination
12 tbsp (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened but still cool, cut into 12 pieces
1 cup raspberry preserves

Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 9-inch-square baking pan with nonstick cooking spray. Line pan with foil, enough to come up the sides. Spray foil with nonstick cooking spray.

Mix flour, oats, sugars, soda, salt, and nuts at low speed until combined, about 30 seconds. With mixer running at low speed, add butter pieces; continue to beat until mixture is well-blended and resembles wet sand, about 2 minutes.

Transfer 2/3 of mixture to prepared pan and use hands to press crumbs evenly into bottom. Bake until starting to brown, about 20 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, spread preserves evenly over hot bottom crust; sprinkle remaining oat-nut mixture evenly over preserves. Bake until bubbly around edges and top is golden brown, about 30 minutes, rotating pan from front to back halfway through baking time. Cool on wire rack to room temperature, about 1½ hours, then remove from pan using foil as handles. Cut into 1¼- to 1½-inch squares and serve.

Healthified Raspberry Bars:
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup whole wheat flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter, softened
1 egg white
3/4 cup raspberry fruit spread
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Heat oven to 350°F. Line 8-inch square pan with foil. In large bowl, mix flours, sugar, butter and egg white with electric mixer on low speed until crumbly.
Reserve 1/2 cup crumb mixture for topping. Press remaining crumb mixture firmly in bottom of pan. Spread fruit spread to within 1/2 inch of edges. Sprinkle reserved 1/2 cup crumb mixture over top; sprinkle with walnuts.
Bake 40 to 45 minutes or until light golden brow
The dough is extremely soft. I recommend refrigerating the dough for a couple hours or use the scoop drop method. For more flavor double the lemon zest. These cakey soft cookies are best the day they’re made.

From “Gourmet” Magazine (January 2008)
Makes 3 dozen

For Cookies:
3 c all purpose flour
1 t grated lemon zest
1/2 t baking soda
1/2 t salt
1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, visit softened
1 1/2 c granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1 t vanilla
2/3 c well-shaken buttermilk

For Glaze:
1 1/2 c confectioners sugar
3 T well-shaken buttermilk
1/2 t vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees with rack in middle. Butter 2 large baking sheets. Whisk together flour, visit this site zest, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.

Beat together butter and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer until pale and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition, then beat in vanilla. Mix in flour mixture and buttermilk alternately in batches at low speed, beginning and ending with flour mixture, until smooth. (I chilled the dough in the fridge for about 20 minutes at this point)

Drop level tablespoons of dough about 1 1/2 inches apart onto baking sheets. Bake, 1 sheet at a time, until cookies are puffed and edges are golden, 12 to 15 minutes per batch. Cool cookies on sheets 1 minute, then transfer to racks.

Whisk together all glaze ingredients and brush onto tops of warm cookies (I did two coats of glaze). Let stand until cookies are completely cooled and glaze is set.
The first time I had brussels sprouts was when I was a kid at my friend’s house. They were so good. I have never been able to make them like Beverly. I prefer fresh sprouts over frozen because freezing vegetables such as asparagus and brussels sprouts makes them soggy and rubbery.

Source: Epicurious.

1/2 pound Brussels sprouts
2 large garlic cloves
1 shallot
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons pine nuts

Trim Brussels sprouts and halve lengthwise. Cut garlic and shallots into very thin slices.
In a 10-inch heavy skillet (preferably well-seasoned cast iron) melt 1 tablespoon butter with oil over moderate heat and cook garlic and shallots, stuff stirring, until pale golden. Transfer garlic and shallots with a slotted spoon to a small bowl.

Reduc heat to low and arrange sprouts in skillet, cut sides down, in one layer. Sprinkle sprouts with pine nuts and salt to taste. Cook sprouts, without turning, until crisp-tender and undersides are golden brown, about 15 minutes. With tongs transfer sprouts to a plate, browned sides up. Add garlic, shallots, and remaining 1/2 tablespoon butter to skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until (pine nuts are more evenly pale golden), about 1 minute. Spoon mixture over sprouts and sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper.
I have been searching for a mac and cheese recipe that does not contain canned soup or processed cheese. Better yet this recipe does not require flour and can be made completely gluten free just by substituting gluten free pasta for regular pasta. The first time I made this I was overcome with shock at how creamy the pasta came out.

source: Heavenly Homemakers
2 1/2 cups pasta
3 cups whole milk
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup shredded cheese

Mix pasta, discount milk and salt in a large sauce pan.  Cook over medium-high heat STIRRING ALMOST CONSTANTLY until the pasta is tender (10-15 minutes).  

Remove from heat. Add cheese and stir until melted. Serve immediately.
Found on Pittsburgh Needs Eated, illness adapted from America’s Best Lost Recipes. Similar to a bear claw.

Makes 2 crescents, sick each serving 6

Dough:
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1 package rapid-rise or instant yeast
1 tsp salt
8 tbsp (1 stick) unsalted butter, visit this cut into 1/2 inch pieces and chilled
1/4 cup warm evaporated milk (110 degrees)
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees)
2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 large egg

Filling:
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Burnt Butter Icing:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 tbsp milk

1. For the dough: Pulse the flour, yeast, and salt in a food processor until blended. Add the butter and pulse until the flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal. Turn the mixture into a large bowl.

2. Beat the milk, water, sugar, and egg in a medium bowl. Using a rubber spatula, fold the milk mixture into the flour mixture, then press against the side of the bowl. (The dough will be sticky.) Divide the dough into two pieces, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours.

3. For the filling: Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Stir the brown sugar and almonds together in a small bowl.

4. Working with one piece of dough at a time on a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to a 14×9 inch rectangle. Brush the dough with half the melted butter, then sprinkle with half the almond mixture, leaving a 1/4 inch border around the edges. Starting at the long end, roll the dough into an even cylinder and pinch the dough to seal. Form the cylinder into a crescent shape on a prepared baking sheet and, with a paring knife, make cuts around the outside of the ring, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Rotate each piece cut side up. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Cover with plastic wrap coated with cooking spray and let rise until the dough is almost doubled in size, about 1 hour.

5. Adjust two oven racks to the upper-middle and lower-middle positions and heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake until the crescents are golden brown, about 20 minutes, rotating and switching the sheets halfway through baking. Cool on a rack until just warm, at least 40 minutes.

6. For the icing: While the crescents are cooling, heat the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, swiring the pan constantly, until the butter is golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the butter to a bowl and whisk in the confectioners’ sugar and milk. Drizzle the icing over the crescents. Serve.
Raspberry bars were a favorite when I was a teenager. They are so simple and easy to put together the kids can help out. I am posting two versions. One is close to the original raspberry bar I remember as I kid and the other, story my sister sent to me, drugs a healthier version (using less sugar and butter and adding wheat flour).

Source: Cook’s Illustrated
1 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups quick-cooking oats
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp table salt
1/2 cup finely chopped pecans, more about almonds, walnuts or a combination
12 tbsp (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened but still cool, cut into 12 pieces
1 cup raspberry preserves

Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 9-inch-square baking pan with nonstick cooking spray. Line pan with foil, enough to come up the sides. Spray foil with nonstick cooking spray.

Mix flour, oats, sugars, soda, salt, and nuts at low speed until combined, about 30 seconds. With mixer running at low speed, add butter pieces; continue to beat until mixture is well-blended and resembles wet sand, about 2 minutes.

Transfer 2/3 of mixture to prepared pan and use hands to press crumbs evenly into bottom. Bake until starting to brown, about 20 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, spread preserves evenly over hot bottom crust; sprinkle remaining oat-nut mixture evenly over preserves. Bake until bubbly around edges and top is golden brown, about 30 minutes, rotating pan from front to back halfway through baking time. Cool on wire rack to room temperature, about 1½ hours, then remove from pan using foil as handles. Cut into 1¼- to 1½-inch squares and serve.

Healthified Raspberry Bars:
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup whole wheat flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter, softened
1 egg white
3/4 cup raspberry fruit spread
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Heat oven to 350°F. Line 8-inch square pan with foil. In large bowl, mix flours, sugar, butter and egg white with electric mixer on low speed until crumbly.
Reserve 1/2 cup crumb mixture for topping. Press remaining crumb mixture firmly in bottom of pan. Spread fruit spread to within 1/2 inch of edges. Sprinkle reserved 1/2 cup crumb mixture over top; sprinkle with walnuts.
Bake 40 to 45 minutes or until light golden brow
The dough is extremely soft. I recommend refrigerating the dough for a couple hours or use the scoop drop method. For more flavor double the lemon zest. These cakey soft cookies are best the day they’re made.

From “Gourmet” Magazine (January 2008)
Makes 3 dozen

For Cookies:
3 c all purpose flour
1 t grated lemon zest
1/2 t baking soda
1/2 t salt
1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, visit softened
1 1/2 c granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1 t vanilla
2/3 c well-shaken buttermilk

For Glaze:
1 1/2 c confectioners sugar
3 T well-shaken buttermilk
1/2 t vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees with rack in middle. Butter 2 large baking sheets. Whisk together flour, visit this site zest, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.

Beat together butter and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer until pale and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition, then beat in vanilla. Mix in flour mixture and buttermilk alternately in batches at low speed, beginning and ending with flour mixture, until smooth. (I chilled the dough in the fridge for about 20 minutes at this point)

Drop level tablespoons of dough about 1 1/2 inches apart onto baking sheets. Bake, 1 sheet at a time, until cookies are puffed and edges are golden, 12 to 15 minutes per batch. Cool cookies on sheets 1 minute, then transfer to racks.

Whisk together all glaze ingredients and brush onto tops of warm cookies (I did two coats of glaze). Let stand until cookies are completely cooled and glaze is set.
One day I received a Williams Sonoma catalog in the mail. I love the recipes included in the catalog as much as I enjoy looking at the great kitchen gadgets. One recipe I pulled out was for a steak and egg panini. The recipe lay dormant in my cookbook cabinet because I did not have a panini press. Then one day at the blessed Costco I saw one for $40 and decided to treat myself to an early birthday present. Obsessed with pressed sandwiches, discount I went in search of recipes and found Panini Happy, salve an absolutely fabulous website filled with yummy recipes. This happens to be one of the kids favorites.

2 cinnamon raisin English muffins, split in half lengthwise
8 apple slices (I recommend Granny Smith or other firm variety)
4 slices thick cut bacon, precooked
2 slices sharp cheddar cheese

Preheat panini grill to medium-high heat (375 degrees).
Arrange a layer of apple slices inside the bottom halves of the English muffin. Top with 2 slices of bacon and 1 slice of cheese on each and close the panini with the top muffin halves. Grill for 5-7 minutes until the cheese is melted. Serve immediately and enjoy!

You can also bake these in a toaster oven at 350 degrees for 5-7 minutes.

Happy Thanksgiving Kid Style

I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.

This is my moms pumpkin pie recipe. It is from the Libby pumpkin can. On Rare occasions I find a recipe from a box or can that is actually quite delicious. I have had many comments on how good it is and if they can have the recipe. I am a failure at pastry dough and therefore I buy my own.  But one day I plan on diving in and conquering pie dough.

1 1/2 c sugar
1 can (29oz) pumpkin
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 cans (12oz) evaporated milk
1 tsp ginger
2 unbaked 9-inch deep dish pie shells
1/2 tsp cloves
4 large eggs

Mix sugar, click cinnamon, for sale ginger and cloves in a small bowl. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour into pie shells. Bake in a preheated 425°oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temp to 350°. Bake 40-50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on rack.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.

This is my moms pumpkin pie recipe. It is from the Libby pumpkin can. On Rare occasions I find a recipe from a box or can that is actually quite delicious. I have had many comments on how good it is and if they can have the recipe. I am a failure at pastry dough and therefore I buy my own.  But one day I plan on diving in and conquering pie dough.

1 1/2 c sugar
1 can (29oz) pumpkin
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 cans (12oz) evaporated milk
1 tsp ginger
2 unbaked 9-inch deep dish pie shells
1/2 tsp cloves
4 large eggs

Mix sugar, click cinnamon, for sale ginger and cloves in a small bowl. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour into pie shells. Bake in a preheated 425°oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temp to 350°. Bake 40-50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on rack.
Joy the Baker is at it again with these delicious Pumpkin Pie Bars she adapted from Kraft.

1-1/3 cups flour
3/4 cup granulated sugar, tadalafil divided
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
3/4 cup (1-1/2 sticks) cold butter or margarine
1 cup old-fashioned or quick-cooking oats, uncooked
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 pkg. (8 oz.) cream cheese, softened
3 eggs
1 can (15 oz.) pumpkin
1 Tbsp pumpkin pie spice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 teaspoons bourbon (optional)
a handful of butterscotch or chocolate chips for sprinkling on top (optional)

HEAT oven to 350°F. Line 13×9-inch pan with foil, with ends of foil extending over sides; grease foil. Mix flour, 1/4 granulated sugar and brown sugar in medium bowl; cut in butter with pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in oats and nuts.
RESERVE 1 cup oat mixture; press remaining onto bottom of prepared pan. Bake 15 min. Beat cream cheese, remaining sugar, eggs, vanilla, bourbon, pumpkin and spice with mixer until well blended. Pour over crust; sprinkle with reserved crumb mixture and a handful of butterscotch or chocolate chips (if desired).
BAKE 25 min.; cool 10 min. Use foil to transfer dessert from pan to wire rack; cool completely.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.

This is my moms pumpkin pie recipe. It is from the Libby pumpkin can. On Rare occasions I find a recipe from a box or can that is actually quite delicious. I have had many comments on how good it is and if they can have the recipe. I am a failure at pastry dough and therefore I buy my own.  But one day I plan on diving in and conquering pie dough.

1 1/2 c sugar
1 can (29oz) pumpkin
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 cans (12oz) evaporated milk
1 tsp ginger
2 unbaked 9-inch deep dish pie shells
1/2 tsp cloves
4 large eggs

Mix sugar, click cinnamon, for sale ginger and cloves in a small bowl. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour into pie shells. Bake in a preheated 425°oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temp to 350°. Bake 40-50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on rack.
Joy the Baker is at it again with these delicious Pumpkin Pie Bars she adapted from Kraft.

1-1/3 cups flour
3/4 cup granulated sugar, tadalafil divided
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
3/4 cup (1-1/2 sticks) cold butter or margarine
1 cup old-fashioned or quick-cooking oats, uncooked
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 pkg. (8 oz.) cream cheese, softened
3 eggs
1 can (15 oz.) pumpkin
1 Tbsp pumpkin pie spice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 teaspoons bourbon (optional)
a handful of butterscotch or chocolate chips for sprinkling on top (optional)

HEAT oven to 350°F. Line 13×9-inch pan with foil, with ends of foil extending over sides; grease foil. Mix flour, 1/4 granulated sugar and brown sugar in medium bowl; cut in butter with pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in oats and nuts.
RESERVE 1 cup oat mixture; press remaining onto bottom of prepared pan. Bake 15 min. Beat cream cheese, remaining sugar, eggs, vanilla, bourbon, pumpkin and spice with mixer until well blended. Pour over crust; sprinkle with reserved crumb mixture and a handful of butterscotch or chocolate chips (if desired).
BAKE 25 min.; cool 10 min. Use foil to transfer dessert from pan to wire rack; cool completely.

Thanksgiving is over and I feel like a stuffed turkey. I fasted all day so I could enjoy a few extra calories at dinner time and not feel too guilty. My guilty pleasure was my Grandmother’s blue cheese ball. I nearly devoured half of it single-handedly.

This Thanksgiving was my first. In the past we always went to Stephen’s parents or sister’s houses. This year, mind with everyone out of state, case we wanted a nice relaxing kid friendly Thanksgiving. The meal was simple. I know it is Thanksgiving dinner we are talking about here but I could not bring myself to whip up numerous carb loaded dishes. Besides with four adults and three little children we did not need that much. We stuck to the basics of turkey, approved stuffing, corn on the cob roasted vegetables and salad.

Here are a few things Mason and Adelin did to help with the decorations.

Fall Harvest Necklaces: Use string or plain dental floss,  popcorn, a variety of dried fruits.

Thanksgiving placemats: A fun way to teach patterns and weaving.

Thanksgiving hats. The instructions for the Pilgrim Bonnet can be found here.

The centerpiece: The Mayflower

Pumpkin Pie Bars

I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.

This is my moms pumpkin pie recipe. It is from the Libby pumpkin can. On Rare occasions I find a recipe from a box or can that is actually quite delicious. I have had many comments on how good it is and if they can have the recipe. I am a failure at pastry dough and therefore I buy my own.  But one day I plan on diving in and conquering pie dough.

1 1/2 c sugar
1 can (29oz) pumpkin
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 cans (12oz) evaporated milk
1 tsp ginger
2 unbaked 9-inch deep dish pie shells
1/2 tsp cloves
4 large eggs

Mix sugar, click cinnamon, for sale ginger and cloves in a small bowl. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour into pie shells. Bake in a preheated 425°oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temp to 350°. Bake 40-50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on rack.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.

This is my moms pumpkin pie recipe. It is from the Libby pumpkin can. On Rare occasions I find a recipe from a box or can that is actually quite delicious. I have had many comments on how good it is and if they can have the recipe. I am a failure at pastry dough and therefore I buy my own.  But one day I plan on diving in and conquering pie dough.

1 1/2 c sugar
1 can (29oz) pumpkin
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 cans (12oz) evaporated milk
1 tsp ginger
2 unbaked 9-inch deep dish pie shells
1/2 tsp cloves
4 large eggs

Mix sugar, click cinnamon, for sale ginger and cloves in a small bowl. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour into pie shells. Bake in a preheated 425°oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temp to 350°. Bake 40-50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on rack.
Joy the Baker is at it again with these delicious Pumpkin Pie Bars she adapted from Kraft.

1-1/3 cups flour
3/4 cup granulated sugar, tadalafil divided
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
3/4 cup (1-1/2 sticks) cold butter or margarine
1 cup old-fashioned or quick-cooking oats, uncooked
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 pkg. (8 oz.) cream cheese, softened
3 eggs
1 can (15 oz.) pumpkin
1 Tbsp pumpkin pie spice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 teaspoons bourbon (optional)
a handful of butterscotch or chocolate chips for sprinkling on top (optional)

HEAT oven to 350°F. Line 13×9-inch pan with foil, with ends of foil extending over sides; grease foil. Mix flour, 1/4 granulated sugar and brown sugar in medium bowl; cut in butter with pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in oats and nuts.
RESERVE 1 cup oat mixture; press remaining onto bottom of prepared pan. Bake 15 min. Beat cream cheese, remaining sugar, eggs, vanilla, bourbon, pumpkin and spice with mixer until well blended. Pour over crust; sprinkle with reserved crumb mixture and a handful of butterscotch or chocolate chips (if desired).
BAKE 25 min.; cool 10 min. Use foil to transfer dessert from pan to wire rack; cool completely.

Banana and Cream Cheese Crepes

I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Fiesta Flavored Couscous Salad

In the book His Needs Her Needs the concept of the love Bank is introduced. Throughout our lives we are constantly adding and subtracting from the love bank. The goal is to have a surplus of love credits so that the bank never falls empty. Theoretically, price when we meet someone the way they treat us or speak to us determines if love points are deposited or not. The more points that person deposits the closer we begin to feel toward them. Makes sense. If someone hates us, viagra says derogatory remarks or is abusive then surely we are not going to want to be around that person. The book refers to married couples but I suspect the theory could also be applied to friends and family.

Dinnertime is the one part of the day to sit down as a family and communicate, discuss the events of the day or week, solve problems or situations at school or work, and share stories and goals. Use the time to express your love and gratitude, teach about sex, drugs, drinking, and nutrition, go over the rules of the house, discuss manners, how to manage finances, help build one another, or plan a vacation. The purpose is to get to know each other by lingering a little longer around the table. This is how your kids will learn how to communicate, show affection, learn to trust, share feelings and feel loved. These are all ways to add points to our child’s love bank. They will learn they can trust us because we truly care about them. The relationships between siblings will be strengthened as well.

A number of studies show that children who eat dinner with their families regularly (at least 5 nights a week) are less likely to get involved with drugs and alcohol than those who do not. They get better grades, exhibit less stress and eat healthier. The studies also indicate that teenage girls are less likely to become pregnant or experience an eating disorder. A Harvard study revealed family dinners are more beneficial than play and story time in the development of vocabulary in young children. Studies have also shown that family mealtime reduces the stress level of working moms. An article in the June 2006 Time magazine reported “among those who eat together three or fewer times a week, 45% say the TV is on during meals (as opposed to 37% of all households), and nearly one-third say there isn’t much conversation. Such kids are also more than twice as likely as those who have frequent family meals to say there is a great deal of tension among family members, and they are much less likely to think their parents are proud of them.”

Now that we know the importance of family meal time lets tackle reality. Sadly in many households the kitchen is void of family members and dinner. The art of making homemade meals is non-existent in many homes today. In some homes a bag of fast food is quickly divided among the family members with respected persons walking off in different directions. For those who attempt to have family meals few are met with a great deal of resistance and too soon dismiss the practice feeling defeated.

Start the building process by getting everyone involved in preparing the meal. Learn how to make a menu and prepare three easy meals and rotate them each week. Carry the chatter to the dinner table as you sit down to enjoy a meal everyone had a part in making. Gordon Ramsey, chef and host of Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen understands the importance of sharing a meal together. In his home Sunday lunch is mandatory family time.

In past generations family stories were passed around the dinner table. The children got to know their uncles and grandparents listening to those stories. Stephen’s dad carried on a tradition started by his father of asking trivia questions during dinner as a means of conversation. Amanda Blake Soule author of Creative Family uses dinnertime as a time to reflect on what they are most grateful for. Dinnertime at the White House remains the same for the Obama family. An interview in the March 2009 issue of People revealed the Obama family takes turns sharing their “rose and thorn” for the day.

Eating dinner together is no cure-all however it is the means to providing stability and strength to the family. Our kids realized they could be part of the conversation and now Mason enjoys telling us wild stories and both Mason and Adelin have fun answering the questions Stephen asks of us. All it takes is a commitment to turn off the phones, TV and the racing mind. Statistics prove it is worth every battle in the end.
In the book His Needs Her Needs the concept of the love Bank is introduced. Throughout our lives we are constantly adding and subtracting from the love bank. The goal is to have a surplus of love credits so that the bank never falls empty. Theoretically, price when we meet someone the way they treat us or speak to us determines if love points are deposited or not. The more points that person deposits the closer we begin to feel toward them. Makes sense. If someone hates us, viagra says derogatory remarks or is abusive then surely we are not going to want to be around that person. The book refers to married couples but I suspect the theory could also be applied to friends and family.

Dinnertime is the one part of the day to sit down as a family and communicate, discuss the events of the day or week, solve problems or situations at school or work, and share stories and goals. Use the time to express your love and gratitude, teach about sex, drugs, drinking, and nutrition, go over the rules of the house, discuss manners, how to manage finances, help build one another, or plan a vacation. The purpose is to get to know each other by lingering a little longer around the table. This is how your kids will learn how to communicate, show affection, learn to trust, share feelings and feel loved. These are all ways to add points to our child’s love bank. They will learn they can trust us because we truly care about them. The relationships between siblings will be strengthened as well.

A number of studies show that children who eat dinner with their families regularly (at least 5 nights a week) are less likely to get involved with drugs and alcohol than those who do not. They get better grades, exhibit less stress and eat healthier. The studies also indicate that teenage girls are less likely to become pregnant or experience an eating disorder. A Harvard study revealed family dinners are more beneficial than play and story time in the development of vocabulary in young children. Studies have also shown that family mealtime reduces the stress level of working moms. An article in the June 2006 Time magazine reported “among those who eat together three or fewer times a week, 45% say the TV is on during meals (as opposed to 37% of all households), and nearly one-third say there isn’t much conversation. Such kids are also more than twice as likely as those who have frequent family meals to say there is a great deal of tension among family members, and they are much less likely to think their parents are proud of them.”

Now that we know the importance of family meal time lets tackle reality. Sadly in many households the kitchen is void of family members and dinner. The art of making homemade meals is non-existent in many homes today. In some homes a bag of fast food is quickly divided among the family members with respected persons walking off in different directions. For those who attempt to have family meals few are met with a great deal of resistance and too soon dismiss the practice feeling defeated.

Start the building process by getting everyone involved in preparing the meal. Learn how to make a menu and prepare three easy meals and rotate them each week. Carry the chatter to the dinner table as you sit down to enjoy a meal everyone had a part in making. Gordon Ramsey, chef and host of Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen understands the importance of sharing a meal together. In his home Sunday lunch is mandatory family time.

In past generations family stories were passed around the dinner table. The children got to know their uncles and grandparents listening to those stories. Stephen’s dad carried on a tradition started by his father of asking trivia questions during dinner as a means of conversation. Amanda Blake Soule author of Creative Family uses dinnertime as a time to reflect on what they are most grateful for. Dinnertime at the White House remains the same for the Obama family. An interview in the March 2009 issue of People revealed the Obama family takes turns sharing their “rose and thorn” for the day.

Eating dinner together is no cure-all however it is the means to providing stability and strength to the family. Our kids realized they could be part of the conversation and now Mason enjoys telling us wild stories and both Mason and Adelin have fun answering the questions Stephen asks of us. All it takes is a commitment to turn off the phones, TV and the racing mind. Statistics prove it is worth every battle in the end.
There is at least one night a week when we are having so much fun playing that we loose track of time and before we know it 6:00 has come and gone. Dinner becomes a bedtime snack after baths and before the kids shuffle off to bed. For this very purpose I always house a can of refried beans in the pantry for a super-duper fast meal. Wash it all down with a nice cold glass of milk.

Tortillas, sick corn or flour
Refried beans
1/2 cup salsa
Shredded cheddar or Monterrey Jack and cheddar blend
Shredded lettuce
Diced Tomatoes, mind optional
Diced Onions, information pills optional

For burritos, slather the upper half of a flour tortilla with refried beans. Sprinkle with some cheese and lettuce. Fold the opposite side over like a taco or halfway tucking the sides in before folding once more.

For a tostada: Heat a flour tortilla in a skillet until crispy or use a corn tortilla. Top with beans, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and onions.

In the book His Needs Her Needs the concept of the love Bank is introduced. Throughout our lives we are constantly adding and subtracting from the love bank. The goal is to have a surplus of love credits so that the bank never falls empty. Theoretically, price when we meet someone the way they treat us or speak to us determines if love points are deposited or not. The more points that person deposits the closer we begin to feel toward them. Makes sense. If someone hates us, viagra says derogatory remarks or is abusive then surely we are not going to want to be around that person. The book refers to married couples but I suspect the theory could also be applied to friends and family.

Dinnertime is the one part of the day to sit down as a family and communicate, discuss the events of the day or week, solve problems or situations at school or work, and share stories and goals. Use the time to express your love and gratitude, teach about sex, drugs, drinking, and nutrition, go over the rules of the house, discuss manners, how to manage finances, help build one another, or plan a vacation. The purpose is to get to know each other by lingering a little longer around the table. This is how your kids will learn how to communicate, show affection, learn to trust, share feelings and feel loved. These are all ways to add points to our child’s love bank. They will learn they can trust us because we truly care about them. The relationships between siblings will be strengthened as well.

A number of studies show that children who eat dinner with their families regularly (at least 5 nights a week) are less likely to get involved with drugs and alcohol than those who do not. They get better grades, exhibit less stress and eat healthier. The studies also indicate that teenage girls are less likely to become pregnant or experience an eating disorder. A Harvard study revealed family dinners are more beneficial than play and story time in the development of vocabulary in young children. Studies have also shown that family mealtime reduces the stress level of working moms. An article in the June 2006 Time magazine reported “among those who eat together three or fewer times a week, 45% say the TV is on during meals (as opposed to 37% of all households), and nearly one-third say there isn’t much conversation. Such kids are also more than twice as likely as those who have frequent family meals to say there is a great deal of tension among family members, and they are much less likely to think their parents are proud of them.”

Now that we know the importance of family meal time lets tackle reality. Sadly in many households the kitchen is void of family members and dinner. The art of making homemade meals is non-existent in many homes today. In some homes a bag of fast food is quickly divided among the family members with respected persons walking off in different directions. For those who attempt to have family meals few are met with a great deal of resistance and too soon dismiss the practice feeling defeated.

Start the building process by getting everyone involved in preparing the meal. Learn how to make a menu and prepare three easy meals and rotate them each week. Carry the chatter to the dinner table as you sit down to enjoy a meal everyone had a part in making. Gordon Ramsey, chef and host of Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen understands the importance of sharing a meal together. In his home Sunday lunch is mandatory family time.

In past generations family stories were passed around the dinner table. The children got to know their uncles and grandparents listening to those stories. Stephen’s dad carried on a tradition started by his father of asking trivia questions during dinner as a means of conversation. Amanda Blake Soule author of Creative Family uses dinnertime as a time to reflect on what they are most grateful for. Dinnertime at the White House remains the same for the Obama family. An interview in the March 2009 issue of People revealed the Obama family takes turns sharing their “rose and thorn” for the day.

Eating dinner together is no cure-all however it is the means to providing stability and strength to the family. Our kids realized they could be part of the conversation and now Mason enjoys telling us wild stories and both Mason and Adelin have fun answering the questions Stephen asks of us. All it takes is a commitment to turn off the phones, TV and the racing mind. Statistics prove it is worth every battle in the end.
There is at least one night a week when we are having so much fun playing that we loose track of time and before we know it 6:00 has come and gone. Dinner becomes a bedtime snack after baths and before the kids shuffle off to bed. For this very purpose I always house a can of refried beans in the pantry for a super-duper fast meal. Wash it all down with a nice cold glass of milk.

Tortillas, sick corn or flour
Refried beans
1/2 cup salsa
Shredded cheddar or Monterrey Jack and cheddar blend
Shredded lettuce
Diced Tomatoes, mind optional
Diced Onions, information pills optional

For burritos, slather the upper half of a flour tortilla with refried beans. Sprinkle with some cheese and lettuce. Fold the opposite side over like a taco or halfway tucking the sides in before folding once more.

For a tostada: Heat a flour tortilla in a skillet until crispy or use a corn tortilla. Top with beans, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and onions.

Our version of Huevos Ranchos was adapted from Juanita Sorrez, approved a friend I met while in Freemont Texas. She calles this dish, page “the poor man’s breakfast”. She made hers with left over homemade flour tortillas, from the day before, torn into bite sized pieces, scrambled eggs, cheese and salsa. Juanita’s salsa was so hot, when she was a girl her father would tell her “Juanita, your salsa is so hot it would make the devil fart.” I always got a laugh out of that.

Juanita tried to teach me how to make her most sought after flour tortillas but I could never get them just right. Her tortillas are thick and soft and tender. Mine were always thick and crumbly. Making Juanita’s “poor man’s breakfast” with inferior tortillas just will not do. Then I came across a variation of huevos ranchos on Smitten Kitchen. She cooked the whole egg on top of the warmed tortilla. Try as I might it was a flop every time. Either the egg was over cooked or the tortilla. I liked the idea of a poached egg though. I also wanted the prep to be simple. My daughter was the final inspiration. While I tend to stick to designated breakfast type foods she can eat anything. Including a bean and cheese burrito with lettuce. I know that does not sound so odd as breakfast burritos are a weekly staple in this house. Although it is how a semi runny poached egged ended up on a bed of refried beans, cheese, and salsa. It is not Juanita’s but it is oh so delicioso!

6 Tortillas (taco sized flour or corn)
6 Eggs
1-2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons water
1 (15 ounce) can refried beans
1- 1 1/2 cups Colby cheese, shredded
Salsa
Cilantro

Heat a skillet, with a lid, over medium heat. Melt butter making sure to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the eggs. Once the whites have turned white add the water, reduce the heat to low or turn off, and cover. Continue to cook until desired doneness, about 2-5 minutes.

If using canned refried beans pour contents into a pan over medium-low heat. Add a few tablespoons of water and mix throughly. Reduce heat to low.

Heat corn tortillas in a little oil. When it’s brown, flip it over. Warm flour tortillas on a dry skillet.

To serve, spread each tortilla with some beans, sprinkle with cheese, a drizzle of salsa (or more) and top with the egg. Garnish with a little cheese, salsa and cilantro.

Serves 6

Variations:
– Replace the egg with scrambled eggs
– Additional toppings:
Black Beans
Chopped tomatoes
Sour Cream
Avocado
Onions
Jalapenos
In the book His Needs Her Needs the concept of the love Bank is introduced. Throughout our lives we are constantly adding and subtracting from the love bank. The goal is to have a surplus of love credits so that the bank never falls empty. Theoretically, price when we meet someone the way they treat us or speak to us determines if love points are deposited or not. The more points that person deposits the closer we begin to feel toward them. Makes sense. If someone hates us, viagra says derogatory remarks or is abusive then surely we are not going to want to be around that person. The book refers to married couples but I suspect the theory could also be applied to friends and family.

Dinnertime is the one part of the day to sit down as a family and communicate, discuss the events of the day or week, solve problems or situations at school or work, and share stories and goals. Use the time to express your love and gratitude, teach about sex, drugs, drinking, and nutrition, go over the rules of the house, discuss manners, how to manage finances, help build one another, or plan a vacation. The purpose is to get to know each other by lingering a little longer around the table. This is how your kids will learn how to communicate, show affection, learn to trust, share feelings and feel loved. These are all ways to add points to our child’s love bank. They will learn they can trust us because we truly care about them. The relationships between siblings will be strengthened as well.

A number of studies show that children who eat dinner with their families regularly (at least 5 nights a week) are less likely to get involved with drugs and alcohol than those who do not. They get better grades, exhibit less stress and eat healthier. The studies also indicate that teenage girls are less likely to become pregnant or experience an eating disorder. A Harvard study revealed family dinners are more beneficial than play and story time in the development of vocabulary in young children. Studies have also shown that family mealtime reduces the stress level of working moms. An article in the June 2006 Time magazine reported “among those who eat together three or fewer times a week, 45% say the TV is on during meals (as opposed to 37% of all households), and nearly one-third say there isn’t much conversation. Such kids are also more than twice as likely as those who have frequent family meals to say there is a great deal of tension among family members, and they are much less likely to think their parents are proud of them.”

Now that we know the importance of family meal time lets tackle reality. Sadly in many households the kitchen is void of family members and dinner. The art of making homemade meals is non-existent in many homes today. In some homes a bag of fast food is quickly divided among the family members with respected persons walking off in different directions. For those who attempt to have family meals few are met with a great deal of resistance and too soon dismiss the practice feeling defeated.

Start the building process by getting everyone involved in preparing the meal. Learn how to make a menu and prepare three easy meals and rotate them each week. Carry the chatter to the dinner table as you sit down to enjoy a meal everyone had a part in making. Gordon Ramsey, chef and host of Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen understands the importance of sharing a meal together. In his home Sunday lunch is mandatory family time.

In past generations family stories were passed around the dinner table. The children got to know their uncles and grandparents listening to those stories. Stephen’s dad carried on a tradition started by his father of asking trivia questions during dinner as a means of conversation. Amanda Blake Soule author of Creative Family uses dinnertime as a time to reflect on what they are most grateful for. Dinnertime at the White House remains the same for the Obama family. An interview in the March 2009 issue of People revealed the Obama family takes turns sharing their “rose and thorn” for the day.

Eating dinner together is no cure-all however it is the means to providing stability and strength to the family. Our kids realized they could be part of the conversation and now Mason enjoys telling us wild stories and both Mason and Adelin have fun answering the questions Stephen asks of us. All it takes is a commitment to turn off the phones, TV and the racing mind. Statistics prove it is worth every battle in the end.
There is at least one night a week when we are having so much fun playing that we loose track of time and before we know it 6:00 has come and gone. Dinner becomes a bedtime snack after baths and before the kids shuffle off to bed. For this very purpose I always house a can of refried beans in the pantry for a super-duper fast meal. Wash it all down with a nice cold glass of milk.

Tortillas, sick corn or flour
Refried beans
1/2 cup salsa
Shredded cheddar or Monterrey Jack and cheddar blend
Shredded lettuce
Diced Tomatoes, mind optional
Diced Onions, information pills optional

For burritos, slather the upper half of a flour tortilla with refried beans. Sprinkle with some cheese and lettuce. Fold the opposite side over like a taco or halfway tucking the sides in before folding once more.

For a tostada: Heat a flour tortilla in a skillet until crispy or use a corn tortilla. Top with beans, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and onions.

Our version of Huevos Ranchos was adapted from Juanita Sorrez, approved a friend I met while in Freemont Texas. She calles this dish, page “the poor man’s breakfast”. She made hers with left over homemade flour tortillas, from the day before, torn into bite sized pieces, scrambled eggs, cheese and salsa. Juanita’s salsa was so hot, when she was a girl her father would tell her “Juanita, your salsa is so hot it would make the devil fart.” I always got a laugh out of that.

Juanita tried to teach me how to make her most sought after flour tortillas but I could never get them just right. Her tortillas are thick and soft and tender. Mine were always thick and crumbly. Making Juanita’s “poor man’s breakfast” with inferior tortillas just will not do. Then I came across a variation of huevos ranchos on Smitten Kitchen. She cooked the whole egg on top of the warmed tortilla. Try as I might it was a flop every time. Either the egg was over cooked or the tortilla. I liked the idea of a poached egg though. I also wanted the prep to be simple. My daughter was the final inspiration. While I tend to stick to designated breakfast type foods she can eat anything. Including a bean and cheese burrito with lettuce. I know that does not sound so odd as breakfast burritos are a weekly staple in this house. Although it is how a semi runny poached egged ended up on a bed of refried beans, cheese, and salsa. It is not Juanita’s but it is oh so delicioso!

6 Tortillas (taco sized flour or corn)
6 Eggs
1-2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons water
1 (15 ounce) can refried beans
1- 1 1/2 cups Colby cheese, shredded
Salsa
Cilantro

Heat a skillet, with a lid, over medium heat. Melt butter making sure to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the eggs. Once the whites have turned white add the water, reduce the heat to low or turn off, and cover. Continue to cook until desired doneness, about 2-5 minutes.

If using canned refried beans pour contents into a pan over medium-low heat. Add a few tablespoons of water and mix throughly. Reduce heat to low.

Heat corn tortillas in a little oil. When it’s brown, flip it over. Warm flour tortillas on a dry skillet.

To serve, spread each tortilla with some beans, sprinkle with cheese, a drizzle of salsa (or more) and top with the egg. Garnish with a little cheese, salsa and cilantro.

Serves 6

Variations:
– Replace the egg with scrambled eggs
– Additional toppings:
Black Beans
Chopped tomatoes
Sour Cream
Avocado
Onions
Jalapenos
Source: Pioneer Woman.com

chicken legs, healing or boneless breasts
2 cup plain yogurt
2-3 garlic cloves, buy minced
Parsley
Juice of 1 lemon
Kosher salt
Some butter
Panko (start with about 1 cup, clinic add as needed)

Pour 1-2 cups of yogurt into a mixing bowl. Peel and mince a couple of garlic cloves and add them to the yogurt. Add chopped parsley and the juice of one lemon. Mix well.
Rinse your chicken and pat it dry, and salt well with Kosher salt.
In another bowl, place your breadcrumbs and stir in a bit of salt.
Butter a baking dish. With a pair of tongs, dip each chicken piece in the yogurt mixture, turning thoroughly to coat. Then roll the chicken in the panko breadcrumbs. Cover each piece thoroughly and place in the baking dish.
Finally, place a small slice of butter over the largest part of each chicken piece. Cover with foil and bake at 350 (I recommend a bit of a higher heat) for 1 hour to 1 1/4 hours, removing the foil for the last 15 minutes of baking. When the chicken is nice and golden, remove from the oven and enjoy!

Variations:
Season the chicken with seasonings. I have been addicted to Emeril’s Chicken Seasoning.
Add chives to the yogurt.
In the book His Needs Her Needs the concept of the love Bank is introduced. Throughout our lives we are constantly adding and subtracting from the love bank. The goal is to have a surplus of love credits so that the bank never falls empty. Theoretically, price when we meet someone the way they treat us or speak to us determines if love points are deposited or not. The more points that person deposits the closer we begin to feel toward them. Makes sense. If someone hates us, viagra says derogatory remarks or is abusive then surely we are not going to want to be around that person. The book refers to married couples but I suspect the theory could also be applied to friends and family.

Dinnertime is the one part of the day to sit down as a family and communicate, discuss the events of the day or week, solve problems or situations at school or work, and share stories and goals. Use the time to express your love and gratitude, teach about sex, drugs, drinking, and nutrition, go over the rules of the house, discuss manners, how to manage finances, help build one another, or plan a vacation. The purpose is to get to know each other by lingering a little longer around the table. This is how your kids will learn how to communicate, show affection, learn to trust, share feelings and feel loved. These are all ways to add points to our child’s love bank. They will learn they can trust us because we truly care about them. The relationships between siblings will be strengthened as well.

A number of studies show that children who eat dinner with their families regularly (at least 5 nights a week) are less likely to get involved with drugs and alcohol than those who do not. They get better grades, exhibit less stress and eat healthier. The studies also indicate that teenage girls are less likely to become pregnant or experience an eating disorder. A Harvard study revealed family dinners are more beneficial than play and story time in the development of vocabulary in young children. Studies have also shown that family mealtime reduces the stress level of working moms. An article in the June 2006 Time magazine reported “among those who eat together three or fewer times a week, 45% say the TV is on during meals (as opposed to 37% of all households), and nearly one-third say there isn’t much conversation. Such kids are also more than twice as likely as those who have frequent family meals to say there is a great deal of tension among family members, and they are much less likely to think their parents are proud of them.”

Now that we know the importance of family meal time lets tackle reality. Sadly in many households the kitchen is void of family members and dinner. The art of making homemade meals is non-existent in many homes today. In some homes a bag of fast food is quickly divided among the family members with respected persons walking off in different directions. For those who attempt to have family meals few are met with a great deal of resistance and too soon dismiss the practice feeling defeated.

Start the building process by getting everyone involved in preparing the meal. Learn how to make a menu and prepare three easy meals and rotate them each week. Carry the chatter to the dinner table as you sit down to enjoy a meal everyone had a part in making. Gordon Ramsey, chef and host of Kitchen Nightmares and Hell’s Kitchen understands the importance of sharing a meal together. In his home Sunday lunch is mandatory family time.

In past generations family stories were passed around the dinner table. The children got to know their uncles and grandparents listening to those stories. Stephen’s dad carried on a tradition started by his father of asking trivia questions during dinner as a means of conversation. Amanda Blake Soule author of Creative Family uses dinnertime as a time to reflect on what they are most grateful for. Dinnertime at the White House remains the same for the Obama family. An interview in the March 2009 issue of People revealed the Obama family takes turns sharing their “rose and thorn” for the day.

Eating dinner together is no cure-all however it is the means to providing stability and strength to the family. Our kids realized they could be part of the conversation and now Mason enjoys telling us wild stories and both Mason and Adelin have fun answering the questions Stephen asks of us. All it takes is a commitment to turn off the phones, TV and the racing mind. Statistics prove it is worth every battle in the end.
There is at least one night a week when we are having so much fun playing that we loose track of time and before we know it 6:00 has come and gone. Dinner becomes a bedtime snack after baths and before the kids shuffle off to bed. For this very purpose I always house a can of refried beans in the pantry for a super-duper fast meal. Wash it all down with a nice cold glass of milk.

Tortillas, sick corn or flour
Refried beans
1/2 cup salsa
Shredded cheddar or Monterrey Jack and cheddar blend
Shredded lettuce
Diced Tomatoes, mind optional
Diced Onions, information pills optional

For burritos, slather the upper half of a flour tortilla with refried beans. Sprinkle with some cheese and lettuce. Fold the opposite side over like a taco or halfway tucking the sides in before folding once more.

For a tostada: Heat a flour tortilla in a skillet until crispy or use a corn tortilla. Top with beans, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and onions.

Our version of Huevos Ranchos was adapted from Juanita Sorrez, approved a friend I met while in Freemont Texas. She calles this dish, page “the poor man’s breakfast”. She made hers with left over homemade flour tortillas, from the day before, torn into bite sized pieces, scrambled eggs, cheese and salsa. Juanita’s salsa was so hot, when she was a girl her father would tell her “Juanita, your salsa is so hot it would make the devil fart.” I always got a laugh out of that.

Juanita tried to teach me how to make her most sought after flour tortillas but I could never get them just right. Her tortillas are thick and soft and tender. Mine were always thick and crumbly. Making Juanita’s “poor man’s breakfast” with inferior tortillas just will not do. Then I came across a variation of huevos ranchos on Smitten Kitchen. She cooked the whole egg on top of the warmed tortilla. Try as I might it was a flop every time. Either the egg was over cooked or the tortilla. I liked the idea of a poached egg though. I also wanted the prep to be simple. My daughter was the final inspiration. While I tend to stick to designated breakfast type foods she can eat anything. Including a bean and cheese burrito with lettuce. I know that does not sound so odd as breakfast burritos are a weekly staple in this house. Although it is how a semi runny poached egged ended up on a bed of refried beans, cheese, and salsa. It is not Juanita’s but it is oh so delicioso!

6 Tortillas (taco sized flour or corn)
6 Eggs
1-2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons water
1 (15 ounce) can refried beans
1- 1 1/2 cups Colby cheese, shredded
Salsa
Cilantro

Heat a skillet, with a lid, over medium heat. Melt butter making sure to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the eggs. Once the whites have turned white add the water, reduce the heat to low or turn off, and cover. Continue to cook until desired doneness, about 2-5 minutes.

If using canned refried beans pour contents into a pan over medium-low heat. Add a few tablespoons of water and mix throughly. Reduce heat to low.

Heat corn tortillas in a little oil. When it’s brown, flip it over. Warm flour tortillas on a dry skillet.

To serve, spread each tortilla with some beans, sprinkle with cheese, a drizzle of salsa (or more) and top with the egg. Garnish with a little cheese, salsa and cilantro.

Serves 6

Variations:
– Replace the egg with scrambled eggs
– Additional toppings:
Black Beans
Chopped tomatoes
Sour Cream
Avocado
Onions
Jalapenos
Source: Pioneer Woman.com

chicken legs, healing or boneless breasts
2 cup plain yogurt
2-3 garlic cloves, buy minced
Parsley
Juice of 1 lemon
Kosher salt
Some butter
Panko (start with about 1 cup, clinic add as needed)

Pour 1-2 cups of yogurt into a mixing bowl. Peel and mince a couple of garlic cloves and add them to the yogurt. Add chopped parsley and the juice of one lemon. Mix well.
Rinse your chicken and pat it dry, and salt well with Kosher salt.
In another bowl, place your breadcrumbs and stir in a bit of salt.
Butter a baking dish. With a pair of tongs, dip each chicken piece in the yogurt mixture, turning thoroughly to coat. Then roll the chicken in the panko breadcrumbs. Cover each piece thoroughly and place in the baking dish.
Finally, place a small slice of butter over the largest part of each chicken piece. Cover with foil and bake at 350 (I recommend a bit of a higher heat) for 1 hour to 1 1/4 hours, removing the foil for the last 15 minutes of baking. When the chicken is nice and golden, remove from the oven and enjoy!

Variations:
Season the chicken with seasonings. I have been addicted to Emeril’s Chicken Seasoning.
Add chives to the yogurt.
The first time I had couscous was when I was in Texas. I knew a guy who was from Tahiti. One night he made couscous in a pot with cabbage and whole tomatoes. Ever since that night couscous has become a pantry staple. I gravitated toward this dish because this summer I had a major affair with limes and spices like cumin and red chili peppers and cilantro. I put cilantro on everything. And why not, mind the flea market was selling ten bunches for a dollar. Add some chicken or black beans to complete the meal.

Couscous is small, abortion granular pasta that is steamed like rice. Almost any rice or pasta dish could be substituted for couscous.

1 cup uncooked couscous
1 1/4 cups chicken broth
3 tbsp olive oil
4 tbsp fresh lime juice
2 tsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp ground cumin
8 green onions, chopped
1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 cup frozen corn kernels, thawed
2 (15 oz) cans black beans, drained
Salt and pepper to taste

Bring chicken broth to a boil in a 2 quart or larger sauce pan and stir in the couscous. Cover the pot and remove from heat. Let stand for 5 minutes.
In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lime juice, vinegar and cumin. Add green onions, red pepper, cilantro, corn and beans and toss to coat.
Fluff the couscous well, breaking up any chunks. Add to the bowl with the vegetables and mix well. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve at once or refrigerate until ready to serve.

Source: allrecipes

30-Day Meal Plan: Planning and Shopping for the Month Saves Time and Money

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Mexican Tostadas

I have always loved spicy food. I thought I could handle heat that is until at Seventeen I traveled cross county to Texas. The salsa there was so hot my mouth was inflamed for the rest of the day. I dared not eat another lick of the stuff the remainder of my visit in Texas. Upon my return home I remained adverse to hot spicy foods for sometime. Years later I returned to Texas. It was there I learned from many friends how to cook some of my most favorite Mexican dishes. One evening at Mrs. Rodriguez house I learned to make Tostadas complete with homemade refried beans. There are so many ways to make frijoles refritos but to be honest I have no problem using a can of store bought refried beans. It is super quick and before you know it dinner is on the table. I do however, view enjoy making my own tortillas. Corn or flour can be used. Traditionally corn is the tortilla of choice but flour will work. The tortillas can be baked in the oven until crispy about 8 minutes on 375 degrees for a less fat version.

Serves 5-6
5-6 corn or flour tortillas
Vegetable oil
1 (15-ounce) can Refried beans
2 Romaine Lettuce Hearts or 1/2 head iceberg lettuce, viagra 40mg sliced thin
Shredded Cheddar or crumbled queso fresco or cotija cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 avocado, chopped or guacamole
1 small onion, diced
1 cup of Salsa
1/2 cup sliced radishes
1/2 cup diced Red Pepper

Pour about 1/4 inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat on medium-high until oil sizzles when a drop of water or crumb is placed in pan. (Not smoking hot) The tortilla should sizzle and bubble up instantly after it is placed in the oil. Cook tortilla 30 seconds, until golden, on each side until firm and crisp. Drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Meanwhile heat beans in a small pan. Stir in a little water, about 2-3 tablespoons stirring and mashing. Keep warm and moist.

To serve top tortilla with beans, lettuce, cilantro, a squeeze of lime juice, cheese and then any other desired toppings.

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Mexican Tostadas

I have always loved spicy food. I thought I could handle heat that is until at Seventeen I traveled cross county to Texas. The salsa there was so hot my mouth was inflamed for the rest of the day. I dared not eat another lick of the stuff the remainder of my visit in Texas. Upon my return home I remained adverse to hot spicy foods for sometime. Years later I returned to Texas. It was there I learned from many friends how to cook some of my most favorite Mexican dishes. One evening at Mrs. Rodriguez house I learned to make Tostadas complete with homemade refried beans. There are so many ways to make frijoles refritos but to be honest I have no problem using a can of store bought refried beans. It is super quick and before you know it dinner is on the table. I do however, view enjoy making my own tortillas. Corn or flour can be used. Traditionally corn is the tortilla of choice but flour will work. The tortillas can be baked in the oven until crispy about 8 minutes on 375 degrees for a less fat version.

Serves 5-6
5-6 corn or flour tortillas
Vegetable oil
1 (15-ounce) can Refried beans
2 Romaine Lettuce Hearts or 1/2 head iceberg lettuce, viagra 40mg sliced thin
Shredded Cheddar or crumbled queso fresco or cotija cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 avocado, chopped or guacamole
1 small onion, diced
1 cup of Salsa
1/2 cup sliced radishes
1/2 cup diced Red Pepper

Pour about 1/4 inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat on medium-high until oil sizzles when a drop of water or crumb is placed in pan. (Not smoking hot) The tortilla should sizzle and bubble up instantly after it is placed in the oil. Cook tortilla 30 seconds, until golden, on each side until firm and crisp. Drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Meanwhile heat beans in a small pan. Stir in a little water, about 2-3 tablespoons stirring and mashing. Keep warm and moist.

To serve top tortilla with beans, lettuce, cilantro, a squeeze of lime juice, cheese and then any other desired toppings.

I adapted this recipe after my friend Marilyn’s skillet potatoes. She slices the potatoes and adds them to a cast iron skillet with oil, diagnosis salt and pepper. Covers the pan and simmers, prescription tossing occasionally until tender. I use her method when cooking diced potatoes for breakfast; adding chopped onions and garlic. Tonight, I wanted something garlicky. I had some left over bacon that would pair nicely with a garlic butter sauce.

5 potatoes, sliced thick
2-3 slices bacon
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried dill weed
salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter
garlic powder

Cook the bacon in a skillet. Remove the bacon and add the garlic and potatoes. Cover and cook until tender. Add pepper, dill, garlic powder, butter and bacon.

Variations:
Sometimes I add 1/2 -1 cup water or broth and simmer. Simmer until the potatoes are done.

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Mexican Tostadas

I have always loved spicy food. I thought I could handle heat that is until at Seventeen I traveled cross county to Texas. The salsa there was so hot my mouth was inflamed for the rest of the day. I dared not eat another lick of the stuff the remainder of my visit in Texas. Upon my return home I remained adverse to hot spicy foods for sometime. Years later I returned to Texas. It was there I learned from many friends how to cook some of my most favorite Mexican dishes. One evening at Mrs. Rodriguez house I learned to make Tostadas complete with homemade refried beans. There are so many ways to make frijoles refritos but to be honest I have no problem using a can of store bought refried beans. It is super quick and before you know it dinner is on the table. I do however, view enjoy making my own tortillas. Corn or flour can be used. Traditionally corn is the tortilla of choice but flour will work. The tortillas can be baked in the oven until crispy about 8 minutes on 375 degrees for a less fat version.

Serves 5-6
5-6 corn or flour tortillas
Vegetable oil
1 (15-ounce) can Refried beans
2 Romaine Lettuce Hearts or 1/2 head iceberg lettuce, viagra 40mg sliced thin
Shredded Cheddar or crumbled queso fresco or cotija cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 avocado, chopped or guacamole
1 small onion, diced
1 cup of Salsa
1/2 cup sliced radishes
1/2 cup diced Red Pepper

Pour about 1/4 inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat on medium-high until oil sizzles when a drop of water or crumb is placed in pan. (Not smoking hot) The tortilla should sizzle and bubble up instantly after it is placed in the oil. Cook tortilla 30 seconds, until golden, on each side until firm and crisp. Drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Meanwhile heat beans in a small pan. Stir in a little water, about 2-3 tablespoons stirring and mashing. Keep warm and moist.

To serve top tortilla with beans, lettuce, cilantro, a squeeze of lime juice, cheese and then any other desired toppings.

I adapted this recipe after my friend Marilyn’s skillet potatoes. She slices the potatoes and adds them to a cast iron skillet with oil, diagnosis salt and pepper. Covers the pan and simmers, prescription tossing occasionally until tender. I use her method when cooking diced potatoes for breakfast; adding chopped onions and garlic. Tonight, I wanted something garlicky. I had some left over bacon that would pair nicely with a garlic butter sauce.

5 potatoes, sliced thick
2-3 slices bacon
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried dill weed
salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter
garlic powder

Cook the bacon in a skillet. Remove the bacon and add the garlic and potatoes. Cover and cook until tender. Add pepper, dill, garlic powder, butter and bacon.

Variations:
Sometimes I add 1/2 -1 cup water or broth and simmer. Simmer until the potatoes are done.
This is a recipe given to me by a friend Cheryl Wellman. I found the recipe great as is but another friend of mine suggests doubling the sauce.

6 pieces boneless, this site skinless chicken breast
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp Lawry’s season salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tsp Worchestershire sauce
1 can cream of chicken
Bacon

Oil a 9 X 13 casserole dish. Lay pieces of chicken in a pan. Combine sour cream, prescription soup, salt, pepper, and worchestershire sauce. Pour mixture over chicken. Layer 3 pieces of bacon on top. Cook uncovered at 375 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Just before chicken is done, cook one slice of bacon per chicken breast. Cook until almost crispy, but done. Wrap the bacon around chicken or lay on the plate and put chicken and sauce over it. Serve with rice.

Variations:
The recipe says you can cook the bacon with the chicken but it will take 3 hours at 350 and the bacon is not as crispy this way, but still good. I have not tried it. I have made bacon wrapped chicken before and I do not recall it taking 3 hours.

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Mexican Tostadas

I have always loved spicy food. I thought I could handle heat that is until at Seventeen I traveled cross county to Texas. The salsa there was so hot my mouth was inflamed for the rest of the day. I dared not eat another lick of the stuff the remainder of my visit in Texas. Upon my return home I remained adverse to hot spicy foods for sometime. Years later I returned to Texas. It was there I learned from many friends how to cook some of my most favorite Mexican dishes. One evening at Mrs. Rodriguez house I learned to make Tostadas complete with homemade refried beans. There are so many ways to make frijoles refritos but to be honest I have no problem using a can of store bought refried beans. It is super quick and before you know it dinner is on the table. I do however, view enjoy making my own tortillas. Corn or flour can be used. Traditionally corn is the tortilla of choice but flour will work. The tortillas can be baked in the oven until crispy about 8 minutes on 375 degrees for a less fat version.

Serves 5-6
5-6 corn or flour tortillas
Vegetable oil
1 (15-ounce) can Refried beans
2 Romaine Lettuce Hearts or 1/2 head iceberg lettuce, viagra 40mg sliced thin
Shredded Cheddar or crumbled queso fresco or cotija cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 avocado, chopped or guacamole
1 small onion, diced
1 cup of Salsa
1/2 cup sliced radishes
1/2 cup diced Red Pepper

Pour about 1/4 inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat on medium-high until oil sizzles when a drop of water or crumb is placed in pan. (Not smoking hot) The tortilla should sizzle and bubble up instantly after it is placed in the oil. Cook tortilla 30 seconds, until golden, on each side until firm and crisp. Drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Meanwhile heat beans in a small pan. Stir in a little water, about 2-3 tablespoons stirring and mashing. Keep warm and moist.

To serve top tortilla with beans, lettuce, cilantro, a squeeze of lime juice, cheese and then any other desired toppings.

I adapted this recipe after my friend Marilyn’s skillet potatoes. She slices the potatoes and adds them to a cast iron skillet with oil, diagnosis salt and pepper. Covers the pan and simmers, prescription tossing occasionally until tender. I use her method when cooking diced potatoes for breakfast; adding chopped onions and garlic. Tonight, I wanted something garlicky. I had some left over bacon that would pair nicely with a garlic butter sauce.

5 potatoes, sliced thick
2-3 slices bacon
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried dill weed
salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter
garlic powder

Cook the bacon in a skillet. Remove the bacon and add the garlic and potatoes. Cover and cook until tender. Add pepper, dill, garlic powder, butter and bacon.

Variations:
Sometimes I add 1/2 -1 cup water or broth and simmer. Simmer until the potatoes are done.
This is a recipe given to me by a friend Cheryl Wellman. I found the recipe great as is but another friend of mine suggests doubling the sauce.

6 pieces boneless, this site skinless chicken breast
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp Lawry’s season salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tsp Worchestershire sauce
1 can cream of chicken
Bacon

Oil a 9 X 13 casserole dish. Lay pieces of chicken in a pan. Combine sour cream, prescription soup, salt, pepper, and worchestershire sauce. Pour mixture over chicken. Layer 3 pieces of bacon on top. Cook uncovered at 375 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Just before chicken is done, cook one slice of bacon per chicken breast. Cook until almost crispy, but done. Wrap the bacon around chicken or lay on the plate and put chicken and sauce over it. Serve with rice.

Variations:
The recipe says you can cook the bacon with the chicken but it will take 3 hours at 350 and the bacon is not as crispy this way, but still good. I have not tried it. I have made bacon wrapped chicken before and I do not recall it taking 3 hours.
4 strips bacon
4 boneless pork loin chops (preferably 1-inch thick)
2 1/2 tsp dry barbecue seasoning
2 medium onions, clinic sliced 1/4-inch thick
1/2 cup barbecue sauce

Wrap a strip of bacon around the edges of each pork chop and secure with toothpicks; season on both sides with barbecue seasoning. Grill pork and onion over medium heat for 10 minutes, turning once. Transfer onion to a large piece of foil and top with barbecue sauce; seal foil, leaving room for air to circulate. Cook pork and onions for 10 minutes more or until pork is cooked through and onions are very soft. Top pork with cooked onions.

Source: Raley’s Something Extra

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Mexican Tostadas

I have always loved spicy food. I thought I could handle heat that is until at Seventeen I traveled cross county to Texas. The salsa there was so hot my mouth was inflamed for the rest of the day. I dared not eat another lick of the stuff the remainder of my visit in Texas. Upon my return home I remained adverse to hot spicy foods for sometime. Years later I returned to Texas. It was there I learned from many friends how to cook some of my most favorite Mexican dishes. One evening at Mrs. Rodriguez house I learned to make Tostadas complete with homemade refried beans. There are so many ways to make frijoles refritos but to be honest I have no problem using a can of store bought refried beans. It is super quick and before you know it dinner is on the table. I do however, view enjoy making my own tortillas. Corn or flour can be used. Traditionally corn is the tortilla of choice but flour will work. The tortillas can be baked in the oven until crispy about 8 minutes on 375 degrees for a less fat version.

Serves 5-6
5-6 corn or flour tortillas
Vegetable oil
1 (15-ounce) can Refried beans
2 Romaine Lettuce Hearts or 1/2 head iceberg lettuce, viagra 40mg sliced thin
Shredded Cheddar or crumbled queso fresco or cotija cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 avocado, chopped or guacamole
1 small onion, diced
1 cup of Salsa
1/2 cup sliced radishes
1/2 cup diced Red Pepper

Pour about 1/4 inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat on medium-high until oil sizzles when a drop of water or crumb is placed in pan. (Not smoking hot) The tortilla should sizzle and bubble up instantly after it is placed in the oil. Cook tortilla 30 seconds, until golden, on each side until firm and crisp. Drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Meanwhile heat beans in a small pan. Stir in a little water, about 2-3 tablespoons stirring and mashing. Keep warm and moist.

To serve top tortilla with beans, lettuce, cilantro, a squeeze of lime juice, cheese and then any other desired toppings.

I adapted this recipe after my friend Marilyn’s skillet potatoes. She slices the potatoes and adds them to a cast iron skillet with oil, diagnosis salt and pepper. Covers the pan and simmers, prescription tossing occasionally until tender. I use her method when cooking diced potatoes for breakfast; adding chopped onions and garlic. Tonight, I wanted something garlicky. I had some left over bacon that would pair nicely with a garlic butter sauce.

5 potatoes, sliced thick
2-3 slices bacon
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried dill weed
salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter
garlic powder

Cook the bacon in a skillet. Remove the bacon and add the garlic and potatoes. Cover and cook until tender. Add pepper, dill, garlic powder, butter and bacon.

Variations:
Sometimes I add 1/2 -1 cup water or broth and simmer. Simmer until the potatoes are done.
This is a recipe given to me by a friend Cheryl Wellman. I found the recipe great as is but another friend of mine suggests doubling the sauce.

6 pieces boneless, this site skinless chicken breast
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp Lawry’s season salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tsp Worchestershire sauce
1 can cream of chicken
Bacon

Oil a 9 X 13 casserole dish. Lay pieces of chicken in a pan. Combine sour cream, prescription soup, salt, pepper, and worchestershire sauce. Pour mixture over chicken. Layer 3 pieces of bacon on top. Cook uncovered at 375 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Just before chicken is done, cook one slice of bacon per chicken breast. Cook until almost crispy, but done. Wrap the bacon around chicken or lay on the plate and put chicken and sauce over it. Serve with rice.

Variations:
The recipe says you can cook the bacon with the chicken but it will take 3 hours at 350 and the bacon is not as crispy this way, but still good. I have not tried it. I have made bacon wrapped chicken before and I do not recall it taking 3 hours.
4 strips bacon
4 boneless pork loin chops (preferably 1-inch thick)
2 1/2 tsp dry barbecue seasoning
2 medium onions, clinic sliced 1/4-inch thick
1/2 cup barbecue sauce

Wrap a strip of bacon around the edges of each pork chop and secure with toothpicks; season on both sides with barbecue seasoning. Grill pork and onion over medium heat for 10 minutes, turning once. Transfer onion to a large piece of foil and top with barbecue sauce; seal foil, leaving room for air to circulate. Cook pork and onions for 10 minutes more or until pork is cooked through and onions are very soft. Top pork with cooked onions.

Source: Raley’s Something Extra
Here are two of my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipes. The first one produces thick gooey chocolate morsels while the bottom recipe results are thinner and crispy.

David Lebovitz: The Great Chocolate Chip Cookie
Source: The Great Book of Chocolate
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, viagra dosage cold, dosage cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
1 cup walnuts or pecans, toasted and chopped

Adjust the oven rack to the top 1/3 of the oven and preheat to 300F. Line three baking sheets with parchment paper.

Beat the sugars and butters together until smooth. Mix in the egg, vanilla, and baking soda. Stir together the flour and salt, then mix them into the batter. Mix in the chocolate chips and nuts.
Scoop the cookie dough into 2-tablespoon balls and place 8 balls, spaced 4 inches apart, on each of the baking sheets. Bake for 18 minutes, or until pale golden brown. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack. Store at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
Make about 20 cookies.

The River Cottage Chocolate Chip Cookies:
Source: The River Cottage Family Cookbook
3 1/2 ounces dark chocolate
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 tsp vanilla
1 cup flour, all-purpose or white pastry
1/2 tsp baking powder
a pinch of salt

Preheat the oven to 375. Line each baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper. Chop the chocolate into little chunks and set aside.

Heat the butter in a small saucepan on low until it has just melted. Meanwhile, add the sugars to a mixing bowl. Pour melted butter on top of the sugar and beat with a wooden spoon. Add the egg and vanilla; beat until well blended.

Sift the flour, powder and salt into the mixing bowl. Add the chopped chocolate.

Scoop by heaping tablespoonfuls on to the baking sheets two inches apart. (These cookies really spread out.) Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the cookies are just turning golden brown. Let sit on the baking sheets for a couple of minutes, then carefully transfer to a wire rack to cool.
Makes about 12 cookies

Alternatives:
I usually only have semi-sweet chocolate chips on hand instead of the 3 1/2 ounces dark chocolate.

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Mexican Tostadas

I have always loved spicy food. I thought I could handle heat that is until at Seventeen I traveled cross county to Texas. The salsa there was so hot my mouth was inflamed for the rest of the day. I dared not eat another lick of the stuff the remainder of my visit in Texas. Upon my return home I remained adverse to hot spicy foods for sometime. Years later I returned to Texas. It was there I learned from many friends how to cook some of my most favorite Mexican dishes. One evening at Mrs. Rodriguez house I learned to make Tostadas complete with homemade refried beans. There are so many ways to make frijoles refritos but to be honest I have no problem using a can of store bought refried beans. It is super quick and before you know it dinner is on the table. I do however, view enjoy making my own tortillas. Corn or flour can be used. Traditionally corn is the tortilla of choice but flour will work. The tortillas can be baked in the oven until crispy about 8 minutes on 375 degrees for a less fat version.

Serves 5-6
5-6 corn or flour tortillas
Vegetable oil
1 (15-ounce) can Refried beans
2 Romaine Lettuce Hearts or 1/2 head iceberg lettuce, viagra 40mg sliced thin
Shredded Cheddar or crumbled queso fresco or cotija cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 avocado, chopped or guacamole
1 small onion, diced
1 cup of Salsa
1/2 cup sliced radishes
1/2 cup diced Red Pepper

Pour about 1/4 inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat on medium-high until oil sizzles when a drop of water or crumb is placed in pan. (Not smoking hot) The tortilla should sizzle and bubble up instantly after it is placed in the oil. Cook tortilla 30 seconds, until golden, on each side until firm and crisp. Drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Meanwhile heat beans in a small pan. Stir in a little water, about 2-3 tablespoons stirring and mashing. Keep warm and moist.

To serve top tortilla with beans, lettuce, cilantro, a squeeze of lime juice, cheese and then any other desired toppings.

I adapted this recipe after my friend Marilyn’s skillet potatoes. She slices the potatoes and adds them to a cast iron skillet with oil, diagnosis salt and pepper. Covers the pan and simmers, prescription tossing occasionally until tender. I use her method when cooking diced potatoes for breakfast; adding chopped onions and garlic. Tonight, I wanted something garlicky. I had some left over bacon that would pair nicely with a garlic butter sauce.

5 potatoes, sliced thick
2-3 slices bacon
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried dill weed
salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter
garlic powder

Cook the bacon in a skillet. Remove the bacon and add the garlic and potatoes. Cover and cook until tender. Add pepper, dill, garlic powder, butter and bacon.

Variations:
Sometimes I add 1/2 -1 cup water or broth and simmer. Simmer until the potatoes are done.
This is a recipe given to me by a friend Cheryl Wellman. I found the recipe great as is but another friend of mine suggests doubling the sauce.

6 pieces boneless, this site skinless chicken breast
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp Lawry’s season salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tsp Worchestershire sauce
1 can cream of chicken
Bacon

Oil a 9 X 13 casserole dish. Lay pieces of chicken in a pan. Combine sour cream, prescription soup, salt, pepper, and worchestershire sauce. Pour mixture over chicken. Layer 3 pieces of bacon on top. Cook uncovered at 375 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Just before chicken is done, cook one slice of bacon per chicken breast. Cook until almost crispy, but done. Wrap the bacon around chicken or lay on the plate and put chicken and sauce over it. Serve with rice.

Variations:
The recipe says you can cook the bacon with the chicken but it will take 3 hours at 350 and the bacon is not as crispy this way, but still good. I have not tried it. I have made bacon wrapped chicken before and I do not recall it taking 3 hours.
4 strips bacon
4 boneless pork loin chops (preferably 1-inch thick)
2 1/2 tsp dry barbecue seasoning
2 medium onions, clinic sliced 1/4-inch thick
1/2 cup barbecue sauce

Wrap a strip of bacon around the edges of each pork chop and secure with toothpicks; season on both sides with barbecue seasoning. Grill pork and onion over medium heat for 10 minutes, turning once. Transfer onion to a large piece of foil and top with barbecue sauce; seal foil, leaving room for air to circulate. Cook pork and onions for 10 minutes more or until pork is cooked through and onions are very soft. Top pork with cooked onions.

Source: Raley’s Something Extra
Here are two of my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipes. The first one produces thick gooey chocolate morsels while the bottom recipe results are thinner and crispy.

David Lebovitz: The Great Chocolate Chip Cookie
Source: The Great Book of Chocolate
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, viagra dosage cold, dosage cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
1 cup walnuts or pecans, toasted and chopped

Adjust the oven rack to the top 1/3 of the oven and preheat to 300F. Line three baking sheets with parchment paper.

Beat the sugars and butters together until smooth. Mix in the egg, vanilla, and baking soda. Stir together the flour and salt, then mix them into the batter. Mix in the chocolate chips and nuts.
Scoop the cookie dough into 2-tablespoon balls and place 8 balls, spaced 4 inches apart, on each of the baking sheets. Bake for 18 minutes, or until pale golden brown. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack. Store at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
Make about 20 cookies.

The River Cottage Chocolate Chip Cookies:
Source: The River Cottage Family Cookbook
3 1/2 ounces dark chocolate
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 tsp vanilla
1 cup flour, all-purpose or white pastry
1/2 tsp baking powder
a pinch of salt

Preheat the oven to 375. Line each baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper. Chop the chocolate into little chunks and set aside.

Heat the butter in a small saucepan on low until it has just melted. Meanwhile, add the sugars to a mixing bowl. Pour melted butter on top of the sugar and beat with a wooden spoon. Add the egg and vanilla; beat until well blended.

Sift the flour, powder and salt into the mixing bowl. Add the chopped chocolate.

Scoop by heaping tablespoonfuls on to the baking sheets two inches apart. (These cookies really spread out.) Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the cookies are just turning golden brown. Let sit on the baking sheets for a couple of minutes, then carefully transfer to a wire rack to cool.
Makes about 12 cookies

Alternatives:
I usually only have semi-sweet chocolate chips on hand instead of the 3 1/2 ounces dark chocolate.
This year it has been my quest to simplify our lives and home. I used to subscribe to the more playgroups the better school of thought; rationalizing my children needed to be among their peers. That has since changed as I feel we are each others peers.

Back when our oldest was born we were sucked into the toy mania bandwagon that proclaimed “Your child is this many months old, cheapest these toys are essential for his milestone development.” The instant Mason was bored we were off to the toy store for something new. Our obsession with buying toys was nothing compared to the hordes of toys given to him from relatives with good intentions. I like playing with the toys as much as any kid, drug but I am not running a toy store here. I am trying to raise a family and in the process I hope to instill in them good core values while having fun in the process. I confess I am a little relieved the majority of the toys were lost in the move. However, it did not take long for our collection to grow and our home to become overrun once again.

Before moving to a more rural area several years ago, we were used to the fast paced life offered by the city. After the birth of our first son, Stephen and I realized the city life was of no importance. We longed to raise our children in a more simplistic environment. We wanted trails to hike, woods to explore and streams to forge all in our own backyard. I had visions of our little family spending our days outdoors playing and working a garden surrounded by a variety of fruit trees. Mostly I wanted a simpler life with a close knit family. Thus the hunt for a more basic creative and simpler life began.

I have wonderful memories (I am sure at the time it was agony) of all my desires and passion set on a particular toy that my mom refused to buy no matter how enormous a tantrum I threw. Moreover, I remember the abundant joy that raced through my blood as the coveted toy was unveiled Christmas Morning. As a parent I relish giving the kids prizes. I also anguish over Mason’s lack of an attachment to even just one toy. The non birthday or holiday toy buying ceased in hopes that my children would come to discover gratitude for the things they already have. Periodically throughout the year when I am in the mood to purge I sort through the stash tossing anything broken or never played with and boxing up the rest to rotate in and out. Still the clutter was unmanageable. Something had to be done. The toys that managed to survive were in great condition but the question remained, did we really need them all?

As my search into simplistic and creative living ensued I stumbled upon the book “The Power of Play” by David Elkind. The book touches on the importance of letting kids play and the types of environments that inhibit and cultivate true unadulterated child’s play. The boxes of toys were chucked; the TV became obsolete as we spent the majority of our day outside exploring. Excited by the find, as the book was right on course in the direction I was headed, I relayed my delight to a friend of mine. At the mention of the words Montessori and Waldorf education, free play, and the subject of toys, my friend was ecstatic. She proceeded to explain her most recent discovery in the realm of creativity and simplicity.

Patty had just begun reading “The Creative Family” written by Amanda Blake Soule, a mother of three, with one on the way. Patty immediately thought of me when she came across an idea called the “Sound Wall”. (Which by the way was immediately instituted and deemed successful) I could not wait until Patty finished her copy of “The Creative Family.” So I went out and bought my own.

In the book The Creative Family, Amanda shares her discoveries as she taps into her own inner creative self. Thought to have zero creative talent, Amanda comes to realize creativity is not limited to the philosophies of art class 101. Inspired by her children’s innate ability to create, Amanda explores ways to connect with her family and foster gratitude for each other and for the wonderful bounties surrounding them. If you are looking for suggestions on how to make the most out of the time you spend with your family I highly recommend this book to steer you in the right direction. I was reminded of several traditions of our own. One such tradition was our holiday tree (in the book it is called a season tree) and game nights.

I came to the realization I need to delve into my creative psyche as much as the children do. Arts and crafts used to be something rare because I thought I had to have a project and I was never prepared. I have learned to use their art time as my preparation time. If there is a project I want to do with the kids, I work on it getting it all together while they are creating their own master pieces. We are all happy and filled. To find out more about Amanda visit her website site at soulemama.com.

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Mexican Tostadas

I have always loved spicy food. I thought I could handle heat that is until at Seventeen I traveled cross county to Texas. The salsa there was so hot my mouth was inflamed for the rest of the day. I dared not eat another lick of the stuff the remainder of my visit in Texas. Upon my return home I remained adverse to hot spicy foods for sometime. Years later I returned to Texas. It was there I learned from many friends how to cook some of my most favorite Mexican dishes. One evening at Mrs. Rodriguez house I learned to make Tostadas complete with homemade refried beans. There are so many ways to make frijoles refritos but to be honest I have no problem using a can of store bought refried beans. It is super quick and before you know it dinner is on the table. I do however, view enjoy making my own tortillas. Corn or flour can be used. Traditionally corn is the tortilla of choice but flour will work. The tortillas can be baked in the oven until crispy about 8 minutes on 375 degrees for a less fat version.

Serves 5-6
5-6 corn or flour tortillas
Vegetable oil
1 (15-ounce) can Refried beans
2 Romaine Lettuce Hearts or 1/2 head iceberg lettuce, viagra 40mg sliced thin
Shredded Cheddar or crumbled queso fresco or cotija cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 avocado, chopped or guacamole
1 small onion, diced
1 cup of Salsa
1/2 cup sliced radishes
1/2 cup diced Red Pepper

Pour about 1/4 inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat on medium-high until oil sizzles when a drop of water or crumb is placed in pan. (Not smoking hot) The tortilla should sizzle and bubble up instantly after it is placed in the oil. Cook tortilla 30 seconds, until golden, on each side until firm and crisp. Drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Meanwhile heat beans in a small pan. Stir in a little water, about 2-3 tablespoons stirring and mashing. Keep warm and moist.

To serve top tortilla with beans, lettuce, cilantro, a squeeze of lime juice, cheese and then any other desired toppings.

I adapted this recipe after my friend Marilyn’s skillet potatoes. She slices the potatoes and adds them to a cast iron skillet with oil, diagnosis salt and pepper. Covers the pan and simmers, prescription tossing occasionally until tender. I use her method when cooking diced potatoes for breakfast; adding chopped onions and garlic. Tonight, I wanted something garlicky. I had some left over bacon that would pair nicely with a garlic butter sauce.

5 potatoes, sliced thick
2-3 slices bacon
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried dill weed
salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter
garlic powder

Cook the bacon in a skillet. Remove the bacon and add the garlic and potatoes. Cover and cook until tender. Add pepper, dill, garlic powder, butter and bacon.

Variations:
Sometimes I add 1/2 -1 cup water or broth and simmer. Simmer until the potatoes are done.
This is a recipe given to me by a friend Cheryl Wellman. I found the recipe great as is but another friend of mine suggests doubling the sauce.

6 pieces boneless, this site skinless chicken breast
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp Lawry’s season salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tsp Worchestershire sauce
1 can cream of chicken
Bacon

Oil a 9 X 13 casserole dish. Lay pieces of chicken in a pan. Combine sour cream, prescription soup, salt, pepper, and worchestershire sauce. Pour mixture over chicken. Layer 3 pieces of bacon on top. Cook uncovered at 375 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Just before chicken is done, cook one slice of bacon per chicken breast. Cook until almost crispy, but done. Wrap the bacon around chicken or lay on the plate and put chicken and sauce over it. Serve with rice.

Variations:
The recipe says you can cook the bacon with the chicken but it will take 3 hours at 350 and the bacon is not as crispy this way, but still good. I have not tried it. I have made bacon wrapped chicken before and I do not recall it taking 3 hours.
4 strips bacon
4 boneless pork loin chops (preferably 1-inch thick)
2 1/2 tsp dry barbecue seasoning
2 medium onions, clinic sliced 1/4-inch thick
1/2 cup barbecue sauce

Wrap a strip of bacon around the edges of each pork chop and secure with toothpicks; season on both sides with barbecue seasoning. Grill pork and onion over medium heat for 10 minutes, turning once. Transfer onion to a large piece of foil and top with barbecue sauce; seal foil, leaving room for air to circulate. Cook pork and onions for 10 minutes more or until pork is cooked through and onions are very soft. Top pork with cooked onions.

Source: Raley’s Something Extra
Here are two of my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipes. The first one produces thick gooey chocolate morsels while the bottom recipe results are thinner and crispy.

David Lebovitz: The Great Chocolate Chip Cookie
Source: The Great Book of Chocolate
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, viagra dosage cold, dosage cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
1 cup walnuts or pecans, toasted and chopped

Adjust the oven rack to the top 1/3 of the oven and preheat to 300F. Line three baking sheets with parchment paper.

Beat the sugars and butters together until smooth. Mix in the egg, vanilla, and baking soda. Stir together the flour and salt, then mix them into the batter. Mix in the chocolate chips and nuts.
Scoop the cookie dough into 2-tablespoon balls and place 8 balls, spaced 4 inches apart, on each of the baking sheets. Bake for 18 minutes, or until pale golden brown. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack. Store at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
Make about 20 cookies.

The River Cottage Chocolate Chip Cookies:
Source: The River Cottage Family Cookbook
3 1/2 ounces dark chocolate
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 tsp vanilla
1 cup flour, all-purpose or white pastry
1/2 tsp baking powder
a pinch of salt

Preheat the oven to 375. Line each baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper. Chop the chocolate into little chunks and set aside.

Heat the butter in a small saucepan on low until it has just melted. Meanwhile, add the sugars to a mixing bowl. Pour melted butter on top of the sugar and beat with a wooden spoon. Add the egg and vanilla; beat until well blended.

Sift the flour, powder and salt into the mixing bowl. Add the chopped chocolate.

Scoop by heaping tablespoonfuls on to the baking sheets two inches apart. (These cookies really spread out.) Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the cookies are just turning golden brown. Let sit on the baking sheets for a couple of minutes, then carefully transfer to a wire rack to cool.
Makes about 12 cookies

Alternatives:
I usually only have semi-sweet chocolate chips on hand instead of the 3 1/2 ounces dark chocolate.
This year it has been my quest to simplify our lives and home. I used to subscribe to the more playgroups the better school of thought; rationalizing my children needed to be among their peers. That has since changed as I feel we are each others peers.

Back when our oldest was born we were sucked into the toy mania bandwagon that proclaimed “Your child is this many months old, cheapest these toys are essential for his milestone development.” The instant Mason was bored we were off to the toy store for something new. Our obsession with buying toys was nothing compared to the hordes of toys given to him from relatives with good intentions. I like playing with the toys as much as any kid, drug but I am not running a toy store here. I am trying to raise a family and in the process I hope to instill in them good core values while having fun in the process. I confess I am a little relieved the majority of the toys were lost in the move. However, it did not take long for our collection to grow and our home to become overrun once again.

Before moving to a more rural area several years ago, we were used to the fast paced life offered by the city. After the birth of our first son, Stephen and I realized the city life was of no importance. We longed to raise our children in a more simplistic environment. We wanted trails to hike, woods to explore and streams to forge all in our own backyard. I had visions of our little family spending our days outdoors playing and working a garden surrounded by a variety of fruit trees. Mostly I wanted a simpler life with a close knit family. Thus the hunt for a more basic creative and simpler life began.

I have wonderful memories (I am sure at the time it was agony) of all my desires and passion set on a particular toy that my mom refused to buy no matter how enormous a tantrum I threw. Moreover, I remember the abundant joy that raced through my blood as the coveted toy was unveiled Christmas Morning. As a parent I relish giving the kids prizes. I also anguish over Mason’s lack of an attachment to even just one toy. The non birthday or holiday toy buying ceased in hopes that my children would come to discover gratitude for the things they already have. Periodically throughout the year when I am in the mood to purge I sort through the stash tossing anything broken or never played with and boxing up the rest to rotate in and out. Still the clutter was unmanageable. Something had to be done. The toys that managed to survive were in great condition but the question remained, did we really need them all?

As my search into simplistic and creative living ensued I stumbled upon the book “The Power of Play” by David Elkind. The book touches on the importance of letting kids play and the types of environments that inhibit and cultivate true unadulterated child’s play. The boxes of toys were chucked; the TV became obsolete as we spent the majority of our day outside exploring. Excited by the find, as the book was right on course in the direction I was headed, I relayed my delight to a friend of mine. At the mention of the words Montessori and Waldorf education, free play, and the subject of toys, my friend was ecstatic. She proceeded to explain her most recent discovery in the realm of creativity and simplicity.

Patty had just begun reading “The Creative Family” written by Amanda Blake Soule, a mother of three, with one on the way. Patty immediately thought of me when she came across an idea called the “Sound Wall”. (Which by the way was immediately instituted and deemed successful) I could not wait until Patty finished her copy of “The Creative Family.” So I went out and bought my own.

In the book The Creative Family, Amanda shares her discoveries as she taps into her own inner creative self. Thought to have zero creative talent, Amanda comes to realize creativity is not limited to the philosophies of art class 101. Inspired by her children’s innate ability to create, Amanda explores ways to connect with her family and foster gratitude for each other and for the wonderful bounties surrounding them. If you are looking for suggestions on how to make the most out of the time you spend with your family I highly recommend this book to steer you in the right direction. I was reminded of several traditions of our own. One such tradition was our holiday tree (in the book it is called a season tree) and game nights.

I came to the realization I need to delve into my creative psyche as much as the children do. Arts and crafts used to be something rare because I thought I had to have a project and I was never prepared. I have learned to use their art time as my preparation time. If there is a project I want to do with the kids, I work on it getting it all together while they are creating their own master pieces. We are all happy and filled. To find out more about Amanda visit her website site at soulemama.com.

This book review is well past due. I came to the realization a few weeks ago, viagra that after two weeks of toting the book around with me everywhere I went in the house it just might be that I am in love with the book. There is a cupboard in the kitchen that houses a myriad of cookbooks. There are a few that never see the light of day except when the cabinet door is open yet there they remain. Of the others there may be a recipe or two I use from time to time. The River Cottage Family Cookbook, viagra buy however is different. I have made the majority of the recipes in the book with pleasing results. If there is one cookbook that should belong in every family kitchen I would say The River Cottage Family Cookbook is that book.

I love simple. More often than not recipes comprised of a few ingredients often taste better than their more zealous rivals. I believe in allowing the natural flavor of an ingredient to emerge aided by rather than masked with intense spices and seasonings. Ellie Krieger is a prime example of cooking with the seasons, this however; as much as I enjoy her recipes they do not contain pantry staples, which to me common pantry staples constitutes simple.

The author has taken great pride in his knowledge of where our food comes from. Each chapter is divided by ingredient beginning with flour, then milk, eggs, vegetables and so on ending with chocolate. The author also discusses with great detail the history behind a particular ingredient and how it is used. While he tries to persuade the reader to search out farm fresh eggs and organic fruits and vegetables the common household will find the recipes tasty even if they are made with general supermarket ingredients. Many whole foods seasonal cooking books include recipes that use ingredients that are a little too gourmet for my taste, livers and the like, which is not the case with
The River Cottage Family Cookbook. This is one cookbook that is worth every penny spent.

Last year, what is ed I snagged a grill/panini press for a phenomenal $40.00. We have not pulled it out for a few months. I was surprised to hear Mason request a grilled sandwich for lunch a week ago. Since then, medications we have been heating up ham and turkey sandwiches everyday now. The adults, approved however, have had a little more fun with our panini sandwiches. I wanted to try using a couple of items I typically have on hand; english muffins and feta cheese. Feta and blue cheese are usually interchangeable and proved to be a nice substitute. Pair it up with some homemade sweet potato chips.

4 Soft sandwich rolls
1 1/3 cups chopped white meat rotisserie chicken
4 deli slices ham
3/4 cup crumbled clue cheese
1/2 cup ranch dressing

Preheat panini press. Place the roll bottoms on a work surface and top with the chicken and ham.
In a small bowl, mix the cheese and ranch dressing and spread on the roll top. Sandwich the two together and place in the panini press. Cook for 3-4 minutes. Serve with cut veggie sticks.

Variations:
Replace ham with crumbled bacon.
Use feta or Gorgonzola cheese.

Oriental Chicken Salad

The first time I had this salad was at my favorite Chinese restaurant, healing it has been so long ago the name has escaped my memory. A friend of mine used to order it all the time. It was off menu so if any one wanted one of course they had to ask for it. Their salad consisted of iceberg lettuce, cheap carrots, this red cabbage, fried wonton strips and peanuts with a peanut dressing. The dressing in my version actually came from an Asian Chicken Wrap recipe. It has worked so far but I get bored after a while and start hunting for something new.

I used to make my own crispy chicken until I discovered pre-made crispy chicken in the freezer section.  Bake for 10 minutes. By the time the chicken has cooked and cooled, the salad is ready and on the table. I cut the chicken into smaller bites and serve. As far as the salad itself goes, you can also use a broccoli slaw mix with your favorite lettuce or bagged greens, pre-made Asian salad dressing and grilled chicken

Oriental Chicken Salad toppings

Dressing:
1 tablespoons honey
4 tablespoons Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup Mayonnaise or plain yogurt
1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Blend ingredients well. Chill.

Salad: Use any combination
Romaine lettuce hearts
Napa and red cabbages
Baby spinach
1 carrot, chopped julienne
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
sliced almonds
crispy chow mein noodles
Mandarin Oranges

Crispy Chicken:
oil for frying
salt and pepper
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup panko flakes or corn flakes
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
Skinless boneless chicken breast fillets. cut into bit size pieces

In a small shallow bowl, combine flour with panko flakes, salt and pepper. In another bowl beat egg and milk. Dip chicken pieces into egg mixture then flour coating completely. Fry in heated oil until cooked through.

Mexican Tostadas

I have always loved spicy food. I thought I could handle heat that is until at Seventeen I traveled cross county to Texas. The salsa there was so hot my mouth was inflamed for the rest of the day. I dared not eat another lick of the stuff the remainder of my visit in Texas. Upon my return home I remained adverse to hot spicy foods for sometime. Years later I returned to Texas. It was there I learned from many friends how to cook some of my most favorite Mexican dishes. One evening at Mrs. Rodriguez house I learned to make Tostadas complete with homemade refried beans. There are so many ways to make frijoles refritos but to be honest I have no problem using a can of store bought refried beans. It is super quick and before you know it dinner is on the table. I do however, view enjoy making my own tortillas. Corn or flour can be used. Traditionally corn is the tortilla of choice but flour will work. The tortillas can be baked in the oven until crispy about 8 minutes on 375 degrees for a less fat version.

Serves 5-6
5-6 corn or flour tortillas
Vegetable oil
1 (15-ounce) can Refried beans
2 Romaine Lettuce Hearts or 1/2 head iceberg lettuce, viagra 40mg sliced thin
Shredded Cheddar or crumbled queso fresco or cotija cheese
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 avocado, chopped or guacamole
1 small onion, diced
1 cup of Salsa
1/2 cup sliced radishes
1/2 cup diced Red Pepper

Pour about 1/4 inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat on medium-high until oil sizzles when a drop of water or crumb is placed in pan. (Not smoking hot) The tortilla should sizzle and bubble up instantly after it is placed in the oil. Cook tortilla 30 seconds, until golden, on each side until firm and crisp. Drain on a paper towel. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

Meanwhile heat beans in a small pan. Stir in a little water, about 2-3 tablespoons stirring and mashing. Keep warm and moist.

To serve top tortilla with beans, lettuce, cilantro, a squeeze of lime juice, cheese and then any other desired toppings.

I adapted this recipe after my friend Marilyn’s skillet potatoes. She slices the potatoes and adds them to a cast iron skillet with oil, diagnosis salt and pepper. Covers the pan and simmers, prescription tossing occasionally until tender. I use her method when cooking diced potatoes for breakfast; adding chopped onions and garlic. Tonight, I wanted something garlicky. I had some left over bacon that would pair nicely with a garlic butter sauce.

5 potatoes, sliced thick
2-3 slices bacon
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried dill weed
salt and pepper
2 tbsp butter
garlic powder

Cook the bacon in a skillet. Remove the bacon and add the garlic and potatoes. Cover and cook until tender. Add pepper, dill, garlic powder, butter and bacon.

Variations:
Sometimes I add 1/2 -1 cup water or broth and simmer. Simmer until the potatoes are done.
This is a recipe given to me by a friend Cheryl Wellman. I found the recipe great as is but another friend of mine suggests doubling the sauce.

6 pieces boneless, this site skinless chicken breast
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp Lawry’s season salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tsp Worchestershire sauce
1 can cream of chicken
Bacon

Oil a 9 X 13 casserole dish. Lay pieces of chicken in a pan. Combine sour cream, prescription soup, salt, pepper, and worchestershire sauce. Pour mixture over chicken. Layer 3 pieces of bacon on top. Cook uncovered at 375 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Just before chicken is done, cook one slice of bacon per chicken breast. Cook until almost crispy, but done. Wrap the bacon around chicken or lay on the plate and put chicken and sauce over it. Serve with rice.

Variations:
The recipe says you can cook the bacon with the chicken but it will take 3 hours at 350 and the bacon is not as crispy this way, but still good. I have not tried it. I have made bacon wrapped chicken before and I do not recall it taking 3 hours.
4 strips bacon
4 boneless pork loin chops (preferably 1-inch thick)
2 1/2 tsp dry barbecue seasoning
2 medium onions, clinic sliced 1/4-inch thick
1/2 cup barbecue sauce

Wrap a strip of bacon around the edges of each pork chop and secure with toothpicks; season on both sides with barbecue seasoning. Grill pork and onion over medium heat for 10 minutes, turning once. Transfer onion to a large piece of foil and top with barbecue sauce; seal foil, leaving room for air to circulate. Cook pork and onions for 10 minutes more or until pork is cooked through and onions are very soft. Top pork with cooked onions.

Source: Raley’s Something Extra
Here are two of my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipes. The first one produces thick gooey chocolate morsels while the bottom recipe results are thinner and crispy.

David Lebovitz: The Great Chocolate Chip Cookie
Source: The Great Book of Chocolate
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, viagra dosage cold, dosage cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
1 cup walnuts or pecans, toasted and chopped

Adjust the oven rack to the top 1/3 of the oven and preheat to 300F. Line three baking sheets with parchment paper.

Beat the sugars and butters together until smooth. Mix in the egg, vanilla, and baking soda. Stir together the flour and salt, then mix them into the batter. Mix in the chocolate chips and nuts.
Scoop the cookie dough into 2-tablespoon balls and place 8 balls, spaced 4 inches apart, on each of the baking sheets. Bake for 18 minutes, or until pale golden brown. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack. Store at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
Make about 20 cookies.

The River Cottage Chocolate Chip Cookies:
Source: The River Cottage Family Cookbook
3 1/2 ounces dark chocolate
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 egg
2 tsp vanilla
1 cup flour, all-purpose or white pastry
1/2 tsp baking powder
a pinch of salt

Preheat the oven to 375. Line each baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper. Chop the chocolate into little chunks and set aside.

Heat the butter in a small saucepan on low until it has just melted. Meanwhile, add the sugars to a mixing bowl. Pour melted butter on top of the sugar and beat with a wooden spoon. Add the egg and vanilla; beat until well blended.

Sift the flour, powder and salt into the mixing bowl. Add the chopped chocolate.

Scoop by heaping tablespoonfuls on to the baking sheets two inches apart. (These cookies really spread out.) Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the cookies are just turning golden brown. Let sit on the baking sheets for a couple of minutes, then carefully transfer to a wire rack to cool.
Makes about 12 cookies

Alternatives:
I usually only have semi-sweet chocolate chips on hand instead of the 3 1/2 ounces dark chocolate.
This year it has been my quest to simplify our lives and home. I used to subscribe to the more playgroups the better school of thought; rationalizing my children needed to be among their peers. That has since changed as I feel we are each others peers.

Back when our oldest was born we were sucked into the toy mania bandwagon that proclaimed “Your child is this many months old, cheapest these toys are essential for his milestone development.” The instant Mason was bored we were off to the toy store for something new. Our obsession with buying toys was nothing compared to the hordes of toys given to him from relatives with good intentions. I like playing with the toys as much as any kid, drug but I am not running a toy store here. I am trying to raise a family and in the process I hope to instill in them good core values while having fun in the process. I confess I am a little relieved the majority of the toys were lost in the move. However, it did not take long for our collection to grow and our home to become overrun once again.

Before moving to a more rural area several years ago, we were used to the fast paced life offered by the city. After the birth of our first son, Stephen and I realized the city life was of no importance. We longed to raise our children in a more simplistic environment. We wanted trails to hike, woods to explore and streams to forge all in our own backyard. I had visions of our little family spending our days outdoors playing and working a garden surrounded by a variety of fruit trees. Mostly I wanted a simpler life with a close knit family. Thus the hunt for a more basic creative and simpler life began.

I have wonderful memories (I am sure at the time it was agony) of all my desires and passion set on a particular toy that my mom refused to buy no matter how enormous a tantrum I threw. Moreover, I remember the abundant joy that raced through my blood as the coveted toy was unveiled Christmas Morning. As a parent I relish giving the kids prizes. I also anguish over Mason’s lack of an attachment to even just one toy. The non birthday or holiday toy buying ceased in hopes that my children would come to discover gratitude for the things they already have. Periodically throughout the year when I am in the mood to purge I sort through the stash tossing anything broken or never played with and boxing up the rest to rotate in and out. Still the clutter was unmanageable. Something had to be done. The toys that managed to survive were in great condition but the question remained, did we really need them all?

As my search into simplistic and creative living ensued I stumbled upon the book “The Power of Play” by David Elkind. The book touches on the importance of letting kids play and the types of environments that inhibit and cultivate true unadulterated child’s play. The boxes of toys were chucked; the TV became obsolete as we spent the majority of our day outside exploring. Excited by the find, as the book was right on course in the direction I was headed, I relayed my delight to a friend of mine. At the mention of the words Montessori and Waldorf education, free play, and the subject of toys, my friend was ecstatic. She proceeded to explain her most recent discovery in the realm of creativity and simplicity.

Patty had just begun reading “The Creative Family” written by Amanda Blake Soule, a mother of three, with one on the way. Patty immediately thought of me when she came across an idea called the “Sound Wall”. (Which by the way was immediately instituted and deemed successful) I could not wait until Patty finished her copy of “The Creative Family.” So I went out and bought my own.

In the book The Creative Family, Amanda shares her discoveries as she taps into her own inner creative self. Thought to have zero creative talent, Amanda comes to realize creativity is not limited to the philosophies of art class 101. Inspired by her children’s innate ability to create, Amanda explores ways to connect with her family and foster gratitude for each other and for the wonderful bounties surrounding them. If you are looking for suggestions on how to make the most out of the time you spend with your family I highly recommend this book to steer you in the right direction. I was reminded of several traditions of our own. One such tradition was our holiday tree (in the book it is called a season tree) and game nights.

I came to the realization I need to delve into my creative psyche as much as the children do. Arts and crafts used to be something rare because I thought I had to have a project and I was never prepared. I have learned to use their art time as my preparation time. If there is a project I want to do with the kids, I work on it getting it all together while they are creating their own master pieces. We are all happy and filled. To find out more about Amanda visit her website site at soulemama.com.

This book review is well past due. I came to the realization a few weeks ago, viagra that after two weeks of toting the book around with me everywhere I went in the house it just might be that I am in love with the book. There is a cupboard in the kitchen that houses a myriad of cookbooks. There are a few that never see the light of day except when the cabinet door is open yet there they remain. Of the others there may be a recipe or two I use from time to time. The River Cottage Family Cookbook, viagra buy however is different. I have made the majority of the recipes in the book with pleasing results. If there is one cookbook that should belong in every family kitchen I would say The River Cottage Family Cookbook is that book.

I love simple. More often than not recipes comprised of a few ingredients often taste better than their more zealous rivals. I believe in allowing the natural flavor of an ingredient to emerge aided by rather than masked with intense spices and seasonings. Ellie Krieger is a prime example of cooking with the seasons, this however; as much as I enjoy her recipes they do not contain pantry staples, which to me common pantry staples constitutes simple.

The author has taken great pride in his knowledge of where our food comes from. Each chapter is divided by ingredient beginning with flour, then milk, eggs, vegetables and so on ending with chocolate. The author also discusses with great detail the history behind a particular ingredient and how it is used. While he tries to persuade the reader to search out farm fresh eggs and organic fruits and vegetables the common household will find the recipes tasty even if they are made with general supermarket ingredients. Many whole foods seasonal cooking books include recipes that use ingredients that are a little too gourmet for my taste, livers and the like, which is not the case with
The River Cottage Family Cookbook. This is one cookbook that is worth every penny spent.
Make it Simple:
The idea of once a month cooking is to simplify life. If a month sounds too overwhelming start small. Try once a week cooking, visit web gradually adding more meals as you become acclimated. Trouble finding the time? Hire a baby sitter, seek cook in smaller amounts during the day, stuff double favorite recipes and freeze the excess, cook with a friend.

Meal Planning:
A few days before the beginning of the month begin assembling a menu for the month. I am a list person. On my menu I like to write down the name of the recipe, where to find the recipe (including the page number if it is in a book). My sister Allison uses recipe cards she pulls out and keeps together for reference. Choose 6-14 recipes. This number is based on the probability of eating a particular dish several times throughout the month. My sister-n-law Natalie has three monthly menus she rotates. She gets the kids involved in planning the menu by having them choose a few of their favorite recipes. Or designate one day out of the week to each child and let them come up with the menu for that day.

Now that the menu is in order it is time to compile a shopping list. Go through each recipe to determine how much of each ingredient is needed. Factor in how many times a particular recipe will be used that month. (If using a OMC recipe the amount should already be calculated for 4-6 meals) Other products to include on the list may include freezer bags-gallon and quart, freezer wrap, aluminum foil and aluminum baking pans (optional).

Grocery Shopping:
Utilize the weekly sales flyer to plan meals around sale items for maximum savings. To get the most for your money shop around for the best deals and consider buying in bulk from a warehouse. Warehouses tend to have the best deals on spices, meats, dairy and bread. Use store circulars to compare prices on fruits and vegetables.

Plan to go shopping on a day when you will not be rushed. Hire a babysitter or trade babysitting with a friend. Give your self time to frequent several stores to get the best prices.

Once the food is home take care of your purchases. My sister uses shopping day to separate and bag the raw meat by quantity per recipe or sauce. She freezes chicken or beef in marinades to be used in simple dishes. She does not cook anything on shopping day. Some once a month veterans shop and cook on the same day.

Cooking Day:
At home divide the meat for each meal into bags. Add a sauce or marinade if needed to the bag. My sister puts the rest of the groceries away then goes through the recipe cards and organizes them by meat or sauce- chicken, beef and tomato. Then she picks the meals she wants to make that week. Instead of making every meal at once she prepares according to what is on the menu that night. If it is a tomato sauce night, she doubles the recipe to make sauce for general purposes and then makes other tomato based dishes to freeze. When beef or chicken is on the menu she checks her recipe cards for other meals that have the same basic flavoring and doubles the meat to assemble the other recipes. Add garlic and onion to beef for an Italian flavor. Add chili power the next night for tacos and an egg with oatmeal for meatloaf the following night. Double each meal then freeze.

Freeze your Meals:
Once your meals are cool, find a place for them in them in the freezer. Label all meals with the name of the meal, cooking instructions and the date it was frozen.

Freezer Bags – The bags spread out flat and they stack up nicely on top of each other taking less space. Pour cooled liquid such as soups and sauces into freezer bags and lay flat on a shelf in the freezer. For casseroles, freeze in the pan then pop out and store in a freezer bag. Remember to remove as much air as possible from the bag to prevent freezer burn.

Foil Pans or Freezer Containers – For casseroles such as lasagna or enchiladas, put a layer of plastic wrap on top of the food then cover with foil. Make sure that you use enough wrap to cover over the entire top of the dish.

Vacuum Sealer – These are great because they help to protect your food from freezer burn allowing the food to stay really fresh tasting. Never seal liquids unless they have been frozen first. Same goes for raw meat. The suction can cause the juices to enter the sealer and damage the unit.

Recipe Links:
pammshouse
bakingdelights
christysclipart

Cooking Tips:
– Do not freeze pasta in sauces or soup. It turns mushy (I learned that the hard way). Grains such as barley may be added after the soup cools. Use fresh beans cooked until slightly tender. Canned and over cooked beans turn to mush in the freezer.

– I have tried freezing raw potatoes, not a good idea. They do say however mashed potatoes are fine to freeze.

– I read once it was not a good idea to free meals with cream of soup in them but every recipe labeled OMC pretty much has some cream of soup in it. I am guessing it must be ok.

– Use marinades for raw meat.

– Cooked meat has a shorter life span in the freezer than raw.
Never refreeze meat. That includes cooked meat that was once frozen.

Mom’s Coconut Cake

Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
My kids love it when I put out the muffin pan filled with fun snacks. They think we are having a party.

Set out a large bowl of popcorn. Fill smaller bowls, cheapest muffin pans or mini loaf pans with various snacks such as the ones listed.

Nuts and seeds
Crackers
Cereal
Pretzel
Dried fruit
cheese
Chocolate chips
Spices: Cinnamon, and brown sugar, viagra nutmeg, Cajun seasoning, garlic,

Give the kids bowls, bags or ice cream cones to fill with their favorite snacks.

Popping popcorn on the stove top: pour about three tablespoons of vegetable oil (don’t use butter, it will burn) in a large pot. heat the oil over medium heat. To test if the oil is hot enough drop a single kernel in the pot and cover allowing steam to escape. If it sizzles and pops right away it is ready. Pour 1/2 cup (enough to cover the bottom of the pot, a single layer). Cover and shake to evenly spread the oil. When the popping begins to slow to a few seconds apart, remove the pan from the stove. Season to taste.

Zucchini

There are so many recipes for banana bread and zucchini bread it is enough to make the head spin trying to decided which one is going to turn out right. So I have a couple of recipes for you to try. One is a traditional zucchini bread with a hint of cinnamon. The other combines sweet potatoes with an assortment of spices.

Zucchini Sweet Potato Bread
Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, tadalafil November 1992
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup grated zucchini
1 1/2 cup peeled and grated sweet potato
1 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter and flour a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan and set aside.

Sift the first 7 ingredients into a medium sized bowl. In a separate, more about large bowl, ambulance beat the sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla extract. Mix in the zucchini and sweet potato. Add the dry ingredients and stir just to combine. Fold in the nuts and cranberries and stir well.

Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Cool bread in pan on a rack for 15 minutes. Loosen the edges of the bread with a butter knife and turn out on a rack to cool completely. Can be prepared 1 day in advance. Wrap in foil and keep at room temperature.

Variations: By Joy the Baker
-The nutmeg and the cloves are optional.
-For less fat use 1/2 cup oil and 1/4 cup apple sauce in place of the 3/4 cup oil.
-Use 1 cup granulated sugar and 1 cup brown sugar.
-Replace the 2 cups flour with 1 cup all-purpose and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Zucchini Bread
Classic Zucchini Bread
Source: Coconut & Lime
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp baking powder
3 eggs, room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 2 and 1/2 medium sized)
2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Stir flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl.

Beat eggs separately and add sugar until fluffy. Fold egg mixture into dry ingredients. Add oil, shredded zucchini and vanilla. Mix thoroughly.
Divide batter into two greased loaf pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool on rack, then remove from pan and continue cooling on rack.

For muffins, bake for about 15-20 minutes.
My kids love it when I put out the muffin pan filled with fun snacks. They think we are having a party.

Set out a large bowl of popcorn. Fill smaller bowls, cheapest muffin pans or mini loaf pans with various snacks such as the ones listed.

Nuts and seeds
Crackers
Cereal
Pretzel
Dried fruit
cheese
Chocolate chips
Spices: Cinnamon, and brown sugar, viagra nutmeg, Cajun seasoning, garlic,

Give the kids bowls, bags or ice cream cones to fill with their favorite snacks.

Popping popcorn on the stove top: pour about three tablespoons of vegetable oil (don’t use butter, it will burn) in a large pot. heat the oil over medium heat. To test if the oil is hot enough drop a single kernel in the pot and cover allowing steam to escape. If it sizzles and pops right away it is ready. Pour 1/2 cup (enough to cover the bottom of the pot, a single layer). Cover and shake to evenly spread the oil. When the popping begins to slow to a few seconds apart, remove the pan from the stove. Season to taste.

One of our Christmas traditions has been to rush out a batch of sugar cookies for Santa and a basket of nibbles for the reindeer all last minute. Then we rush the kids up stairs and wait for a scream of delight when they spy a wrapped present on their bed. Faster than you can say eggnog the boxes are ripped open to reveal the first gift of Christmas- Pajamas.

I thought of my sister-n-law who continued a family tradition of serving scrumptious cinnamon rolls and hot chocolate every Christmas Eve. Ever since I saw the doughnut pan in the Pottery Barn holiday catalog last year I have been dreaming of doughnuts and hot chocolate on Christmas Eve. And if we once again forget to make Santa’s cookies until last minute, cheapest I am sure he would not mind a oh so yummy chocolate glazed doughnut with sprinkles.

Makes 1 dozen doughnuts
1 (1/4-oz) package active dry yeast (2 1/2 teaspoons)
2 tablespoons warm water (105–115°F)
3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour plus additional for sprinkling and rolling out dough
1 cup whole milk at room temperature
1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, discount softened
3 large egg yolks
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
About 10 cups vegetable oil for deep frying

Stir together yeast and warm water in a small bowl until yeast is dissolved. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. (If yeast doesn’t foam, discard and start over with new yeast.)

Mix together flour, milk, butter, yolks, sugar, salt, cinnamon, and yeast mixture in mixer at low speed until a soft dough forms. Increase speed to medium-high and beat 3 minutes more. Scrape dough down side of bowl (all around) into center, then sprinkle lightly with flour (to keep a crust from forming). Cover bowl with a clean kitchen towel (not terry cloth) and let dough rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until doubled in bulk, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. (Alternatively, let dough rise in bowl in refrigerator 8 to 12 hours.)

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and roll out with a lightly floured rolling pin into a 12-inch round (1/2 inch thick). Cut out as many rounds as possible with 3-inch cutter, then cut a hole in center of each round with 1-inch cutter and transfer doughnuts to a lightly floured large baking sheet. Cover doughnuts with a clean kitchen towel and let rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until slightly puffed, about 30 minutes (45 minutes if dough was cold when cutting out doughnuts). Do not re-roll scraps.

Heat 2 1/2 inches oil in a deep 4-quart heavy pot until it registers 350°F on thermometer. Fry doughnuts, 2 at a time, turning occasionally with a wire or mesh skimmer or a slotted spoon, until puffed and golden brown, about 2 minutes per batch. Transfer to paper towels to drain. (Return oil to 350°F between batches.) I also fried the doughnut holes for about 1 minute and them tossed them in powdered sugar and cinnamon sugar straight out of the hot grease.

Source: Gourmet, December 2006

Chocolate Glaze: This is enough glaze for a double batch of doughnuts!
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/4 cup whole milk, warmed
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped
2 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted

Combine butter, milk, corn syrup, and vanilla in medium saucepan and heat over medium heat until butter is melted. Decrease the heat to low, add the chocolate, and whisk until melted. Turn off heat, add the powdered sugar, and whisk until smooth. Place the mixture over a bowl of warm water and dip the doughnuts immediately. Allow glaze to set for 30 minutes before serving. Recipe from Alton Brown.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

This recipe comes from a woman I met in Baybrook Texas. I wish I could remember her name because she really deserves the recognition. She is one of those die hard Christmas bakers but her goodies are the ones you look forward to all year. I have tried other versions of the pumpkin roll but Stephen and I agree we like taste and texture of this version best. So, more about the pumpkin roll has become a regular at our Thanksgiving table.

Many of my friends comment on how intimidated they are of making a rolled cake. It looks pretty daunting but is actually as simple as cutting and frosting a layer cake. I felt the same way before I made my first one. May I side with GI-Joe when I say knowing is half the battle. There is not that much batter, which has made a few people nervous. The cake is supposed to be thin so that it can be rolled up. There are two ways to roll the cake. I was taught to roll the cake with the short side facing me rolling short side toward the other shorts side. Last year I made a different recipe with a friend and she rolled it with the longest side towards her rolling longest side to long side. The only difference I could tell is the way my friend does it produces a much longer roll which means more to go around but they pieces are thinner and smaller. I prefer the denser version of rolling it into a shorter loaf.

Cake:
1 cup sugar
2/3 cups pumpkin
3 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 cups flour
1 tsp cinnamon

Filling:
1 (8 oz) pkg cream cheese
2 tbsp butter, softened
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 375. Spray a jelly roll pan with cooking spray or lightly spritz with water. This is to hold the waxed paper in place. Then line the pan with waxed or parchment paper. Spray the paper with cooking spray.
Combine the sugar, pumpkin and eggs; mix well. Add the soda, salt, flour and cinnamon; mix well.

Spread the batter in pan evenly. Bake 14-18 minutes. (Do Not Over Bake). Cover the pan with a clean dry dish towel then top with a wire cooling rack. Immediately invert pan onto hand/dish towel.

Peel off paper. With the long side in front of you, roll the cake up in the towel. Let cool rolled up.

Combine filling ingredients, mixing well. Unroll the cake, remove the towel, spread filling evenly. Roll cake back up (without the towel), wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

I cannot remember where I found this but it is a fun little treat to make with the kids.

1 packet of orange jello
4 oranges

Make up orange jello according to the packet instructions. Set aside for 20 minutes to cool.
Slice oranges in half and scoop out the flesh, symptoms cialis 40mg using a small knife or spoon. Fill the orange cavities with cooled jello. Place the orange halves, upright, on a tray. Refrigerate for 3 hours or until set.

A few years ago I went on a quest to dig up recipes from the early 1900’s. I was curious to know what types of meals they prepared at the time while living on a strict budget with limited convinences. Timbale was one of the few that intriqued me the most. Surprisingly I discovered that by mid-18thC people were becoming concerned about the added calorie count of baking in crusts and were looking for alternative ways of cooking without having to eat the container.

A timbale is sort of like an eggy souffle or custard that can be made using a variety of ingredients, malady including the classic timbale of spinach, rx mushrooms, onions, and breadcrumbs in addition to other types of meats, grains and vegetables. Timbale is usually prepared in individual ramekins cooked partially submerged in a tray of water. The steam created by the water aids in helping the custard to set. Timbale may be served hot or cold in individual ramekins or plated and dressed with a sauce.

I thought I would include the classic version of a Timbale in addition to a more modern flavorful recipe from one of my favorite chef’s Michael Chiarello of Napa Valley.

Chicken Timbale
Source: Unknown – Budget saver meal from the late 1930’s
1 1/2 cups cooked rice
1 1/2 cups diced cooked chicken
1 cup milk
2 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup chicken broth
1 tbsp finely diced onion
1 tsp salt
ground black pepper

Mix all ingredients together. Divide mixture among custard cups or individual baking dishes.

Place cups in pan of very hot water and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center of timbale comes out clean.

Variations:
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti, or noodles may be substituted for the cooked rice,
Cooked ham, pork, turkey, fish, or rabbit may be used in place of the chicken. If you have less than the 1 1/2 cups of chicken (or other meat) the recipe calls for, stretch the meat with sliced hard cooked eggs and cooked peas.

**When serving to little kids limit the heat by using mild Italian Sausage in the filling and 1 jalapeno pepper in the sauce.
Pastina Timbale
Source: Michael Chiarello
Salt
1 tbsp unsalted butter
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 pound spicy Italian sausage links, boiled for 6 minutes and cut into bite-size pieces
2 tsp minced garlic
1 cup fresh bread crumbs
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 pound pastina (tiny pasta)
Pastina Timbale Sauce, recipe follows

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Brush 8 (12-ounce) ramekins or 1 large oven-safe bowl with butter and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan and saute sausage until browned.

Meanwhile, combine 2 tablespoons of the oil and the minced garlic in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook until the garlic is light brown, about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the bread crumbs to the skillet and stir them every minute for 3 to 5 minutes until the crumbs are lightly toasted. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup of the parsley and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Cook for 30 seconds. Pour the bread crumb mixture into the prepared ramekins or bowl and press around the sides to line with the bread crumb mixture, using your fingers to evenly distribute it along the bottom and up the sides.

While the Pastina Timbale Sauce is simmering, cook the pastina in the boiling salted water until just shy of al dente, about 9 minutes. Drain the pastina in a colander. Reheat the sauce, if needed, and add the drained pastina and then the browned sausage. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of parsley, and remaining 3/4 cup Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir to combine. Transfer the pastina mixture to the lined ramekins (1 1/4 cups per ramekin) or large bowl. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Invert the molded pastina timbale onto warmed individual serving plates, and serve.

Pastina Timbale Sauce:
3 pounds canned diced tomatoes, drained
2 jalapeno chiles
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup minced onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano leaves
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp Gorgonzola
1 small jar roasted peppers, julienned (about 1 cup)
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a bowl, toss tomatoes and whole jalapeno chiles with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place tomato mixture on a cookie sheet and roast in oven for 15 or 20 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove from heat and finely chop the tomatoes. Transfer tomato pulp and any juices from the cutting board to a bowl. Chop the chiles and taste to determine their heat.

Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat until hot. Add the onion, season with salt, and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and oregano and stir. Add the chiles and simmer for another minute, only adding as much jalapeno as you want for spice. Add the tomatoes and their juice and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir in the Gorgonzola. Stir in the roasted peppers and the parsley. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Keep warm until ready to serve.
I hate it when I am ready to cook something then discover I am missing an ingredient. So glad there are clever people out there who have figured out a few substitutions. Beware of substitutions though. I made the chili powder for my chili once and it turned out really spicy. Some substitutes you cannot even tell a difference but others will alter the taste and texture. It is of course always best to use the real deal.

Allspice: 1 tsp ground allspice = approximately 5 whole berries.

Allspice: 1/4 tsp cinnamon + 1/2 tsp ground cloves + 1/4 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Anise Seed: 3-4 Anise Stars = 1/2 teaspoon.

Apple Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Arrowroot: 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour = 2 teaspoons.

Baking Powder: 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar = 1 tsp.

Baking Soda: 2 tsp double-acting baking powder + replace acidic liquid ingredient in recipe with non-acidic liquid = 1 teaspoon.

Balsamic Vinegar: Equal amount of sherry or cider vinegar.

Bread Crumbs:  3/4 cup cracker crumbs = 1 cup.

Brown Sugar: 1 tbsp light molasses + enough sugar to fill 1 dry measure cup or 1 cup raw sugar = 1 cup.

Butter: salted- 1 cup or 2 sticks unsalted butter + 1/4 tsp salt OR 1 cup margarine OR 7/8 cup lard OR vegetable shortening.

Buttermilk: Place 1 tbsp white vinegar or lemon juice in a liquid measuring cup. Fill to 1 cup with room temp whole or 2% milk and let stand for 5 minutes OR 1 cup milk + 3/4 tsp cream of tartar OR 1 cup plain yogurt.

Chili Powder: 1 tsp paprika + 2 tsp ground cumin + 1 tsp cayenne pepper + 1 tsp oregano + 2 tsp garlic powder.

Chocolate: Bittersweet or Semi-Sweet (1 oz.)  = 1/2 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar.

Cocoa Powder: 3 Tbsp. Dutch-processed = 1 oz. Unsweetened chocolate + 1/8 tsp. baking soda + reduce fat in recipe by 1 tbsp OR 3 tbsp natural cocoa powder + 1/8 tsp. baking soda.

Corn Starch: (as a thickener) Equal amount of Minute Tapioca for cornstarch, no rx use slightly less for flour or Arrowroot.

Cream of Tartar: 1/2 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice = 1/2 teaspoon.

Egg: 1 large egg =  3-1/2 tbsp thawed frozen egg or egg substitute OR 2 egg whites.

Garlic: 1 clove = 1/8 tsp Garlic Powder OR 1/4 tsp dried minced garlic.

Ginger, Fresh: 1 tsp ground ginger + 1/4 tsp white pepper + 1/2 tsp lemon juice OR 1 tbsp minced crystallized ginger with the sugar washed off = 1 tbsp grated.

Gingerroot:  1/8 tsp ground ginger powder OR 1 tbsp rinsed and chopped candied ginger = 1 tbsp minced.

Half & Half: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/2 tbsp butter or margarine + enough milk to equal 1 cup.

Heavy Cream: (1 cup) for cooking or baking 3/4 cup milk + 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Herbs, Fresh: (three times the amount of dried) 1 Tbsp = 1 tsp dried herbs OR 1/4 tsp powdered herbs.

Honey: 1 cup for cooking or baking- 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of liquid appropriate for recipe.

Italian Seasoning: 1/2 tsp dried basil + 1/4 tsp dried oregano + 1/4 tsp dried thyme = 1 teaspoon.

Molasses: 1 cup honey OR 1 cup dark corn syrup OR 3/4 cup light or dark brown sugar , dissolved in 1/4 cup liquid = 1 cup.

Juniper Berries: 2 bay leaves + 1 tsp caraway seeds + 1 chopped mint leaf = 6 to 10 crushed.

Mushrooms, fresh:  1 cup sliced and cooked = 1 can (4 oz.) mushrooms, drained.

Mustard, Dry: 1 tbsp prepared mustard = 1 teaspoon.

Mustard, Prepared:  1/2 tsp dry mustard powder + 2 tsp white vinegar =1 tablespoons.

Oil: Canola, Sunflower and Vegetable Oils, Substitute one for one.

Onion, Chopped: Small- 1 tsp onion powder or 1 tbsp minced onion. Medium- 1 tbsp onion powder.

Onion, Minced: 1 small minced = 1/2 tsp onion powder.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp nutmeg + 1/8 tsp cardamom = 1 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Pie Spice: 1/2 tsp cinnamon + 1/4 tsp ground ginger + 1/8 tsp allspice + 1/8 tsp nutmeg = 1 teaspoon.

Poultry Seasoning:  1/4 tsp ground thyme + 3/4 tsp ground sage = 1 teaspoon.

Sour Cream:  1 cup plain yogurt or 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough evaporated milk to equal 1 cup.

Tomato Juice: 1/2 cup tomato sauce + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Tomato Sauce: 1/2 cup tomato paste or puree + 1/2 cup water = 1 cup for cooking.

Wine, Red: Nonalcoholic wine, apple cider, beef broth or water.

Wine, White:  Nonalcoholic wine, white grape juice, apple juice, chicken broth or water.

Yogurt: 1 cup buttermilk OR 1 tbsp lemon juice and enough milk to equal 1 cup OR 1 cup sour cream.

Source: about.com
This dish became a household favorite growing up. We all went crazy when mom made her meat stuffed shells. As for the sauce, web I think each of us has made our own rendition. The key to the sauce is cooking it all day and using the freshest ingredients. The measurements for the herbs are for dried herbs. If using fresh use three times as much.

Many people use ricotta or cottage cheese (cottage cheese is definitely healthier) in their shells but I grew up with the cream cheese and therefore prefer it better. I tried making stuffed shells once with doctored store bought sauce when I was in a hurry. But never again; it does not taste the same. To be honest it was horrible.

Time: about 4 hours or more
Sauce:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 large onion, check chopped
4-5 cloves garlic, order minced
1 tbsp oregano
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 tsp salt, to taste
1/4 tsp pepper
1 medium green pepper, chopped
7-8 Cremini mushrooms, sliced or 1 small can sliced mushrooms
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste, plus water
1 (29 oz) can tomato puree, plus water or 2 boxes of Pomo
1 (29 oz) can tomato sauce, plus water
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
1 (4 oz) can tomato paste

Filling:
1 pound mild Italian sausage, casings removed
1 pound ground beef
1 (8oz) cream cheese
1 bag Italian cheese blend (Parmesan, Romano and Mozzarella cheeses, shredded)
1 box large shell pasta

Sauté onion and garlic in oil. Add green pepper, mushrooms and spices. Add paste, plus one can of water. Add Puree, plus one can of water. Simmer, stirring occasionally, all day or at least 2 hours.

Boil Shells until chewy-not too soft. Drain, place on towel.

Meanwhile, in a skillet, brown sausage and beef. Mix in cream cheese and a little sauce. In a baking pan put a little sauce in the bottom of pan, fill shells with meat mixture, place in pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with more sauce and cheese. Bake 350° 30-40 min.

This recipe will make enough for 1 13×9 pan in addition to 2 8×8 square pans. To freeze make pans as directed, cover with plastic wrap and foil and freeze. Thaw before baking. Cover with tin foil and bake 30-50 minutes. Remove the tin foil the last 15 minutes to brown the cheese. Bake until bubbly and center is hot.

Variations:
Add 1 carrot, julienne, chopped or diced. 1/2 zucchini, shredded or chopped. Sometimes I use a variety of bell peppers in the place of the green bell pepper.
My sister adds cook wheat berries to her sauce to add extra fiber.
Try adding 1/2 to 1 cup grape or apple juice in the place of water.
Asian noodle stir-fry is one of several inexpensive recipes I came up with using Top Ramen. It is definitely a recipe that can be played around with. Omit the Top Ramen for rice and chicken broth. The broth in the recipe is made with pasta water and the season packet. Sometimes I eat mine on a bed of steamed cabbage instead of noodles.

1 tbsp oil
2 cups chopped chicken or beef
two pkgs top ramen
1 cup broth, ed
1 small onion, ed sliced
1 cup broccoli chopped
1 carrot, story chopped jullian
1 celery stick, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 tbsp cornstarch
2 tbsp soy sauce

Boil noodles. Use one cup of the pasta water and one season packet to make the broth.
Combine cornstarch and 3 tbsp broth.
Cook meat in oil and soy sauce. Remove. Saute veggies in butter. Add broth and cornstarch mixture. Add meat and noodles.

Chicken Enchiladas with red sauce

I learned how to make enchiladas from Dora Osoria in Baybrook Texas. I took the method of making enchiladas from Dora and adapted the Red Enchilada Sauce from Allrecipes.

Earlier this year we went to a local Mexican restaurant where Stephen ordered his usual enchilada. This time what the waitress gave him did not look like an enchilada at all. The waitress explained it was a stacked enchilada. Cooks faster. Pretty clever.

Serving Size 6-8
Chicken:
4 large chicken breast
1 cup broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or salt and pepper to season
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, viagra chopped

Place chicken in a large skillet. Add broth, cumin, lime juice, thyme, oregano, and salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook until almost no longer pink about 10 to 20 minutes. Shred, toss with cilantro, and put aside.

***Meanwhile, prepare the enchilada sauce (recipe follows).***

Enchiladas:
Cheese, Mexican blend or shredded cheddar and Monterey (about 1 pound)
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Preheat oven to 350.

Pour a little enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 inch baking dish, enough to cover the bottom. Lay a tortilla in sauce, flip. Place on a working surface, sprinkle with cheese and shredded chicken. Fold the top, bottom, then sides and place in dish. Once pan is full (about 6 to 8 enchiladas) drizzle sauce over enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake 30 minutes; until cheese is melted and golden brown.

Enchilada Sauce:
Source: AllRecipes
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

My daughter and I have been reading the Little House books together each night before bed. I enjoy most their methods for repurposing every little bit. I doubt I will be making hog head cheese anytime soon. However, doctor I do boil the chicken carcass for broth and I save the juices from the roast to flavor stew. I have also been known to save bacon grease. A tip my Great Aunt Ruth taught me. As for shining my shoes with it, try like Pa with his bear lard, I think there is a limit to my resourcefulness.

We have a freezer in the garage. It has served us well over the years. In the summer I like to stock up on fresh berries and vegetables. There were packages of meat bought on sale and pans and bags of sauces and casseroles. The last time I had to dump food because the power had been off due to a tripped switch I decided enough is enough. I had just stocked up on meat for two months too. $60.00 now lay at the bottom of a garbage can. Stephen despises leftovers; so, now I usually scale the recipe down or transpose it into something else. Like turning left over chicken soup into chicken potpie, enchiladas, or tortilla soup.

The ingredients used in these enchiladas can easily be doubled and frozen or transformed into another dish. This week I was able to turn shredded beef enchiladas into beef stew, pasta with spaghetti sauce and roasted vegetables, chicken parmesan with steamed broccoli, and beef quesadillas.

The beef may be salvaged from a left over Sunday dinner roast. Season with a pinch each of the spice rub to flavor. Reserve the pan juices for the stew.

For the tomato sauce mix a 28-oz can of tomato sauce, an 8-oz can of tomato paste and a 14.5-oz can of diced tomatoes together. Take out the amount called for in the recipe for the enchilada sauce then save the rest for spaghetti or chicken parmesan the next night. Heat some oil in a pot. Add half an onion- chopped , 4 cloves garlic- chopped, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, 1 teaspoon dried thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of black pepper; cooking until onions are tender. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at least 2 hours.

Four days of meals. I think Ma and Pa would be proud.

*On a side note the spice rub for the shredded beef is my go to taco seasoning recipe. I quit buying taco seasoning and just use this. For tacos I mix the quantity as stated but only use a tablespoon or two. Smart & Final is a restaurant supply grocery store here in the area. They have huge containers of dried herbs for half the price of the little glass jars at the supermarket.

Enchiladas:
Shredded Beef (recipe below)
Enchilada sauce (recipe below)
Monterey Jack cheese, shredded
1 small can sliced olives
1/2 cup chopped red onion
Corn or flour tortillas

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread a 1/4 cup enchilada sauce on the bottom of a 13X9 baking pan. Dip each side of a tortilla in the enchilada sauce. Fill tortilla with a few tablespoons shredded beef and cheese. Fold up the sides and place seam side down in baking dish. Pour another 1/4 cup of sauce over the enchiladas. Sprinkle with cheese, chopped onions and olives. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until cheese is melted and the sauce in the dish is bubbly.

Shredded Beef:
Source: Old Church Cookbook
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 1/2 to 3 pounds chuck roast
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 1/2 cups of beef broth
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
6 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup onion minced

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl mix the cumin, chili powder, oregano, coriander, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub the spice mixture all over the roast, completely coating the meat.

Place the beef in the hot pan for 2-3 minutes on each side to sear the meat. Transfer to a crock pot or deep casserole with a lid. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the beef broth to the pan stirring and scraping the bottom to loosen all the charred bits. Pour over roast. Add cilantro, garlic, and onion to pot with the meat. Cover and transfer to the oven. Bake 2-3 hours. Remove any fat then shred the beef using two forks.

Enchilada Sauce:
Sauce: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/ten-minute-enchilada-sauce/Detail.aspx
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/4 cups water or broth
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons minced onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in flour and chili powder, reduce heat to medium, and cook until the sauce starts to thicken slightly, stirring constantly to prevent burning the flour.

Gradually stir in tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder until smooth. Continue cooking over medium heat about 5-7 minutes, or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
This recipe comes from a Cooking Light Cookbook. I made it for a dinner party we hosted one Christmas. Since then Pear and Ginger Crisp has become a Holiday tradition.

Filling:
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp grated lemon peel
2 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 1/2 pounds pears, medications peeled, order cored and sliced

Topping:
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbsp chilled butter, information pills cut into small pieces
1 1/2 (1-oz) slices whole wheat bread
1/4 cup almonds, ground
1/4 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add filling ingredients, cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place pear mixture in a 2-quart casserole dish lightly coated with cooking spray.
Topping: Combine flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt; cut in butter, until mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place bread in a food processor, pulse 10 times or until crumbs measure 3/4 cup. Stir breadcrumbs and nuts into flour mixture. Sprinkle flour mixture evenly over pear mixture. Bake 40 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden. Top with whip cream, ice cream or sweetened condensed milk. Yields: 8

(Note: If you prefer only a hint of Ginger, omit it from the topping.)

This recipe comes from a woman I met in Baybrook Texas. I wish I could remember her name because she really deserves the recognition. She is one of those die hard Christmas bakers but her goodies are the ones you look forward to all year. I have tried other versions of the pumpkin roll but Stephen and I agree we like taste and texture of this version best. So, more about the pumpkin roll has become a regular at our Thanksgiving table.

Many of my friends comment on how intimidated they are of making a rolled cake. It looks pretty daunting but is actually as simple as cutting and frosting a layer cake. I felt the same way before I made my first one. May I side with GI-Joe when I say knowing is half the battle. There is not that much batter, which has made a few people nervous. The cake is supposed to be thin so that it can be rolled up. There are two ways to roll the cake. I was taught to roll the cake with the short side facing me rolling short side toward the other shorts side. Last year I made a different recipe with a friend and she rolled it with the longest side towards her rolling longest side to long side. The only difference I could tell is the way my friend does it produces a much longer roll which means more to go around but they pieces are thinner and smaller. I prefer the denser version of rolling it into a shorter loaf.

Cake:
1 cup sugar
2/3 cups pumpkin
3 eggs
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 cups flour
1 tsp cinnamon

Filling:
1 (8 oz) pkg cream cheese
2 tbsp butter, softened
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 375. Spray a jelly roll pan with cooking spray or lightly spritz with water. This is to hold the waxed paper in place. Then line the pan with waxed or parchment paper. Spray the paper with cooking spray.
Combine the sugar, pumpkin and eggs; mix well. Add the soda, salt, flour and cinnamon; mix well.

Spread the batter in pan evenly. Bake 14-18 minutes. (Do Not Over Bake). Cover the pan with a clean dry dish towel then top with a wire cooling rack. Immediately invert pan onto hand/dish towel.

Peel off paper. With the long side in front of you, roll the cake up in the towel. Let cool rolled up.

Combine filling ingredients, mixing well. Unroll the cake, remove the towel, spread filling evenly. Roll cake back up (without the towel), wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate.

I think I found this recipe in an Everyday Food issue. My first thought was “balsalmic vinegar and maple syrup? What an interesting combination.” It turned out to be amazing. Well maybe not amazing but pretty darn good. I use 2-4 cutlets and reduce the time.

I love the show Hells Kitchen. My friends look at me like I am crazy but they like “Dancing With the Stars”. I have picked up many helpful cooking tips from watching Hells Kitchen. The most important being, viagra meat continues to cook as it rests. To avoid dry pork chops I watch them closely cooking them until they are just done. I take them out and cover them with tin foil for about 5 minutes.

1/4 c Balsalmic Vinegar
1 tbsp maple syrup

2 pork tenderloins (12 oz each)
2-3 apples, ed cut into wedges
1 large red onion, cut into wedges
1 tbsp olive oil
salt/pepper

Preheat oven to 450.
Glaze: In a sauce pan bring vinegar and syrup to a boil over high heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce is reduced to 1/4 cup. Remove from heat. Reserve 1 tbsp.

Place apples and onions on a baking sheet. Drizzle with oil, and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Arrange in a single layer. Roast about 15 minutes, until golden. Remove from oven and toss.
Meanwhile, place pork chops in a baking dish lined with foil. Season with salt and pepper. Brush with glaze from sauce pan.

Return apples/onions to the oven on a rack in the bottom 1/3 of the oven. Place pork on a rack in the top 1/3 of oven. Roast 10 minutes. Remove pork and brush with remaining glaze. Roast until cooked through and apples are tender, about 10 minutes more. Serve with apples and onions.
One December several years ago I was making pancakes for the family and realized I did not have any syrup. The spices remind me of Christmas time.

2 small pears, pharmacy capsule peeled, more about cored and sliced
1 small apple, erectile peeled, cored and sliced
Dash Nutmeg
1 / 8 tsp Cinnamon
1/3 cup raisins
Dash ground cloves
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 / 2 cup water
1 tbsp butter

In a sauce pan add all ingredients let come to a boil then simmer until pears and apples are soft. Mash up some of the pears and apples slightly to blend.  If syrup is to runny, in a small bowl mix juice from pan and a little flour until smooth. Add to syrup.  Serve with pancakes, waffles or French toast.
Note: use older pears and apples that are on the mushy side.
One December several years ago I was making pancakes for the family and realized I did not have any syrup. The spices remind me of Christmas time.

2 small pears, pharmacy capsule peeled, more about cored and sliced
1 small apple, erectile peeled, cored and sliced
Dash Nutmeg
1 / 8 tsp Cinnamon
1/3 cup raisins
Dash ground cloves
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 / 2 cup water
1 tbsp butter

In a sauce pan add all ingredients let come to a boil then simmer until pears and apples are soft. Mash up some of the pears and apples slightly to blend.  If syrup is to runny, in a small bowl mix juice from pan and a little flour until smooth. Add to syrup.  Serve with pancakes, waffles or French toast.
Note: use older pears and apples that are on the mushy side.

This Thanksgiving we started a Advent Gratitude Turkey. Every night after dinner we each take a paper feather and draw or write something we are grateful for. The kids enjoy looking at the pictures and talking about what they mean.

I heard someone say once that we need to fill our homes with happy and uplifting memories. So when the time comes that they are faced with a difficult choice they will think of home and the love that is felt there. I think the first place to start is gratitude. Learning to appreciate life’s gifts, seek big and small is a crucial lesson I strive to teach my children on a daily basis.

Be an example: Children learn by watching our actions. When we say please and thank you or are affectionate and loving in our words and actions we are teaching our children to become sensitive to the feelings of others and develop empathy. Showing disregard towards others and rules, complaining and negativity teaches our children life is unpleasant.

Set Limits: When Mason was a toddler we got into a horrible habit of buying him something every time we went to the store. After the birth of our second child I realized what a disservice Stephen, I and the relatives were being by allowing him to have so many toys. Far too often the toys our kids scream over end up abandoned or broken. Ultimately children develop a sense of entitlement that can lead to a lifetime of disappointment. Many touching life experiences are a result of a lesson learned in “less is more”.

Express Gratitude: I always try to express my gratitude to my children if they help me with a chore, when they treat each other nicely, or give me a hug. When Stephen goes to work I thank him and tell him know how proud I am that he works so hard for us. At the end of the day we gather as a family and share what we are most grateful for.

Say Thank You: Writing thank-you notes is a habit that never goes out of style but is slowly becoming a lost art. After a birthday or holiday I try to make myself stop, sit down with my children and teach them the art of expressing gratitude. I usually give them stamps and let them stamp away. Sometimes they will draw a picture or our four year old will dictate while I write.

Service: When we are serving others we tend to forget our own troubles and often feel more gratitude for what we have.

When I think of gratitude naturally Thanksgiving traditions come to mind. Every Thanksgiving I am reminded of two outstanding individuals, Ingrid and Dave Frey. When I was living in Texas far from family they welcomed me into their home for Thanksgiving dinner. Before we filled our plates, we passed a bowl filled with candy corn around the table. I am not a candy corn fan but I took a couple to be polite. Once everyone had their candy Ingrid asked us to count how many pieces of candy corn we had and name that many things we are thankful for.
One December several years ago I was making pancakes for the family and realized I did not have any syrup. The spices remind me of Christmas time.

2 small pears, pharmacy capsule peeled, more about cored and sliced
1 small apple, erectile peeled, cored and sliced
Dash Nutmeg
1 / 8 tsp Cinnamon
1/3 cup raisins
Dash ground cloves
3 tbsp brown sugar
1 / 2 cup water
1 tbsp butter

In a sauce pan add all ingredients let come to a boil then simmer until pears and apples are soft. Mash up some of the pears and apples slightly to blend.  If syrup is to runny, in a small bowl mix juice from pan and a little flour until smooth. Add to syrup.  Serve with pancakes, waffles or French toast.
Note: use older pears and apples that are on the mushy side.

This Thanksgiving we started a Advent Gratitude Turkey. Every night after dinner we each take a paper feather and draw or write something we are grateful for. The kids enjoy looking at the pictures and talking about what they mean.

I heard someone say once that we need to fill our homes with happy and uplifting memories. So when the time comes that they are faced with a difficult choice they will think of home and the love that is felt there. I think the first place to start is gratitude. Learning to appreciate life’s gifts, seek big and small is a crucial lesson I strive to teach my children on a daily basis.

Be an example: Children learn by watching our actions. When we say please and thank you or are affectionate and loving in our words and actions we are teaching our children to become sensitive to the feelings of others and develop empathy. Showing disregard towards others and rules, complaining and negativity teaches our children life is unpleasant.

Set Limits: When Mason was a toddler we got into a horrible habit of buying him something every time we went to the store. After the birth of our second child I realized what a disservice Stephen, I and the relatives were being by allowing him to have so many toys. Far too often the toys our kids scream over end up abandoned or broken. Ultimately children develop a sense of entitlement that can lead to a lifetime of disappointment. Many touching life experiences are a result of a lesson learned in “less is more”.

Express Gratitude: I always try to express my gratitude to my children if they help me with a chore, when they treat each other nicely, or give me a hug. When Stephen goes to work I thank him and tell him know how proud I am that he works so hard for us. At the end of the day we gather as a family and share what we are most grateful for.

Say Thank You: Writing thank-you notes is a habit that never goes out of style but is slowly becoming a lost art. After a birthday or holiday I try to make myself stop, sit down with my children and teach them the art of expressing gratitude. I usually give them stamps and let them stamp away. Sometimes they will draw a picture or our four year old will dictate while I write.

Service: When we are serving others we tend to forget our own troubles and often feel more gratitude for what we have.

When I think of gratitude naturally Thanksgiving traditions come to mind. Every Thanksgiving I am reminded of two outstanding individuals, Ingrid and Dave Frey. When I was living in Texas far from family they welcomed me into their home for Thanksgiving dinner. Before we filled our plates, we passed a bowl filled with candy corn around the table. I am not a candy corn fan but I took a couple to be polite. Once everyone had their candy Ingrid asked us to count how many pieces of candy corn we had and name that many things we are thankful for.
My mom’s coconut cake was probably my favorite part of Thanksgiving. My dad’s birthday is November 24th. It became a tradition to celebrate his birthday on Thanksgiving Day with a coconut cake.

1 white cake mix
1 1/4 cups light Karo syrup
2 egg whites
1 tsp vanilla
1 box cook/serve vanilla pudding
1 pkg Coconut

Bake cake in two round cake pans according to box directions. Cool.

Cook pudding according to box directions. Cover with plastic wrap, hospital making sure to gently press wrap flat against pudding. Chill 3-4 hours. Mix a couple cups of coconut into cooled pudding.

Cut cake rounds in half lengthwise to make 4 cake rounds. Place one round on a plate. Spread coconut pudding over layer. Top with next cake round and pudding, price repeat with third round. Top with 4th cake round. Place cake in the fridge.

Heat syrup on medium heat until a film begins to form (should have small steam bubbles). Beat egg whites one at a time on high speed until fluffy and stiff. (should not move when bowl is turned upside down). Pour syrup into the egg whites a little at a time, beating until thick. Add vanilla.

Frost cake with meringue mixture. Sprinkle with coconut. Keep refrigerated.

Dot with Maraschino cherries for added color.

Mom’s Pumpkin Pie

I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.
I admit I have an addiction to breakfast foods. These banana and cream cheese crepes do not help. I do not know where it came from as I have had this recipe for years. A crepe pan is not necessary when making crepes. A small fry pan works just as well, dosage if not better. I learned to make crepes from Mr. King, purchase a “Rock Scientist”. We just ate them with butter and syrup. Crepes can be stuffed with jams, viagra buy vegetables or fruits. The toppings are just as endless.

Crepes:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cup milk
4 eggs
2 tbsp butter or margarine, melted

Fillings:
1 orange- 1 tbsp zest, 3 tbsp juice
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup powdered sugar
3 bananas
Chocolate Sauce

Combine flour and salt. Add milk, eggs and butter, whisking until smooth. Heat pan over medium heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup batter into pan. Immediately tilt pan so uncooked portions flow to open areas of pan. Cook about 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Loosen edge of crepe; turn. Beat cream cheese and zest. Beat whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture. Cut bananas in half crosswise; cut each half lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Toss bananas in orange juice. For each crepe, place about 1/3 cup banana mixture in center of crepe. Top with 1/4 cup cream cheese mixture; fold sides over cream cheese mixture. Drizzle with chocolate-flavored syrup.

Nothing screams Happy Valentine’s Day more than crepes with strawberry sauce and chocolate. This strawberry sauce takes it a bit further by combining cream cheese, website or mascarpone cheese, with strawberries. It is literally out of this world delicious!

1 cup strawberries, chopped
1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese until smooth. Fold in berries.
Last Christmas there was a lot of buzz going around about caramels. A friend of mine invited me over to make Christmas goodies with her. The much talked about caramels were on the list. I am glad she knew what she was doing because I definitely did not have a clue. The caramels were a little hard to get out of my pan. But they were so cute wrapped up like little candy. They are a lot of work but well worth the experience.

No one really knew anything about the caramel recipe. I later found out that the recipe belonged to my friend Cathy’s, online Grandmother. She is also the same person who gave me the Easy Chicken recipe. The caramels have been a favorite holiday tradition that Cathy continues to share.

4 cups sugar
3 pints (6 cups) Heavy Cream
2 cups white corn syrup
Candy thermometer
A large stock pot with think non-reactive bottom

Spray a jelly roll pan really well with cooking spray.
Bring the sugar, syrup and 1 carton of cream (2 cups) to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes; stirring all the time. Add the 2nd carton (2 cups) of cream and boil for another 10 minutes, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom to avoid burning the cream. Add the 3rd carton (2 cups) of cream, continue stirring. Boil until temperature reaches 248 degrees on a candy thermometer (firm ball stage). Remove from heat. Pour directly into greased jelly roll pan. Refrigerate until set. When ready to cut, let caramels come to room temperature. About an hour before cutting. Cut in bite sized squares about 1-inch X 1-inch. Wrap squares in waxed paper.
Makes 10-12 dozen, depending on the size cut.

I have heard this cake goes by a few different names, recipe Better Than Sex, visit Better Than Robert Redford. Since this is a family site, ask I will call it the Skore Bar Cake. I picked this recipe up from a friend of mine. This cake is really good but very rich.

1 box Chocolate cake mix
1 small can Condensed Milk
1 small jar caramel topping
1 Skore candy bar, broken in pieces
1 container whipped topping

Bake cake according to package directions in a 13 X 9 cake pan. Cool. Poke holes all over top of cake. Pour milk over cake spreading evenly. Pour Caramel topping over milk. Top with whipped topping. Sprinkle with candy bar pieces. Chill in refrigerator.

This is my moms pumpkin pie recipe. It is from the Libby pumpkin can. On Rare occasions I find a recipe from a box or can that is actually quite delicious. I have had many comments on how good it is and if they can have the recipe. I am a failure at pastry dough and therefore I buy my own.  But one day I plan on diving in and conquering pie dough.

1 1/2 c sugar
1 can (29oz) pumpkin
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 cans (12oz) evaporated milk
1 tsp ginger
2 unbaked 9-inch deep dish pie shells
1/2 tsp cloves
4 large eggs

Mix sugar, click cinnamon, for sale ginger and cloves in a small bowl. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour into pie shells. Bake in a preheated 425°oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temp to 350°. Bake 40-50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on rack.

Thanksgiving Butternut Squash Pie

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.
My sister recently sent an email with a recipe she created using ingredients from her pantry. It just so happened “stone soup” was on our menu that night. So, visit this it got me thinking about how easy it is to whip up a simple, no rx good for you, approved quick pot of soup.

Mason and I read the book Stone Soup last week at school. The premise of the book is a weary traveler stopped at the home of an old woman asking her for food. She snobbishly turned him away telling him she did not have any food in the house or garden. Before she could close the door he asked her for a stone from her yard. Confused she questioned him why would he want a stone. He told her to make stone soup. Intrigued the old woman obliged him with a pot and as the story goes on she offered him the vegetables needed to make the soup fit for a king. Like the stone soup in the story every soup starts with a base of water with vegetables or meat for flavoring.

Stock can be made up of chicken, vegetable or beef broths. It can be creamy, with flour or cream. A tomato base comprised of bits of tomato or tomato puree. Soups may also be thick or thin. The flavoring comes from a variety of herbs, seasonings, vegetables and fats from meat or butter.

* A general guideline when using fresh herbs in a recipe is to use 3 times as much as you would use of a dried herb. 1/4 teaspoon of a dried herb for a recipe that serves 4.

Allison’s Pantry Taco Style Soup:
Canned Goods- kidney beans, corn, carrots, french cut green beans, tomato sauce and diced tomatoes.
Add to browned meat with garlic and onions. Add taco seasoning and top with sour cream and cheese.

This is my clean out the refrigerator and pantry version of Minestrone Soup:
1 tbsp oil
1/2 cup bell pepper
1 cup Brussels sprouts, halved
1 carrot, sliced
2 celery stalks, chopped
2 oz Italian sausage or panchetta
1 cup onions
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup fresh parsley
1 tbsp fresh basil
salt and pepper to taste
5 cups broth, beef or chicken
2 cans diced tomatoes, puree one or both cans
1 can garbanzo beans

Heat oil in a pot; add peppers, brussels sprouts, celery and carrots. Let brown slightly then remove. Add sausage onions and garlic. Cook until sausage is no longer pink. Add the parsley and basil. Toss.
Add broth, salt, pepper and tomatoes. Simmer 30-45 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add the garbanzo beans. Simmer 5 minutes. To serve, top with Parmesan cheese.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.
My sister recently sent an email with a recipe she created using ingredients from her pantry. It just so happened “stone soup” was on our menu that night. So, visit this it got me thinking about how easy it is to whip up a simple, no rx good for you, approved quick pot of soup.

Mason and I read the book Stone Soup last week at school. The premise of the book is a weary traveler stopped at the home of an old woman asking her for food. She snobbishly turned him away telling him she did not have any food in the house or garden. Before she could close the door he asked her for a stone from her yard. Confused she questioned him why would he want a stone. He told her to make stone soup. Intrigued the old woman obliged him with a pot and as the story goes on she offered him the vegetables needed to make the soup fit for a king. Like the stone soup in the story every soup starts with a base of water with vegetables or meat for flavoring.

Stock can be made up of chicken, vegetable or beef broths. It can be creamy, with flour or cream. A tomato base comprised of bits of tomato or tomato puree. Soups may also be thick or thin. The flavoring comes from a variety of herbs, seasonings, vegetables and fats from meat or butter.

* A general guideline when using fresh herbs in a recipe is to use 3 times as much as you would use of a dried herb. 1/4 teaspoon of a dried herb for a recipe that serves 4.

Allison’s Pantry Taco Style Soup:
Canned Goods- kidney beans, corn, carrots, french cut green beans, tomato sauce and diced tomatoes.
Add to browned meat with garlic and onions. Add taco seasoning and top with sour cream and cheese.

This is my clean out the refrigerator and pantry version of Minestrone Soup:
1 tbsp oil
1/2 cup bell pepper
1 cup Brussels sprouts, halved
1 carrot, sliced
2 celery stalks, chopped
2 oz Italian sausage or panchetta
1 cup onions
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup fresh parsley
1 tbsp fresh basil
salt and pepper to taste
5 cups broth, beef or chicken
2 cans diced tomatoes, puree one or both cans
1 can garbanzo beans

Heat oil in a pot; add peppers, brussels sprouts, celery and carrots. Let brown slightly then remove. Add sausage onions and garlic. Cook until sausage is no longer pink. Add the parsley and basil. Toss.
Add broth, salt, pepper and tomatoes. Simmer 30-45 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add the garbanzo beans. Simmer 5 minutes. To serve, top with Parmesan cheese.
I have been excited to cook with barbecue sauce ever since I discovered Red Tail Ale Tangy BBQ sauce. I made a ham last week and smothered it with half the bottle. We ate it all week in sandwiches, doctor omelets and with potatoes. This recipe for BBQ Chicken Salad comes from a friend of mine who had the salad at a ladies luncheon. It was so good she had to have the recipe. Fortunately for us, her friends, she thought we should have the recipe too. Wendy copied the recipe as stated from the book but she does not measure the ingredients, just throws it all together. She usually makes this dish with left over BBQ chicken. She adds a couple extra chicken breasts to the pan and refrigerates them to make the salad the next day. I love getting two meals out of one.

Chicken:
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 cup barbecue sauce

Marinate chicken in barbecue sauce, then bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Chop into pieces and refrigerate.

Salad:
1/2 head iceberg lettuce, chopped
1/2 head Romaine lettuce, chopped
3 to 4 Roma tomatoes, chopped
1 jicama, peeled and diced
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 cup frozen sweet corn, thawed
1/2 pound Monterey Jack cheese, grated

Combine chicken in a large salad bowl with salad ingredients and toss.  Serve with Ranch Dressing, additional BBQ sauce and crispy corn tortilla chips.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.
My sister recently sent an email with a recipe she created using ingredients from her pantry. It just so happened “stone soup” was on our menu that night. So, visit this it got me thinking about how easy it is to whip up a simple, no rx good for you, approved quick pot of soup.

Mason and I read the book Stone Soup last week at school. The premise of the book is a weary traveler stopped at the home of an old woman asking her for food. She snobbishly turned him away telling him she did not have any food in the house or garden. Before she could close the door he asked her for a stone from her yard. Confused she questioned him why would he want a stone. He told her to make stone soup. Intrigued the old woman obliged him with a pot and as the story goes on she offered him the vegetables needed to make the soup fit for a king. Like the stone soup in the story every soup starts with a base of water with vegetables or meat for flavoring.

Stock can be made up of chicken, vegetable or beef broths. It can be creamy, with flour or cream. A tomato base comprised of bits of tomato or tomato puree. Soups may also be thick or thin. The flavoring comes from a variety of herbs, seasonings, vegetables and fats from meat or butter.

* A general guideline when using fresh herbs in a recipe is to use 3 times as much as you would use of a dried herb. 1/4 teaspoon of a dried herb for a recipe that serves 4.

Allison’s Pantry Taco Style Soup:
Canned Goods- kidney beans, corn, carrots, french cut green beans, tomato sauce and diced tomatoes.
Add to browned meat with garlic and onions. Add taco seasoning and top with sour cream and cheese.

This is my clean out the refrigerator and pantry version of Minestrone Soup:
1 tbsp oil
1/2 cup bell pepper
1 cup Brussels sprouts, halved
1 carrot, sliced
2 celery stalks, chopped
2 oz Italian sausage or panchetta
1 cup onions
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup fresh parsley
1 tbsp fresh basil
salt and pepper to taste
5 cups broth, beef or chicken
2 cans diced tomatoes, puree one or both cans
1 can garbanzo beans

Heat oil in a pot; add peppers, brussels sprouts, celery and carrots. Let brown slightly then remove. Add sausage onions and garlic. Cook until sausage is no longer pink. Add the parsley and basil. Toss.
Add broth, salt, pepper and tomatoes. Simmer 30-45 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add the garbanzo beans. Simmer 5 minutes. To serve, top with Parmesan cheese.
I have been excited to cook with barbecue sauce ever since I discovered Red Tail Ale Tangy BBQ sauce. I made a ham last week and smothered it with half the bottle. We ate it all week in sandwiches, doctor omelets and with potatoes. This recipe for BBQ Chicken Salad comes from a friend of mine who had the salad at a ladies luncheon. It was so good she had to have the recipe. Fortunately for us, her friends, she thought we should have the recipe too. Wendy copied the recipe as stated from the book but she does not measure the ingredients, just throws it all together. She usually makes this dish with left over BBQ chicken. She adds a couple extra chicken breasts to the pan and refrigerates them to make the salad the next day. I love getting two meals out of one.

Chicken:
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 cup barbecue sauce

Marinate chicken in barbecue sauce, then bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Chop into pieces and refrigerate.

Salad:
1/2 head iceberg lettuce, chopped
1/2 head Romaine lettuce, chopped
3 to 4 Roma tomatoes, chopped
1 jicama, peeled and diced
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 cup frozen sweet corn, thawed
1/2 pound Monterey Jack cheese, grated

Combine chicken in a large salad bowl with salad ingredients and toss.  Serve with Ranch Dressing, additional BBQ sauce and crispy corn tortilla chips.
I got my pumpkin fix. Now it is time move on. I have heard of sweet potato pie but never a squash pie. I thought it would be a nice change to our Thanksgiving dinner this year.

From Pittsburgh Needs Eated adapted from David Lebovitz’s Room for Dessert

Makes one 10-inch pie
2 pounds butternut squash (for about 2 cups pulp)
1 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup milk
4 eggs
3/4 cup light brown sugar, what is ed firmly packed
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground cloves
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
pinch of salt
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 tbsp brandy
one 10-inch pre-baked pie crust

Position the oven rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 400F. Line a baking sheet with parchment and rub generously with butter.

Slice the squash in half lengthwise. With a spoon, remove the seeds and fibers from the cavity. Place the halves cut side down on the baking sheet and bake for 45 minutes, until tender and fully cooked.

While the squash is baking, mix together the cream, milk, eggs, sugar, spices, salt, vanilla, and brandy.

When the squash is cooked, remove it from the oven and turn the oven down to 375F. Scoop out the squash pulp and add to the other ingredients. Mix until smooth in a food processor or blender.

Pour the warm filling into the pre-baked pie shell and bake for 30-35 minutes, until just barely set in the center.