Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

The kids were playing with the salad spinner while I was making dinner. Adelin asked what it was so we washed some lettuce and put it in the spinner. Then I remembered a project in Gadgetology. Place a sheet of paper in the spinner, order add food coloring and spin. I do not think ours turned out right. Bummed we put the bowl in the sink and cleaned up for dinner. After dinner when I went to wash the bowl we made a lovely discovery. The paper we used had turned yellow from the food coloring and water.

Excited we pulled out baking sheets, tadalafil paper, food coloring, a spray bottle with water and a squirt bottle with water. We placed our sheets of paper in the baking sheet. Dropped several drops of food coloring and added water. The kids had a blast mixing colors.

We had to carefully remove the paper from the pan to avoid tearing it. We layed them on a sheet of foil to dry overnight.

The kids were playing with the salad spinner while I was making dinner. Adelin asked what it was so we washed some lettuce and put it in the spinner. Then I remembered a project in Gadgetology. Place a sheet of paper in the spinner, order add food coloring and spin. I do not think ours turned out right. Bummed we put the bowl in the sink and cleaned up for dinner. After dinner when I went to wash the bowl we made a lovely discovery. The paper we used had turned yellow from the food coloring and water.

Excited we pulled out baking sheets, tadalafil paper, food coloring, a spray bottle with water and a squirt bottle with water. We placed our sheets of paper in the baking sheet. Dropped several drops of food coloring and added water. The kids had a blast mixing colors.

We had to carefully remove the paper from the pan to avoid tearing it. We layed them on a sheet of foil to dry overnight.
This is a recipe given to me by my sister, clinic Allison. These granola grain cookies are a variation of the Anzac biscuits; a thin chewy cookie from the early 1900’s.

“Anzac biscuits (originally called Soldiers’ biscuits) came into being around 1915 (during World War I) when soldiers’ wives and/or mothers would bake and send the biscuits to the troops stationed overseas. The biscuits were ideal, link because they were cheap to make (remember that it was the Great Depression), try non-perishable (Anzac biscuits contain no eggs or milk) and so didn’t need refrigeration, and gave the men some added nutrition and sustenance.”

“After the landing of Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACs) in Gallipoli, the biscuits were renamed in honour of those brave soldiers who landed that fateful 25th day of April on the coast of Turkey, now known as Anzac Cove.” –AnzacBiscuits.net

The brewers yeast is optional. It’s use is only meant to add additional nuttrients. Do not confuse brewers yeast with baking yeast. Baking yeast is meant to be used in dough and should never be ingested. Brewers yeast is a nutritional supplement found in health food stores and may be used in it’s raw form in batters and as flavoring on popcorn.

Allow cookies to cool completely before snacking.
Source:
1 cup all-purpose or whole wheat pastry flour, plus 1/2 cup flour, optional, for more cake like texture
1 cup desiccated coconut
1 1/2 cup rolled oats
1 1/2 cup rice crispy
1 cup brown sugar
6 tbsp 1/2 cup butter, cut into little cubes
1/2 cup golden syrup or honey
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 tbs flaxseed meal
4 tbs water
2 Liberal tbsp brewers yeast
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp Protein powder
1 cup choc chips, nuts and/or dried fruit

Preheat oven to 350F degrees.
In a 1/4 cup measuring cup pour in 2 tablespoons flaxseed meal and fill with water, set aside to absorb.
In a large bowl combine the flour, oats, rice krispies, coconut, soda, protein powder and yeast. Mix well.
Cream the brown sugar and butter until fluffy. Add the honey, flaxseed meal with water and vanilla; mix well. Add the dry mixture and mix well until well distributed and crumbly consistency. Add fruit, nuts or chocolate chips.
Use a tablespoon spoon to scoop out onto a baking sheet. Press down for a flatter crispier cookie. Or keep in a mound for a more cake like cookie (especially if more flour was added). Bake in a moderate oven, 350F, for 13 – 18 minutes. Cool on the baking sheet or use a thin metal spatula to remove cookies from the baking sheet, cleaning the spatula each time. Cool completely. Store in an airtight container.

Alternatives:
Press batter into a baking dish. Cut into bars when cooled or bake longer for granola that can be crumbled up.
Bake longer for a crunchier cookie. Shorter for a chewy snack.

Classic Anzac Biscuit:
1 cup plain flour
I cup sugar
1 cup rolled oats
1 cup desiccated coconut
4 oz butter
2 tablespoons boiling water
1 tablespoon golden syrup
1 teaspoon baking soda (add a little more water if mixture is too dry)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Grease a baking sheet or line with baking paper.

In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the butter and syrup until the butter has melted.
In a medium bowl, combine the boiling water and baking soda. Stir in the melted butter and syrup. Combine with the dry ingredients; mixing thoroughly.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto the greased baking tray 2-3 inches apart. (Biscuits WILL spread during baking) Bake for 12 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from oven. Allow the Anzac biscuits to cool on the tray for a few minutes before removing to a cooling rack.

The kids were playing with the salad spinner while I was making dinner. Adelin asked what it was so we washed some lettuce and put it in the spinner. Then I remembered a project in Gadgetology. Place a sheet of paper in the spinner, order add food coloring and spin. I do not think ours turned out right. Bummed we put the bowl in the sink and cleaned up for dinner. After dinner when I went to wash the bowl we made a lovely discovery. The paper we used had turned yellow from the food coloring and water.

Excited we pulled out baking sheets, tadalafil paper, food coloring, a spray bottle with water and a squirt bottle with water. We placed our sheets of paper in the baking sheet. Dropped several drops of food coloring and added water. The kids had a blast mixing colors.

We had to carefully remove the paper from the pan to avoid tearing it. We layed them on a sheet of foil to dry overnight.
This is a recipe given to me by my sister, clinic Allison. These granola grain cookies are a variation of the Anzac biscuits; a thin chewy cookie from the early 1900’s.

“Anzac biscuits (originally called Soldiers’ biscuits) came into being around 1915 (during World War I) when soldiers’ wives and/or mothers would bake and send the biscuits to the troops stationed overseas. The biscuits were ideal, link because they were cheap to make (remember that it was the Great Depression), try non-perishable (Anzac biscuits contain no eggs or milk) and so didn’t need refrigeration, and gave the men some added nutrition and sustenance.”

“After the landing of Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACs) in Gallipoli, the biscuits were renamed in honour of those brave soldiers who landed that fateful 25th day of April on the coast of Turkey, now known as Anzac Cove.” –AnzacBiscuits.net

The brewers yeast is optional. It’s use is only meant to add additional nuttrients. Do not confuse brewers yeast with baking yeast. Baking yeast is meant to be used in dough and should never be ingested. Brewers yeast is a nutritional supplement found in health food stores and may be used in it’s raw form in batters and as flavoring on popcorn.

Allow cookies to cool completely before snacking.
Source:
1 cup all-purpose or whole wheat pastry flour, plus 1/2 cup flour, optional, for more cake like texture
1 cup desiccated coconut
1 1/2 cup rolled oats
1 1/2 cup rice crispy
1 cup brown sugar
6 tbsp 1/2 cup butter, cut into little cubes
1/2 cup golden syrup or honey
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 tbs flaxseed meal
4 tbs water
2 Liberal tbsp brewers yeast
1 tsp vanilla
1 tbsp Protein powder
1 cup choc chips, nuts and/or dried fruit

Preheat oven to 350F degrees.
In a 1/4 cup measuring cup pour in 2 tablespoons flaxseed meal and fill with water, set aside to absorb.
In a large bowl combine the flour, oats, rice krispies, coconut, soda, protein powder and yeast. Mix well.
Cream the brown sugar and butter until fluffy. Add the honey, flaxseed meal with water and vanilla; mix well. Add the dry mixture and mix well until well distributed and crumbly consistency. Add fruit, nuts or chocolate chips.
Use a tablespoon spoon to scoop out onto a baking sheet. Press down for a flatter crispier cookie. Or keep in a mound for a more cake like cookie (especially if more flour was added). Bake in a moderate oven, 350F, for 13 – 18 minutes. Cool on the baking sheet or use a thin metal spatula to remove cookies from the baking sheet, cleaning the spatula each time. Cool completely. Store in an airtight container.

Alternatives:
Press batter into a baking dish. Cut into bars when cooled or bake longer for granola that can be crumbled up.
Bake longer for a crunchier cookie. Shorter for a chewy snack.

Classic Anzac Biscuit:
1 cup plain flour
I cup sugar
1 cup rolled oats
1 cup desiccated coconut
4 oz butter
2 tablespoons boiling water
1 tablespoon golden syrup
1 teaspoon baking soda (add a little more water if mixture is too dry)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Grease a baking sheet or line with baking paper.

In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the butter and syrup until the butter has melted.
In a medium bowl, combine the boiling water and baking soda. Stir in the melted butter and syrup. Combine with the dry ingredients; mixing thoroughly.

Drop by teaspoonfuls onto the greased baking tray 2-3 inches apart. (Biscuits WILL spread during baking) Bake for 12 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from oven. Allow the Anzac biscuits to cool on the tray for a few minutes before removing to a cooling rack.

The oatmeal cookie is one of my favorite fall treats. The spiciness whispers autumn. In this particular version, cialis 40mg cinnamon has been replaced with nutmeg for a nice subtle flavor. This recipe comes from the  Baking Illustrated Cookbook.

1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp freshly ground nutmeg
1/2 tsp salt
16 tbsp (2 sticks) unsalted butter, case softened but still cool
1 cup packed light brown sugar
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
3 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
1 1/2 cups raisins, this optional

Preheat the oven to 350. Line two baking sheets with parchment or spray with nonstick cooking spray.
Whisk the flour, baking powder, nutmeg and salt together in a small bowl.
Either by hand or with an electric mixer, beat the butter on medium speed until creamy. Add the sugars; beat until fluffy, about 3 minutes. Beat in the eggs, 1 at a time.
Stir dry ingredients into the sugar mixture. Add the oats and raisins.
Roll two tablespoons of dough into a ball and place on prepared baking sheets at least two inches apart.
Bake until the cookie edges turn golden brown, 22-25 minutes, rotating the baking sheets front to back and top to bottom halfway through baking time. Cool on baking sheets 2 minutes. Transfer to wire rack. Do not over bake. The edges should be brown but the rest of the cookie should be light in color.

Variations:
Substitute 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg for the grated if in a pinch.
A less sweet option: reduce sugar by 1/4 cup.
Date Oatmeal Cookies: Substitute 1 1/2 cups chopped dates for the raisins.
Ginger Oatmeal Cookies: Add 3/4 tsp ground ginger to the flour and omit raisins.
Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies: Omit the nutmeg. Substitute 1 1/2 cups semisweet chocolate chips for the raisins.
Nut Oatmeal Cookies: decrease flour to 1 1/2 cups and add 3/4 cup ground almonds. Add 1 cup chopped walnuts with the oatmeal.
Orange and Almond Oatmeal Cookies: Omit the raisins. Add 2 tbsp minced orange zest and 1 cup toasted chopped almonds (toast nuts in 350-degree oven for 5 minutes) along with oats.

BBQ Sauce Chicken Chop Salad

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.
My sister recently sent an email with a recipe she created using ingredients from her pantry. It just so happened “stone soup” was on our menu that night. So, visit this it got me thinking about how easy it is to whip up a simple, no rx good for you, approved quick pot of soup.

Mason and I read the book Stone Soup last week at school. The premise of the book is a weary traveler stopped at the home of an old woman asking her for food. She snobbishly turned him away telling him she did not have any food in the house or garden. Before she could close the door he asked her for a stone from her yard. Confused she questioned him why would he want a stone. He told her to make stone soup. Intrigued the old woman obliged him with a pot and as the story goes on she offered him the vegetables needed to make the soup fit for a king. Like the stone soup in the story every soup starts with a base of water with vegetables or meat for flavoring.

Stock can be made up of chicken, vegetable or beef broths. It can be creamy, with flour or cream. A tomato base comprised of bits of tomato or tomato puree. Soups may also be thick or thin. The flavoring comes from a variety of herbs, seasonings, vegetables and fats from meat or butter.

* A general guideline when using fresh herbs in a recipe is to use 3 times as much as you would use of a dried herb. 1/4 teaspoon of a dried herb for a recipe that serves 4.

Allison’s Pantry Taco Style Soup:
Canned Goods- kidney beans, corn, carrots, french cut green beans, tomato sauce and diced tomatoes.
Add to browned meat with garlic and onions. Add taco seasoning and top with sour cream and cheese.

This is my clean out the refrigerator and pantry version of Minestrone Soup:
1 tbsp oil
1/2 cup bell pepper
1 cup Brussels sprouts, halved
1 carrot, sliced
2 celery stalks, chopped
2 oz Italian sausage or panchetta
1 cup onions
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup fresh parsley
1 tbsp fresh basil
salt and pepper to taste
5 cups broth, beef or chicken
2 cans diced tomatoes, puree one or both cans
1 can garbanzo beans

Heat oil in a pot; add peppers, brussels sprouts, celery and carrots. Let brown slightly then remove. Add sausage onions and garlic. Cook until sausage is no longer pink. Add the parsley and basil. Toss.
Add broth, salt, pepper and tomatoes. Simmer 30-45 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add the garbanzo beans. Simmer 5 minutes. To serve, top with Parmesan cheese.

Apple Tart Cake

I was finally able to salvage enough apples to make this apple tart cake. Fruit does not last very long around here. You know the saying, treatment check “If you have not used it in a year then toss it?” I can’t remember the last time I used my apple corer/slicer but by sheer luck it went undetected when I was gathering items for the garage sale. The narrow escape ensures it will remain in the drawer for at least another year.

I was really hesitant about the icing. It tasted too bland and too much like powdered sugar. On the cake it seemed to melt away not contributing any extra dimension of flavor. I recommend leaving it off or using another recipe for orange icing.

Slice of Apple Tart Cake

Source: CookingBread.com
1 1/2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
5 granny smith apples (peeled, corded and sliced thin )
1 cup powdered sugar
3-4 tablespoons orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 11-inch tart pan with shortening or cooking spray and a little flour.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into a small bowl.

In a large bowl beat eggs and sugar until thick, white and satiny. Add the vanilla to the slightly warm melted butter; mix into egg mixture until well blended. Stir in the sliced apples; tossing until completely coated. Fold in the sifted dry ingredients until just incorporated.

Pour into the prepared tart pan and bake for 50-55 minutes. Remove from oven and cool on a wire rack.

Icing:
Mix the powdered sugar and orange juice until well blended. Drizzle over cooled cake.

Pumpkin and date scones

I have learned a few tips over the years relative to baking. I was never very good baking. My pastries were always dry. The whole process was depressing. Then I started watching cooking shows and then my sister-n-law Roxanne gave me the Baking Illustrated cookbook. The book opened my eyes to the chemistry involved. The temperature of the kitchen plus the precise temperature and measurement of ingredients. There is a scientific method that unless you are in the know you will never find in a typical recipe.

Learning the art of making scones could be the first stepping stone to conquering fluffy biscuits and dare I say pastry crust. The key to scones, prescription biscuits and pie crust is using cold ingredients and to handle the dough as little as possible. To do this the dry ingredients are whisked thoroughly as well as the wet before combining the two. You also want to keep the butter and milk in the refrigerator until it is time to add them. Now get out there and bake up some scones. Like these Pumpkin and Date scones. Yum yum!

I was attracted to the pumpkin and date part. I used butternut squash and dates but I think I prefer pumpkin and raisins better. There are two pumpkin scone recipes in this post. The first is an adaptation of Belinda Jeffery’s Mix and Bake by Pittsburg Needs Eated. I enjoyed the simplicity of the scone. No fuss. Just delicious warmth. The second connects with my more wild side that needs flavor to build on top of flavor producing a carnival ride of scrumptious delight.


Source: adaptation by Pittsburg Needs Eated

3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
10 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried cherries or cranberries
1 cup cold cooked mashed butternut squash or pumpkin
3/4 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly dust a sturdy baking sheet with flour or line with parchment paper; set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter, or rub the butter in using your fingers, until mixture resembles bread crumbs.

Add the dates tossing to coat with the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle. Whisk the pumpkin and buttermilk and pour into the well. Stir gently until just combined. This dough is sticky. If it is too sticky and you prefer using an ice cream scoop, place scoopfuls of mixture on prepared baking sheet 1-inch apart.

Otherwise, to cut the scones, tip mixture out onto a floured surface and dust lightly with flour. Gather dough together; pat into a 1 1/2 inch think round. Dip a scone cutter or a small tumbler into flour, then stamp out the scones, dipping the cutter into the flour between each one or cut the scones into triangles using a sharp knife dusted with flour.

Place the scones 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, milk or egg wash (1 yolk to 2 tsp water).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer to a large clean tea towel; wrapping them up in the towel to keep moist. Let sit for 5-10 minutes, serve the scones with butter.

Pumpkin Scones

Pumpkin Scones
Source: Morning Coffee and Tea
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup cold unsalted butter
1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup pumpkin (if canned, be sure there are no spices or sugar added)
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Sift together flour, sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Cut cold butter into small pieces and cut into flour. Mixture should look like coarse crumbs. In a separate bowl mix together the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla. Add to flour mixture and mix until the dough comes together (don’t overmix).

Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Shape or pat dough into a circle about 1 1/2 inches thick. Slice in half, and then cut each half into 3 equal pie-shaped wedges. Brush with egg glaze (1 egg beaten with 1 tbsp milk), and sprinkle with Turbinado sugar.

Bake on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Makes 6 scones.

Optional: Add white chocolate chips and/or chopped pecans.

Pumpkin Spice Butter
1/4 cup (half a stick) butter, softened
1/4 cup pumpkin puree
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp allspice

Combine all and mix till creamy.
My sister recently sent an email with a recipe she created using ingredients from her pantry. It just so happened “stone soup” was on our menu that night. So, visit this it got me thinking about how easy it is to whip up a simple, no rx good for you, approved quick pot of soup.

Mason and I read the book Stone Soup last week at school. The premise of the book is a weary traveler stopped at the home of an old woman asking her for food. She snobbishly turned him away telling him she did not have any food in the house or garden. Before she could close the door he asked her for a stone from her yard. Confused she questioned him why would he want a stone. He told her to make stone soup. Intrigued the old woman obliged him with a pot and as the story goes on she offered him the vegetables needed to make the soup fit for a king. Like the stone soup in the story every soup starts with a base of water with vegetables or meat for flavoring.

Stock can be made up of chicken, vegetable or beef broths. It can be creamy, with flour or cream. A tomato base comprised of bits of tomato or tomato puree. Soups may also be thick or thin. The flavoring comes from a variety of herbs, seasonings, vegetables and fats from meat or butter.

* A general guideline when using fresh herbs in a recipe is to use 3 times as much as you would use of a dried herb. 1/4 teaspoon of a dried herb for a recipe that serves 4.

Allison’s Pantry Taco Style Soup:
Canned Goods- kidney beans, corn, carrots, french cut green beans, tomato sauce and diced tomatoes.
Add to browned meat with garlic and onions. Add taco seasoning and top with sour cream and cheese.

This is my clean out the refrigerator and pantry version of Minestrone Soup:
1 tbsp oil
1/2 cup bell pepper
1 cup Brussels sprouts, halved
1 carrot, sliced
2 celery stalks, chopped
2 oz Italian sausage or panchetta
1 cup onions
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup fresh parsley
1 tbsp fresh basil
salt and pepper to taste
5 cups broth, beef or chicken
2 cans diced tomatoes, puree one or both cans
1 can garbanzo beans

Heat oil in a pot; add peppers, brussels sprouts, celery and carrots. Let brown slightly then remove. Add sausage onions and garlic. Cook until sausage is no longer pink. Add the parsley and basil. Toss.
Add broth, salt, pepper and tomatoes. Simmer 30-45 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add the garbanzo beans. Simmer 5 minutes. To serve, top with Parmesan cheese.
I have been excited to cook with barbecue sauce ever since I discovered Red Tail Ale Tangy BBQ sauce. I made a ham last week and smothered it with half the bottle. We ate it all week in sandwiches, doctor omelets and with potatoes. This recipe for BBQ Chicken Salad comes from a friend of mine who had the salad at a ladies luncheon. It was so good she had to have the recipe. Fortunately for us, her friends, she thought we should have the recipe too. Wendy copied the recipe as stated from the book but she does not measure the ingredients, just throws it all together. She usually makes this dish with left over BBQ chicken. She adds a couple extra chicken breasts to the pan and refrigerates them to make the salad the next day. I love getting two meals out of one.

Chicken:
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 cup barbecue sauce

Marinate chicken in barbecue sauce, then bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Chop into pieces and refrigerate.

Salad:
1/2 head iceberg lettuce, chopped
1/2 head Romaine lettuce, chopped
3 to 4 Roma tomatoes, chopped
1 jicama, peeled and diced
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 cup frozen sweet corn, thawed
1/2 pound Monterey Jack cheese, grated

Combine chicken in a large salad bowl with salad ingredients and toss.  Serve with Ranch Dressing, additional BBQ sauce and crispy corn tortilla chips.

Card Board Princess Castle

Adelin is passionate about princesses right now. I am thrilled to see her actually playing and interested in something other than Caillou. She saw a Princess playhouse in a toy magazine and wanted me to take her to the store right away. I smiled, viagra then tried to distract her with something else.

While we were in the backyard playing, decease I noticed a large cardboard box the kids had not yet managed to destroy. The dusty gears in my head started to grind and smoke. Ten minutes later, Adelin had her very own Princess Castle. I think I was more astonished that she actually loved it. The next step is paint.

Enameled 7 Quart Cast Iron Casserole Dish

Adelin is passionate about princesses right now. I am thrilled to see her actually playing and interested in something other than Caillou. She saw a Princess playhouse in a toy magazine and wanted me to take her to the store right away. I smiled, viagra then tried to distract her with something else.

While we were in the backyard playing, decease I noticed a large cardboard box the kids had not yet managed to destroy. The dusty gears in my head started to grind and smoke. Ten minutes later, Adelin had her very own Princess Castle. I think I was more astonished that she actually loved it. The next step is paint.

Adelin is passionate about princesses right now. I am thrilled to see her actually playing and interested in something other than Caillou. She saw a Princess playhouse in a toy magazine and wanted me to take her to the store right away. I smiled, viagra then tried to distract her with something else.

While we were in the backyard playing, decease I noticed a large cardboard box the kids had not yet managed to destroy. The dusty gears in my head started to grind and smoke. Ten minutes later, Adelin had her very own Princess Castle. I think I was more astonished that she actually loved it. The next step is paint.

I have coveted this pot since Patty brought hers over to make raspberry jam. I love the colors: Sand, cheap Red, physician Green, advice Blue. What I like most is how wide and roomy it is and how well it cooks. The dish can transfer from stovetop to oven with ease. My mom sent a gift certificate for my birthday to buy a set of Martha Stewart Ice Cream dishes that are no longer available. How convenient. I was able to put the money toward my Martha Stewart Cast Iron Casserole dish instead. Thanks mom! I love my birthday present.

Makeing Time for the Family: Family Fun Table Talk At The Dinner Table

Sitting down at the table together is still one of the best ways for families to grow and stay connected.

When we gather around the dinner table, prescription I envision happy children with hands washed, viagra buy eager to devour the meal prepared for them. Once seated, there is a hush as we take hands and offer thanks for our bounties. The conversations are light and fun. There is a feeling of warmth as we enjoy one another’s company while we discuss the highlights of our day.

There is a book that has been nestled among my cookbooks since Christmas. It is called “Dinner? It’s in the Bag!” Bringing your family back to the table one meal at a time. I have only ever leafed through the recipe section. Tonight, however, I had a few spare moments while I was making dinner to peruse the book a little further. The last section is titled “Table Talk and Family Fun.” There were a few ideas I thought worth noting.

“Meal time is a time to relax, connect and learn. Discipline, unpleasant subjects, tragic stories and stern lectures have no seat at the dining table. Those subjects can be discussed later in a private setting. Laying the cares of the day aside, turning off the television, video games, internet, telephone and turning on soft background music, will greatly enhance your efforts. As families gather around the table, the door is opened to learning about what we are all thinking, feeling and dreaming.

The author goes on to say, when her children were young every morning during breakfast her husband would pose a question. The children were encouraged to think about it during the day and collect research on the topic in preparation for discussing the answers that night at dinner. I was reminded of stories I have heard Stephen’s father tell about growing up around the dinner table. It was a question and answer feast each night as his father would ask a trivia question based on the current events of the day, past history or uncanny bits of information.

Another suggestion that was made in the book was about the importance of gratitude. Meal time is the “perfect time to express love and gratitude for each other and for our blessings.” She and her husband encouraged their children to take turns sharing their positive feelings about what they like about each other. She then talks about a friend whose family keeps a gratitude journal. When their children were younger, they would tell someone what to write in the journal or they would draw pictures. Today, the grandchildren have the opportunity to add their thoughts to the gratitude book.

I feel our lives are so busy during the day and especially more so leading up to dinner time. There have been times when the kids have dug in and left before Stephen and I ever got to the table. When we gather around the dinner table, for me, it is a time to sit together as a family. The only time during the day that we can toss our to do list aside and focus on each other. We give a sigh and let the rush of the day go. Sometimes, in the silence I can hear the children wondering “what is that strange sound?”

We can make dinner time more exciting by playing games such as trivia or making up stories. Take the time to really communicate. Ask questions. Be interested. Be positive. Really Listen.

Finding The Perfect Pumpkin

Last summer Stephen and I had a much needed get-a-way for a few days in Half Moon Bay. A million thanks to our nieces Roxy and Tori. Half Moon Bay is a quaint little (what I call surfer) town by the ocean south of San Francisco. I was hoping to come back with a couple of recipes to share but no such luck. The first night Stephen decided to drive back inland to a commercial restaurant. The whole part of getting away was to escape capitalism and enjoy a simple relaxing weekend. I know he is reluctant to try new restaurants and if you have ever watched Kitchen Nightmares with Chef Ramsey, medical you would be hesitant too. We do not get out much, web so when we do we stick to the tried and true.

On the second night of our stay, we decided to try the Crab Shack adjacent to the hotel, which by the way was amazing and worth the money. The hotel was amazing, not the crab shack. The restaurant was packed and the wait long; usually the sign of a decent fare. If we had checked with foodies on Chowhound we would have known not to go there. Stephen uses the GPS while I confer with Chowhound.
Last summer Stephen and I had a much needed get-a-way for a few days in Half Moon Bay. A million thanks to our nieces Roxy and Tori. Half Moon Bay is a quaint little (what I call surfer) town by the ocean south of San Francisco. I was hoping to come back with a couple of recipes to share but no such luck. The first night Stephen decided to drive back inland to a commercial restaurant. The whole part of getting away was to escape capitalism and enjoy a simple relaxing weekend. I know he is reluctant to try new restaurants and if you have ever watched Kitchen Nightmares with Chef Ramsey, medical you would be hesitant too. We do not get out much, web so when we do we stick to the tried and true.

On the second night of our stay, we decided to try the Crab Shack adjacent to the hotel, which by the way was amazing and worth the money. The hotel was amazing, not the crab shack. The restaurant was packed and the wait long; usually the sign of a decent fare. If we had checked with foodies on Chowhound we would have known not to go there. Stephen uses the GPS while I confer with Chowhound.

Halloween is nearing fast and it is time to pick out a pumpkin. It has become a tradition to visit the pumpkin patch in the area; however, price this year we took a trip to the Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch in Lathrop CA.


We had a great time in the petting zoo, ask but the highlight of our day was picking the perfect pumpkin that will soon become a Halloween Jack-O-Lantern.

With our bounty in hand we retired to the car and headed home for our traditional Pumpkin Picking Cinnamon Rolls.

You’ve Been BOO-ed

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?> Nutty popcorn bars is a great new take on protein bars. This recipe came from the June 2007 Heath Magazine, this created by David Gaus an Executive pastry chef in Washington DC. Beware! I can never only eat one.  They are so tasty.

1 1/2 cups rolled oats
1 cup unsalted, sildenafil dry-roasted peanuts
12 cups popcorn (without salt or fat)
Cooking spray
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1 cup light brown sugar
5 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp vanilla
1 1/2 cups raisins

Preheat oven to 350. Place oats and peanuts on a baking sheet; bake for 12 minutes. Remove the sheet from the oven and cool completely.
Place popped corn in a very large heatproof bowl that has been sprayed with cooking spray. Set aside a 15 X 10 X 1-inch jelly roll pan sprayed with cooking spray.
In a medium saucepan, combine butter, sugar and honey. Heat over medium heat stirring until mixture comes to a boil. Let mixture boil for 1 1/2 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in salt and vanilla.
Pour hot syrup over popped corn and mix until well coated. Stir in raisins, oats and peanuts. Spread evenly onto prepared pan. Allow to cool completely, about 30 minutes.
Turn out onto a large cutting board; cut 24 equal squares. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

Alternatives:
In a pinch I have used salted peanuts and packaged low sodium low fat popcorn.
I have also thrown in some almonds and cashews with the peanuts to make one cup.
Golden Raisin or Cranberries are a nice addition as well.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
As a born and bred Southern Gal turned California chic, purchase I occasionally get the hanker’n for some good ol’ southern barbecue. This summer I returned to my roots when I went to visit my family in South Florida. Before my arrival, my brother asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I immediately requested, BBQ. Upon arriving in Florida, my brother stopped off for take out at a local BBQ restaurant. One of his must haves was their BBQ Nachos. At the mention of BBQ Nachos, I was quite intrigued. They were just like nachos only they had BBQ sauce on them. This is my own version based on what I remember.

Tortilla chips
Shredded chicken
BBQ Sauce
olives
jalepenos
cheese
tomatoes
cilantro
red onion
green onions
Pico de Gallo
beans

Place a layer of chips in an oven proof dish. Sprinkle with cheese and any combination of toppings. Add another layer of chips and cheese. Bake at 350 until the cheese is melted. Add additional toppings and serve.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
As a born and bred Southern Gal turned California chic, purchase I occasionally get the hanker’n for some good ol’ southern barbecue. This summer I returned to my roots when I went to visit my family in South Florida. Before my arrival, my brother asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I immediately requested, BBQ. Upon arriving in Florida, my brother stopped off for take out at a local BBQ restaurant. One of his must haves was their BBQ Nachos. At the mention of BBQ Nachos, I was quite intrigued. They were just like nachos only they had BBQ sauce on them. This is my own version based on what I remember.

Tortilla chips
Shredded chicken
BBQ Sauce
olives
jalepenos
cheese
tomatoes
cilantro
red onion
green onions
Pico de Gallo
beans

Place a layer of chips in an oven proof dish. Sprinkle with cheese and any combination of toppings. Add another layer of chips and cheese. Bake at 350 until the cheese is melted. Add additional toppings and serve.
A budget is an extremely important tool to help you stay on top of your spending to ensure you do not go into debt. For those individuals who are already in debt, buy more about a budget will help put spending habits into perspective. Change is a lengthy and difficult process. It is common to feel hopeless, pharm impossible or even deprived. However, website like in the story “The Tortoise and the Hare”, if you work slowly and steadily, you can achieve what you put your mind to. Don’t look at solving your debt problems as you would dieting. “Diets” generally do not work. Subtle changes over time will result in long term habits and eventually financial peace of mind.

One thing Franklin Covey, many life coaches, and weight loss books have in common is the first thing they ask you to do when you want to make a change is to keep a journal. Our goal is to become free of debt. Jot down every living expense that you owe. We use a white board above our desk. You could use software programs or paper and a pencil. Living expenses may include: rent/mortgage, house and car insurance, security service, pest service, electric company, gas company, water, sewage, gas for your car, cell and/or home phone, cable, internet, food, entertainment, baby, online services such video/game rentals, credit cards, loans.

Now, list the amount you pay and the budgeted amount (what you can spend each month in each category based on your income). Some expenditures are fixed, the mortgage, insurance and city services, meaning they are the same amount every month; while others have a budgeted allotment we work toward changing such as the electric bill, food and gasoline. Be reasonable and realistic. If you are spending more than you are bringing in sit down and decide what items need to be eliminated, temporarily suspended or which services you can call to negotiate a better price.

For us, the majority of our money was escaping through nickel and dime purchases. Once we started to keep close tabs on what we were spending our money on we had a better idea how to tackle the problem. Which is why it is extremely beneficial to also begin keeping a log of every single purchase you make. Let me reiterate, EVERY single purchase cash and credit no matter how tiny or huge. If you spend most of your money eating out, try cutting out 1 to 2 outings a week and then go down from there. You won’t feel so deprived. How much you save depends on how aggressive you are. Review the list every week or monthly to help you “keep moving forward”.

I had a yoga teacher once that stressed “you only get back what you put in.” If you sacrifice a lot you will reach your goal faster.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
As a born and bred Southern Gal turned California chic, purchase I occasionally get the hanker’n for some good ol’ southern barbecue. This summer I returned to my roots when I went to visit my family in South Florida. Before my arrival, my brother asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I immediately requested, BBQ. Upon arriving in Florida, my brother stopped off for take out at a local BBQ restaurant. One of his must haves was their BBQ Nachos. At the mention of BBQ Nachos, I was quite intrigued. They were just like nachos only they had BBQ sauce on them. This is my own version based on what I remember.

Tortilla chips
Shredded chicken
BBQ Sauce
olives
jalepenos
cheese
tomatoes
cilantro
red onion
green onions
Pico de Gallo
beans

Place a layer of chips in an oven proof dish. Sprinkle with cheese and any combination of toppings. Add another layer of chips and cheese. Bake at 350 until the cheese is melted. Add additional toppings and serve.
A budget is an extremely important tool to help you stay on top of your spending to ensure you do not go into debt. For those individuals who are already in debt, buy more about a budget will help put spending habits into perspective. Change is a lengthy and difficult process. It is common to feel hopeless, pharm impossible or even deprived. However, website like in the story “The Tortoise and the Hare”, if you work slowly and steadily, you can achieve what you put your mind to. Don’t look at solving your debt problems as you would dieting. “Diets” generally do not work. Subtle changes over time will result in long term habits and eventually financial peace of mind.

One thing Franklin Covey, many life coaches, and weight loss books have in common is the first thing they ask you to do when you want to make a change is to keep a journal. Our goal is to become free of debt. Jot down every living expense that you owe. We use a white board above our desk. You could use software programs or paper and a pencil. Living expenses may include: rent/mortgage, house and car insurance, security service, pest service, electric company, gas company, water, sewage, gas for your car, cell and/or home phone, cable, internet, food, entertainment, baby, online services such video/game rentals, credit cards, loans.

Now, list the amount you pay and the budgeted amount (what you can spend each month in each category based on your income). Some expenditures are fixed, the mortgage, insurance and city services, meaning they are the same amount every month; while others have a budgeted allotment we work toward changing such as the electric bill, food and gasoline. Be reasonable and realistic. If you are spending more than you are bringing in sit down and decide what items need to be eliminated, temporarily suspended or which services you can call to negotiate a better price.

For us, the majority of our money was escaping through nickel and dime purchases. Once we started to keep close tabs on what we were spending our money on we had a better idea how to tackle the problem. Which is why it is extremely beneficial to also begin keeping a log of every single purchase you make. Let me reiterate, EVERY single purchase cash and credit no matter how tiny or huge. If you spend most of your money eating out, try cutting out 1 to 2 outings a week and then go down from there. You won’t feel so deprived. How much you save depends on how aggressive you are. Review the list every week or monthly to help you “keep moving forward”.

I had a yoga teacher once that stressed “you only get back what you put in.” If you sacrifice a lot you will reach your goal faster.
We pulled out our slurpee/snowcone maker, store dusted it off and made a refreshing treat with this recipe I found online, but I apologize I have no clue where I got. It was a site that had all these great cool summer kid treats. Once I locate it, I will update this post. Until then, enjoy her version of an easy snow cone.

1 Envelope KOOL-AID, Unsweetened, any flavor
1 Cup sugar
1/2 Cup cold water
8 Cups finely crushed ice

Place soft drink mix and sugar in small bowl. Add cold water; stir to dissolve. For each serving, pour about 1 tablespoon soft drink mixture over 1 cup ice.

Variations:
Use 3/4 cup KOOL-AID Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drink Mix, any flavor; omit sugar.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
As a born and bred Southern Gal turned California chic, purchase I occasionally get the hanker’n for some good ol’ southern barbecue. This summer I returned to my roots when I went to visit my family in South Florida. Before my arrival, my brother asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I immediately requested, BBQ. Upon arriving in Florida, my brother stopped off for take out at a local BBQ restaurant. One of his must haves was their BBQ Nachos. At the mention of BBQ Nachos, I was quite intrigued. They were just like nachos only they had BBQ sauce on them. This is my own version based on what I remember.

Tortilla chips
Shredded chicken
BBQ Sauce
olives
jalepenos
cheese
tomatoes
cilantro
red onion
green onions
Pico de Gallo
beans

Place a layer of chips in an oven proof dish. Sprinkle with cheese and any combination of toppings. Add another layer of chips and cheese. Bake at 350 until the cheese is melted. Add additional toppings and serve.
A budget is an extremely important tool to help you stay on top of your spending to ensure you do not go into debt. For those individuals who are already in debt, buy more about a budget will help put spending habits into perspective. Change is a lengthy and difficult process. It is common to feel hopeless, pharm impossible or even deprived. However, website like in the story “The Tortoise and the Hare”, if you work slowly and steadily, you can achieve what you put your mind to. Don’t look at solving your debt problems as you would dieting. “Diets” generally do not work. Subtle changes over time will result in long term habits and eventually financial peace of mind.

One thing Franklin Covey, many life coaches, and weight loss books have in common is the first thing they ask you to do when you want to make a change is to keep a journal. Our goal is to become free of debt. Jot down every living expense that you owe. We use a white board above our desk. You could use software programs or paper and a pencil. Living expenses may include: rent/mortgage, house and car insurance, security service, pest service, electric company, gas company, water, sewage, gas for your car, cell and/or home phone, cable, internet, food, entertainment, baby, online services such video/game rentals, credit cards, loans.

Now, list the amount you pay and the budgeted amount (what you can spend each month in each category based on your income). Some expenditures are fixed, the mortgage, insurance and city services, meaning they are the same amount every month; while others have a budgeted allotment we work toward changing such as the electric bill, food and gasoline. Be reasonable and realistic. If you are spending more than you are bringing in sit down and decide what items need to be eliminated, temporarily suspended or which services you can call to negotiate a better price.

For us, the majority of our money was escaping through nickel and dime purchases. Once we started to keep close tabs on what we were spending our money on we had a better idea how to tackle the problem. Which is why it is extremely beneficial to also begin keeping a log of every single purchase you make. Let me reiterate, EVERY single purchase cash and credit no matter how tiny or huge. If you spend most of your money eating out, try cutting out 1 to 2 outings a week and then go down from there. You won’t feel so deprived. How much you save depends on how aggressive you are. Review the list every week or monthly to help you “keep moving forward”.

I had a yoga teacher once that stressed “you only get back what you put in.” If you sacrifice a lot you will reach your goal faster.
We pulled out our slurpee/snowcone maker, store dusted it off and made a refreshing treat with this recipe I found online, but I apologize I have no clue where I got. It was a site that had all these great cool summer kid treats. Once I locate it, I will update this post. Until then, enjoy her version of an easy snow cone.

1 Envelope KOOL-AID, Unsweetened, any flavor
1 Cup sugar
1/2 Cup cold water
8 Cups finely crushed ice

Place soft drink mix and sugar in small bowl. Add cold water; stir to dissolve. For each serving, pour about 1 tablespoon soft drink mixture over 1 cup ice.

Variations:
Use 3/4 cup KOOL-AID Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drink Mix, any flavor; omit sugar.
This year for Halloween, viagra we are adopting a family tradition from my sister-n-law. Every year for the past ten years, pharmacy at least, they have celebrated Halloween with a mystery dinner complete with a menu. Does Eye of Newt sound appetizing? Don’t be too alarmed. That is what they call hot dogs in the land of witches and goblins.

Here are a few of our favorite Halloween Dinner ideas:

Beverages:
Witches Brew- Hot Chocolate
Love Potion – Orchard Apple Punch

Appetizers:
Witches Fingers – Bread Sticks
Spider Egg Sacks – Boiled Eggs
Shrunken Heads – Raisin filled Apple Jack-o-Lanterns
Boogers on A Stick – Mini Carmel Apples
Witch’s Hair with Goblin’s Eyes: Shredded Carrots with Grapes

Entrees:
Monkey Brains with Alligator Eye Balls- Spaghetti and Meatballs
Bat Stew – Hearty Chili
Mummy Rolls – Hot Dogs wrapped in crescent rolls
Road Kill Pie – Chicken Pot Pie
Grilled CobwebsPizza
Ghosts and Baked Tombstones – Meatloaf and Mashed potato ghosts
Pumpkin Bites – Apple Ham and Cheese Sandwich
Roasted Pumpkins – Chicken Broccoli Braid

Desserts:
Flies on Decaying Pumpkin – Pumpkin Chip Cookies
Fried Bats – Bat shaped cookies
Moth balls – Cupcakes
Frosted Jack-o-Lanterns – Ice Cream filled oranges
Ghosts – Popcorn Balls
Candy Corn Cookies – Sugar Cookie Dough

If you are new to creating a menu, store cost it can seem daunting a first. I use my computer, stomach but a pad of paper or a calendar works fine. Start off simple. You could begin by selecting a theme for each day of the week. Something like: soup or breakfast on Sunday, this web Try Something New Monday, Taco Tuesday’s, seafood on Wednesday, Mexican Thursday’s, Italian Friday’s, Saturday’s dinner salads, ect. When you are putting together your menu, include a main dish and all sides. Ex: Wednesday Dinner: Poached Salmon, roasted potatoes and grilled asparagus, water and strawberries. With time and some practice it will become easier.

I caved in and started making a menu because I was spending too much time sifting through cookbooks or browsing the internet every night looking for something healthy, yet good. Everyday at 4:00, I would go into a panic over what to cook for dinner. Before I knew it, the clock read 5:25 and my nose was still in a book or I was standing in the kitchen mulling over what I could make from the few things we had in the pantry and refrigerator. Frustrated, I tried to make a menu but nothing changed; it still was taking too long to come up with a recipe to fill in the blank. Then, I decided to assign a category or theme to each day of the week to narrow the search. Now, I had to only come up with one recipe and if I found others that looked interesting, I plugged them in the subsequent week’s spots. Wa-la, a months worth of meals, done!

Not quite. The kids, became pickier and I did not have a ton of time to spend in the kitchen anymore to experiment with new recipes. There was a period after our third baby was born where we had the same dish on the same day each week. Creating a menu is really about what works for your family. My sister-n-law has input from her kids on menu suggestions.

Sometimes things come up. A menu is just a guide. Maybe you do not feel like eating what is on the menu for that night. It is perfectly ok to switch nights around or pull something together from items on hand. However, you decide to do it remember to keep it simple and do not forget to post the menu where you can see it. Otherwise it is easy to forget what is for dinner. My other sister-n-law makes a copy of the recipes she plans on using so she does not have to go hunting for it later.

To save money on groceries think back to college. When I was in college I did not have a lot of money to spend on groceries. I planned meals around each other so nothing went to waste. If you plan on trying a new recipe think of other recipes that use the same ingredients. It may seem boring or monotonous but it saves money. Savy shoppers arrange their menus around what deals they pick up at the grocery store that week. Or they stock up for next months menu.

Finally, create a shopping list based on the ingredients needed for each recipe. Make sure to list the quanties. If a recipe calls for two potatoes and later in the week you plan on having mashed potatoes you’ll need to buy more than two potatoes. Once you have your list, it is time to go shopping. Some people like to shop once a week, while others push for every two weeks. See how long you can go without having to go to the grocery store. You will be surprised at what you can come up with using the items in your pantry, freezer and refrigerator. Save the money you would have normally spent and use it to stock up on sale items you use most.
If you are new to creating a menu, store cost it can seem daunting a first. I use my computer, stomach but a pad of paper or a calendar works fine. Start off simple. You could begin by selecting a theme for each day of the week. Something like: soup or breakfast on Sunday, this web Try Something New Monday, Taco Tuesday’s, seafood on Wednesday, Mexican Thursday’s, Italian Friday’s, Saturday’s dinner salads, ect. When you are putting together your menu, include a main dish and all sides. Ex: Wednesday Dinner: Poached Salmon, roasted potatoes and grilled asparagus, water and strawberries. With time and some practice it will become easier.

I caved in and started making a menu because I was spending too much time sifting through cookbooks or browsing the internet every night looking for something healthy, yet good. Everyday at 4:00, I would go into a panic over what to cook for dinner. Before I knew it, the clock read 5:25 and my nose was still in a book or I was standing in the kitchen mulling over what I could make from the few things we had in the pantry and refrigerator. Frustrated, I tried to make a menu but nothing changed; it still was taking too long to come up with a recipe to fill in the blank. Then, I decided to assign a category or theme to each day of the week to narrow the search. Now, I had to only come up with one recipe and if I found others that looked interesting, I plugged them in the subsequent week’s spots. Wa-la, a months worth of meals, done!

Not quite. The kids, became pickier and I did not have a ton of time to spend in the kitchen anymore to experiment with new recipes. There was a period after our third baby was born where we had the same dish on the same day each week. Creating a menu is really about what works for your family. My sister-n-law has input from her kids on menu suggestions.

Sometimes things come up. A menu is just a guide. Maybe you do not feel like eating what is on the menu for that night. It is perfectly ok to switch nights around or pull something together from items on hand. However, you decide to do it remember to keep it simple and do not forget to post the menu where you can see it. Otherwise it is easy to forget what is for dinner. My other sister-n-law makes a copy of the recipes she plans on using so she does not have to go hunting for it later.

To save money on groceries think back to college. When I was in college I did not have a lot of money to spend on groceries. I planned meals around each other so nothing went to waste. If you plan on trying a new recipe think of other recipes that use the same ingredients. It may seem boring or monotonous but it saves money. Savy shoppers arrange their menus around what deals they pick up at the grocery store that week. Or they stock up for next months menu.

Finally, create a shopping list based on the ingredients needed for each recipe. Make sure to list the quanties. If a recipe calls for two potatoes and later in the week you plan on having mashed potatoes you’ll need to buy more than two potatoes. Once you have your list, it is time to go shopping. Some people like to shop once a week, while others push for every two weeks. See how long you can go without having to go to the grocery store. You will be surprised at what you can come up with using the items in your pantry, freezer and refrigerator. Save the money you would have normally spent and use it to stock up on sale items you use most.
Extreme shoppers can slice as much as 50% – 60% off their monthly grocery bill just by using coupons and waiting until the item goes on sale. If it is not on sale, visit this they do not buy it. They stock up on the items they use the most while they are on sale and they plan their menus around the bargains they can pick up at the grocery store that week.

To get the scoop, hospital check out thegrocerygame.com. The site tells you what’s on sale at the store you choose, then click the coupon and print. It does cost money, but you can get a four week trial for just a dollar.

Other sites worth a visit include: couponing, MommySavesBig, CouponMom, MyGroceryDeals, thecentsiblesawyer.blogspot, budget101.
If you are new to creating a menu, store cost it can seem daunting a first. I use my computer, stomach but a pad of paper or a calendar works fine. Start off simple. You could begin by selecting a theme for each day of the week. Something like: soup or breakfast on Sunday, this web Try Something New Monday, Taco Tuesday’s, seafood on Wednesday, Mexican Thursday’s, Italian Friday’s, Saturday’s dinner salads, ect. When you are putting together your menu, include a main dish and all sides. Ex: Wednesday Dinner: Poached Salmon, roasted potatoes and grilled asparagus, water and strawberries. With time and some practice it will become easier.

I caved in and started making a menu because I was spending too much time sifting through cookbooks or browsing the internet every night looking for something healthy, yet good. Everyday at 4:00, I would go into a panic over what to cook for dinner. Before I knew it, the clock read 5:25 and my nose was still in a book or I was standing in the kitchen mulling over what I could make from the few things we had in the pantry and refrigerator. Frustrated, I tried to make a menu but nothing changed; it still was taking too long to come up with a recipe to fill in the blank. Then, I decided to assign a category or theme to each day of the week to narrow the search. Now, I had to only come up with one recipe and if I found others that looked interesting, I plugged them in the subsequent week’s spots. Wa-la, a months worth of meals, done!

Not quite. The kids, became pickier and I did not have a ton of time to spend in the kitchen anymore to experiment with new recipes. There was a period after our third baby was born where we had the same dish on the same day each week. Creating a menu is really about what works for your family. My sister-n-law has input from her kids on menu suggestions.

Sometimes things come up. A menu is just a guide. Maybe you do not feel like eating what is on the menu for that night. It is perfectly ok to switch nights around or pull something together from items on hand. However, you decide to do it remember to keep it simple and do not forget to post the menu where you can see it. Otherwise it is easy to forget what is for dinner. My other sister-n-law makes a copy of the recipes she plans on using so she does not have to go hunting for it later.

To save money on groceries think back to college. When I was in college I did not have a lot of money to spend on groceries. I planned meals around each other so nothing went to waste. If you plan on trying a new recipe think of other recipes that use the same ingredients. It may seem boring or monotonous but it saves money. Savy shoppers arrange their menus around what deals they pick up at the grocery store that week. Or they stock up for next months menu.

Finally, create a shopping list based on the ingredients needed for each recipe. Make sure to list the quanties. If a recipe calls for two potatoes and later in the week you plan on having mashed potatoes you’ll need to buy more than two potatoes. Once you have your list, it is time to go shopping. Some people like to shop once a week, while others push for every two weeks. See how long you can go without having to go to the grocery store. You will be surprised at what you can come up with using the items in your pantry, freezer and refrigerator. Save the money you would have normally spent and use it to stock up on sale items you use most.
Extreme shoppers can slice as much as 50% – 60% off their monthly grocery bill just by using coupons and waiting until the item goes on sale. If it is not on sale, visit this they do not buy it. They stock up on the items they use the most while they are on sale and they plan their menus around the bargains they can pick up at the grocery store that week.

To get the scoop, hospital check out thegrocerygame.com. The site tells you what’s on sale at the store you choose, then click the coupon and print. It does cost money, but you can get a four week trial for just a dollar.

Other sites worth a visit include: couponing, MommySavesBig, CouponMom, MyGroceryDeals, thecentsiblesawyer.blogspot, budget101.
I love Halloween. It is absolutely my favorite holiday. Ok, check I say the same thing about Christmas when I see the lights and hear the timeless carols. Oh, ed can’t forget the smell of pine trees.

Back to Halloween. Last year, little goblins were out in our neighborhood on a mission to spread a little Halloween spirit. When we arrived home one afternoon, to our surprise on the doorstep was a small paper bag with a card and goodies inside telling us we had been BOO-ed. We had not a clue who placed it there. But, over the next several days, little packages started appearing on the doorsteps of neighboring houses. It was a sweet gesture to bring our community together.

This year, why not stir up some excitement at work or among friends or church family. I did not keep the poem that was on our bag, but here is one I found on organizedchristmas.com. You can use this poem or make up your own. The fun is in leaving the treat for someone without them knowing who left it.

The air is cool, the season fall,
Soon Halloween will come to all.

Ghosts and goblins, spooks galore…
Tricky witches at your door.

The spooks are after things to do,
In fact a spook brought this “Boo” to you!

The excitement comes when friends like you,
Copy this note and make it two.

We’ll all have smiles upon our faces,
No one will know who “BOO”ed who’s places!

Just two short days to work your spell,
Keep it secret, hide it well.

Please join the fun, the seasons here .
Just spread these “BOO’s” and Halloween cheer.

Include a sheet of paper that says:

You have been BOOED! Please keep it going by following these directions:

Enjoy your treat
Place the BOO sign on your front door or visible in a window
Within 2 days, make 2 copies of this note, make 2 treats and 2 BOO signs to secretly deliver to 2 neighbors/friends without a BOO.

Halloween Mystery Menu

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?> Nutty popcorn bars is a great new take on protein bars. This recipe came from the June 2007 Heath Magazine, this created by David Gaus an Executive pastry chef in Washington DC. Beware! I can never only eat one.  They are so tasty.

1 1/2 cups rolled oats
1 cup unsalted, sildenafil dry-roasted peanuts
12 cups popcorn (without salt or fat)
Cooking spray
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1 cup light brown sugar
5 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp vanilla
1 1/2 cups raisins

Preheat oven to 350. Place oats and peanuts on a baking sheet; bake for 12 minutes. Remove the sheet from the oven and cool completely.
Place popped corn in a very large heatproof bowl that has been sprayed with cooking spray. Set aside a 15 X 10 X 1-inch jelly roll pan sprayed with cooking spray.
In a medium saucepan, combine butter, sugar and honey. Heat over medium heat stirring until mixture comes to a boil. Let mixture boil for 1 1/2 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in salt and vanilla.
Pour hot syrup over popped corn and mix until well coated. Stir in raisins, oats and peanuts. Spread evenly onto prepared pan. Allow to cool completely, about 30 minutes.
Turn out onto a large cutting board; cut 24 equal squares. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

Alternatives:
In a pinch I have used salted peanuts and packaged low sodium low fat popcorn.
I have also thrown in some almonds and cashews with the peanuts to make one cup.
Golden Raisin or Cranberries are a nice addition as well.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
As a born and bred Southern Gal turned California chic, purchase I occasionally get the hanker’n for some good ol’ southern barbecue. This summer I returned to my roots when I went to visit my family in South Florida. Before my arrival, my brother asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I immediately requested, BBQ. Upon arriving in Florida, my brother stopped off for take out at a local BBQ restaurant. One of his must haves was their BBQ Nachos. At the mention of BBQ Nachos, I was quite intrigued. They were just like nachos only they had BBQ sauce on them. This is my own version based on what I remember.

Tortilla chips
Shredded chicken
BBQ Sauce
olives
jalepenos
cheese
tomatoes
cilantro
red onion
green onions
Pico de Gallo
beans

Place a layer of chips in an oven proof dish. Sprinkle with cheese and any combination of toppings. Add another layer of chips and cheese. Bake at 350 until the cheese is melted. Add additional toppings and serve.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
As a born and bred Southern Gal turned California chic, purchase I occasionally get the hanker’n for some good ol’ southern barbecue. This summer I returned to my roots when I went to visit my family in South Florida. Before my arrival, my brother asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I immediately requested, BBQ. Upon arriving in Florida, my brother stopped off for take out at a local BBQ restaurant. One of his must haves was their BBQ Nachos. At the mention of BBQ Nachos, I was quite intrigued. They were just like nachos only they had BBQ sauce on them. This is my own version based on what I remember.

Tortilla chips
Shredded chicken
BBQ Sauce
olives
jalepenos
cheese
tomatoes
cilantro
red onion
green onions
Pico de Gallo
beans

Place a layer of chips in an oven proof dish. Sprinkle with cheese and any combination of toppings. Add another layer of chips and cheese. Bake at 350 until the cheese is melted. Add additional toppings and serve.
A budget is an extremely important tool to help you stay on top of your spending to ensure you do not go into debt. For those individuals who are already in debt, buy more about a budget will help put spending habits into perspective. Change is a lengthy and difficult process. It is common to feel hopeless, pharm impossible or even deprived. However, website like in the story “The Tortoise and the Hare”, if you work slowly and steadily, you can achieve what you put your mind to. Don’t look at solving your debt problems as you would dieting. “Diets” generally do not work. Subtle changes over time will result in long term habits and eventually financial peace of mind.

One thing Franklin Covey, many life coaches, and weight loss books have in common is the first thing they ask you to do when you want to make a change is to keep a journal. Our goal is to become free of debt. Jot down every living expense that you owe. We use a white board above our desk. You could use software programs or paper and a pencil. Living expenses may include: rent/mortgage, house and car insurance, security service, pest service, electric company, gas company, water, sewage, gas for your car, cell and/or home phone, cable, internet, food, entertainment, baby, online services such video/game rentals, credit cards, loans.

Now, list the amount you pay and the budgeted amount (what you can spend each month in each category based on your income). Some expenditures are fixed, the mortgage, insurance and city services, meaning they are the same amount every month; while others have a budgeted allotment we work toward changing such as the electric bill, food and gasoline. Be reasonable and realistic. If you are spending more than you are bringing in sit down and decide what items need to be eliminated, temporarily suspended or which services you can call to negotiate a better price.

For us, the majority of our money was escaping through nickel and dime purchases. Once we started to keep close tabs on what we were spending our money on we had a better idea how to tackle the problem. Which is why it is extremely beneficial to also begin keeping a log of every single purchase you make. Let me reiterate, EVERY single purchase cash and credit no matter how tiny or huge. If you spend most of your money eating out, try cutting out 1 to 2 outings a week and then go down from there. You won’t feel so deprived. How much you save depends on how aggressive you are. Review the list every week or monthly to help you “keep moving forward”.

I had a yoga teacher once that stressed “you only get back what you put in.” If you sacrifice a lot you will reach your goal faster.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
As a born and bred Southern Gal turned California chic, purchase I occasionally get the hanker’n for some good ol’ southern barbecue. This summer I returned to my roots when I went to visit my family in South Florida. Before my arrival, my brother asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I immediately requested, BBQ. Upon arriving in Florida, my brother stopped off for take out at a local BBQ restaurant. One of his must haves was their BBQ Nachos. At the mention of BBQ Nachos, I was quite intrigued. They were just like nachos only they had BBQ sauce on them. This is my own version based on what I remember.

Tortilla chips
Shredded chicken
BBQ Sauce
olives
jalepenos
cheese
tomatoes
cilantro
red onion
green onions
Pico de Gallo
beans

Place a layer of chips in an oven proof dish. Sprinkle with cheese and any combination of toppings. Add another layer of chips and cheese. Bake at 350 until the cheese is melted. Add additional toppings and serve.
A budget is an extremely important tool to help you stay on top of your spending to ensure you do not go into debt. For those individuals who are already in debt, buy more about a budget will help put spending habits into perspective. Change is a lengthy and difficult process. It is common to feel hopeless, pharm impossible or even deprived. However, website like in the story “The Tortoise and the Hare”, if you work slowly and steadily, you can achieve what you put your mind to. Don’t look at solving your debt problems as you would dieting. “Diets” generally do not work. Subtle changes over time will result in long term habits and eventually financial peace of mind.

One thing Franklin Covey, many life coaches, and weight loss books have in common is the first thing they ask you to do when you want to make a change is to keep a journal. Our goal is to become free of debt. Jot down every living expense that you owe. We use a white board above our desk. You could use software programs or paper and a pencil. Living expenses may include: rent/mortgage, house and car insurance, security service, pest service, electric company, gas company, water, sewage, gas for your car, cell and/or home phone, cable, internet, food, entertainment, baby, online services such video/game rentals, credit cards, loans.

Now, list the amount you pay and the budgeted amount (what you can spend each month in each category based on your income). Some expenditures are fixed, the mortgage, insurance and city services, meaning they are the same amount every month; while others have a budgeted allotment we work toward changing such as the electric bill, food and gasoline. Be reasonable and realistic. If you are spending more than you are bringing in sit down and decide what items need to be eliminated, temporarily suspended or which services you can call to negotiate a better price.

For us, the majority of our money was escaping through nickel and dime purchases. Once we started to keep close tabs on what we were spending our money on we had a better idea how to tackle the problem. Which is why it is extremely beneficial to also begin keeping a log of every single purchase you make. Let me reiterate, EVERY single purchase cash and credit no matter how tiny or huge. If you spend most of your money eating out, try cutting out 1 to 2 outings a week and then go down from there. You won’t feel so deprived. How much you save depends on how aggressive you are. Review the list every week or monthly to help you “keep moving forward”.

I had a yoga teacher once that stressed “you only get back what you put in.” If you sacrifice a lot you will reach your goal faster.
We pulled out our slurpee/snowcone maker, store dusted it off and made a refreshing treat with this recipe I found online, but I apologize I have no clue where I got. It was a site that had all these great cool summer kid treats. Once I locate it, I will update this post. Until then, enjoy her version of an easy snow cone.

1 Envelope KOOL-AID, Unsweetened, any flavor
1 Cup sugar
1/2 Cup cold water
8 Cups finely crushed ice

Place soft drink mix and sugar in small bowl. Add cold water; stir to dissolve. For each serving, pour about 1 tablespoon soft drink mixture over 1 cup ice.

Variations:
Use 3/4 cup KOOL-AID Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drink Mix, any flavor; omit sugar.
This is a recipe submitted by Sharon Chupp to the Family Circle Magazine.

2 cups crisp rice cereal
2 cups peanut butter flavored corn and oat cereal
2 cups marshmallows
2 cups chopped pecans
1 1/2 pounds white chocolate, help here chopped

Coat a large baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. In a large bowl, help sales combine rice cereal, peanut butter cereal, marshmallows and pecans. Place chopped chocolate in a medium sized bowl. Microwave on high for about 3 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir until smooth. Pour melted chocolate over cereal mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or until firm. Cut into 24 squares.
I love fall. I love the smells. I love the crispness in the air. September reminds me of the Fall Apple Harvest Festival in Sebastopol, viagra order California.  Just thinking about about their Apple Fritters makes my mouth water. Another fall/winter favorite of mine is Wassail. A blend of fruit juices and aromatic spices fills the room with warmth. I came across this hot drink, viagra order I believe it was on recipetips.com. I thought it would be a great addition to welcome chilled trick or treaters home on Halloween.

1 (36 oz) can apple juice – chilled
1 (12 oz) can frozen cranberry cocktail concentrate, thawed
1 cup orange juice
6 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 red apple

In a large punch bowl or pitcher, combine apple juice, cranberry concentrate and orange juice. Stir to combine. Slowly add ginger ale. Thinly slice apple vertically to create whole apple slices. Remove the seeds. Float on top of punch.

Variations:
Try adding some Red Hots candies to spike the punch.
Ellie Krieger is one of my favorite chefs. I love her no-nonsense style to creating healthy meals. You can find more of her recipes on foodnetwork.com or her books “The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life and Small Changes”, decease “Big Results: A 12-Week Action Plan to a Better Life.”

1 (3 to 4 pound) pineapple
Cooking spray
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rum
1 pint light vanilla ice cream

Cut the top and bottom off of the pineapple, pharm peel and cut it crosswise into 8 rings, about 1/2-inch each. Use a spoon or apple corer to carve out the center core of each ring.
Spray a large grill pan with cooking spray and heat over a medium flame. Grill the pineapple, in 2 or 3 batches, for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until it is nicely brown and grill marks have appeared. (You can also grill this on an outdoor grill sprayed with cooking spray before being heated.)
While the last batch of pineapple cooks, heat the butter, sugar and rum in a small saucepan over a low heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved and the sauce has thickened slightly, about 2 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat.
Place a pineapple ring on each plate, scoop 1/4 cup of ice cream into the center of the ring, and drizzle about 2 teaspoons of sauce on top.
This recipes comes from an issue of the Southern Living magazine. It is one of my family’s favorite to go breakfast meals. These can be made up in advance and frozen.

1 (1 lb) package ground pork sausage, viagra hot or mild
1 (11-oz) can refrigerated French bread dough
1 1/2 cups shredded pizza cheese blend

Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, stirring until sausage crumbles and is no longer pink. Remove from pan; drain well, pressing between paper towels.
Unroll dough into a rectangle shape on a lightly greased baking sheet; sprinkle evenly with sausage and cheese. Beginning with one long side, roll up, jelly-roll fashion. Turn, seam side down, on baking sheet, and pinch end to secure filling inside. Cut 3 (1/4-inch deep) slits across top of dough with a sharp knife.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven; let stand 10 minutes before slicing.

Alternatives:
You can buy the dough or make the dough. I have even used homemade pizza dough and it turned out fine.
I have also substituted shredded mozzarella with a cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese blend instead of the pizza cheese.
I gave this recipe to a friend of mine who tried adding scrambled eggs. She said it worked great and held well in the freezer.
As a born and bred Southern Gal turned California chic, purchase I occasionally get the hanker’n for some good ol’ southern barbecue. This summer I returned to my roots when I went to visit my family in South Florida. Before my arrival, my brother asked me what I wanted for dinner that night. I immediately requested, BBQ. Upon arriving in Florida, my brother stopped off for take out at a local BBQ restaurant. One of his must haves was their BBQ Nachos. At the mention of BBQ Nachos, I was quite intrigued. They were just like nachos only they had BBQ sauce on them. This is my own version based on what I remember.

Tortilla chips
Shredded chicken
BBQ Sauce
olives
jalepenos
cheese
tomatoes
cilantro
red onion
green onions
Pico de Gallo
beans

Place a layer of chips in an oven proof dish. Sprinkle with cheese and any combination of toppings. Add another layer of chips and cheese. Bake at 350 until the cheese is melted. Add additional toppings and serve.
A budget is an extremely important tool to help you stay on top of your spending to ensure you do not go into debt. For those individuals who are already in debt, buy more about a budget will help put spending habits into perspective. Change is a lengthy and difficult process. It is common to feel hopeless, pharm impossible or even deprived. However, website like in the story “The Tortoise and the Hare”, if you work slowly and steadily, you can achieve what you put your mind to. Don’t look at solving your debt problems as you would dieting. “Diets” generally do not work. Subtle changes over time will result in long term habits and eventually financial peace of mind.

One thing Franklin Covey, many life coaches, and weight loss books have in common is the first thing they ask you to do when you want to make a change is to keep a journal. Our goal is to become free of debt. Jot down every living expense that you owe. We use a white board above our desk. You could use software programs or paper and a pencil. Living expenses may include: rent/mortgage, house and car insurance, security service, pest service, electric company, gas company, water, sewage, gas for your car, cell and/or home phone, cable, internet, food, entertainment, baby, online services such video/game rentals, credit cards, loans.

Now, list the amount you pay and the budgeted amount (what you can spend each month in each category based on your income). Some expenditures are fixed, the mortgage, insurance and city services, meaning they are the same amount every month; while others have a budgeted allotment we work toward changing such as the electric bill, food and gasoline. Be reasonable and realistic. If you are spending more than you are bringing in sit down and decide what items need to be eliminated, temporarily suspended or which services you can call to negotiate a better price.

For us, the majority of our money was escaping through nickel and dime purchases. Once we started to keep close tabs on what we were spending our money on we had a better idea how to tackle the problem. Which is why it is extremely beneficial to also begin keeping a log of every single purchase you make. Let me reiterate, EVERY single purchase cash and credit no matter how tiny or huge. If you spend most of your money eating out, try cutting out 1 to 2 outings a week and then go down from there. You won’t feel so deprived. How much you save depends on how aggressive you are. Review the list every week or monthly to help you “keep moving forward”.

I had a yoga teacher once that stressed “you only get back what you put in.” If you sacrifice a lot you will reach your goal faster.
We pulled out our slurpee/snowcone maker, store dusted it off and made a refreshing treat with this recipe I found online, but I apologize I have no clue where I got. It was a site that had all these great cool summer kid treats. Once I locate it, I will update this post. Until then, enjoy her version of an easy snow cone.

1 Envelope KOOL-AID, Unsweetened, any flavor
1 Cup sugar
1/2 Cup cold water
8 Cups finely crushed ice

Place soft drink mix and sugar in small bowl. Add cold water; stir to dissolve. For each serving, pour about 1 tablespoon soft drink mixture over 1 cup ice.

Variations:
Use 3/4 cup KOOL-AID Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drink Mix, any flavor; omit sugar.
This year for Halloween, viagra we are adopting a family tradition from my sister-n-law. Every year for the past ten years, pharmacy at least, they have celebrated Halloween with a mystery dinner complete with a menu. Does Eye of Newt sound appetizing? Don’t be too alarmed. That is what they call hot dogs in the land of witches and goblins.

Here are a few of our favorite Halloween Dinner ideas:

Beverages:
Witches Brew- Hot Chocolate
Love Potion – Orchard Apple Punch

Appetizers:
Witches Fingers – Bread Sticks
Spider Egg Sacks – Boiled Eggs
Shrunken Heads – Raisin filled Apple Jack-o-Lanterns
Boogers on A Stick – Mini Carmel Apples
Witch’s Hair with Goblin’s Eyes: Shredded Carrots with Grapes

Entrees:
Monkey Brains with Alligator Eye Balls- Spaghetti and Meatballs
Bat Stew – Hearty Chili
Mummy Rolls – Hot Dogs wrapped in crescent rolls
Road Kill Pie – Chicken Pot Pie
Grilled CobwebsPizza
Ghosts and Baked Tombstones – Meatloaf and Mashed potato ghosts
Pumpkin Bites – Apple Ham and Cheese Sandwich
Roasted Pumpkins – Chicken Broccoli Braid

Desserts:
Flies on Decaying Pumpkin – Pumpkin Chip Cookies
Fried Bats – Bat shaped cookies
Moth balls – Cupcakes
Frosted Jack-o-Lanterns – Ice Cream filled oranges
Ghosts – Popcorn Balls
Candy Corn Cookies – Sugar Cookie Dough

Experimenting with Celery and Food Coloring

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

This recipe was THE popular weekly dinner menu item with my circle of friends. No one knew exactly where it came from, viagra though. One person thought it was this person’s, discount and that person thought it was someone else, this and that person thought it was….. well you get the picture. I followed all the someone’s back to my friend Cathy Carter. She got the recipe from her Grandmother. Then one day when I was looking through a cookbook of crock pot recipes, low and behold there it was, but with a slight variation. Once you try it you’ll know why it is a favorite.

***Adapted August 5, 2012***
I have since adapted this recipe to eliminate the processed and canned ingredients. The original recipe called for canned condensed chicken soup and an Italian seasonings packet. Review the notes under variations for these substitutions. For variations to the homemade versions of Italian seasonings and condensed chicken follow the links provided.

Source: Cathy’s Grandmother
2 tablespoons Italian season mix (recipe below)
1 (8 oz) package cream cheese
6 chicken breasts
2 cups cream of chicken (based on recipe below)

Place all the ingredients in the crock pot. Cook on low for 4-6 hours. Serve over rice or noodles.

Italian Seasonings Mix:
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

In a small bowl, mix together the garlic salt, onion powder, sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

Cream of Chicken:
1 1/2 cups fresh chicken stock*
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon onion powder**
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder***
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt (or less; taste to test)
1/4 teaspoon parsley
dash of paprika
1 1/2 cups milk
3/4 cup flour

In medium-sized saucepan, boil chicken broth, 1/2 cup of the milk, and the seasonings for a minute or two (longer if using fresh onions or garlic).
In a bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup of milk and flour. Add to boiling mixture and continue whisking briskly until mixture boils and thickens. Remove from heat.

Variations:
– 1 can cream of chicken soup (cream of celery or mushroom can be substituted)
– In place of above seasoning use 1 packet Italian salad dressing powdered mix.
– Fat free version, in place of the cream cheese and cream of soup use a cup of water.
– Low fat version, omit the cream cheese.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

This recipe was THE popular weekly dinner menu item with my circle of friends. No one knew exactly where it came from, viagra though. One person thought it was this person’s, discount and that person thought it was someone else, this and that person thought it was….. well you get the picture. I followed all the someone’s back to my friend Cathy Carter. She got the recipe from her Grandmother. Then one day when I was looking through a cookbook of crock pot recipes, low and behold there it was, but with a slight variation. Once you try it you’ll know why it is a favorite.

***Adapted August 5, 2012***
I have since adapted this recipe to eliminate the processed and canned ingredients. The original recipe called for canned condensed chicken soup and an Italian seasonings packet. Review the notes under variations for these substitutions. For variations to the homemade versions of Italian seasonings and condensed chicken follow the links provided.

Source: Cathy’s Grandmother
2 tablespoons Italian season mix (recipe below)
1 (8 oz) package cream cheese
6 chicken breasts
2 cups cream of chicken (based on recipe below)

Place all the ingredients in the crock pot. Cook on low for 4-6 hours. Serve over rice or noodles.

Italian Seasonings Mix:
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

In a small bowl, mix together the garlic salt, onion powder, sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

Cream of Chicken:
1 1/2 cups fresh chicken stock*
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon onion powder**
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder***
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt (or less; taste to test)
1/4 teaspoon parsley
dash of paprika
1 1/2 cups milk
3/4 cup flour

In medium-sized saucepan, boil chicken broth, 1/2 cup of the milk, and the seasonings for a minute or two (longer if using fresh onions or garlic).
In a bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup of milk and flour. Add to boiling mixture and continue whisking briskly until mixture boils and thickens. Remove from heat.

Variations:
– 1 can cream of chicken soup (cream of celery or mushroom can be substituted)
– In place of above seasoning use 1 packet Italian salad dressing powdered mix.
– Fat free version, in place of the cream cheese and cream of soup use a cup of water.
– Low fat version, omit the cream cheese.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

This recipe was THE popular weekly dinner menu item with my circle of friends. No one knew exactly where it came from, viagra though. One person thought it was this person’s, discount and that person thought it was someone else, this and that person thought it was….. well you get the picture. I followed all the someone’s back to my friend Cathy Carter. She got the recipe from her Grandmother. Then one day when I was looking through a cookbook of crock pot recipes, low and behold there it was, but with a slight variation. Once you try it you’ll know why it is a favorite.

***Adapted August 5, 2012***
I have since adapted this recipe to eliminate the processed and canned ingredients. The original recipe called for canned condensed chicken soup and an Italian seasonings packet. Review the notes under variations for these substitutions. For variations to the homemade versions of Italian seasonings and condensed chicken follow the links provided.

Source: Cathy’s Grandmother
2 tablespoons Italian season mix (recipe below)
1 (8 oz) package cream cheese
6 chicken breasts
2 cups cream of chicken (based on recipe below)

Place all the ingredients in the crock pot. Cook on low for 4-6 hours. Serve over rice or noodles.

Italian Seasonings Mix:
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

In a small bowl, mix together the garlic salt, onion powder, sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

Cream of Chicken:
1 1/2 cups fresh chicken stock*
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon onion powder**
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder***
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt (or less; taste to test)
1/4 teaspoon parsley
dash of paprika
1 1/2 cups milk
3/4 cup flour

In medium-sized saucepan, boil chicken broth, 1/2 cup of the milk, and the seasonings for a minute or two (longer if using fresh onions or garlic).
In a bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup of milk and flour. Add to boiling mixture and continue whisking briskly until mixture boils and thickens. Remove from heat.

Variations:
– 1 can cream of chicken soup (cream of celery or mushroom can be substituted)
– In place of above seasoning use 1 packet Italian salad dressing powdered mix.
– Fat free version, in place of the cream cheese and cream of soup use a cup of water.
– Low fat version, omit the cream cheese.

As a young boy, drug my mom and Aunts would rave about my grandfather’s pizza. I asked him once how he made his pizza so “good”. He responded in a Mr. Miyagi type pearl of wisdom, link “You just have to love pizza”. I took away from that a new understanding and confusion. First, I was amazed to find out that kids are not the only ones that love pizza. But if that were true, why didn’t we have pizza more often?

The real lessons came later. I realized that if you truly love something, then you will give the extra care and attention it deserves. When making pizza, or anything else, you should make it the way you like it.

When I was old enough, I went to the store and bought all the ingredients to make my own first pizza. It was awesome. It was about 4 inches thick, and wiped out my college food budget for the week, but it was the best pizza ever.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, pizzas are fun to make, which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some people prefer the store bought ready made pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go; while others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough. Even still, there are those who enjoy making their own pizza crust. Once you determine the type of crust you want to use, the next step is the sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in a jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before. Because like wine and cheese, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans will work.

NOW THE FUN PART:

Once everything is prepared it is time to start the party. Set out the pizza crust, sauce and toppings.
Toppings can include but are not limited to:
Ham, Pineapple, cooked Bacon, cooked Italian Sausage, Pepperoni, sliced Mushrooms, sliced Olives, sliced or chopped Onions, Bell Pepper, cooked Chicken, Sliced Tomatoes, cooked Hamburger, Artichokes, Garlic, Spinach, Lots and Lots of Mozzarella Cheese (shredded or sliced)

Let the kids paint on some olive oil with a basting brush. (A moderator should portion out the olive oil and sauce for each pizza.) Then let the kids decorate their pizza with their favorite toppings.

Life lessons:
I have taught an object lesson at a few of our pizza parties. I would start out with some dessert toppings on the table. Ask the kids if they like chocolate syrup, whipped cream, or cherries. They all say “Yeesss!” and “Yum!”. Then say, “Great, we are going to make pizza today. Do you like chocolate syrup and cherries on your pizza?” The normal response has been “Nooo!” and “Yuk!”. Some of the kids may have been to a restaurant that serves dessert pizza, but we can ignore them. So the question remains, “You mean to tell me you like chocolate syrup and love pizza, but do not like them at the same time?” How can that be?

That reminds me of a saying. There is a time and a place for everything.

”Who likes to play, run and tell funny jokes?” Everyone should be saying, “Me, me, me!” Then I ask, “Are there some times when it is not OK to run, play, and tell funny jokes? Who can give me some examples of places that we should not run, play, and tell funny jokes.” Places like libraries, church, school, museums, and visiting mom or dad at work. Some places it can even be very dangerous to run, jump, and play. Sometimes it is so much fun to laugh, run, play, and tell funny jokes. And sometimes it is not OK to do those things. We can love chocolate syrup and we can love pizza, but we do not have to eat them together. So let’s have some fun and make some pizzas with only our favorite things that we like.

Submitted by my brother Todd.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

A garden is a great way to spend time as a family. There is a surreal satisfaction watching little seedlings grow and sprout into magnificent vegetation. Gardens can be anything you want to make them. You can build a raised garden or simply use pots or barrels. You do not need a large plot of land to have a productive garden. In fact, unhealthy even if you live in an apartment building you can grow a garden. Gardens can also be incorporated into the existing landscape. Try using strawberry plants as a border.

When to plant what:

January: Onions, drugs potatoes, spinach

February: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, radishes, onions, peas, potatoes, spinach

March: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, watermelons, muskmelons, peas, potatoes, spinach, cucumbers, radishes, beans, lettuce, corn, tomatoes

April: carrots, radishes, spinach, beans, corn, cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes

May: Beans, peppers, corn, cucumbers, muskmelons, pumpkins, summer squash, winter squash, tomatoes, watermelons

June: Beans, corn, celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, muskmelons, peppers, summer squash, winter squash

July: Celery, beans, corn, summer squash, tomatoes

August: Broccoli, celery, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes

September: Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, peas, radishes, spinach

October: Onions, peas, radishes, spinach

November: Peas, spinach

December: Onions, potatoes, spinach
Fun Family Food is all about creating a memorable dinning experience with your kids in a healthy way. Food is the essence of life. Food is comfort. Food creates an atmosphere of warmth that we equate with joy.

Feasts have always been the trademark of joyous occasions. We create delectable menus to celebrate special moments and holidays. We serve food at social gatherings and business meetings. When ever my kids see an animal such as a dog, approved cat or fish the first thing they want to do is feed it.

Dinnertime used to be a time when the family would sit around the table and share stories, help feelings or a log of the day. It created a family bond but most of all long lasting memories. Family Recipes have been handed down through the ages or died off with the maker but we still can remember the special bread our mom used to make or uncle Joe’s potato pancakes he made every Sunday morning. Maybe your memory was movie night every Friday night with Pizza.

The quintessential question is how can we enjoy these occasions and serve everyday meals that are still fun, more about healthy and tasty. I am not talking about serving a birthday cake made of tofu. You can still stop by McDonalds to get your kids chicken and fries on that day you are so stressed you do not feel like cooking. We are here for real families, in the real world.

We know you do not have time to go looking through cookbooks or online recipe sources that offer ten chicken casserole dishes. We want to share our best tips, tricks and experiences to help make your life easier but most of all create happy family memories using what we all love…Food.
EAT 5 A DAY!

Eating a serving of vegetables or fruit from each color group is one way to get the nutrients and fiber your body craves. You can buy them frozen, find canned, fresh, or dried.

RED: red apples, red grapes, raspberries, cherries, watermelon, cranberries, strawberries, pomegranates, pink or red grapefruit, rhubard, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, radicchio, beets and red onions.

ORANGE and YELLOW: Carrots, pumpkin, yellow and orange peppers, corn, yellow tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes, peaches, nectarines, cumquats, starfruit, apples, apricots, cantaloupe, oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, mangoes, pineapple and lemons.

GREEN: Dark leafy greens such as romaine lettuce, red tip lettuce, green leaf lettuce, swiss chard, kale, bok choy, spinach, and arugula. Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, green beans, snap peas, edamame, zucchini, green onions, celery, asparagus, artichokes, parsnips, leeks, cucumber, collard greens, okra, green apples, limes, green grapes, kiwi fruit, honeydew melon, pears and avocado.

BLUE AND PURPLE: eggplant, purple cabbage, olives, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, plums, purple grapes, boysenberries, dates, figs.

WHITE: bananas, white nectarines, white peaches, jicama, palm, garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, shallots, onions, white corn, water chestnuts and potatoes.

Roasted Salmon with Lemon Slices

Growing up, discount we never had salmon at our house. So, I never knew the fish existed until I attended a family reunion when I was a teenager. I had an Uncle who brought salmon he caught in Alaska. I have tried salmon prepared a variety of ways, but it was not until four years ago when a friend brought some over that I fell in love. It was like eating dessert. The flavors were so rich and decadent. You do not need to do much to cook perfect salmon. Just a few ingredients to enhance the flavor and do not over cook it.

4 Salmon fillets
4 tbsp butter, melted
Dill weed, 1 tsp dried or 1 tbsp fresh
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Salt & Pepper
1-2 Lemons, sliced

This can be cooked on stove top or baked in the oven. Preheat oven to 350. Line a baking dish with tin foil, making sure to have enough foil to fold over to seal. Cover the bottom of the dish with the lemon slices. Pour the melted butter over lemons. Season salmon with dill, garlic, salt and pepper. Place salmon fillets on top of the lemon slices. Seal the foil shut. Cook for 15-25 minutes or until opaque.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

This recipe was THE popular weekly dinner menu item with my circle of friends. No one knew exactly where it came from, viagra though. One person thought it was this person’s, discount and that person thought it was someone else, this and that person thought it was….. well you get the picture. I followed all the someone’s back to my friend Cathy Carter. She got the recipe from her Grandmother. Then one day when I was looking through a cookbook of crock pot recipes, low and behold there it was, but with a slight variation. Once you try it you’ll know why it is a favorite.

***Adapted August 5, 2012***
I have since adapted this recipe to eliminate the processed and canned ingredients. The original recipe called for canned condensed chicken soup and an Italian seasonings packet. Review the notes under variations for these substitutions. For variations to the homemade versions of Italian seasonings and condensed chicken follow the links provided.

Source: Cathy’s Grandmother
2 tablespoons Italian season mix (recipe below)
1 (8 oz) package cream cheese
6 chicken breasts
2 cups cream of chicken (based on recipe below)

Place all the ingredients in the crock pot. Cook on low for 4-6 hours. Serve over rice or noodles.

Italian Seasonings Mix:
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

In a small bowl, mix together the garlic salt, onion powder, sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

Cream of Chicken:
1 1/2 cups fresh chicken stock*
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon onion powder**
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder***
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt (or less; taste to test)
1/4 teaspoon parsley
dash of paprika
1 1/2 cups milk
3/4 cup flour

In medium-sized saucepan, boil chicken broth, 1/2 cup of the milk, and the seasonings for a minute or two (longer if using fresh onions or garlic).
In a bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup of milk and flour. Add to boiling mixture and continue whisking briskly until mixture boils and thickens. Remove from heat.

Variations:
– 1 can cream of chicken soup (cream of celery or mushroom can be substituted)
– In place of above seasoning use 1 packet Italian salad dressing powdered mix.
– Fat free version, in place of the cream cheese and cream of soup use a cup of water.
– Low fat version, omit the cream cheese.
I am reading the book “The Power of Play” written by David Elkind. The book discusses the importance of allowing our children to just be kids. Elkind describes the differences of play in children from infancy through the teenage years and into adulthood. He argues that in today’s modern world, discount ambulance there are far too many organized activities, side effects too great an emphasis on early education and too much TV and video games and not enough unstructured play. As a result, no rx children are not given the outlets needed to foster their imaginations and develop at a natural pace. He cautions parents to beware of “Parent Peer-Pressure” with regards to sports, toys and education.

I really enjoyed reading his assessment on the transformation of toys through the years. Mostly, because my biggest dilemma at present is what to do with all the toys that have been given to the kids through the years. In past generations, toys served a purpose. They were meant to build imaginations through imitation of roles such as a mom, dad or vocation. With today’s toys, it is hard to find a toy that does not have an electronic chip in it.

My husband has urged me countless times to weed out the toys. After reading part of the book, we were motivated to go through all the toys, box up and get rid of anything our children has not played with and according to David Elkind’s book, does not foster a growing imagination. It was hard; believe me, because many of the toys were in great condition and the majority of them were given to the kids by relatives.

“The Power of Play” gave me the assurance that as a mom, I am on the right track. When my oldest was born, I asked the pediatrician months later about the activities I should be doing with my baby. All she said was, “let him explore”. I took my pediatricians advice to heart. I felt I really wanted my kids to enjoy being a child. We sing, we dance, paint, look for bugs, perform science experiments, cook, play hide-and-seek or monster-coming. We throw balls and ride our bikes. My young ones will not be little for long, why rush it.

Whether it is cracking eggs, discount measuring ingredients, this site or setting the table, sales helping plan the menu, or anything else age appropriate; when kids are part of the preparation and cooking process, they tend to eat what they had a hand in making.

To help get my kids involved in the meal, we pretend we are going grocery shopping. We use a medium sized wooden basket to shop for the ingredients I need in the pantry and in the refrigerator. One of them will hold the basket while the other one puts the items in. Sometimes the oldest plays cashier.

 

I do my best to avoid taking my little ones with me to the store. If I do venture out with them in tow, page it is always first thing in the morning before they get tired, right after their snack. As a mom, I am glad to see grocery stores catering more toward moms with young kids. The grocery store we go to has car shopping carts to keep kids pre-occupied. When I was growing up, the bakery gave away a free cookie. Yet, there are times they get bored with driving the fire engine and would rather help fill up the cart with whatever goodies catch their eyes, This ultimately ends in my 2-year-old screaming an aria all the way to the car.

After one disastrous trip, I remembered something a great friend once told me. She suggested that I take a picture album and fill it with pictures of my baby, but also include pictures of the foods my baby liked to eat. Then take the album with me when I go to the grocery store and help my son find the items. The next thought I had was, my kids love to help me cook and clean. At home, if they are bored, I give them a task and most of the time they are more than excited to take it on. That got me thinking.

Give the kids a task. The grocery store is a playground for learning. Let them help locate the items on your list. The kids think it is a game and what kid does not like a game of “I Spy”?  My 4-year-old son has started making his own shopping list.

Think numbers and colors, not to mention vocabulary skills. Children can learn valuable math skills when they use the scale to weigh items or count out money at the register. My kids love counting the vegetables and fruits as they put them in the bags. If you have toddlers, help them discover different textures by letting them touch an item. Teach them the name in addition to the shape and color.

 

 

 

Making messes is what kids do best. As a parent, about it sometimes the last thing you need is another mess to clean up. Yet, more about we know hands-on activities, cialis 40mg such as cooking, helping with the chores, painting, playing with play dough, and coloring, are important to a child’s cognitive and imaginative development. In addition, such activities are great for making memories.

Kids want to be like their parents; therefore, they love to mimic us pushing a lawn mower or cooking in the kitchen. Certainly there are some things little kids cannot help us with until they are older, but allowing them to help sweep, even though they leave a trail behind, empowers them and it creates a memory.

Those memories can be good ones or they can be bad ones. Water spilt, while helping you do the dishes, can be cleaned up. Flour all over you, the dog, and the house can be cleaned up. Give them a well of memories they can look back on. Say to yourself, “This is not a mess; it is a memory.”

If your toddler is capable of getting into your cabinets, order he is old enough to cook. To keep your little ones busy while you are making dinner, doctor let them mimic you by giving them their own pot and spoon and some food to cook at the table or on the floor near you.

These are a great family treat. The kids go nuts over them. I am glad, site because they are healthy, viagra sale as well as really tasty. They are perfect for breakfast, on the go, or as a snack. Or, if you are desperate for something sweet, try them warm with a sprinkle of chocolate chips and a dollop of whip cream.

1 cup old fashion rolled oats (not instant)
1 cup non-fat milk
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup applesauce (with cinnamon or unsweetened)

2 eggs (for a healthier option use the whites only)
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon, divided
2 tsp. sugar, divided
½ cup each raisins or nuts (optional)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a muffin pan with cooking spray.

Ground the oatmeal with the flour in a food processor. Combine milk, applesauce and eggs. Mix until combined. In a separate bowl whisk or sift the flour, sugar, salt, soda, powder, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp sugar, raisins and nuts.

Fold wet ingredients into dry, and mix until just combined. Do not over mix the batter or the muffins will be tough. You should still see small ribbons of flour. Spoon into the muffin pan. Combine 1 tsp cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle on top of each muffin. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until done. Remove from pan to cool.

Many people love pizza. It is easy and versatile. In addition to being yummy, unhealthy pizzas are fun to make, ask which makes it a great activity for the family. Have a house full of the neighbor kids? No problem. Let them make their own personal pizza.

Some prefer the store bought pizza crust, which is a little pricey, but it is a no fail way to go. While others may reach for the refrigerated pizza dough, I enjoy making my own.

The next step is the pizza sauce. Before you reach for the stuff in the jar, try making your own. It is easier than you think. It just takes a little preparation. The great thing about sauce is you can make it the day before, because like wine, it tastes better with age. Personally, fresh is best. But if you do not have time to peel and cut tomatoes, or have an herb garden, cans work.

DOUGH:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 package yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
2-3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
Up to 1 cup lukewarm water

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast over the 1/4 cup of warm water and let stand for about 10 minutes.

In a mixer with dough hook or food processor, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add the water and yeast, process 10 seconds. Drizzle in the oil and then the water while machine is running, until a clump of dough forms around the hook/blade. (You may not need all of the water.) Process dough for 30 to 40 seconds longer. (Dough should be just slightly sticky.) Divide dough in half. Knead on floured surface into smooth balls.

For a single pizza, wrap the other ball in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze.

For thin pizza, press the dough directly on a greased 16 inch pizza pan. Brush the dough very lightly with a bit of olive oil and place immediately into the preheated oven without any topping to precook. Precook the crust at 425 degrees F for approximately 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove crust from the oven, spoon on sauce and add desired toppings; sprinkle top lightly with Italian seasoning. Carry the pan to the oven rack and slide the topped pizza off of the pan, directly on to the rack and continue baking for another 10 minutes or until browned.

Variations:
– Replace flour with 50/50 blend of wheat and white. 
– For thicker pizza crust, allow to rise for 10 to 15 minutes in the pan(s). Brush the crust with olive oil, add sauce and toppings, place the entire pizza pan in the oven and bake on the lowest oven rack for about 20 minutes.

SAUCE:
Source: Deep South Dish
1 (6 ounce) can of tomato paste
1 cup of warm water
3 medium cloves of garlic, peeled
1 teaspoon of granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of dried basil
1/2 teaspoon of onion powder
1/4 teaspoon of dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon of dried marjoram
1/4 teaspoon of dried red pepper flakes, optional

Add everything to a food processor or blender and mix well. Freezes well.

During World War II, approved people were encouraged to plant gardens to help sustain a restrictive food supply brought on by the war. Vegetable and herb gardens were cultivated in back and front yards, pilule empty lots and apartment building rooftops, balconies and window sills. Major cities commandeered a portion of public parks to grow vegetables as an advertisement of support for the troops. The government, as well as Agricultural corporations such as Good Housekeeping, Beech-nut, Simon & Schuster, House and Garden Magazine, produced and distributed basic gardening booklets. In addition, a film titled Victory Garden on how to plant and care for a victory garden was made available. Topics included soil health, how to plant, when and what to plant, and how to tend to the plants and pest.

The food raised was shared between the gardeners’ families, friends and neighbors. Any surplus was canned for a later time. Victory Gardens produced up to 40% of all consumed food. The gardens contained vegetables such as beans, beets, carrots, peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, chard, onions, cucumbers, parsley, squash, corn, parsnips, leeks, turnips, cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli, peppers, cauliflower, tomatoes, eggplant, endive, and rutabagas.

When World War II ended, the government dropped the campaign for planting a victory garden. However, there was a serious disadvantage in severing the program too quickly. In the summer of 1946, the agriculture industry still had not come back up to full production, which in turn created a food shortage. Fortunately for some, they continued to plant their gardens earlier that spring and were able to get through the difficult times.

This recipe was THE popular weekly dinner menu item with my circle of friends. No one knew exactly where it came from, viagra though. One person thought it was this person’s, discount and that person thought it was someone else, this and that person thought it was….. well you get the picture. I followed all the someone’s back to my friend Cathy Carter. She got the recipe from her Grandmother. Then one day when I was looking through a cookbook of crock pot recipes, low and behold there it was, but with a slight variation. Once you try it you’ll know why it is a favorite.

***Adapted August 5, 2012***
I have since adapted this recipe to eliminate the processed and canned ingredients. The original recipe called for canned condensed chicken soup and an Italian seasonings packet. Review the notes under variations for these substitutions. For variations to the homemade versions of Italian seasonings and condensed chicken follow the links provided.

Source: Cathy’s Grandmother
2 tablespoons Italian season mix (recipe below)
1 (8 oz) package cream cheese
6 chicken breasts
2 cups cream of chicken (based on recipe below)

Place all the ingredients in the crock pot. Cook on low for 4-6 hours. Serve over rice or noodles.

Italian Seasonings Mix:
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
2 tablespoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
2 tablespoons salt

In a small bowl, mix together the garlic salt, onion powder, sugar, oregano, pepper, thyme, basil, parsley, celery salt and regular salt. Store in a tightly sealed container.

Cream of Chicken:
1 1/2 cups fresh chicken stock*
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon onion powder**
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder***
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt (or less; taste to test)
1/4 teaspoon parsley
dash of paprika
1 1/2 cups milk
3/4 cup flour

In medium-sized saucepan, boil chicken broth, 1/2 cup of the milk, and the seasonings for a minute or two (longer if using fresh onions or garlic).
In a bowl, whisk together the remaining 1 cup of milk and flour. Add to boiling mixture and continue whisking briskly until mixture boils and thickens. Remove from heat.

Variations:
– 1 can cream of chicken soup (cream of celery or mushroom can be substituted)
– In place of